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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Jun 1, 1986

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 JUNE 1986 • FREE!
That Magazine from CITR fml02 cablelOO THE
ON GRANVILLE
JUNE 1986
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
2
The Velveteens
with The
Belgianiques
3                    4
T.B.A.
5                   6
HERALD NIX
.     7
Tex & The
Horseheads
w/Spores &
Roots Roundup
9
T.B.A.
10
Animal
Slaves
w/guests
11                   12
The B-Sides
13                   14
Family Plot
w/guests
16
Industrial
Waste Banned
w/Harry &
the Hackjobs
17                     18
Duke St. Recording Artists
Chalk Circle
w/guests
19                  20                   21
THE PRIDE
23
From Toronto:
The Dub
Poets
24                    25
Brilliant Orange
26
T.B.A.
27                 28
Lost Durangos
w/guests
7 to S PRE-MOVIE SPECIALS • NO COVER 7 to 9 UNLESS POSTED
932 GRANVILLE ST • OPEN 7 pm TIL 2 am • 684-VENU DfcORlfeR
That Magazine from CITR fml02 cablelOO
June 1986 • Vol. 4/No. 5
EDITOR
Chris Dafoe
CONTRIBUTORS
Don Chow, Janis MacKenzie, Pat Carroll,
Terry Walker, Ken Jackson, Bill Mullan,
Kevin Smith, Steve Robertson, CD
PHOTOS
Bill Jans, Jim Main, Ross Cameron
CARTOONS
Chris Pearson, Rod Filbrandt Natasha M.
COVER
Bill Jans
PRODUCTION MANAGERS
Karen Shea, Pat Carroll
DESIGN
Harreson Atley
LAYOUT
Pat Carroll, Randy Iwata, Vic Bonderoff,
Karen Shea, Ken Jackson, Beverly Demchuk,
Dorothy Cameron, David Hart, Robin Razzell
TYPESETTING
Dena Corby, Sheila Haldane
PUBLISHER
Harreson Atley
ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES
David Hart, Robin Razzell
DISTRIBUTION
Bill Mullan, Steve Robertson
BUSINESS MANAGER
Randy Iwata
DISCORDER, c/o CITR Radio 6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C., V6T 2A5. Phone (604) 228-3017.
DISCORDER Magazine is published monthly by
the Student Radio Society of the University of British
Columbia (CITR-UBC Radio).
CITR fml01.9 cablelOO.l broadcasts a 49-watt signal in stereo throughout Vancouver from Gage Towers
on the UBC campus. CITR is also available via FM
cable in Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam,
Port Moody, Maple Ridge and Mission.
DISCORDER circulates 15,000 free copies. For
advertising and circulation inquiries call 228-3017 and
ask for station manager Nancy Smith.
Twelve-month subscriptions available: $10 in Canada, $10 U.S. in the U.S.A., $15 overseas. Send cheque
or money order payable to CITR Publications.
Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, cartoons
and graphics are welcome but they can be returned
only if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped
envelope. DISCORDER does not assume responsibility for unsolicited material.
The offices of CITR and DISCORDER are located
in room 233 of the UBC's Student Union Building. For
general business inquiries or to book the CITR Mobile
Sound System call 228-3017 and ask for station
manager Nancy Smith. The Music Request line is
228-CITR.
IN THIS ISSUE
54-40: THE MAKING OF A DEAL
Into the belly of the beast (the Great Horned Iguana, to be precise)
with Vancouver's latest major label signing. By CD.   6
PLASTICLAND
No, you idiot, not Expo...the band...from Milwaukee.
Psychedelia from the home of Schlitz. By Janis MacKenzie. .... 10
IN EVERY ISSUE
AIRHEAD
Dept. Dept. Dept. Letters to the new Airhead bureaucracy. .....  4
BEHIND THE DIAL
Volunteer Opportunities, early retirement, and more. 12
ON THE DIAL
The essential guide to CITR's programming.
Tape it to your fridge, or the cat. 14
SPIN LIST
Still no Whitney Houston in the Top 20?
What's wrong with these people?  18
VINYL VERDICT
New flat round black things from Wendy O Williams, 54-40,
Laurie Anderson, Ryuichi Sakomoto. 19
ARMCHAIR EYE
Kinky sex and World War III 22
v'
**><*
**«.
■""•"O
CITR'S DESIGN-A-T-SHIRT CONTEST
Send your design to
CITR Radio   Attn: Kevin Smith
6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, V6T 2A5
Deadline July 25
Just make sure your design includes*
the words CITR FM 102 CABLE 100 ,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
UBC RADIO
s*f*
Ce^
&*
tisrt TRACK  ijj RECORDS
)nd store nov\
new release
JOHN CALE
new second store
now open
E
2
I
s
3
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
$6.99
L/? or Cassette
Seymour store only.
592 SEYMOUR ST.
682-7976
MCM & Associates
SOUNDPROOF and CITR
present
present
ncert
FRIDAY • JUNE 27th • 8 pm
UBC THUNDERBIRD ARENA
Tickets at all VTC/CBO outlets - 280-4444, Odyssey
Imports - 866 Granville, and Zulu Records -1869 W. 4th
Another Head Rolls
in the Factual
Verification Dept.
Dear Airhead,
Thank you for your coverage
of Moev in the February Discorder. However, for clarification it
should be noted that credit for
support vocals on the Alibis EP
goes to Christine Janes. I joined
Moev after that record was released.
Thanks anyways.
Michela Arrichiello
(of Moev)
Subscription Dept.
Oh No Not Another
Letter About
Skinny Puppy Dept.
Dear life forms:
I wish to obtain a one-year
subscription to your monthly
magazine, Discorder. Please find
enclosed my money order for ten
dollars ($10.00) (Can.).
Let me take the opportunity to
thank you at CITR for bringing
Siousxie and the Banshees to
Vancouver.
In regards to the ongoing Skinny Puppy credibility debate, perhaps I can contribute a somewhat different viewpoint.
Being so far removed from the
alternative music scene in Vancouver, Skinny Puppy came to
my attention only a year ago.
What initially captured my attention was the distortion of voice
which had appealed to me previously in Nana Hagan and Jim
Thirlwell.
Sickened to the point of physical nausea by the vanilla pudding, technically perfect voices
in pop music, Kevin's distorted,
demonic screams which substituted for vocals were very appealing. Image was of no consideration. I did not even see a picture of the band until last November, and that one had a Boy
George face taped over Kevin
Key's face.
When I attended their Boxing
Day concert, I saw no reason to
doubt their sincerity. Three
rather average looking boys with
RH8Afc
ssssssssssssssssssssssss
c/o CITR Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 2A5
hair much like a wig I have, and
one presumably having fairly
recently injected a large amount
of heroin.
Imagine my shock when I attended their next concert on
March 30! As the lineup grew, I
began to wonder if perhaps I had
inadvertantly found a mini-pops
benefit for Johnny Thunder. No
such luck, I soon discovered. As
the kiddies became progressively more inane, I saw the differences between Skinny Puppy
and Duran Duran begin to thin.
The commercialism-run-amuck
which I saw before and after the
show only further served to convince me that there is no going
home. I will not replace the Bites
cassette which was recently
stolen from me (along with the
Walkman it was in).
Yours sincerely,
Lee Howe I!
Street Beef Dept.
Dear Airhead,
I figure Discorder is the ideal
place to air my frustrations regarding the 1986 Peace March.
I have been to four of the five
marches that have taken place in
Vancouver, and where the others
have had an exciting, almost
radical feel to them, this one
could only be described as too
damn sucky.
I realize how bad it was at the
rally at B.C. Place. Some lady
tearfully lip-synched a song to a
child. I retched when she finished and tearfully hugged the
child, much to the pleasure/chagrin of the audience.
Why on earth would they hold
a rally at B.C. Place? Where are
the Hare Krishnas to dance?
Certainly the hippies wouldn't be
allowed into the stadium.
It was fortunate, however, that
the march was less Pro-Russian
Anti-American and more Every-
one-For-Peace. But yech. How
sucky can you get?
As a friend suggested, it was
almost as if it was a Peace March
sponsored by Coke.
Yech,
Bruce Arnold
Burger King actually.
DISCORDER Eg
du MAURIER
jc3^ZZ FESTIVAL
VANCOUVER
UNE 23-291986
Miles Davis
Wynton Ma
EXPO THEATRE
HYATT REGENCY BALLROOM
NEW YORK THEATRE
7th Birthday Tribute to
ENNY GOODMAN
Jan Garbarek Group
Ornette Coleman and Prime Time
Roscoe Mitchell and Sound Ensemble
Abdullah Ibrahim <Dollar Brand;
WESTERN FRONT
Bill Frisell Tim Berne/Alex Cline June 24
Ran Blake June 25
Jay Clayton Trio with Kenny Wheeler June 26
Bill Smith Ensemble June 27
Steve Lacy Sextet June 28
ROBSON SQUARE CINEMA
Bill   Frisell Kaiser  West   Maksymenko June 23 8 pr
Wondeur Brass/VEJI with Kenny June 24 8 Dr
Wheeler
Tim Berne Trio June 25 8 pr
Obrador Paul Plimley Octet June 26 8 pn
Ceslo and Carhnho Machado June 27 8 pn
Pauhnho Ramos (Brazil)
Mal Waldron Quartet June 28 2 pn
Jane Ira Bloom and Kent McLagan June 29 2 pn
Single Tickets  $13 Series C or D  $40
Tickets at VTC/CBO 280-4444 and Black Swan Records. 736-2897 information.
More Than 400 Musicians! Over 150 Performances!
: senes THE MAJOR WEST COAST JAZZ FESTIVAL
) Ser'ie^ Nightclub performances at The Town Pump, Savoy.
Arts Club Lounge, Hot Jazz Club, Classical Joint, Charlies,
Series Tne Yale and Basm Street.
> series     4 free bandstands plus Canada Pavilion and Expo Bandstands
) Senes *Ticket prices subject to outlet service charges.
PRODUCED BY THE COASTAL JAZZ AND BLUES SOCIETY
PRESENTED BY
JkT Hi.     S £ O KG I A ■ ^
straight COURTING
THE BEAST
CD follows 54-40
in pursuit of the
Great Homed
Iguana—
ARCH 29, 1986. MARK THAT
date on your calendar with a dollar sign. On one side of the dollar
sign put the letters W and B. On
the other side, put the numbers 54 and 40.
Okay so far? Now under this put a question
mark and an exclamation mark.
Why am j asking you to do this ? Sheer perversity, I suppose. Actually there is a reason,
though it might strike you as somewhat specious. March 29 was the day 54-40 (hence the
numbers) signed a contract (the dollar sign)
with Warner Brothers Records (and the
letters).
So what's the big deal, you say? Bands sign
contracts every day, and I've never considered
marking the day on a calendar. There's no
mark for the day Images in Vogue signed their
contract. There's no mark for the Payola$. Like,
who cares?
Point taken: business deals aren't very exciting. But this date and this business deal
mark a significant step in the development of
Vancouver independent music. For five or six
years now we've been hearing what a vibrant
independent music scene we have here in
Vancouver. The envy of the rest of the country, they said. Just you wait, they said. And
for five or six years, bands have sunk under
a sea of red ink and indifference. The two independent bands that were signed to Canadian major labels are now up to their armpits
in hock to those companies, having failed in
that major challenge facing Canadian bands
—breaking the American market. Elsewhere,
DOA is still treading the independent path,
despite bringing in Pinhead Brian McLeod to
nudge them towards the Hard Rock AOR
sound. Poisoned languishes on a bier of press
6     DISCORDER
clippings. Things look a little better at Nettwerk Records, although perhaps not as sunny
as their press releases would have you believe. The bands on the Zulu label are still
packing their own records in the offices above
the Fourth Avenue store.
I don't mean to paint a bleak picture, nor
denigrate the work these people have done
over the last couple of years. The point is that
whatever the creative accomplishments of the
Vancouver independent music scene, its financial underpinnnings are tenuous, to say the
least. And if the financial base collapses, the
creative accomplishments will mean nothing.
Dick. Welcome back to obscurity.
Against this backdrop, 54-40's signing to
Warner Brothers represents a significant step.
No doubt, there will be mumblings of sell-out
from some quarters, but in practical terms the
deal with the American division of WB gives
the band international distribution, sidestepping the branch plant mentality that plagues
Canadian major labels (and which has proved
the undoing of bands like IIV and the Payola$).
It gives 54-40 a ^hance to show what can be
done with the money and power of a major
label behind a band whose music is not made
specifically for the wasteland of AOR radio.
As ugly, monolithic and pigheaded as they
might seem, major labels still rule the roost
of the music industry. They have the money
and organization to press, distribute and promote the music. They can get it to the neb-
bish radio station music director in Manitou,
Wyoming and to the Madonna-Wanna-Be in
Peoria, Arizona in a way that indies can only
dream of. Despite the inroads made by independent labels over the last five years,
major labels, satin baseball jackets and all,
are still the muscle in the music industry.
THE PROCESS that took 54-40 from
the low-rent halls of the politically correct MoDaMu collective to the swinish
splendor of the corporate boardrooms of
America's entertainment giants is every bit as
complex and fraught with meaning as the
mating dance of the Great Horned Iguana.
Indeed, the process bears no small resemblance to the courtship rituals of that odd,
sometimes aggressive, sometimes different
beast. On the one hand, the band: bright-
eyed, eager, yet wary of just what the Beast
wants to do with it. Not exactly the retiring
virgin, but looking for Mister Right. On the
other, the industry: cynical, jaded, its reaction
time showed by substance abuse and insularity, but aware that this sweet young thing
could be of some use. The two circle one
another, sniffing, probing the air with tongues,
making tentative overtures, flattering, feigning
indifference, showing enthusiasm, assessing
motives, gauging capabilities.
The major difference between the reptillian
courtship ritual and the signing process of the
music industry is time. The Great Horned
Iguana either grows impatient and plunges
ahead, or grows bored and retreats to rub itself
off against a rock, usually within the span of
one episode of Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom. Even if it does follow through on the
courtship, the whole affair is consumated in
under a minute, leaving nothing but a pile of
panting scales. In the music business, the
courtship is only the beginning, a prelude to
what both parties hope will be prolific
breeding.
"The initial interest in the band came when we were on tour after the release of Set The
Fire, in April of 1984," says Allan Moy, who
along with Keith Porteous, comprises Gangland Artists, the band's management company. "It was in the middle of the tour, and
most of it was word of mouth. Then they contacted MoDaMu's office and Keith called us
and said 'this person from CBS Records
wants to talk to you guys and see the band.'
Once we got to L.A., there was quite a bit of
interest stirred up—people wanted to see the
band, people wanted to take me out to lunch
and talk about the group. At that point we
hadn't had any experience with major labels,
so it was interesting to say the least.
"But at that point we were spending all our
time and energy trying to make an independent release happen. We weren't going to
major labels and looking for help there. They
came to us, I guess, because of what we were
doing with the independent release."
"I think the important thing," says Neil
Osborne, 54-40 guitarist and singer, "is that
once we noticed that they were interested, we r
didn't ignore it. We tried to understand it first, *
and then capitalize on it, keeping what we
wanted out of it. It wasn't the first time we'd
considered major labels; when Keith and Allan
took over the management of the band from
our previous manager, Gordon Graham, we
decided that the goal was to take 54-40 to an
international level, and I guess that meant I
major labels. But it was the first time we seriously considered the prospect."
The relationship between the band and
Gangland Artists had its roots in the MoDaMu
collective, which had initially formed to release, among other things, a single by Moy
and Porteous' band, Popular Front. Moy had
been working with 54-40 as part of the collective, road managing tours, and producing Set |
The Fire. When that album took off in the
States, Moy, now joined in the collective by
Porteous, found that handling the business of
54-40 was a full time concern. Financial concerns and tensions within their collective
generated by the attention given 54-40 by Moy
and Porteous prompted the pair to sever their
ties with MoDaMu and form Gangland.
Having severed their ties with MDM, the
task of following up on the initial interest in
54-40 fell largely on Moy and Porteous' shoulders. There were contacts to be maintained,
tapes to be sent out. The process was not,
according to Moy, an active courtship; people
in the music industry who had shown interest
were kept informed of the band's progress, but
54-40 was not ready to go, hat in hand, to the
major labels.
"The game plan was: this is us. You better
appreciate us for what we are, what we do. If
you're not interested in that, then I guess we're
not interested either. There was no strategy,
because there was no worry; we were 54-40;
we were trying to promote this independent
record, and if major labels wanted to come out
and see us and talk about plans that they
might have, we'd be listening.
"I think the real key thing was that we
weren't desperate to sign to a major label. If
there was one impression we made in 1984
it was that if you're not interested at this time
it doesn't concern us, because we're working
on this record and we have plans to make
JUNE   1986 another one. This group will be around in two
years, we'll be around in five years."
"I remember Allan telling us 'you can be an
independent band for 25 years, and do quite
well," says Brad Merritt, the group's bass
player.
"I told Brad that, and then I couldn't come
up with one name. I'm sure there was one."
While the band maintained its independence, it did not ignore the attention. By the
time 54-40 toured the West Coast again in
August, 1984, the attention had become more
serious. People from a number of labels, major and independent, had expressed an interest in signing the band.
What followed was a lull in the band's
career, from August to December, 1984. Porteous had moved to San Francisco to work as
a booking agent and the band laid low and
wrote songs. In March, 1985, 54-40 returned
to the studio to record their third record.
"What Keith made clear when we went into
Mushroom with Dave Ogilvie was that we were
making a tape," says Merritt. "We were going to pour all our resources into recording,
instead of setting money aside for pressing
and so on."
"While the tape was being made, we got
mixes and sent them off to our contacts at
various labels and got response," explains
Porteous. "The idea was that by the time the
recording was finished we would have some
sort of agreement. By that time the band had
been withdrawn from the MoDaMu collective
and we were shipping those tapes to major
labels, indie labels, everyone. So we had all
those contingency plans, with a worst-case
scenerio of the recording being released on
our own label and a best-case scenario of the
band signing a major international deal."
THE TAPES SHARPENED the interest
of a number of labels, mostly American majors and independents. While
Canadian major label response was not discouraging, none of the domestic companies
made serious overtures. This lack of interest
in their homeland did not surprise the band.
"I always got the impression that Canadian
major labels didn't quite know what they would
do with a 54-40," says Moy. •
"Canadian labels want a hit song right away,
or rather a hit sound, and I don't think they
saw that in 54-40."
Osborne is a little more blunt in his assessment of the Canadian majors: "The last thing
I wanted to do was to sign a deal with a Canadian major label; I thought it would be the
death of the band. There'd be no room to grow,
because the whole attitude is wrong. The
whole music scene in this country is fucked,
as far as major labels go; they just seem like
puppets of the American companies. And the
American labels were letting us be ourselves.
They weren't saying 'you're singing flat' or 'we
don't hear a hit'."
"The concern of Keith and myself was that
so many bands that had been signed on Canadian major labels proper had such a difficult
time presenting themselves on the international scene," says Moy, diplomatically. "There's
handfuls of them that just don't do anything
across the border and then it gets to the second record, and if they haven't done real big
numbers in Canada, that's it. It's over."
Having decided their best chances lay
south of the 49th parallel, the band toured the
West Coast yet again in October, 1985. The
goal this time was to penetrate the monoliths
of the major labels and isolate the individuals
inside the corporate towers.
"We zeroed in on human beings," explains
Osborne, "became their friends, found out
what they really thought."
Among the individuals they focussed on
was Kevin Laffey, a junior A&R (artist and
repetoire) rep at Warner Brothers. Porteous
had contacted Laffey after his previous contact at WB had moved to another company.
Concerned that the door at WB was shut
since the company was not accepting unsolicited tapes, Porteous asked the contact who
he could send tapes to. He was directed to
Laffey, a fan of the band for a number of years.
Laffey sent copies of 54-40's tapes to the
senior A&R reps at WB. A number of these
contacted the band, interested in signing
them.
AT THIS POINT let's turn our attention
back to the Great Horned Iguana.
(You do remember the Great Horned
Iguana, don't you?) It has been observed that,
as the mating ritual gets more intense, the
female of the species will often become confused and lower her guard. She will appear
overeager, raising her tail and waving her
hindquarters seductively. This can have a
number of effects on the male of the species.
On one hand, he can suddenly lose interest.
The male Great Horned Iguana is a notably
May
30/31
June
6/7
13/14
20/21
27/28
WING NUTS w/guests
ZEALOTS w/guests
L. KABONG w/THE YOUNG PUPS
HOI POLLOI w/IDYL TEA from Edmonton
THE HIP TYPE wfguests
Vlive music in the lounge
I   FRIDAYS FROM 10:30-SATURDAYS FROM 11:30 P.M.
ARTS CLUB THEATRE   1181 SEYMOUR  683-0151
HELL IS MY
DESTINATION
JUST LIKE -fo r. —^;
ftEMlMb PASS£N6fc*S4
THAT THE ftAK ANbZ
gUFF£T /S STILL ^
OPEN  fOft THE  «^
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AND NON-ALLoMOLict
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BIFF IS HERE!
Biff Designs now available at the
T-Shirt Gallery
2050 West Fourth • 738-0484
8      DISCORDER chauvinistic brute and likes the feeling that
this whole process is a challenging seduction.
Or he may make outrageous demands of the
female, figuring he's got her where he wants
her.
Likewise, bands in pursuit of a major label
contract can lose a sense of perspective as
the possibility of a deal becomes more likely.
The deal itself becomes the primary goal, and
the music fades to the background. Sometimes the prospect of a deal can paralyze a
band as they wait for the hammer to drop.
"There was a lapse there," says Phil Com-
parelli, who plays trumpet and guitar with the
band. "It went from 'you guys are really good,
good luck' to 'we want to sign the band,' and
for a moment it really slowed down the band
as we sat back and said, 'well? well? well?',
waiting for something concrete to happen. We
had to say 'whoa, let's go on our own,
because we could be sitting here for years.'
It helped in that way, because it made us ask
who we were doing this for anyways."
"The thing you have to figure out when
you're dealing with A&R people is where that
person is in the company," explains Moy.
"We'd get these people saying they wanted
to sign the band and we'd tell the band and
we'd look around and go 'well, what's the next
step?' I mean, right up to the time we signed
with Warner Brothers, there were people from
three or four record companies saying they
wanted to sign the band."
The buzz generated by Laffey's groundwork
caught the attention of Felix Chamberlain, a
senior A&R man at WB in L.A. Chamberlain
flew up to see the band play with Shriekback.
After the show, he arranged to fly Osborn and
Porteous down to L.A. to talk about the band.
"It was one of the first times that a record
company guy had talked to me," says Osborne, "rather than to Keith and Allan. I mean,
they speak a language that is foreign to me.
Anyways, Keith and I laid all our cards on the
table. I came back afterwards and said, 'well,
they may not sign us, but they know who we
are'."
Following the meeting in L.A., Chamberlain
suggested to the band that they release the
tape themselves.
"That sort of threw us for a loop, and we
were scrambling around trying to figure that
out, and then they turned around and wanted
to sign the band."
"I think Felix and Kevin wanted to be sure
about how this would work," explains Moy.
"No good A&R person is going to risk their
whole reputation pushing through a band that
other key people in the company won't support. They have to sell it inside the company."
"If this fails two years from now," adds Keith,
"they want to be able to say 'well, there were
a lot of people who could've pulled the plug
on this'."
Having committed themselves to WB, Porteous and Moy were faced with negotiating a
contract.
"It's interesting," says Porteous, "you can
tell exactly what the record company thinks
of the band by reading the contract. It's all
there. With 54-40, we wanted a contract that
would allow the band to develop at our own
pace. We didn't want to have to be A Ha and
sell a million copies first album out. We got
that with Warner Brothers."
AND SO EVERYONE is happy, right?
The band's happy. The record com-
. pany is happy (although there are
reportedly a few noses out of joint at WB's
Canadian subsidiary WEA). So why have we
left both a question mark and an exclamation
mark on the calendar? (You do remember the
calendar?)
Simply because it is too early to tell whether
this is a good thing for 54-40. More than one
band has been spoiled by the pressure to sell.
After all, someone has to earn the money to
pay for those satin baseball jackets. Commercial pressures can do strange things to a
band. If, two years from now, 54-40 is still making music as vital, penetrating, and meaningful as they have for the past six years, then
cross out the question mark and crack the
champagne.
Conversely, if you're inclined to mumble
sell-out when the topic of major labels comes
up, you might be well advised to hold your
counsel, at least for the moment. 54-40 have
broken the cycle of stagnation that has prevented the Vancouver music scene from
reaching a wider audience. Positive things
may come of this, even if it's not as cozy or
politically correct as you might like it to be. But
if, two years from now, 54-40 have succumbed to the pressures to conform and turn out
a record of slick AOR rock, or have split up
under a cloud of debt, then I'll come over to
your house and cross out the exclamation
mark. And we can have a grand old time chanting sell-out together
54*40'$ first album for Warner Brothers will be
released in Canada and the US on June 16.
Announcing
the return of
HOUSE
COM
w/guests
Unnatural Silence
Silent Shadows
JUNE 20 • 7:30 p.m.
NEW YORK THEATRE
$6.50 advance
$7.00 at the door
Tix: Zulu, Odyssey
JUNE   1986       9 FIRST LET ME JUST CONFESS
that I am, first and foremost, a
music fan and not an interviewer, so when three quarters of
Plasticland came into the CITR studios
expecting to be asked intelligent questions, I told them there were free to talk
about anything they liked. Before I get
to the results of our largely undirected
conversation (of which the introduction
has been irretrievably lost), here's an
introduction to the band members:
Glenn Rehse: Vocals, 12-string guitar,
mellotron, organ, African percussion,
sleighbells. (And music history.)
John Frankovic: Bass, vocals, percussion, bouzouki, trombone, Berimbau.
Dan Mullen: Guitar, backing vocals,
12-string guitar. (Unfortunately Dan
couldn't make it to the interview.)
Victor Demichei: Drums. (This is Victor's third time around with Plasticland,
although you probably won't see his
name on either of the two albums.)
Discorder: When Plasticland was putting
together their first LP, Colour Appreciation,
Lolita insisted on the band recording two
covers.
John: They wanted to make sure the buying public would know where we were coming
from.
Glenn (in typical understatement—just look
at one of the album covers): We thought that,
you know, the attire of the band and the
packaging of the record should give people
enough of an idea.
The two songs Plasticland chose were
"Magic Rocking Horse" by Pinkerton's Assorted
Colours (whom Glenn discovered on television
when he was eight or nine, and the band was
playing on a barge floating down the Mersey),
and "Alexander" by Electric Banana, a name used by the Pretty Things when they were recording for a soundtrack company.
As well as being a rock historian of sorts,
Glenn is a big Pretty Things fan. (He makes it
sound more like "Pretty Thangs.")
J: As a matter of fact, Glenn even keeps a
great little wallet-sized picture of Pretty Things.
G:  Got it with me.
J: Well, actually they (Lolita) did us a favour
by saying that they wanted some psychedelic
bands because if they hadn't restricted us to
that then there's a whole new span of, like, the
Ronettes, the Walker Brothers—
G: Right, the Wall of Sound groups that also
had a lot of impact on us, and also the soul
sounds that start to come through a little bit
more on the new album, the Wonderland
album, on isolated tracks. The first one has
a little bit more of a mod feel, it's got a little
bit more rave-up and R & B to it—the new
sound is a little bit heavier and has a little bit
more of a soul grind to it, but it still plays full
10      DISCORDER
&#$*ftlfl»V
homage to, you know, all the original inspirations that show up on the first album.
G: The thing that is really frustrating for a
band like Plasticland is that psychedelia, in
most people's minds, is something that only
happened in the 60s, and they have a real
restricted, narrow view of what it's all about.
And the fact that there were bands producing various types of psychedelic music—the
psychedelic music scene grew, and it tangen-
ted off in different areas—you had the tangent
of country bands that were being psychedelic
like the Flying Burrito Brothers, then you have
new groups that are being inspired by them.
J: Of course overseas in the mid-seventies
you had all the great space rock bands...Look
how Tangerine Dream started—thoroughly
psychedelic going into electric.
D: But surely psychedelic and electronic
music are not completely incompatible?
J: They're not incompatible at all.
G: They are now, in my mind they are, because they are so over-exploited with the synthesis process. You have bands like Tangerine
Dream, of course, that started out making
sounds on their instruments emulating early
Pink Floyd's "Interstellar Overdrive" and then
they just got into using machines to make the
sounds instead of themselves.
J: Well, you've got Kraftwerk who didn't even
consider themselves musicians, they thought
of themselves as—
G: Technicians.
J:  Yeah, sound engineers.
Victor (a rare statement): So that like kind
of evolved into a whole new style of its own,
you know, electronics.
Here I made the mistake of linking the
psychedelic movement with drug use. Plasticland was quick to explain that they do not condone drug use of any kind, and that there were
not, when they played the Savoy the night
before, "tripping," as someone in the audience
accused them.
G: We think of the music as being exciting
enough, and enough of a drug in itself, that
you should be able to catch a buzz off of it.
That's what was so exciting about the whole
thing when it first hit me, because when I was
ten years old, I wasn't taking drugs...The way
that the music scene hit me, I was very young,
and I saw it as being something very exciting.
There were no drugs involved with it for me
then, and, it had a lot of impact. And I'm hoping that people can fill the swirl of what's going on without having to endanger their health
with probably substances that they don't even
know what chemically they are...
D:  So if psychedelia doesn't have anyting to
do with drugs, what is it?
J: A splash of creativity...almost an explosion
of creativity, a colourful one.
V:  In fashion, you know, and in the way you
view things and treat people—
G: And art. It's an aesthetic feeling. It's a feeling of extension and tangent.
J:  It's not just music—it's a whole feel.
G:  Yeah. (Here he goes on to make connections between other movements, particularly
new country, and psychedelic.)
D:  Wow.
G: Are we mystics or what?
J: We make a certain psychedelic statement,
there's also a very dark psychedelic statement
that can be made—it's such a variety of
things. We're just encompassing one small
aspect of the psychedelic.
G: We like to think of ourselves as the bridging point of a few different forms of psychedelia. As you know there were a lot of music
scenes that tangented off from it—country
rock is one of them, another is heavy metal.
Bands like Blue Cheer, MC5, The Cream, Jimi
Hendrix Experience, the Pink Fairies—see,
that's what I was saying, there was great
psychedelic music in the seventies...
Our prior band was one that was overwhelmed with synthesizers and massive
amounts of percussion...At any rate, though,
it was an overwhelming experience just to
move the equipment. Fortunately with the
technology we were frequently able to turn it
on and walk away from the stage for awhile
to rest. (Laughs.) That gets right down to the
point that I was saying. For us, we looked at
the situation, we looked at everybody's tangents—
J:  Genesis and Yes and how far away from
rock they were getting, you know.
G: Yes, all those bands.
J: They were getting real boring.
G: And we decided we had to go back to our
roots and for us, for me, that was rhythm and
blues music from the 60s. I had an older sister
that went to England—she came back with a
real rich resource of magazines...there were a lot of new young groups, the Creation, the
Smoke, the new Pink Floyd with Syd Barrett,
this is like 1967. They were a new exciting
entity—we're not talking, you know, massive
pigs flying over stadiums, we're talking a London nightclub with about 50 people in it, starting to get the whole raving scene going.
J (drawing out his words): Just going crazy.
G: And having a good time. And that's what
we want to do—we don't want to see people
getting themselves into trouble or go pass out
in the streets, but we would like people to be
able to escape from the ugliness of the outer
world and enter (he pauses for effect) the
Plasticland.
After playing "Pop! Op Drops" and "Grassland of Reeds and Things":
J (talking about "Pop! Op Drops"): The song
is not actually a song but it's actually an advertisement for a candy that Glenn had come up
with and designed. Op Art candies, very sweet.
G: And forever changing flavours. You would
eat this candy and get an explosion of a million different flavours all at once, instead of
just one. Anyways, about "Wonderland" (he
means "Grassland of Reeds and Things")—
we intentionally decided to drop the drums in
favour of a floating beat, that moves in and
out of beat. The string section, the percussion,
and the bass and the guitar parts are all
synched in and out of each other in order to
create that floating effect and, you know, when
you listen to it, that is the psychedelia, the
movement, the shifting of the sounds and the
rhythms—that is the psychedelic effect of it,
and if we'd had a pronounced beat in there,
the effect would have been lost.
J: Well, originally I wanted to have a marching beat in there, you know (demonstrates),
but that would have ruined the effect completely.
/ asked the band when we could expect
another album.
G: Actually we have tracks that are already
finished and tracks that are close to finished.
We ran out of space on this album—we already have 12 songs on there, we have three
others that were recorded at Breezeway,
where this was done, with the exception of the
"Flower Power" track, which was done at the
studio where the first LP was recorded. We
have tracks sitting at both places that need
mixdown—whether or not these'll show up on
the next album, we don't know. We have a lot
of fresh material but we still are playing all
those songs live. So virtually what we have is
a whole album's worth of live material, half of
which you can't get on record yet.
J: So bring your tape players.. .And then send
them (the tapes) to us—our P.O. Box is 18448.
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53218. Does thai
sound like a good advertisement?
That night Stacey (who operated for the interview) and I went up to the band, after their
second set at the Savoy and got our records
autographed. Glenn wrote on mine what could
be the Plasticland philosophy: "To Janis, it's
all in the mind."
—Janis McKenzie
Just 3 short blocks
from the New West
SkyTrain Station
m&
Phone for available times
and rates
526-3455
MCI 2"
16 TRACK
The latest in
digital reverb
and effects
processors by
Lexicon/Yamaha
JUNE   1986      11 BEHIND
dIal
WAAH! v
ONCE AGAIN, cries of "tjhange come screeching through the CITR Mtisic Department, like
those of an ever-larger baby with musical diarrhea. Best of luck and unhampered progress
to Jason Grant, who was last seen grinning
sheepishly as he ran up a gangplank. Meanwhile, joining Don Chow and bearing fresh
linen are Kevin Smith and Janis McKenzie.
With any luck, our kid'll soon be big enough
to snatch the wheel of the radio-controlled
vehicle away from those stuck in the middle
of the road. Look, too, for the new and improved Spin List, and take a good listen before you cross the street.
Buy Now...Buy Often...
WE TOLD YOU last month about the entire
staff of CITR getting jobs at Expo. We offered
you the chance to become members of CITR
for the measly price of $10. Well, we heard
from some of you, but we just wanted to remind you that the offer still stands. Yessiree,
you too can become a denizen of the airwaves. You'll be trained on CITR's shiny, ultramodern broadcast equipment. You'll be given
the opportunity to ask embarassing personal
questions while interviewing prominent figures
in the world of academia, music, politics and
business.
Are yoiy going to let this magnificent opportunity slip through your fingers as you cultivate
unthinkable skin cancers on the beaches of
Vancouver?
For more information contact CITR at 228-
3017 or drop by and see us in Room 233M
the Student Union Building at UBC between
PARTY TIME
9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.
...And There's More
WHILE WE'RE ON the topic of volunteering...
Have we mentioned that this humble little rag
is also looking for contributors? If you fancy
yourself a writer, photographer, cartoonist,
artist or graphic designer (as a matter fact, if
you fancy yourself period), you can become
part of one of the Most Amazing Publishing
Ventures Ever To Grace The Face Of The
Earth. Write scathing putdowns of the lifework
of starving musicians! Take pictures of ugly
rock stars! Discover the ancient secrets of
magazine layout!
For God's sake, do something...
Contact Chris Dafoe or Karen Shea at 228-
3017 for more information.
by Chris Pearson
IT'S A &(\VteAK,WP
souw tne /jcflwvi
ueAd-xne PiAVT.
;^/^/^/^/v^/^/^^^^/^/^/^^'v^/^/^^'^/^^
R R I M A L D A N C E
IV1 U S I C FOR
ALTERNATIVE
URBAN    TYRES
HiNRG, NEW, OLD WAVE,X
AVANT-GARDE, PUNK,FUNK
DANCE 40, ROCKABILLY ETC ^
BUT NO PALM TREES.
FRI b\ SAT. 7KM.
p/wee oiai
13465 KING GEORGE
SURREY   584-1044
RESTRICTED
UNDER 19
\
What in the world
-     to do9'
AMARC 2
July 25-29.
Holding an
\ international
| conference of
j   community broadcasters during Expo
may not be the best
thing to do, but then
again, neither is Expo.
We need 350 billets
and plenty of
volunteers.
So if you've been
wondering "What in
the world to do this
summer?"
J Volunteer organization meeting
I June 19, 7:00 p.m.
1 Vancouver Indian Centre Rm 107
1607 E. Hastings (at Commercial) I
Give us a call.
Amarc office
253-0427
DISCORDER Vancouver Folk Music Festival
The Albion Tour Band
with Cathy Lesurf * Peter Alsop
Joey Ayala * Barkin' Kettle
Batucaje
Heather Bishop & Tracy Riley
Roy Bookbinder
Bob Bossin & Dennis Nichol
Greg Brown * Bob Brozman
Henry Butler
The California Cajun Orchestra
Chautaugua '86 with the
Flying Karamazov Brothers
Michael Cooney * Clann na Gael
Alexander Eppler Group
David Essing * Archie Fisher
Stefan Grossman
Grupo Moncada * High Country
Igni Tawanka * Joolz
Karelia * Katari Taiko
The Kentucky Warblers
Ladies Against Women
Lapo Kabwit * Christine Lavin
The Little Mountain Band
Lo Jai
Ross McRae & Lorraine Helgerson
Celso & Carlinhos Machado
Metamora * Bill Morrissey
Charlie Murphy & Jami Sieber
Musical Ride
On to Ottawa Trek 1935-1985
Peter Ostroushko & Tim Hennessy
U. Utah Phillips
Michael Pratt & Lynn McGown
Queen Ida & The Bon Temps
Zydeco Band
Chris Rawlings * Reel World
John Renbourn
The Righteous Mothers
Garnet Rogers
Sally Rogers & Howie Bursen
Shays' Rebellion
Sheila's Brush * Sileas
Fred Small
Jorge Strunz, Ardeshir Farah
& Ciro Hurtado
Sweet Honey in the Rock
Swingshift * Marcia Taylor
Phil & Hilda Thomas
The Total Experience
Gospel Choir
Lucie Blue Tremblay
Peter Paul Van Camp
Vancouver Sath presents
"Picket Line"
Dave Van Ronk
We Three
Nancy White & Doug Wilde
Chris Whiteley & Caitlin Hanford
Whole Loaf Theatre
Cris Williamson
Wives' Tales Story Tellers
JULY
18, 19, 20
Jericho Beach Park
iformation
Early Bird tickets are $42 and are on sale now. They must be purchasd
(or your mail order postmarked) by 5 pm, Sat, June 21. After that,
regular advance tickets will be $47.
Friday only tickets are $17.
Saturday or Sunday only tickets are $25.
*Hey, are you a group of 15 or more? If so, you can enjoy a 10%
discount! Phone 879-2931 for details.
Special Ticket Prices
Fixed income tickets are $35. These are available only at the Vancouver
Folk Music Festival office, and are limited to one per person.
Youth Tickets (ages 13-18) are $15 a day.
Children's Tickets (ages 3-12) are $3 a day for Saturday and Sunday.
Children accompanied by an adult are free on Friday.
In Vancouver ■
Black Swan
Records
2936 W. 4th Ave.
734-2828
Zulu Records
1869 W. 4th Ave.
738-3232
—VTC/CBO outlets (280-4411).
Highlife Records
1317 Commercial Drive
251-6964
In Castlegar
Carl's Drugs Ltd.
646 18th Ave. S.
365-7260
Vancouver Folk
Music Festival
3271 Main St.
879-2931
- In Victoria ■
Victoria Folklore
Centre
539 Pandora Ave.
383-3412
Early Bird tickets @ $42 Can./$35 U.S.
Children's Saturday tickets at $3
Children's Sunday tickets @ $3
Regular Advance tickets @ $47
Friday tickets @ $17
Saturday tickets @ $25
Sunday tickets @ $25
Subtotal
Postage @ $3 order registered mail.
TOTAL ENCLOSED
Make cheques/money orders payable to the Vancouver Folk Music
Festival
Name	
Address .	
City    	
Prov.
. Code
3271 Main St.. Vancouver. B.C.   V5V 3M6 ON
"THE
DIAL
5:00 pm    DINNER MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEWS, INSIGHT and
a DAILY FEATURE.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
WEEKEND REGULARS
8:00 am    Sign-On
Noon        BRUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
6:00 pm   SAT./SUN. MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather, plus
GENERIC REVIEW, analysis of current affairs and special features.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
WEEKDAY HIGHLIGHTS
WEEKDAY REGULARS
7:30 am    Sign-On
8:00 am    WAKE-UP REPORT
News, sports and weather.
10:00 am BREAKFAST REPORT
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEW and INSIGHT.
12:00 pm HIGH PROFILE.
1:00 pm    LUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
3:00 pm    AFTERNOON SPORTSBREAK
MONDAYS
SOUNDTRAK
10:30-11:30 am
Radio Improv: A self-contained hour of
spoken word sound effects and various
genres of music. In Stereo.
THE BLUES SHOW
8:00-9:00 pm
Can blue men sing the whites? Join host
Eric Von Schlippen to find out.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00 pm-12:30 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time Jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview, and local music news.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
Album Features: 11:00 pm.
01 June  Composers are featured tonight...
full length compositions for large
orchestras in the classical style by
John Lewis, Charles Mingus,
George Russell, Jimmy Giuffre
and others.
09 June Blue Train—One of John Coltrane's
favorite albums, a Blue Note
classic.
76 June Jazz at Massey Hall (1953). The last
recorded gathering of the founding
fathers of Modern Jazz.
23 June A repeat of Benny Goodman's 1938
Carnegie Hall Jazz Concert.
30 June Music From The Connection. One of
the more famous "off-Broadway"
plays
TUESDAYS
THE FOLK SHOW
8:00-9:30 pm
After a brief sojourn in Southern California,
the Folk Show returns to its 11/2 hour duration
for host Steve Edge to present a personal
history of folk music.
03 June Early folkies Woodie Guthrie, Pete
Seeger, John Fahey, The Chieftains, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, etc.
10 June  British folk-rock of the 60s from
Fairport Convention, Pentangle,
etc. American stuff from The
Open June First
SUMMER WEAR & ACCESSORIES FOR MEN & WOMEN
ll43 GRANVILLE ST. • V2 BLOCK NORTH OF DAVIE
683-2544
14     DISCORDER
ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
SUNTANNING
10 SESSIONS        20 SESSIONS &
$39   $69*°*
Share Sessions with a Friend
ALSO AVAILABLE 1 BED WITH SPECIAL
FACE TANNER $1.00 EXTRA PER SESSION
HAIR STYLING
20% Discount
on any hair care services
with Robert
5784 University Blvd.        Ph. 224-1922
(in UBC Village)
Valid with presentation of this ad
224-9116
Expires June 30, 1986 1 FREE BUE6ER
EVERY FRIDAY SATURDAY & SUNDAY
BRING RICE, TOAST,
CARDS, FLASHLIGHTS
and NEWSPAPERS.
ALL AGES ADMITTED
ALL SEATS $5.00
Studio (zlnama
rrt (E-X-C-E • L-L-E-TFT) xr
Th e  eat e rY
THE GOOD DEAL IS your
least expensive burger is
free when two are ordered.
This applies to beef and tofu
burgers only, and isn't valid
for take-out or any other
coupon.
Enjoy your burg &
have a nice day!
J43LVL^QA^VWY_7M-M98_
Byrds, Band, Dylan (again).
17 June  Further developments by Fairports,
Richard Thompson, Boys of the
Lough, Steeleye Span, Rossel-
son/Bailey, Kate & Anna, Ry
Cooder, Stan Rogers, etc.
24 June To the present day with Spirit of
the West, Pogues, Billy Bragg,
Clannad, Dick Gaughan.
LOVE PEACE AND VIOLENCE
11:00 pm-1:00 am
An earnest effort to resolve 7,000 years of
passion, sedation and empty threats (read
civilization), featuring live sex, tape loops,
simulated drug taking and lots of normal
music. "Some things are so stupid that they
must be done." E. Raoul
BUNKUM OBSCURA
9:30-11:00 pm
A Bit off the wall
A Bit on the floor
A Bit under your shoes.
PLAYLOUD
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
As soon as one stops to suffer, one stops to
exist. Aural surgery performed by Larry
Thiessen. Nothing is planned. Nothing is left.
WEDNESDAYS
VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
10:30-11:30 am
04 June Professor Michael Smith: Genetic
Engineering—7986
11 June   Dean Victoria Fromkin: Brain,
Mind and Language
18 June  Professor John Caldwell: The
News from Halley's Comet
25 June Mr. Herbert A. Simon:. Why
Economists Disagree.
JUST LIKE WOMEN
5:75-6 pm
Tune in for 45 minutes of invigorating and
stimulating interviews, news and music. For
anyone interested in women's issues or learning more about them.
THE AFRICAN SHOW
8:00-9:30 pm
Catch the latest in African news and Music
with Umerah Patrick Oukulu and Todd
Langmuir. News at 8:30. Special feature
weekly at 9:00. Onward-Harambe.
THE KNIGHT AFTER
Midnight to 4:00 am
Music to clobber Yuppies by—featuring radio
shows traded with alternative stations in
Europe and the U.S. This show will really
mess up your BMW!
THURSDAYS
PARTY WITH ME, PUNKER!
3:00-5:00 pm
Same place, same time, different hosts. Join
rock action and Crusty Love for cool tunes
and special guests and features. Tune into
Crusty for the last Thursday of May for the
best of Vancouver punk rock, including local
antiquities.
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00-9:00 pm
Screaming guitars, throbbing basses, pounding drums, pumping pianos and howling
saxes: Top of the Bops has them all, and you
can have them too!
MEL BREWER PRESENTS
11:00 pm-Midnight
The universe is decaying. This manifests
itself as change. Things change. Tune in
to hear this weekly dose of local music interviews, mike squeals, and things that go
bump in the night^change.
FRIDAYS
FRIDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
10:30-11:30 am
STIRRINGS: Your host Kirby Hill has just felt
the scent of Spring. Out of the hibernation of
the winter semester, this Wolf reawakens in
search of fresh summer territories. This
month the Wolf senses:
06 June A festival of mimes, clowns and
other creative personalities; Beaux
Gestes '86 is here.
13 June B.C.'s film industry. Both the creative
and the business side analyzed and
expressed.
20 June Much stuff about El Salvador, featur-
JUNE  1986     15 3^mfalS°L0f^0^
19Q6
[Bullfrog Recording School
■    is now offering week long intensive
Sound & Recording
Engineering Courses
Three Levels of Instruction.
Trade School Certified
Tax deductible & very affordable
Enroll Nowl   Space is limitedl
Ltarn to record the practical way
BULLFROG
RECORDING STUDIOS
2475 DUNBAR STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
(604) 734-4617
ing Seeds for El Salvador, and
various guest speakers.
27 June Arts therapy and healing. A profile of
the conference on May 8-11.
POWER CHORD
3:30-5:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring
the underground alternative to mainstream
metal: local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities, plus album give-aways.
SOUL GALORE
8:00-9:30 pm
All the tearjerkers, all the hipshakers. From
R&B to funk and especially soul. Join Fiona
MacKay and Anne Devine and wear your
soul shoes.
06 June Specialty Records—featuring Little
Richard, Lloyd Price, Clifton
Chenier, and the Soul Stirrers with
Sam Cooke, to name a few.
13 June Mr. Superbad himself, the godfather
of Soul—James Brown, Part I, of
course.
20 June Women Soul Singers of the 70s, including selections from Aretha
Franklin, Roberta Flack, Patti
Labelle, Dionne Warwick, etc.
27 June An All-Requests show-—your chance
to hear all your soul favorites.
THE BIG SHOW
9:30 pm-midnight
Why pay money to get into a nightclub on a
Friday night? If Big InternationAI can't get
you dancing, no-one can.
THE VISITING PENGUIN SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Now, finally, a reason to stay up past the BIG
SHOW on Friday nights. Yes, Andreas Kitz-
mann and Steve Gibson dish out requests,
new music, interviews and selfless egotism.
WEEKEND HIGHLIGHTS
SATURDAYS
EARLY MUSIC SHOW
7:30-10:00 am
Have breakfast to music from the Medieval,
Renaissance and Baroque periods, played on
strange and exotic instruments. With host
Ken Jackson.
07 June Anonymus, a medieval ensemble
from Quebec are featured.
14 June  Rameau
21 June Orlando Gibbons
28 June Spotlight on Christopher
Hogwood.
NEOFILE
Noon-4:00 pm
A rundown of the newest, most exciting and
insipid releases raked in during the week at
CITR. Join music directors and charismalep-
tic hosts Don Chow and Kevin Smith for an
eclectic musical pig-out, with occasional interviews, live mixes, and peripheral relevance.
PROPAGANDA! .
6:30-9:00 pm
An eclectic mix of interviews, reviews, music,
' KlHfrTS
4>i                          :?
m                                i
- ELECTRO
•■
(                                                     /
- POP ?   PUNK, ROCKABILLY,               £_^                               ^       /
-MOTOWN,   50s  &   60s ROCKriROtxV                                /
^y" j~~ TRASH & THBASH5€IRL  GROUPS>|                 /
\   J?               - BRITISH   INVASION,   PSYCHFOEUC
W                    1                 -OHE   HIT   WONDERS!
#                                                                          A :  %
1                    _„,.„„                           X     \r*"~ - - -DANCE ~ «~
A                                                            i                  /
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§275 SEYMOHH,,
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I
****                  Immmmm*                       )             685-3288
if                    ( hut. loggers welcome)
16      DISCORDER humour, High Profiles, and other features
with Mike Johal.
PYJAMA PARTY
9:00 pm-1:00 am
Your hosts Mike Mines and Robin Razzell
present everything from ambient music for
snoozing to upbeat tunes for popcorn and
pillow fights.
TUNES 'R' US
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Music, Music, Music, Handyman Bob, Music,
Music, My Favorite Album, Music, Music,
Experimental To Classical, Teddy Kelowna
presents, and yes more music.
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
8:00 am-Noon
A sampling of the vibrant, electric and exhilarating sound often erroneously filed under
the misnomer of "classical" (i.e. pedantic)
music.
01, 08, 15 June   Works by female composers, and an attempt to discover why they
are so rare, even in the 20th Century.
22 June George Crumb Ancient Voices of
Children
29 June Ravel Daphis et Chloe
ROCKERS SHOW
Noon-3:00 pm
The best in Roots, Rock, Reggae, DJ and
Dub. With your hosts George Family Man
Barrett, Collin Hepburn and Bruce James.
MICHAEL WILLMORE'S ROCK TALK
3:00-6:00 pm
Authentic Rock 'N' Roll from the 1950s and
1960s featuring many collectors' items and
rock rarities you'd never hear anywhere else.
SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE
8:00-9:00 pm
Testing 1...2...3
Testing 1...2...3
Ladies and gentlemen, Sunday Night Live
proudly presents...
01 June Lyle Mays
08 June R.E.M.
75 June  TBA
22 June Miles Davis
29 June NoMeansNo
FAST FORWARD
9:00 pm-1:00 am
Mark Mushet searches the world over for experimental, minimalist, avant-garde, electronic, and other non-mainstream sounds.
01 June The usual parade of happy hits.
08 June An evening of Sonarchy. Sergio
Barroso and Paul Dolden live from
the Western Front May 15th.
75 June  New releases and news from the
"Fringe," the other side of television, coming soon to Cable 10.
22 June Another parade of hits and a
special guest.
29 June The best of the "Various Artists"
live radio tape collages on Fast Forward.
LIFE AFTER BED
7 am-4 am
The return of the nightmare from the people
you're parents warned you about. Ugly radio
has returned. Warn your avocados.
DESSERT
& COFFEE SPECIAL $2.25
Evenings from 6:00 p.m.
— cappuccino or cafe latte
with cheesecake
/Mon. -Thurs
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
820 HOWE STREET
8 am-10:30 pm
8 am-Midnight
11 am-Midnight
noon-7 pm
683-5122
DUTHIE BOOKS
Despite the thousands of visitors
and the crowds at the fair, a strange
peace has settled over the downtown
core. Most of the traffic, both automobile and pedestrian, has been drawn
to the Expo site. It's a good time to
slide downtown to check the late spring
arrivals.
One of these is the mass market
paperback edition of this year's just
announced Edgar winner (the prize
awarded by the Mystery Writers of
America for best crime novel of the
year) The Suspect by Vancouver writer
L.R. Wright. Ms. Wright has published three novels previously, but this is
her first foray into the genre of mystery
novels. She may have found her calling.
The Suspect is set on the Sunshine
coast, follows most of the traditions of
its canon, but features as one of the
lead characters eighty year old George
Wilcox. It is notable for its crisp style,
elegant plotting, and unusual ending.
One of the funniest novels published
in recent years is Money by Martin
Amis, now issued in a mass market edition by Penquin. It's a different kind
of transatlantic novel set in London
and New York, and written in a wild
rhythmic prose that rings with all the
recent buzz words, cliches and brand
names, and yet remains extraordinary
throughout. The main character is an
unsavory character who tells his story
very frankly. One should be warned; it
is the story of a man obsessed with
pornography, booze, obscenity, and of
course, money.
Marguerite Duras topped the bestseller lists in France almost as soon as
hd last book, The Lover, was released. When that novel was translated and
published in English last year it
brought Duras a broad readership in
North America that she never had
before despite her emminence among
French writers. Consequently some of
her older novels are being reissued. The
first of those to appear is one as haunting, beautiful, and erotic as The
Lover—The Ravishing Of Lol -Stein,
published in a beautiful trade paperback edition in the Pantheon Modern
Writers series. Lol Stein is a heartbroken young woman who returns to
the town where her tragedy took place
and is slowly drawn into the position
first of the voyeur and then...A memoir
by Duras has also been published this
year, and a very, very extraordinary
book it is too. It was first published in
France last year, and now in hardcover
in English this spring. It is entitled The
War, and tells the story of Duras' war
years in Paris as a member of the
French resistance. It is written in incredibly clear prose that has a disturbing ethereal quality. It is superbly
translated by the translator of The
Lover, Barbara Bray. The reason The
War was not published until last year
is explained by Duras in a short preface
from which I quote the first two
sentences: "I found this diary in a couple of exercise books in the blue cupboards a Neauphle-le-Chateau. I have
no recollection of having written it!'
919 Robson Street     Arbutus Village Square     4444 W. 10th Ave.
687-4496 738-1833 224-7012
919 ROBSON ST. NOW OPEN 9-9 MON. - FRI.
JUNE   1986      17 spy\
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TWINTONE
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LAURIE ANDERSON
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WB/WEA
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North America
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EDWARD KA-SPEL
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THE CRAMPS
A Date With Elvis
BIG BEAT
CHRIS HOUSTON
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CAUSASIAN
DEATH OF SAMANTHA
Strungout on Jargon
HOMESTEAD
THE COSTELLO SHOW
King of America
CBS
PHALANX
Got Something Good For You
MOERS MUSIC
ROBERT WYATT
Old Rottonhat
ROUGH TRADE/WEA
THE GO-BETWEENS
Liberty Belle
POLYGRAM
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Welcome to Dreamland
CELLULOID
PTOSE
Ingobles Limaces
AYAA
SLOW
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ZULU
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DEF JAM/CBS
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K.422
THE PANDORAS
Stop Pretending
RHINO
COLOURBOX
Colourbox
4AD/POLYGRAM
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PETER GABRIEL
Sledgehammer
WEA
MACATTACK
The Art of Drums
BAAD
ART OF NOISE
Peter Gunn
MCA
THE WATER WALK
Far Fields/Seven Statues
"DEMO**
KEVIN ZED
More/Tea Type
BEAT
ZAMBONI DRIVERS
Skating Ghost
SIGNPOST
SONIC YOUTH
Flower/Halloween
HOMESTEAD
THE BEASTIE BOYS
She's On It/Slow and Low
DEF JAM
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Don't Want To Know If...
WEA
THE JESUS AND MARY CHAIN   Some Candy Talking
NME 7"
THE BOTTOM LINE
Blood in This Land
**DEMO**
STUBBORN BLOOD
Tightrope/Love Fix
**DEMO**
THE POGUES
Poguetry In Motion EP
STIFF/MCA
SHADOWY MEN ON A
SHADOWY PLANET
Our Weapons Are Useless
SHADOWY
SHOP ASSISTANTS
Safety Net
53RD & 3RD 54-40
54-40
(WEA)
SINGING IN THE SHOWER OR STROL-
ling down the street, oblivious to your surroundings, a certain song stuck in your head,
sounding over and over. It happens to everybody and because it does this phenomenon
has to be regarded as pop music's most basic
yardstick of success.
To be perfectly honest, I never expected to
find myself humming 54-40 songs while washing the dishes, but it happened. I was staring
at a sinkful of greasy water and singing
"(Everytime I Look at You) I Go Blind." Heavy
irony, but never was housework so enjoyable.
Therein lies the major difference between
>this album and 54-40's previous work. Most
of the earlier stuff is typified by a cold and
often terminally obscure introspection that
makes for a rather sober and solitary listening experience. There's nothing wrong with
that except that I find myself getting restless
and fidgety if I listen to Selection ot even Set
The Fire all the way through.
Not so with this album. I've listened to it
countless times and I still think it's a wonderful record. Why? Because the songs are just
so damn catchy. Since 54-40 has never been
regarded as a band to chew gum by,
might give the impression that they have radically altered their sound. I don't want to mislead. Neil Osborne's voice retains the resonant growl that has always characterized the
taut, coiled spring tension of 54-40. It's just
that now there is so much more.
The warmer, fuller aura of this album is
evidence of superior production and the increasing maturity of the band's songwriting
talent. Simpler song structures are more fully embellished with guitar and the previously
under-utilized Phil Comparelli plays a prominent role as the band appears to have learned how to use two voices effectively. The production is smooth, crisp, uncluttered and clear,
and commercial radio programmers, who are
always whining about the inferior production
quality of local releases, will have to come up
with a different excuse for not playing this
record.
If nothing else, the new album sounds more
"rawk" than anything the band has done
before. "Baby Ran" has hit written all over it
and the aforementioned "1 Go Blind" drives
me to pop distraction. There is no doubt in my
mind that this album can only serve to win
54-40 a bunch of new fans and enhance their
reputation outside Vancouver. The question is
how their longtime local fans will react to it?
I anticipate a few sellout accusations but I
can't fathom any possible justification for
them. If the band are to be congratulated for
anything it is that they have managed to make
a record that can stand beside anything else
in North American, a record that reflects a
steadily growing and ever-widening appeal yet
betrays nary a hint of contrivance. That 54-40
now has major label support is merely just.
The foot is in the door. Now is the time to kick
it wide open.
—Steve Robertson
Leon Redbone
Red To Blue
August Records (US)
LEON'S BACK WITH HIS FIRST ALBUM
since 1980 and really, nothing much has
NEW & USED/CONCERT TIX
ABDULLAH IBRAHIM
  Water From an Ancient Well
PHIL WOODS QUINTET
  Heaven
SHEILA JORDAN
 The Crossing
BILLIE HOLIDAY
 At Monterrey 1958
GEORGE ST AVIS w7 ANGER, MARSHALL
& DEGRASSI Morning Mood
BLACK SWAN
RECORDS
* BLACKHAWK TITLES IN STOCK
• 60s RE-ISSUES
• NEW FOLK & BLUES TITLES
SOUNDTRACKS BACK IN STOCK
Amarcord/Diva/Liquid Sky
AFFINITY JAZZ TITLES
Special Price
5.98 Single Import LP
lues, is still a
charming anachronism, and, when he puts
his mind to it, is still a deft and tasteful
guitarist.
As Hank Williams Jr. remarks on one of Red
to Blue's opening tracks, Leon sure sounds
like he's got a case of the miseries. He's lost
at love more times than most people have hot
meals, nobody wants him and he's discovered
the shock of "Reaching Out For Someone
And Not Finding Anyone There." But if Leon
really has the blues it's hard to tell. Redbone's
reworking of these Pre-WWII gems is as sharp
as his trademark white suit, and as delightfully camp as a flip of the Panama hat. No one
will find Leon lacking in character; some may
find him lacking soul.
Redbone's approach to his music, most of
it drawn from the popular music of the 20's
and 30's, is actually refreshing when one considers the grim earnestness that prevailed in,
say, the rockabilly revival. Leon is a stubborn
anachronism, but he sees the humour otthe
situation enough not to bore us in his pursuit
of authenticity. He's willing to camp it up when
the need arises.
Camp or no camp, Redbone is a skilled
guitarist. Usually content to provide rhythmic
support while the clarinets and trumpets provide brightening accents to the songs, Redbone is still capable of some string-popping
virtuosity. On "Whose Honey Are You?" he
unleashes a bouncy, playful, almost hilarious
solo that gives the song a bouyant charm. And
if his slide work on "Diamonds" comes dan-
2936 W. 4th 734-2828
BOYS OF THE LOUGH
 Welcoming Paddy Holme
VARIOUS WOMEN DUB POETS
 Women Talk
THE PRISONER SOUNDTRACK
IRMA THOMAS (New!)
 The New Rules
BENNIE WALLACE
 Twilight Time gerously close to palm tree kitsch, well, no
one's taking this too seriously anyways.
Red To Blue isn't earth-shaking stuff; there
is an element of novelty in Redbone's approach, but it makes for fine diverting listening and wonderful accompaniment to the
drinking of bathtub gin martinis. And there are
times when I can't think of a higher compliment.
-CD
Wendy O Williams
Kommander Of Kaos
Zebra
REMEMBER THE GIRL IN ELEMENTARY
school who used to beat up the boys in
the younger grades? Ever wonder what she's
doing now? I think I know.
After starring in porn flicks and making her
mark in the "punk" scene by chain-sawing
guitars in half and blowing up Cadillacs, she's
moved onward and become the Kommander
of Kaos, the female equivalent of Motorhead's
Lemmy Kilmister. At least that's what her
"Manager/producer/Songwriter" Rod "Sven-
gali" Swenson would have us believe.
The cover of the album leaves little doubt
what the listener is about to hear. That is, any
record with the singer wearing her hair in a
pony tail, bondage gear strapped to her surgically enhanced bod, while crashing a Cadillac (some things never change) through a
brick wall, can be counted on to remain within
certain parameters. A quick glance at the song
titles, "Pedal to the Metal," "Goin' Wild," "Party," "Jailbait" (yes, the Motorhead song), "Bad
Girl," etc., etc., shows what good ol' Rod wants
us to think about his little gal, and tends to
re-enforce the image created by the cover.
Actually playing the record is a letdown,
even with low expectations. The songs adhere
to the early 70's Black Sabbath mold, with the
odd Eddie Van Halen guitar solo stuck in. It's
as though the metal 'revival' of the past few
years never happened. In short, the songs are
uninspired generic rubbish...with the exception of Ms. Williams' spoken word intro to "Ain't
None o' Your Business" where she speculates
what makes the'Straights' walk so funny (and
here the only attraction is the discovery of her
ability to curse).
Wendy's voice isn't all that one would wish
to build a star around either. The best thing
that could be said about it is that it makes Joe
Strummer sound like Mel Torme. Realizing
this, Rod's mixed her vocals way down in the
songs, which makes it sound like she recorded the whole thing 30 feet away from the
microphone.
The only use for this album, aside from
playing it loudly when the landlord comes to
collect the rent, would be as a warning for
young ladies who insist on bullying the boys.
"See what happens to girls who don't behave,
dear?"
—PC
Ryuichi Sakomoto
Illustrated Musical Encyclopedia
Virgin
IS THERE SUCH A THING AS EXPERI-
mental pop? If there is, Ryuichi Sakomoto's
latest solo work could be regarded as an example; it toys with technology, and hints at
NOW AVAILABLE ON UNDERGROWTH RECORDS
FORBIDDEN BEAT
ALSO AVAILABLE
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U.G. 1304       SHANGHAI DOG
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U.G. 1303       SNAKE FINGER
"/ GAVE MYSELF TO YOU"
U.G. 1302       NO MEANS NO
"YOU KILL ME"
U.G. 1301       A.K.O.B.
"EXPLOSION BLUES"
UNDER GROWTH 86 COMPILATION C-90
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456 SE\
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AVAILABLE AT ALL CONCERNED RECORD OUTLETS
456 SEYMOUR ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA, V6B 3H1
TEL. (604) 685-8841
20     DISCORDER East-West synthesis; at its best, however, the
grandly titled Illustrated Musical Encyclopedia
is merely a demonstration of Sakomoto's ability to create pleasing, well-crafted—and harmless—pop songs.
The album starts weakly with "Field Work."
Thomas Dolby provided vocals, although the
seemingly pointless lyrics are Sakomoto's.
Musically, nothing new is done here; Sako-
moto employs a Fairlight, but all that comes
out is the same sound we heard on 1984's Art
of Noise and, before that, on Slava Tsuker-
man's intense Liquid Sky soundtrack.
Fortunately, the rest of side one is much better. The three remaining tracks, all instrumental, are excellent daydream material, ideal for
background music for your next tea party.
Side two starts off on a formula pop note,
complete with breathy vocals, but then moves
on to much more interesting material, most
of it instrumental. Fans of Sakomoto's earlier
album, Left Handed Dream, might be disappointed by the lack of dance tunes, but on the
whole, the instrumental work on Encyclopedia
makes for a more varied album.
If you are looking for an insight into Japan
or Japanese culture, go see Ran or something; don't buy Ryuichi Sakomoto albums.
His songs, as a rule, deal with Western
themes, played in Western modes. If, on the
other hand, you'd like something conducive
to slipping your brain into neutral, and not having to think about Expo, nuclear clouds or Bill
Bennett for an hour or so, this record may
be just what you need.
—Terry Walker
Laurie Anderson
Home of the Brave (Soundtrack)
WEA
NOT TOO LONG AGO, I FLIPPED ON
Saturday Night Live to see guest artist
Laurie Anderson. Figuring this appearance
must mean a new album, I was eager to see
what she was up to, but her first set was
so disappointing I switched channels.
There is something going wrong here. In the
past a perfect marriage existed between the
lyrics and music in Ms. Anderson's compositions. Detached intellectualism existed in a
rarified atomsphere ("Let x = x"); more inciting
sentiments were given jarring accompaniment
("Example #22"). The two tendencies evened
out in Mr. Heartbreak, one of the most successful "theme" albums. But the lyrics on this
record are just not in the same class. They
range from the undecipherable ("my guess is
that a pineapple is more macho than a knife")
to the banal ("every time I see an iceberg, it
reminds me of you"). Where's the old Anderson wit?
Maybe her lack of direction is a concern to
her as well. She continues to recycle old material. Home of the Brave contains a new version of "Language is a Virus," and there are
quotes from "Mr. Heartbreak." In spite of all
this, the record is not a total loss. "Late Show"
is great, and "White Lily" has the same pondering quality of Big Science, but would I lay
down cold hard cash for it? No. The night I
changed channels on her, I wound up watching The Mummy with Boris Karloff. I got the
better of the deal.
—Ken Jackson
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JUNE  1986     21 Armchair Eye
Where Bill Mullan views the
Third World War in prime time.
SOUND of a phone ringing. It rings three times,
then is picked up.
MAGGIE THATCHER: Prime Minister's office.
Prime Minister speaking.
SECRETARY OF WAR: Greetings, this is the
Secretary of War at the State Department of
the United States. We have a problem. The
companies want something done about this
sluggish world economic situation. Profits
have been running a little thin lately, and we
need to stimulate some growth. Now, we know
there's an alarmingly high number of young
people roaming around in your country with
nothing better to do than stir up trouble for the
police and damage private property. It doesn't
look like they'll ever get a job. We think it's time
we did something constructive with these people. We've got millions of them here, too.
They're crawling all over. The companies suggest we all sit down, have a serious get-
together and start another war.
MAGGIE begins to groan in orgasmic
pleasure.
SECRETARY OF WAR: The President? He
loves the idea. All those missiles streaming
overhead to and fro. NajDalm. People running
down the road, skin on fire. The Kremlin?
They've been itching for the real thing for
years. Hell, Afghanistan's no fun. So, what do
you say? We don't even have to win this war.
We just want to cut down on some of this
excess population. So just start up a draft and
call up as many of those young people as you
can get your hands on. We'll do the same.
MAGGIE'S pleasure has grown more intense.
SECRETARY OF WAR: We can make this war
so big. The more people we kill in this war,
the more the economy will prosper. We can
get rid of practically everybody in your dole
queues if we plan this right, and take every
loafer on welfare right off our computer rolls.
Don't worry about those anti-war demonstrators. Just pump up your heroin supply. It's
easy. We got our college kids so interested in
beer, they don't even care that we've started
manufacturing germ bombs again.
MAGGIE is quite shamefully out of control now.
SECRETARY: Look, war is money. The arms
manufacturers tell me that unless we get our
bomb factories back to full production, the
whole economy is going to collapse. The
Soviets are in the same boat. We all agree that
the time has come for the big one. So what
do you say?
MAGGIE: (Takes a moment to contain herself).
I think it's marvellous.
SECRETARY OF WAR: That's excellent, we
knew you'd agree. The companies will be very
pleased.
THE PRECEDING ARE NOT my words.
They're a slightly edited transcript of
the conversation that takes place over
the music in Dead Kennedy's "Kinky Sex
Makes the World Go Round" (from the War-
gasm compilation album, released in 1983).
I happened to hear it again tor the first time
in at least a year just two nights after the
Arriericans bombed Libya. The TV was on, too
(with the sound off), to an all-night news show.
The first really juicy footage was just beginning to roll in, and there was still a lot of confusion as to what was really going on.
And it struck me suddenly that it had finally begun: The Third World War. Not the war
itself necessarily (you could argue that started
in Korea 25 years ago); but the TV series. A
prime serial along the lines of Hill Street Blues
crossed with The Vietnam War crossed with
Monday Night Football crossed with The Six
O'Clock News; with a cast composed entirely
of real people (including an ex-actor or two);
a virtually unlimited special effects budget;
and a plot so complex and compelling that it
demands the combined resources of all the
world's media to adequately cover it.
Brought to you by Coke, General Motors,
IT&T, Exxon, et cetera. Featuring pathos, seduction, satire, brutal sex, slapstick comedy,
melodrama, adventure, romance, and of
course, ultra-violence. (No nudity! This is
television.)
Let's not talk about how it might end.
—Bill Mullan
22     DISCORDER special events
JUNE 23rd. - 28th.
^B   THE DUMAURIER
* JAZZ AND BLUES FESTIVAL *
•      23rd. TIM BERNE FROM N.Y.
24 - 25 KAREN YOUNG AND
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