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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 1987-09-01

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 That Magazine from CITR FM 102
September 1987 No Cents re
i\
FOCU* 3
Hair Designers Limited
Suite 3 - 837 Beatty St.
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 2M6
683-2357-8
J! disorder
That Magazine form CITR Radio 102
September 1987 Vol V No 8 Issue #56
EDITORS
Bill Mullan, Michael Shea
WRITERS
Travis B., Kevin S., tain Bowman, Dave Campbell,
Pat Carroll, Don Chow, Marc Coulavin, Mike
Harding, Janis McKenzie, Colin Robbins
PHOTOS
David Duprey, Brian Harding, Mark Mushet, M.
Helen J. Orr, John Scully, Karen Shea
ILLUSTRATORS
Rod Filbrandt, Lawrence McCarthy, William
Thompson
COVER
Sook-Yin Lee
ART DIRECTOR
Karen Shea
DESIGN
Harry Hertscheg
LAYOUT
Johanna Block, Pat Carroll, Ross Crockford, Lucy
Crowther, Sandra Dametto, David Duprey, Brian
Harding, Glenn Kruger, Lee-Ann Mitchell, Shedo
Matt Richards, Marina Szyarto
PROGRAM GUIDE
Louis Jantzen
TYPESETTING
Wynn Archibald, Maja Grip, Don Schuetze
BUSINESS MANAGER
Randy Iwata
ADVERTISING
Lucy Crowther
DISTRIBUTION
Bill Mullan
SUBSCRIPTIONS
Randy Iwata
PUBLISHER
Harry Hertscheg
Discorder Magazine, c/o CITR - UBC Radio
6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C. Canada
V6T 2A5 S(604) 228-3017
Discorder is That Magazine from CITR Radio
102 and is published monthly by the Student Radio
Society of the University of British Columbia, although it winds up being printed deep from within
Surrey, Canada.
Discorder Magazine prints what it wants to, but
pledges to put the CITR On The Dial program schedule and SpinList record chart in every issue. Discorder also vows to circulate 17,500 copies by the
first of each month. Subscriptions are encouraged.
Twelve issues: $12 in Canada, $12(US) in the
States, $18 elsewhere. Make money orders or
certified cheques payable to 'CITR Publications'.
CITR Radio 102 broadcasts a 49-watt stereo signal throughout the Vancouver area at 101.9 FM.
But for best reception, hook up to the FM cable network. CITR is at 101.9 cable FM on Rogers (Lower
Mainland) and Shaw (North Shore) cable systems,
but is still at 100.1 on Rogers (Fraser Valley).
Inquiries about CITR, Discorder or the Mobile
Sound System can be directed to station manager
Harry Hertscheg at 228-3017, between 10 am - 4
pm, Monday to Friday. If you want to talk to the
deejay, call 228-2487 or 228-CITR.
IN THIS ISSUE
THIS IS NOT A COMMERCIAL MESSAGE
Vancouver clubs, seen by Dave Campbell
THE INCOMPLETE STORY OF CATTLE PROD
They promote bands, not livestock
FROM BACKYARD TO BIG TIME
V/2 easy steps to stardom
SHINDIG
The true story
A BITTER BITE OF THE BIG APPLE
How to lose weight and sleep in New York City
8
13
16
18
20
MAD DOGS AND TORONTONIANS
22
What Kevin S. did on his summer vacation
THE RAP OF MELLE MEL
24
One of the Furious Five keeps the beat
on the street
THE SHIVERING MAN
26
Mark Mushet speaks softly with Bruce Gilbert
IN EVERY ISSUE
UP FRONT
4
a good place to start
AIRHEAD
6
readers who write
VINYL VERDICT
31
the last word
ON THE DIAL
34
an everyperson's guide to CITR
SPIN LIST
37
platters that matter
LOCAL MOTION
38
a good place to finish
SEPTEMBER 1987    3 BACK ALLEY THEATRE • 751 THURLOW i
UP FRONT
WE KNOW YOU'VE BEEN WAITING
all summer with bated breath and
clenched teeth for this THE BIG
Back to School Rock n' Roll n' Rap Issue
of Discorder. You have in your shaking hands
forty pages of the finest literature money
can't buy, full of pertinent information,
refreshing insights, and scintillating
comments. 'Tis no mean feat, but the
volunteer staff of Discorder has worked many
hard hours to make your temperature rise,
your head swim, your eyes bulge, and your
hands resplendant with the ink of which these
words are made.
There are no less than eight features in the
September issue of Discorder. Now this is
what you call a REAL magazine. Firstly, is the
ROCK section: kicking it off is a Dave
Campbell perspective on the 'live music'
situation here in Vancouver, the one that has
often been called vital and vibrant. Mr.
Campbell, in his "tell-it-like-it-is" manner,
looks at how it was, what it is, and what it
could be. The lads at Cattle Prod, have become movers and shakers in this so-called
'scene' through sheer energy and volume of
work accomplished. Does the Guinness
Book of World Records have an entry for
'most gigs booked' yet? Bill Mullan talks to
Cattle Prod, and discovers, among other
things, that they are not in it for the money. If
YOU are in it for the money, avoid reading Th
Easy Steps from the Rec Room to the Rec
Ord. Here, Pat Carroll deigns to explain, with
the help of several knowledgeable individuals, how to begin to give the best years
of your life to rock 'n' roll. Finally, Travis B.
gives you the REAL truth about Shindig,
CITR's 'battle of the bands' test of endurance
that has become one of the wonders of the
world.
Secondly, Discorder is on the ROLL. Kevin
S. and Michael Shea spent their summer
vacations in Toronto and New York, where
the pleasure was strictly business and the
colour of money was red. Kevin and Michael
rolled back to Vancouver a whole lot happier
knowing that they didn't have to live as
prisoners of the heat and concrete and steel
that characterized the summer in the Big
City.
Finally, Discorder gives you the RAP.
While in New York Don Chow spoke with
Mele Mel, of the Sugarhill Records and Furious Five fame, and he gives you the lowdown
on the state of the art of Rap. In an entirely different sphere, Mark Mushet conducted an articulate discourse with Bruce Gilbert, of
WIRE, Dome, and various solo projects, and
proves once and for all that there is not really
one critical bone in Mr. Mushet's body.
With this issue, Discorder would once
again like to welcome into its ever-loving fold
the talented Mr. Bill Mullan. Bill has co-edited
this issue with Michael Shea, who will soon
depart to continue his quest for love and/or
money. Donations will be gratefully accepted, in the mean, remember that man does not
live by words alone, despite the fact that
sometimes he has to eat them.
BEHIND THE DIAL
• Discorder continues its conquest of the world.
Both the June and July issues were delivered
to several locations in New York City, where
they were welcomed with open arms. Those
locations are: Hudson News at 753 Broadway,
Sounds at 20 St. Mark's Place, It's Only Rock
'n' Roll at 49 West 8th Street, and Venus
Records at 61 West 8th Street. If you are planning a trip to New York, or any other city, town,
or outpost, let us know and we'll set you up
with a bundle of Discorders for a travelling
companion. They don't eat much and they are
very quiet.
• If you are a fan of Wombat, then you'll be interested to know that Rod Filbrandt has just
printed a limited run of Wombat-o-Rama. It's
thirty pages big, half of which is unpublished
Wombat never before seen in Discorder. It is
available at Zulu Records and the T-Shirt Gallery, both on 4th Avenue, for $2.25.
• Speaking of animated benefits, the Vancouver
Society of Independent Animators presents
Bartoonz, an event to be held at Graceland on
September 3rd. It features a screening of
Lupo The Butcher and other locally produced
animated films. On stage will be the Stingin'
Hornets and Poisoned. Tickets are available
in advance for $5.50 at Zulu Records, Track
Records, BeBop, and Graceland. For further
info, call the V.S.I.A. at 874-4418.
CITR CONCERT PRESENTATIONS
Sept. 3 Washington Squares at the
Town Pump
Sept. 4/5 Joe Ely at the Town Pump
Sept. 8 CITR broadcasts live from the
SUB plaza at UBC
Sept 12 Spirit Of The West and The
Crimpolines at the Commodore
boss nm
UHUi
DISCORDER CLUB SODA SHOWCASE
IN CONCERT
THE RETURN OF A LEGEND
"THE MAN,
I   THE LEGEND,
HIS MUSIC"
Wed. - Fri., Sept. 2-4
Wed. & Thurs Tix: $10.00
Fri. only Tix: $12.00
Tix Available VTC/CBO Outlets,
Record Outlets & Club Soda
Charge by phone 280-4444
Next Week Aug. 25, 26
CHINA BLUE
Dance your legs off
Coming Aug. 27-30
DANCE TO THE CLASSIC 60'S
WITH
TANGERINE
681-8202 AIRHEAD
C/O CITR
6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 2A5
THIS IS THE DAWNING OF
THE AGE OF AQUARIUS
To all Discordians,
A view of respect to those whom may choose
to acknowledge. Alternate and punk style
listeners, as far as I am concerned, are
without a doubt - in the real world. This is
of course not to say that others are off in
strange select groups, although sometimes
I wonder. There have always been many
influences to ways of life and musicianship
that are outside the alternate circle. I must
however mention that the general slough of
Top 40 mainstream music has been sorely
lacking perpetual change. Many other things
are also lacking, in which enables new
music and material to be kept fresh and
exhilarating. This is so much to the fact that
Top 40 bands are sounding so meaningless
that the punk alternate scene is like a great
mirage. The mirage is real, great talent,
lyrics, and musicianship are rediscovered.
If you choose to alter your appearance, like
the chameleon, and if it's you, then have
respect. There is no real need to take the
FTW point of view. Quite often society is not
right. The people choose their destiny and
you make your life. Help our generation's
society be another stage better. To be alive
is good when there is such respect. Appreciate as you can and thank you for your
custom.
John
Yes, but have you harmonically converged
lately?
WORDS OF LOVE
Dear CITR,
I have this little message that I wanted to get
across to an ex-girlfriend of mine. I was hoping
that perhaps you might be able to publish it
in the Airhead column. It would of course
be a great favour and highly appreciated
by me.
Yours truly
Razz
Sitha,
I'm sorry I don't have what you're looking
for, because it doesn't exist in me. As for
my hands they're empty and have nothing
to offer you. You took the smile away from
my face, and the light I saw was deceiving,
darkness stole everything. Too bad I got
poisoned again, I thought the pain was
gone, and I had finally, after hundreds of
years of searching the vast universe, found
what I was really looking for. You took all I
had, murdered my soul and buried it. But
alas now my flesh slowly disintegrates, my
spirit wanders worthlessly in this hopeless
wasteland and my jumbled mind frozen
deep in thought.
'Tis better to have loved and lost,
Than never to have loved at all
Tennyson
WORDS OF ?
Words ? have fallen victim to the animated
shrug, the hollow gesture, the silent scream:
Body English. This renaissance of movement has supplanted the language arts to
become the dominant element in human to
human/machine communication. Quite naturally this development buffaloes traditional
linguists who are just now deploring the
dated "I love etc." phenomenon.
Other cultural stewards, namely anthropologists and historians, hasten to label this
Pop-Age, this epoch as "The Millertime"
without fully explaining or exploring the more
than casual relationship between mute
modern man and prehistoric tree-swinging
lincanthropus.
They are confused, of course. For the
answer to the riddle of our increasingly
wordless society resides in France. There,
in silent splendour lives the undisputed mute
master of body motion: Marcel Marceau.
Who'd have thought! Walking against the
wind, claustrophobic invisible boxes, imaginary corn on the cob, all perfect metaphors
to anxious, inarticulate North American kids
struggling against conformity and The Word.
Alan Huml
THE BIGGER THEY ARE . . .
Dear Airhead:
I am currently working on a project/survey
on parodies. My research involves studying
celebrities and analyzing their situation in
relation to their image in relation to their
environment. My research was further stimulated while reading the June issue of
Discorder where I found an active example
of a parody with a twist. I was delighted with
Regional Rhonda's request for an Al Big
cover. Isn't it obvious that Al Big is only a
cover? Has he not,like so many other stars,
become a parody of himself? I believe that
the time has come to categorize Mr. Al Big,
that "tall, dark, handsome hunk of deejay,"
with David Bowie, who my research has led
me to believe, is the most perfect example
of a self-parody. (Although Al Big may lack
the degree of "international" stature that
Bowie has acquired, the parallelism still
exists.)
Perhaps, however, Al Big has managed
to save himself from that dreadful categorization and does not deserve such a derogatory
label. After all, he has finally allowed his Big
Show its death. And granted he can only
imitate himself, he at least has alluded to his
situation with more humility than can be
accredited to most.
Congratulations to all Big Show accomplices who have given Al Big and the Big
Show the reputation they now have. You've
done a fine job in the attempt to exploit
something as big as Al Big. Moreover, cover
or no cover, the man remains a legend.
N. Igmah
Further comments or questions on this topic
may be addressed to the Al Big International
Fan Club, Box 48464, Bentall Centre, Vancouver, B.C. V7X 1A2.
6   DISCORDER 8 FREE BURGERS
AT
STUDENTS ONLY
Details at the Fogg n' Suds
Campus nearest you.
Fairview Fogg Fogg on Fourth Fogg on the Bay
| Broadway & Cambie Kitsilano English Bay
872-3377 732-3377 683-2337
every Friday Nite is w
Corona Nite
All Night Long
J350 Richards Street across from Sears Harbour Centre 687-5007 This Is Not A Commercial Message
XL.—»
^m think you're a part of it. It is a quaint
little affair. Its voice is heard on this radio
station. Its words can be read in several
journals (including the one you're reading).
And its face can be seen in the crowds at the
so-called 'alternative' clubs, scattered
throughout the city. It's a scene in several
acts with a small but loyal following made
up of music lovers, music haters, style
commandos, groupies, hangers-on, dead-
beats, rich kids, party animals, drunks,
punks, dance machines, glamour queens,
and just plain fun-loving kids of all ages who
don't care what they're listening to as long
as it isn't commercial.
Now you may think by this description
that your humble scribe is a tad bitter and
jaded by what he has just related. Perhaps
so, but when you're as close to 30 as I am,
you tend to see the world with a slightly
jaundiced eye. But cranky old-fart-ness
aside, I'm supposed to be telling you about
what this scene is.
The scene lives in the clubs. It eats,
drinks (and drinks and drinks), lives, dies,
sleeps (no, no, you can't sleep here) and
loves there. The scene is in the clubs
because the bands are there and the bands
are there because the club owners want the
scene there. Because, most importantly ,
the scene drinks there, and attracts those
who would want to be a part of the scene
themselves.
When the scene was born, it was small.
It was noisy, wild, full of energy, and scary.
It lived in the halls and shit-hole-rat-trap
clubs of the east end. In those days, the
scene was called 'punk' and was considered dangerous, although it never was,
really. As it grew, it became more refined,
better behaved, a little less noisy, not quite
as scary and it began to emerge from its
humble roots in an attempt to gain a more
respectable footing in our society as a
whole. Some of the punks started calling
themselves 'New Wave' and the switch to a
less threatening label convinced one or two
of the more daring club owners to allow the
scene into their establishments.
The risk paid off, the scene didn't smash
the place up (every night). Furniture and
fixtures didn't go missing (much), and the
8   DISCORDER
A happy club-goer trips the light fantastic
scene actually paid admission and bought
drinks. Club owners realised they could
actually make money on the scene. With
some of the risk removed and a profit margin
definitely in the picture, more and more
clubs got into the act. The scene was
gaining respectability and popularity.
As the scene grew, it became more and
more fashionable to be seen with the scene.
And so the more the scene was wanted, the
more the scene grew. And golly, did that
scene grow. Soon the scene was on the
radio, and on TV. You could go to the
movies and see the scene. It was in the
library, at Woodward's, in Vanmag!!! Soon
the scene was everywhere at once and those
who wanted to be seen with the scene were
doing their best not to be.
The Big Crash came with the Invasion of
'86 (I won't use the "E" word). The
scene, once so 'dangerous' that the cops
had to be called in, at least a coupla times,
was now safe enough to bring the kids to.
Several of the scene's most familiar and
notorious members were asked to perform
at the World's Fair! For Money! Now the
scene was faced with a 'situation'. In
general it didn't like the World's Fair, and
didn't want to condone it, but the money
was good. The result of this conflict was a
split scene.
This story, sarcastic and cynical as it may
seem, does have a purpose other than
ridicule. For this we must bring in the other
side of the scene: the Radio Reality.
At the same time as the clubs were
becoming more progressive and open to
new things, radio in this burg, with two
obvious exceptions, was doing its best to
turn back the clock. "Light Rock, Less
Talk" and "Music You Grew Up With"
remain the bandwagons our city's commercial stations choose to follow in the eighties.
With competition for the Yuppie buck being
of prime importance these days, the idea of
introducing new music, especially of the
unproven, local variety, just doesn't quite
fit into the overall scheme of things.
The two exceptions mentioned above are,
of course, Co-op Radio and our own CITR. |nd I saw a door;";
in Heaven and :~~
;heard the same]?
\the ^o^^S voice speaking
yoiceilike ^trumpet'' saying
^Come Up "And I WillvShow You
>VWhat It Js~fo Come
Affordable Fashions
PRE-OWNED & NEW
224-5711
2565      ALMA
■M    ,^
zteeh
Wednesday, September 2
THE SHAPE and LAWNDALE
Thursday September 3 - Heavy Metal Night
ASSAULT and GROUND ZERO and NIGHT VIGIL
Fri. Sat. September 4*5
SKABOOM
Sunday September 6       VTC/CBO
BILLY VERA and THE BEATERS
Wednesday September 9
BOOTLEG and THE SUE MEDLEY BAND
Thursday September 10       VTC/CBO
One Night Only B.B.   KING Two Shows
Friday September 11
A&M Recording Artist PAUL JANZ
with Special Guest MERCURY FESTIVAL
Saturday September 12
MERCURY FESTIVAL
Thursday September 17       VTC/CBO
One Night Only Two Shows
THE RIGHTEOUS BROTHERS
Fri. Sat. September 18*19
TROOPER and SAFRON HENDERSON &
THE TROUBLEMAKERS
featuring members from CHILLIWACK
Sunday September 20
SAFRON HENDERSON &
THE TROUBLEMAKERS
featuring members from CHILLIWACK
Thurs. - Sat. September 24«25«26
JUAN TRAK
FOR MORE INFO CALL 683-8687
cmmm
^XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'     ^
683-8687
UNDERGROUND 0«
VAUTT PARKING AT GATE EMTf AMCt M. Helen J. Orr
TheRheostatics seeing double during the opening night
of the Canadian Independent Music Festival at the Railway Club, August 20
Both have done their best to promote and
present local independent alternative music.
Unfortunately, the listener base remains
relatively small, due mainly to weak broadcast signals and poor reception ("I'd love
to listen to you guys but I can't get it on my
radio"). The result is simple: empty clubs.
We have plenty of promoters putting plenty
of bands (Cattle Prod, alone claims almost 200
listings) into plenty of locations, but with the
lack of media support, even the best acts
aren't drawing a consistent crowd.
With this kind of past, the future does not look
bright. The Johnny-come-lately's of the alternative club world will soon tire of empty-
rooms-for-the-sake-of-art sacrifice and
return to what they know and like best. "TOP
FORTY". Let's face it, top forty is safe, it's
familiar, you know exactly what the band is
going to play, no surprises. The crowd
doesn't have to phone in advance and ask
"What kind of music is that?" But, above all
else, top forty is boring. It's safe, it's
familiar. . .
And it's taking over! Again! Soon it will
be everywhere and the only place left to see
DOA will be the Odd Smelling Hall. Gene
Garcia will be the house band at the
Railway. The Savoy will have nothing but
... But I think you get the idea. The Disco
hordes are back. Don't despair, though.
This tide can be halted. It's time for local
independent alternative music to really take
over the city, not just pretend to. The radio
stations with the biggest audiences have got
to want to play it.
If radio in this town is allowed to remain
narrow, that attitude is going to reflect in all
the music we hear. It'll be on TV, in the
clubs, the record stores, Woodwards. It'll
be everywhere and there'll be no escape.
And all you have to do is pick up the phone.
But don't call the deejays, they'll just tell
you that they'll get fired for playing that;
Call the program director. John Beaudoin
at CFOX and Don Schafer at CFMI are the
ones to start with. They tell everyone else
what to play. And every time your favourite
local band is playing, make sure these guys
know about it. That's all it takes. If enough
people do it, it'll happen. But don't get me
wrong, I am not suggesting that we help
increase the audience of CFOX, just that
we improve the music that the audience
hears. But what of CITR? What will happen
to us? We will always be here. You may
not be able to pick us up, but we'll be here.
Dave Campbell
&
.IN THE BACKSTAGE GUIDE TO
WHO'S WB AND WHERE INMUSIC
VANCOUVER VICTORIA 1987 / 88
FREE Listings for Performers, Musicians and Music Industry Services in an up-to-date and
comprehensive Directory to the Pacific Music Industry. Complimentary, bold and expanded listings
are available. Deadlines are September 30th, 1987. Musicians get indexed use this form and return to;
BACKSTAGE COMMUNICATIONS, #303 - 68 WATER ST.VANCOUVER B.C. V6B 1A4
MUSICIANS/ PERFORMERS LISTING FORM
Q Performer(s) For Hire    OR    Q   Musician Listing Union: Q Yes □   NO
NAME / GROUP:	
Address
City
Postal code
MUSICIAN LISTING: INSTRUMENT(S) PLAYED
PERFORMER(S):   If Group, No. of Members	
Material:  Cover % Original % Recording Status: □ None Q Independent □ Major
Releases: Q Cassette □ EP □ LP Q Video Q Single
Musical Style: (check maximum 3 categories)
Q ACOUSTIC Q AFRO BEAT □ ALTERNATIVE □ BIG BAND Q BLUEGRASS O CLASSICAL
□ COMEDY □ COUNTRY □ DIXIELAND □ FOLK □ FUNK Q 50*S 0 60S
Q EASY LISTENING Q ELECTRONIC Q ETHNIC/TRAD. □ FUSION Q GOSPEL Q HARDCORE
Q INTRNL Q JAZZ □ METAL Q NEW AGE Q POP □ R&B/SOUL Q REGGAE/SKA □ ROCK
□ ROCKABILLY □ SEMI-ACOUSTIC O. SWING Q TECHNO Q TOP 40 Q VARIETY
Backstage will only guarantee the free publication of names,
categories and phone numbers. Other information will be
dependent upon space available. The company cannot be
held responsible for missing or misprinted listings. Unless
otherwise stated, this form will be kept on file at The Pacific
Music Industry Association for use in their reference centre.
NOTE: ALL BOLD AND EXPANDED LISTINGS
ARE PAYABLE IN ADVANCE A CHEQUE OR
MONEY ORDER MUST BE SUBMITTED WTTH A
LISTING FORM, PAYABLE TO: BACKSTAGE
COMMUNICATIONS . FOR ADVERTISING AND
OTHER INQUIRIES, CALL, BACKSTAGE AT
683-9668 OR PMIA AT 684-8841.
TYPE OF LISTING:   (please check one)
□ COMPLIMENTARY LISTING (Name and Phone Number)
Q BOLD LISTING: $15.00 (m standout, boldface type) Enclosed
 cheque _ money order
Q EXPANDED BOLD LISTING: $55.00 Includes 12 to 15 word (80
chars, max) promotional description. Enclosed   cheque/  money
order.
Description: 	
_________
SPONSORED BY THE
PACIFIC MUSIC
INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION
visAppe/fc
COMPLETELY
AND NEVER BE FOUND
$99.50
the Master Trickster
of disappearing techniques
Controversial cm
Innovative    Q<
cinnii
STUNS   AND  IMMOBILIZES
10    DISCORDER <REEK
TAVEkNA
"Lamb on a Spit our Specialty"
DAILY SPECIALS FOR
LUNCH AND DINNER
Try our unique menu, including
•Tzanziki, Melitzano, Houmos
•Spanakotiropita, Saganaki, Lukaniko
•Souvlakia, Mousaka, Kalamaria
•And much, much more!
•Plus... pizza
• Pasta also a specialty
Mon. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.
Sunday to Midnight
TAKE OUT • CATERING • WEDDINGS
ANNIVERSARIES • BIRTHDAYS
FREE DELIVERY
Phone for Reservations:
736-2118 / 736-9442
2272 West 4th Ave., Kitsilano
mm
wm
13661 WEST BROADWAY
_IflCI-5___3
SEPTEMBER
4/5 From Seattle
GREEN RIVER
with guests
11/12 NERVOUS FELLOWS
with guests
18/19 THE FOUR ONES and
From San Francisco
DOT 3
25/26 from Montreal
DEJA VOODOO &
THE DEAD CATS
Coming in October
from California
THE FURIES &
THE CAT HEADS
Cover Charge $3.00 except for special events.
I LIVE MUSIC IN THE LOUNGE I
FRIDAYS FROM 10:30-SATURDAYS FROM 11:30 RM    I
ARTS CLUB THEATRE 1181 SEYMOUR 683-0151 *NDEfN§etfDEr«T
W      m *"$* FESrwA^_%5^fW I
isr
tHo
1 1«
**tM H**P*Nf
■JUL** ^O**
«via frMNJUl
» » * With livestock. Som_H,q#
looking for work"'
b in-omptete story of Cattle Productions
le Prod.} begins in various .parts' pi ■;
°^na_a, hone of them Vancouver.
"the cheese place, though
" the cheese in
nd of quiet
Jpktfry tee
meanwhile were rival promoters banging
their heads against the wall in the limited
_ dmonton alteA'Stfefe:
independent scene, 'What it was-realty.
back in Edmonton, was there was a void to
be filled, and the void was independent
music, and if s the same in most cities And
that's what Cattle Prod, does basically, It
fills   voids    That's   what   any   worthwhile
promote them, we
ystry. We have
_was
a living being one.
:#0_ get to a point where
God,; why am 1 doing this? I don't
•    The lestion  here  was. Van
couver's independent alternative music;:
scene "The independent music scene was
just everytajiragH^Hp their own doing
whatever they could The Savoy was being
j we wanted lo start expand-
SlS^^^B^fe^ venue for
j to legitimize th.
rf t want a future H
■   earning   a -M$%
ig ,a new
to tell people, look. ^^BSk
Jay;::$K|
studeht::A€
anti-educa
ing what, tg^
as such. I de
to be iri:#pjv"i;
"er|_inly
:ut hhen
I You get
ew band.
to me. It w;as, .
:rp^r'_een before. ~l£
iff fust i^Mi^i^
oid   Tw&\ye<
as   a   UBC
d four faculties,
that we had an
Not really know-
no career goals
fas just no reason
life was quite new
big playground I'd
I sort of took a year
study revealed the
he started booking
lent of CITR. Some-
ie met Mark who was
and their informal
o  booking  the  Arts
The rest is history. It involves The Emerald
Building, "the only snot-green building in
Vancouver's  downtown."   It  involves  long
Jnours and precious iittle income, telephone
-offs and days without power. It involves
sd$§ serious partying, like a certain lost
|st spring spent with the Screaming
pays Jay, "I seem to recall having
piazing time." Barry joined Cattle
^arly 1987, mainly because there
iuch work for only two people. If
dreamer, and Jay's the realist,
pe necessary role of mediator. As
nips go, it appears to be working,
hole system is working now. We're
our bills.  I really don't believe it.
^used to be scratching month to month,
viow we're scratching every two months."
Mark's even gained weight recently.
"Guerrilla promotion" would be the best
label for the Cattle Prod, approach. There
are no rules as such other than the aforementioned necessity that there be "fun"
involved, and yes, one actual commandment. "We have to make sure that we
always have someone doing twelve band
blow-outs, keeping an eye on what's going
on in the underground." If you haven't
witnessed an Arts club Twelve Band Blow
Out or its equivalent, you don't really know
rock 'n roll. Imagine a cross between those
old TV amateur hours and the best house
SEPTEMBER 1987    13 Tamahnous Theatre
and the Line by Line Writing Partnership present
Arcadian Hall
221 4 Main Street
September 11 - 1 3 at 11:45 pm and September 1 4- 1 6 at 7:00 pm
Tickets $5, available at the door. Call 688-8385 for information.
parties you've been to. Imagine the kind of
sweaty, beer drenched reality Bruce Springsteen can only dream of. Somebody's got
to provide a means for moving a band from
the basement to the clubs, and in the history
of Vancouver's independent scene, no
one's ever done it more consistently than
Cattle Prod. "I counted our phone book the
other day and there was one-hundred
ninety-some local bands that we can draw
from at any point. Every city's got lots of little
bands. They've got to start up somewhere
and slowly start weeding themselves out,
unless they've got rich parents, and then
they just stick around and get annoying."
But Cattle Prod, is more than just locally
focused. Witness the Butthold Surfers journey to our dimension earlier this year, a
memory so vivid you can still smell the
chemical smoke. "It was just a wild show,
but it didn't really get wild until the show was
over. You have a band with three sort of
hippies and three bright but psychotic
people—the three front people. Gibby,
Paul and Pinkus. And after the show, Gibby
had cut his arm and we'd taken him to the
hospital. Meanwhile, Paul, the guitar player,
was really mad at Pinkus, the bass player,
for some reason or other. We had to restrain
him, actually pin him to the ground on four
separate occasions, just to calm him down.
He threw a bottle of beer at us. We had to
duck and it smashed against the wall behind
our heads. He smashed every glass in the
place. At one point, he sprayed Pinkus with
lighter fluid and tried to set him on fire. That
was a little harsh. You don't usually run into
that sort of attitude." Rock 'n roll is a vicious
game.
14    DISCORDER
Witness the Canadian Independent Music
Festival (currently kicking off just as this
month's Discorder goes to press). The idea
was Mark's originally, going back to pre-
Expo days. At the time, it was to be an
international festival, and for a while he had
the powers-that-be at Expo convinced as
to its validity, but last minute budget
cut-backs saw it fall through the cracks. It
was chopped to FIRA, the local band
showcase, which eventually got canceled
anyway after Slow were rude. So the CIRAC
Festival (Canadian Independent Recording
Artists in Concert) was hastily thrown together as an alternative to what was going
down in the World's Biggest Shopping Mall. This year's festival with its newer simpler
name is bigger, theoretically better, and
just one more step of an admittedly ambitious scheme. "It's going to be an international music festival. The main reason for
doing this, other than highlighting Canadian
talent which we will continue to do, is to
create this networking session where you're
bringing together as many bands from all
parts of Canada as possible, playing and
meeting with each other, and exchanging
whatever they can information-wise, so that
they can support each other when they go
back home - getting a band from Halifax
playing with a band from Saskatoon, so
when the Saskatoon band goes out to
Halifax, they've already got a little bit of a
support group set up for them there. Why
limit that to Canada?"
"The only way to develop our sound is to
hear what's coming out of other places.
There's some incredible bands coming out
of California right now, but nobody's hearing
them. They don't get airplay down there.
They all want to come up here and play.
We get about three phone calls a week."
Think of Vancouver as the elbow of a mighty
large "L" which stretches east across
Canada all the way to Buena Vista, which
stretches south to LA and points beyond.
Think of Vancouver as the center of the
Universe.
But remember, times are tough in the
center of the Universe. Unemployment remains high. Available cash for entertainment
remains tight. Despite all the idealism,,
reality's large ugly head won't go away. A
certain bottom line must be observed.
"We're beer salesmen, and that's what
bands have to be, too. Bands have to learn
how to sell product, not only themselves.
They gotta sell beer in clubs. They're not
gonna get hired in any club unless they do.
They're not going to get hired in any club
unless they have people up dancing, or so
totally enthralled that they're happy to just
sit and watch."
This story remains incomplete. It still lacks
a happy ending. Nobody makes a proper
living off Cattle Prod. yet. Witness Jay Scott
emptying ashtrays at the Savoy every now
and then. The harsh fact is, it's still very
difficult to make an honest living at rock 'n
roll in this town. You're either one of the big
boys cranking out fodder for Big Brother, or
you're doing something else on the side to
make ends meet. There's still no regular all
ages venue in town, no means to get
independent music to the next generation
(the Pepsi generation, they do need it).
Nor is there a decent high-powered radio
station.
The story's also incomplete in terms of
whose names are absent: the Laurie Mercers, the Janet Forsythes, the Bud Lux-
fords, the Gary Taylors et al. Yes, there was
life before Cattle Prod., and current healthy
competition as well. Apologies to all those
excluded. You know who you are.
Bill Mullan
Evenings from 6:00 p.m.
DESSERT
& CAFE LATTE or
CAPPUCCINO
$2.50
Weekdays 9 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Sunday 9 a.m. - midnight
1631 YEW ST.
731-4018
Timbre Productions presents
SEPT.
WASHINGTON
SQUARES
TOWN PUMP
THE JOE ELY
TOWN PUMP
With Special Guests:
ROYAL
CRESCENT
THURS.
SEPT.
17
MOJO NIXON
WITH
Plus Guests
TOWN PUMP
TICKETS: CBO/VTC and all usual outlets, ZULU,
BLACK SWAN, HIGHLIFE & TRACK RECORDS.
PHONE CHARGES: 280-4444.
SEPTEMBER  1987    15 TJME
SO YOU WANT TO FORM A BAND,
eh? And not just some garage
combo that'll never make it across
the street let alone around the
world. No, you want the big time (well, the
medium time anyway). Read on, then. The
Discorder IV2 step method is for you.
Featuring the ideas and opinions of Tracey
Brooks: singer from The Hip Type; Scott
Gubbels from Edge Records (Oversoul
Seven); Grant McDonagh from Zulu
Records; Janis McKenzie from CITR; Len
Morgan, bass player from Oversoul Seven;
Dan Nowack, singer from The Spores and
video-maker; Keith Porteous from Gangland
Artists; and last but not least, Jay Scott from
Cattle Prod.
STEP ONE: STARTING A BAND
(also kicking people out)
This involves the deceptively simple task of
asking people to join this band you want to
form. If you don't already know all the right
people, a good place to start is the clubs
(or wherever it is bands play). The number
of bands formed between sets at the local
night clubs is staggering (usually the soon-
to-be-band members are also staggering). As you've probably noticed by now,
all of this requires that you stick your neck
out in order that you might gain a collection
of friends and acquaintances whom you can
then exploit in your inexorable rise to the top.
Kicking people out of bands is a sad but
unavoidable fact of life for all bands, even
Van Halen. Tracy offers this advice, "You
just boot them, you can't be too nice or they
won't leave. You tell them, 'You're out,
we're sorry, yer a bum'." Keith noted the
16   DISCORDER
best way to avoid this fate yourself is by
turning up at practice on time.
STEP TWO: A PLACE TO PRACTISE
(or  just  how  understanding  are  your
parents about your new hobby)
As the sub-title suggests, somewhere in
your parent's home there might be an OK
short-term answer. But you should be
looking for somewhere else. Failure to do
so will lead to your unexpected sudden
departure from the family nest and, more
importantly, possible exclusion from your
parents' wills (see Step Six, releasing a
records).
Places that count as "somewhere else" are
in constant demand and tend to cost money.
They include warehouses, other people's
basements or unused garages, your
manager's office and, if you're lucky, the
basement of the place you rented after your
parents kicked you out.
STEP TWO & 1/2: SONGWRITING
(!-can't-teach-you-this,-but-believe-me-it's-
important)
This is absolutely the most important thing a
band has to have if it's ever to attract anyone
beyond their friends. With good songs,
everything from inept playing and hostile
crowds to lousy recordings and ugly record
covers can be overcome (e.g. The Replacements).
STEP THREE: RECORDING
(and you thought finding a good drummer
was hard)
The following is a short quiz.
"We've got a MIDI accessible Nieve
Spitfire, 64 in, 48 out, 8 insert mixing consol
(re-wired with SSL and floppies), an
inboard REV 1, a dozen Kepex gates with
five-way parametric EQs and a limiter/
compressor on each channel. Out board it's
got a random-driven AMS chorus and 1"
24-track capability. Of course the whole
thing is SMPTE compatible."
If the above filled you with an urge to
strangle someone with a length of audio tape
then skip ahead to the next paragraph.
According to Keith one way of dealing with
the immense complexities of the recording
studio is to sit down and shake hands with
the little technological demons. Read everything you can find about making audic
tapes, rent a four track machine (they're
cheap) to discover how tapes are made and
ask questions of people who already know
how its done, eg. soundmen at gigs.
STEP FOUR: GETTING GIGS
("Hi there, can I buy you a drink")
Finding the first few gigs can be extremely
difficult, but it has to be done. For a start,
don't ask a band with an enormously high
profile for an opening slot if you've never
played a gig. You're far better off trying to
get on the bill at something like the Arts
Club's 12 Band Blow Outs, where you're
promised a crowd, and a chance to discover
just how fast-paced a show can be. Cattle
Prod. (684-2325) can tell you when the
next one is and who to pester (Jay Scott).
Another good venue for exposure is
CITR's SHINDIG. Despite its "Battle of the
Bands" rep, and the prizes offered, its
really there to give up and coming bands a
place to play and a crowd to play to.
Phoning the radio station (228-3017) and
asking for Harry or Linda will get you on the
way. Otherwise persevere, be friendly,
and, if necessary, retreat to the garage for
more practice. STEP FIVE: GETTING "SERIOUS" ABOUT
YOUR BAND
("Mom, I'm quitting my day job, can I
move back home and live for free?")
According to Grant, "The most important
thing is that the band members all know
exactly what they want. I see bands who
just want to be famous, but don't even know
what sort of fame they want." This is
important. No matter what the band's
ultimate goal is, everyone should agree on
it. As well, again to acknowledge Grant,
don't be a bunch of prima donnas, even if
you're sure you're going to be bigger than
Aerosmith by Christmas. There's no reason
not to be courteous in your business dealings. At some point everyone needs a
favour, and you can never tell who from (like
that promoter you once called a gravy-
sucking pig because he left the brown
M&Ms in your candy jar).
STEP SIX: RELEASING A RECORD
("Hi mom, can I mortgage the house
please?")
Recording a record is pretty much like
recording a demo except its far more
expensive ($50-100/hr), the electronic
toys are more fun, there are gold records
on the wall, and you occasionally meet a
member of Loverboy. You can cut a few
corners here, like recording from midnight
to six a.m., or recording at a cheap studio
and then taking the tape to an expensive one
to mix it (i.e. a place where, according to
Grant, "you can make garbage sound
great"). Chances are, though, if you want
to sound like the bands you dream of playing
next to, you'll have to spend a lot more
money than you'd want to think about (I
once, bought an amp from someone who
spent all the money I paid him the same night
in the studio screwing up a feedback
overdub).
Once the thing is on tape, you've got to
master, press, package and promote the
record it is about to become. Depending
on the complexities of the packaging, the
number you give away (25% is recommended for radio stations, record labels,
media, etc.) add the costs of mailing them
out, the cost of releasing a thousand records
will run you some where in the $3,000/
$4,000 neighbourhood. (The guy I bought
the amp from refers to such things as the
"slurps"). The break even point for an
independent LP is somewhere around 2000
copies, where as an EP "can never pay
itself off" (phone Grant at Zulu and have him
explain it to you), thus you have to tour
which will also lose money. If all of this
seems a little contradictory to you, wait until
the next step.
STEP SEVEN: VIDEOS
("Mom, can I borrow your make-up compact?")
On the surface videos seem a little strange.
They can cost even more than your album.
However, a good video can get you national
exposure, impress your friends from high
school and even, it's rumoured, gain you
minor cult status in Australia (again, ask
Grant to explain). According to Dan all this
can be yours for a measly $4000; less if
you can con the crew into working for free.
Of course, one doesn't have to pay the
big bucks to make some sort of impact here,
Slow and Red Herring both produced good
videos for less than $400 by using simple,
easy to produce, but effective ideas.
THE BIG FINISH
("now I'm going to qualify everything I
just told you")
Don't get discouraged by the enormous
sums of cash that are required. Grants are
available for videos, recording and even for
international tours. As well, many of these
problems will seem far less intimidating the
closer you get to them, or may even solve
themselves (who knows, you may inherit a
house with a sound proofed basement and
a large pile of cash sitting in the middle of
the floor).
Finally, a huge disclaimer. There's a
million ways to make itin the music biz. Our
7V_-step method is just one of them. For
instance, you could just be discovered in
your car singing along to an Elvis tape - by
an influential yet altruistic music biz executive, who signs you on the spot, and does
everything for you, making you rich and
wholly fulfilled before your twenty-first birth-
day Pat Carroll
_<&&_
a*
^
3rd Annual Vancouver Fringe Festival
Main St./Mt. Pleasant Area Vancouver, Canada
Local, National & International Theatre & Performing Arts
September 11-20, 1987
100 Shows, 10 Venues from Noon to Midnight
Detailed program information in September 4th Issue of
The Georgia Straight
For information call 873-3646
The new, the old, the alternate, The FRINGE!
SEPTEMBER 1987    17 EBBBB____JBB
L
L
E   BB
EEP^BBB
Tape Duplicating Centre
203-2182 W. 12th Ave.,
Vancouver, B.C. Canada V6K 2N4
(604) 734-4546
BLANK
TAPES
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C-2 C-100 LENGTHS
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BASF, FUJI, MAXELL, SONY,
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AMPEX REEL-TO-REEL TAPE
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EVERY TAPE CUT TO LENGTH
3-HEAD NAKAMICHI STUDIO DECKS
ARTWORK—PRINTING—PACKAGING
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SALE PRICES INCLUDE: • selection of 6 cassette housings • index cards
•choice of 3 storage boxes • cassette labels • friendly service
Federal & Provincial Sales Tax Extra if Applicable ag
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3T
H&i*
m
5.              ***•*
i
WorldwideT"
"Ionized for the^
V?
verage is now/beini
HIND'IG finals |h Decemi
This year's ^r^nd prize wioi
their every OT&hly wish fulfiMd. Runne
will fly to Sc,9|j||f d for a two-year
paid record^Q session c
Medieval dasfle Studios.
&LL S^feuretfph
fvlAJOR LftfteCci
DUCT endcH&nents
7
VERYONE KNOWS Jll^ttNDRIX^Sfe'
QntoroH a miiltiturlo nf Q_#_ftiL__ ar____^&.--.
S#lf i^MM% i>ca| *t&[& a§($ lant Jo |
compete in SHINDIG Jplease do jtoesort
to bribes like, Bruce f pringsteen JHra few
years ag^Just submit your tap^and if
chpsen by" a discrirr/inating pandfc||K)u will,
A <0&. all former winners and conHfitors in
* §HINDIG^j*i Frank Sinatra tflpubbo.rn
Blood, joT^&ljeclf group in sfc
HINDIGVffe*Jfel(te%r
X^^ay be^^sibTernb^
^'^e a local Ns>|!Sj/'papable
s of origin^pm&erial i ""
participate in $\$pfy
S<Stidfien at 22£-301 A^J^
ntered a multitude of S^&e ar^^r^both vying fqflfi^coveted MWfcpot:
before   finall^H^|nnin^lCrth wants tq^VrfWiarge of s^jISirity, wfi
jipous^
po Contests
■JaJHINDIG  and   becoming
before d®a.h. We all reme^tger^&j
broke ou^f^ien 0_^zte^|jl
Hagar loafc^ijt ir&flie SflKpfG /fj
Metalli^fc£[lhat mao^^night in
, ^e&thelclt cbmpJer.ely dev;
.Dylan and^SJme" Newton
Prom%%|fe_*fe origins a:  _
p£enomenqn,c*SHINDIG hj||J_itated lS^%^M
. gpbal eventjjjfehile the nafbour fills^"' ^
j pleasure craftu§f?the rjfe^nGF lamq|^
hotel industry gloats ofer the massive influx
of MAJOR REd^D'IpMPANY executives,
video   production screws,   important  celebrities, and merr$Sel#bf the RtS^JfVMILY.
(Were YOU thqtig_Tiat wilcNMofiday night
when  Princess Di jammed with the-W|N|
GNUTS?).  "Sfl^^ouvg *ft®^  apartment and the RCMP have formed special
squads to deal with the overwhelming security and traffc nightmares that occur every
year between September and December.
tven in ffif f_$!e orf&%®re4i
asm and general hysteria, SHII
^Ijnues^in its endeavor's*®!© show'
""bands. Organizing an Iftjht of tl
tude requires a year-roiJglistaff
dedicated media scouts, &'-—*
firm, ad agencies \ۤa[
0 throughput jpthe  Free( «Wbrl<fl
ojbelieveg that^ just  at|Ȥu^
Paul McCa^e/^fsthe lu
^concession'^ 6oi/j_J_.
nthus^.*
c6n-
e local
magni-
agencia^ le^alsud^el^tdech^
nic^«xpefl6J8^eogra*pj^, biker gangs.
- a^n^rstyWaw* With a buffet of over $ttf
fjcftltmf CDN, atR rtand .^INDIgL, have
*" created a majejiyidustry in^^icouver that
influences all aspens of musaaefl production
       Free! ^rldU^sl £ard   to
j;brrlusician,
'^engineer, producer and roadie3#£the entire
'^liverse has, at one time or afl&Jier, been
*ifeociated with SHINDIG.     "> W*
.  2 O
jirfee ... the summer came, the New York summer,
which is like no summer anywhere. The heat
and the noise began their destruction of
nerves and sanity and private lives and love
affairs. The air was full of baseball scores
and bad news and treacly songs, and the
streets and the bars were full of hostile
people, made more hostile by the heat. It was
a city without oases, run entirely, insofar, at
least, as human perception could tell, for
money, and its citizens seemed to have lost
entirely any sense of their right to renew
themselves. Whoever, in New York, attempted to cling to this right, lived in New York in
exile - in exile from the life around him; and
this, paradoxically, had the effect of placing
him in perpetual danger of being forever
banished from any real sense of himself.
James Baldwin, Another Country, 1961
NEW YORK, THE SUMMER, 1987 ...
after what had seemed like six
days and five nights spent in this
city of perpetual timelessness, I,
too, had lost any real sense of myself.
Perhaps it was the carnivorous heat which
perspired layers of skin off the body and left
them to lay in steaming gutter pools. Maybe it
was the teeming hordes of Times Square,
forever jostling and jousting and jabbing like
rats trying to escape a maze. Was it the
canyons they called streets, or the hollow
monoliths that formed the walls of those
canyons? Or could it have been the consumption of too many Rolling Rock beers in
cavernous clubs in search of The Good
Time? Whatever it was, I was not me. I was
becoming accustomed to the heat, the
stench, the overcrowding, the excess, the
greed, the hostility- in fact, all the things that
make New York City a truly exciting place to
be - and by doing so losing sense of myself.
Fortunately, we had a four o'clock flight
Thursday to catch at La Guardia to wisk us
away from this dream cum nightmare. And
from the elevated status of our airplane
seats, it doesn't look all that bad. Maybe
that's why they make those building so tall.
I had come to New York City with Al Big,
once a famous CITR disc jockey and now International Man-About-Town. The reason for
our trip: strictly business. We were there to
attend the 8th Annual New Music Seminar,
which, since its inception, has become an
established convention for the fringe
element looking for a way to crack the
proverbial Big Time. Ho-hum. There was little
evidence of 'new music' or 'new ideas' in
attendance at the seminar, instead the
emphasis seemed to be on shmoozing and
boozing and flagrant self-promotion. After
five days my eyesight was blurred by seeing
too many rock'n'roll t-shirts and too much
died hair, and my ears ached from the sound
of hype. Yet, there were a few events that
provided a sense of vitality and profundity to
why the seminar existed in the first place.
The presence of Peter Gabriel and the world
premiere of his Hurricane Irene video,
promoting the efforts of the University for
Peace and documenting a music tour of
Japan led by Gabriel, once again inspired
the notion that pop music can extend itself
beyond its own indulgence. Jello Biafra sat
on a panel dealing with the issue of censor
ship, alongside two PMRC-affiliated
spokesmen who boasted about the fact that
they had burned millions of dollars of 'offensive' records. Needless to say, it was an
emotional and very heated discourse about
the very foundations of the Home of the Free
and Brave.
The most exciting music event, at least for
a couple of white boys with black souls from
the West Coast, was the DJs and MCs Battle
for World Supremacy, which took on the
dimensions of the World Heavyweight Boxing championship. Some of America's best
scratchers, mixers, emcees, and rappers
were pitted against one another where they
each had sixty seconds to prove just how
good they were, then judged by a panel of
exemplary individuals such as Grandmaster
Flash, Kool Moe Dee, Marly Marl, and others.
It was a bizarre concept, yet even within the
confines of a sterile hotel convention room
the 'beat of the street' was heard loud and
clear. This is the sound of urban blight, a
direct and forceful reflection of street life by
people who have lived it, and through their
music provide a source of hope and inspiration for others. And, ladies and gentlemen,
does it make you want to move, too!
To see and hear all of this in New York City
helped to put the state of america into
perspective for this boy from north of the
border. It is a society that has regressed far
from its original mandate to uphold freedom
and equality for all of its citizens. It has segregated and oppressed its peoples to the point
where fear and suspicion are the main
operatives. It is a nation obsessed with
image and excess. And the list goes on but
20    DISCORDER this is no new news is it? Yet in New York City
it is magnified a million times to the point of
utter despair. Were the last days of Rome
anything like this?
The only energy buzz comes from the feel
of the streets, and this is where the
poignancy and urgency of rap and hip hop
take on a whole new meaning. None of this is
to be found in the big nightclubs of the city -
the exciting and glamourous clubs that we
provincials salivate over in glitz fashion and
music magazines and wish that we had in our
own backwater towns. The Palladium, The
Limelight, The Tunnel, and to a lesser
degree, the 1018, the Ritz, and the Cat Club
are voluminous caverns displaying various
stages of disco excess. The maxim here is
more is better and the music is just as
homogeneous as the crowds that are
catered to in the respective venues. The
Pyramid and CBGB's were the only clubs
that emanated any energy or spirit, and they
were small, dirty, hot, and alot of fun.
My little bite of the Big Apple left a bitter
aftertaste. Most of us have the preconception that NYC is the world's most exciting city
- it has the biggest, the best, and the worst of
everything anyone would ever want. This is
true. But is this necessarily a good thing? The
emphasis seems to be more on quantity, not
quality, and it is easy to lose sense of oneself
in the mire of excess. Only from the top of the
Empire State building could I see that there
was a world beyond. But then Al Big didn't
have that problem; he figures people were
shorter on the East Coast and he could see
above and beyond everyone else.
Michael Shea
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SEPTEMBER 1987    21 MAD DOGS AND TORONTONIANS
Kevin S. spends his summer vacation in heat
I DON'T KNOW ABOUT YOU, BUT THE
notion of beginning a new day with only
the benefit of 1V_ hours sleep does not
sit well with my body. Especially when
that body had not actually relaxed at any
point of that (limited) sleep. But that's
what you get when sleeping on a plane. A
midnight flight from Vancouver to Toronto
sustains little excitement yet can deliver
some limited discomfort. Arrival 7 a.m. TO
time (4 a.m. Vancouver and my time). After
travelling on the airport bus into the subway
station something becomes very apparent.
By jesus, it's hot in TO. Anyway, finding a
way into the big city from the airport presents
numerous possibilities. Now if a taxi ride or
rental car ain't plausible options, you can
ride the bus like the rest of us peons. OK,
here's the plan. Take the airport bus into
Islington station. From there hop the subway
for the remaining distance instead of spending an extra buck for the bus direct to
downtown. This provides the uninitiated
tourist with an initial up-close and personal
exposure to hot and sweaty Torontonians
22    DISCORDER
on their way to work during rush hour. As
well this plan necessitates lugging a suitcase
around until you begin to seriously contemplate ditching it (I mean, it is possible to
last a whole week with one set of clothes,
right?). Oh yeah, not a single seat on the
subway will be vacant. Despite these subway
discomforts, a want for sleep and a mounting hunger, just remember that a whole
dollar (Canadian) has been saved.
The ostensible purpose of this excursion
entailed participation as a representative of
CITR at the National Campus/Community
Radio Association (NCRA) annual conference that took place this year at Ryerson
Polytech. This kind of thing comes with a
big-shot executive position within a volunteer organization. If you aren't gonna get
paid, at least ensure you receive some
heavy-duty perks every so often. So there
we were. On the street around 9 or 10 a.m.
in 33°C (equivalent to 40°C with the
Humidex, or so they say in TO) looking for
one CKLN radio station. Ryerson is an
unusual   campus.   More   a   splattering   of
medium-sized highrises, it seems to be
without a.focus. Alas, no one to greet the
weary travellers and cater to our every whim
and desire. Snaking through some hallways
in a building that hopefully houses the station
a discovery finally occurs - CKLN. For one
of the top campus stations in Canada it ain't
too impressive. A scattering of very small
rooms, out-dated equipment and an on-air
booth the size of a closet. It seems a hefty
chunk of the budget goes to full-time paid
staff. Through conversation it becomes clear
that there is little student control of the
station. It would almost seem appropriate
for CKLN to be paying rent rather than being
the beneficiary of monies from the Ryerson
student body. Still, CKLN is quite a progressive station musically.
But what about the conference? CITR
paid your way to this conference. Well, let's
have a report. Did ya pickup any bright
ideas, huh? Are the synapses exploding
with big plans for everybody? Well, ah, ya
see, it's like this. The basic goal of the
conference was to set up a head office for the NCRA so that the organization could
actually accomplish something given the
vast distances separating the member stations. And this was done. Good. Excellent.
A tangible feat executed. Also, some interesting seminars took place. One involved
myself in a heated discussion with some
major label record representatives. If I
remember correctly, I said I didn't care if
they sent us any more records. (But I'm
sure I never dared them to stop giving them
to us). What later developed was a discussion by the campus stations of a boycott
in some form of WEA records because of
their policy of charging $100 for "servicing" the stations with records. There were
a few other bits of excitement like this.
As the three days of the conference
passed by, certain points began to become
evident to certain members of the association. The head office would be established
but the essence of the association would not
be defined. Was it to be a service organization, a lobbying group or a political association? Well, a bit of all three but not by
design or rational choice. A slew of people
with various agendas meant a jumble of
different purposes.
Ryerson is located adjacent to the street
of Toronto. That is, Yonge Street. Lots of
folk, myself included, walk along Yonge for
no apparent reason. The street easily contains a couple hundred fast food joints and
a few record stores but little else. More
specifically we find three McDonald's, no
hookers, a couple strip clubs, very few
panhandlers, a multitude of "help wanted"
signs and lots of arcades with huge neon
signs. Ya, neon signs, boy they sure do like
'em in TO. In contrast to the vacuous nature
of Yonge Street, a more interesting section
of town can be found on Queen Street. Here
we find a row of decent 'alternative' type
clubs: the Bamboo, the Rivoli and the
Horseshoe. Down Queen and onto the
infamous Spadina where we stumble across
the inauspicious front of the famous El
Mocambo. It's somehow refreshing to be
back in a club policed by bouncers who are
goofs. You learn to appreciate the other
places more. We caught the Dead Milkmen
at the El. I don't know exactly where it is but
the RPM Club is another happening place.
Farther away is the Diamond on Sherbourne
which also features more interesting acts.
BEER. The price varies dramatically. The
Queen Street clubs have reasonable prices
along with sidewalk tables to lounge at whilst
getting hammered in the dreadful Toronto
heat. Bottles at the El Mocambo are a joke.
Stick with jugs of draft instead. If, like me,
you think all Canadian beer tastes the same
then why not enjoy some local flavour by
savouring the golden nectar of Hamilton,
Grizzly or Steeler? As well, a tasty ale can
be purloined for less than $3 (except at the
El) in the form of Upper Canada Ale. But the
cheapest beer came on tap for $1.85 at the
radio conference. Still, a tie did occur in this
painstaking search for the best deal. Avail-
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able to the general public, $1.85 for a
bottle of your regular big name beer. It was
at a place right near Yonge. I can't recall
the name but it's near Ryerson and right
across from Sam The Record Man. You'll
find it, no problem.
What about radio in TO, you astutely
inquire. Sure, there's the usual bland,
homogeneous, foul 'music is a product'
stations. However, the sounds of variety can
be found on CKLN's 250 watts and U of T's
mammoth 15,000-watt CIUT The major
downside to Toronto radio lies in the co-
opting of alternative music into the commercial radio mentality by CFNY. In the name
of alternative radio for the masses, we
receive Top 40 DJs who play alternative hits.
Ah, nothin' like the empty-headed mellifluous tones of a boss jock intro-ing the new
Hot Hit by The Mission.
What about the city itself? General impressions? Faster paced than the generally
laidback Vancouver. The people tend to
assume TO is god's gift to Canada. (But
then Vancouverites are probably the same.)
Torontonians are at least initially genuinely
rude, dude. Add to the characteristics
already mentioned the overabundance of
street and hotdog vendors; this leads one
to the conclusion that Toronto has an
ambition. It wants to be an American city.
No, it desires to be the American city; TO
is a New York wanna-be. Oh year, did I
mention it was damn hot? Well, it was.
Kevin S.
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SEPTEMBER  1987    23 EVERYBODY WANTS TO BE A PART
of Rap. They got commercials on
TV with rap, radio commercials,
rap. I took my girl and my little
daughter up to the circus, and the last fifteen
minutes of the circus, the ringmaster was
rappin'. But it's not because the ringmaster
wanna be a rapper, it's because he know that
it's commerical and that it makes money and
that it will sell tickets.
As a musical idiom, rap is ten years old.
Today, as rap records sell in record
numbers, Melle Mel is considered 'old
school'. Part of the original Grandmaster
Flash And The Furious Five, Mel's rap roots
go past the days of the seminal Sugarhill
Records label, to the "pre-commercial
phase, before people even started making
records, when they were doing block parties
or guys was just playing music in front of their
houses." He explains where it all came from:
RAP ROOTS
Basically just out of the streets. A lot of
young brothers that wasn't into crime and
drugs too tough. They didn't have nothing to
do so I guess that's how the music evolved
'cause you had certain phrases. Rap came
about right after the gangs disappeared
from off the streets. The rap came about just
a little after the music. People wasn't captivated totally by just somebody having big
speakers out on the streets and playing the
popular songs or the songs with the beats.
So they needed to incorporate the rap with
the music to make it really catch on and
that's when rap finally started takin' off like in
about 77.
RAP EGO
To be a rapper, you have to have a certain
belief in yourself. And with that belief comes
an ego. With that ego, you're gonna think
that you're God's gift to the dictionary or
God's gift to verbal abuse. So once you
hear somebody state their case, or what
they feel that they are, you're automatically
gonna dispute that. And then with that dispute is friction. That's why in the early roots
of rap it was a lot of rap battles and a lot of
DJ battles. That's what it mainly was, because you always had to show to the people
who was the better man in rap. And even
though the animosity is still in rap, the
competition is not really on a competitive
level, it's just record sales. So with that
thought in mind, you would consider Run
DMC and The Beastie Boys to be the
number one rappers because they proved
their point by record sales, because it's just
a totally commercial thing. Whereas the old
school, they would take it to the stage. Then
24    DISCORDER
they would prove their point to the people.
Instead of trying to prove it over the
airwaves to the mass audience, you would
prove it to a select group and then it would
get around to the masses by word of mouth.
RAP NOW
You'd be considered old school if you
rapped for about seven years. New school
is the kinda guy that just came on the set two
or three years ago and they just took off. But
it's basically no difference because the new
school learnt from the old school. In the
beginning of rap, it was just rappers that
said garbage raps anyway, and that's what
the new school basically is right now.
They're just saying the same kinda raps that
the brothers from the old school would say
but they're just updatin' it a little bit and
that's puttin' updated music behind it. So it's
no real difference, it's just that the new
school is out, the new school is now. It's not
a difference in style or anything because
the style and everything is still the same. It's
just the fact that the new school just started
makin' records.
RAP SPART
How I see rap is more or less like an art form
and then as a sport at the same time, because the competition could be great if the
other rappers had enough self-confidence
to put a certain title on the line. Like the
kinda rapper I am, I done made records, I
done been in a movie, I done did TV shows,
and I done did all kinda things. And if I was
to walk the streets right now, and if a rapper
that never did nothin' in his life came up to
me and challenged me, I'd stop whatever I
was doin' and I'd kick a rhyme to him. And
I'd finish him. Whereas maybe like a Run
DMC, they would not do nothin' like that. Or
they would not join a New Music Seminar
rap competition because they feel that what
they have donet is so great or it means that
much to them that would never put it on the
line because if they was to lose it then it
would be detrimental to their career.
Whereas my career is secondary to my
reputation as the top rapper.
AS FAR AS rap goes, the new school
may have learnt from the old school,
but they also learnt not to get exploited the way the old school was by
Sugarhill Records. Def Jam boasts a distribution deal with CBS as well as a roster
which includes The Beastie Boys, Public
Enemy, and LL Cool J. These artists may be
able to enjoy success in a way that Melle and
his peers never could, but Mel's feelings
about the label stem from other considerations.
THE RAP
MELLE
MEL
RAP IMAGE
They put the records out and the records
sell. And why the records sell is 'cause they
put it out so that young kids could buy 'em.
And the things they put out that young kids
could buy is not the kinda thing like, get up
and go to school everyday so you can
graduate from college and work real hard.
They put it out, Well I make so and so much
amount of money every show, and I stand
like this with my arms folded on the Ave., and
I have on gold chains and I wear fresh adidas
ever day, and I stomp on the stage . . . So
basically what you have is young kids that
wanna portray that lifestyle. But in order for a
young kid to wear three gold chains, at
$1600 apiece, and to wear a sweatsuit
everyday, at $75 apiece, and to stand on the
Ave. lookin' that good, they gonna have to
drop out of school and do something illegal,
or... It's more or less like breeding criminals,
and you'll be able to see in a few years if rap
don't take a change for the better - as far as
gettin' some artistic value and havin'
somethin' really to say to give kids more inspiration in their OWN self-image and to be
what THEY wanna be-you're gonna actually
see crime go in a drastic increase because
they set a certain standard for everybody to
be. You must have gold, you must have clean
sneakers, you must stand tough, you must
be hard. When everybody don't necessarily
gotta live their life that way. I mean, Run
wasn't raised like that, they came from the
suburbs. The Beastie Boys DEFINITELY
wasn't raised like that but they portray that
image and they also try to live out that image.
It would be one thing to portray a certain
image, then once you come off the stage, to
direct a positive attitude toward the kids so
that they know: listen, do not try this trick at
home. That's what Run and them should be
sayin', but instead, they be like, OK, go home
and act that way. Go on the Ave. and stand
that way. Talk this way. Walk this way. It won't
help the youth of the nation or the world any
■ to try to be like a Run DMC or a Beastie Boy or
even a Melle Mel because a lot of the things I
did comin' up, the average kid wouldn't be
able to do. He'd get killed tryin' to do the
things that I did, or that the Beastie Boys or
Run DMC would do. Def Jam does sell and
make records and they are a great contributor in the field of rap, but as far as in the
field of education and role models, they more
or less set rap back about ten years. Because at one time, rap was about sayin'
somethin' that was socially conscious, and
makin' statements that was positive and
meaningful to the youth of the world. But right
now, don't nobody care how the youth of the
world is growin' up as long as they got a gold
chain and some adidas.
RAP REVOLUTION
Public Enemy is just totally radical in another
sense because they're talkin' about a whole
revolution. As far as black people go, revolution has nothing to do with black versus
white. Revolution is a black on black thing
and it's not a revolution that would be fought
with guns. It's not a physical revolution; it's a
mental and a financial revolution. For us to
build up a black middle class, for us to get
out heads together to where it won't be as
much black on black crime. Because the rise
in crime won't be black robbing white people
or black robbing Chinese people or black
robbing Arab people, it'll be black robbing
black people in their own neighbourhoods.
That's the rise in crime that would take place
years from now if the tempo on rap wouldn't
change. So as far as Public Enemy talkin'
about the revolution and this and that and
walkin' around onstage with Uzis and lookin'
like black panthers - that does nothin' for our
position as young people in the neighbourhood. Because we're right on the verge of
young black people being more than just
revolutionaries of the sixties. We're past that
stage. We had people who died to get us
past that stage: Martin Luther King, Malcolm
X, and so forth. So it would make no sense for
us to go ten years back just because Public
Enemy wanna sell records or because they
wanna start a revolution. If they wanna start a
revolution, make theySELF a martyr. Go
stand on the front line. GET killed. Don't just
stand back over the airwaves and then make
another young kid think that he got to be on
the front line when he don't have to. If you
look at it realistically, they ain't doin' nothin' to
support no revolution. They don't pass out
pamphlets or educate people as to what
they're sayin'. All they do is put out records,
so they're not benefitting anyone but
themselves and Def Jam.
IN THE EYES of the music industry and
the record- buying public, the success of
the new school is seen as an establishment of credibility and a reason for rap to be
taken seriously. Commercialization has
directed rap's focus away from the people
whose lives it affects; while middle-class
whiteboys fight for their right to party,
residents of the South Bronx fight for their
survival. Rap has changed over the last ten
years, but the real-life problems of black
America remain the same.
Don Chow
SEPTEMBER 1987    25 Graham Lewis: '/4 of WIRE, Vi of DOME and indivisible as HE SAID
IT WAS FAIRLY CLEAR FROM THE
start. WIRE had a great deal more to
offer than the thrash that became the
standard of the late 70s. After three
highly acclaimed LPs served us with evidence of higher intent, WIRE chose to
disband in 1980, with its four members
pursuing all manner of audio-visual projects, resulting in some very fine solo and
collaborative pieces. 1987 finds them regrouped and more than capable of continuing the upslide into an accomplished realm
where pop craftmanship and sonic exploration exist side by side.
Along the by-ways, however, much of
the WIRE solo material since 1980 has been
neglected, with the possible exception of
some of vocalist Colin Newman's work.
Dome, Duet Emmo, He Said, and Bruce
Gilbert are all 'bits of wire', so to speak,
and are responsible for some very interesting
music. In June, I had an opportunity to
spend an afternoon with Bruce Gilbert and
26    DISCORDER
Graham Lewis, half of WIRE, and all of
Dome. It was Bruce's viewpoint that was
committed to tape and hence he becomes
the spokesman, a man using an 'economy
of verbiage' to offer a summation of his work
with WIRE, Dome, and 'other bits'. Half of
Dome, a quarter of WIRE, and indivisible,
Bruce Gilbert's economy is a rich one.
First, one wants to know why the group
disbanded some seven years ago. "As a
vehicle, WIRE couldn't contain the amount
of work that was current and wasn't able to
fit in with the way WIRE was working."
I take this as meaning that the context of
a pop group was too limiting for such a
wealth of creativity in the minds of its
individual members. In retrospect, I don't
think you'll find much of an argument over
this question. The record-buying public,
however, seems intent on lining the pockets
of thieves as unauthorized re-issues of old
WIRE material continue to surface. Bruce is
Mark Mushet
resigned. "One has to realize that anybody
can walk in off the street into any record
company's offices, look through their back
catalogue, and lease whatever they want."
Such is evidently the case at EMI England. So how does WIRE deal with its
history whilst hoping to connect with a new
audience in North America? "When we
started thinking about functioning again
there was, at least in my mind, some doubt
because of the compromised position we
appeared to be in by these re-issues and
retrospective interest in the group. However, we felt there was a job to be done,
we wanted to do it, so we got on with it. Our
first aim was to function as a live group. It
seems to work so I suppose one's attitude
towards North America is to feel we have to
do it in front of as many people as possible.
Whether their interest is retrospective, or to
do with the way things have been packaged,
I think we have to ignore that and hope that
people will listen to, or respond to, or at
ieast observe, the new things." And one has to wonder about the beginnings of Dome, Bruce and Graham's first
outing following the initial 'demise' of WIRE.
Being a long-time fan of Dome, I had to
ask a fairly typical question, knowing full
well it wouldn't elicit a typical answer. How
did they come up with titles for such abstract
pieces of music? "On Dome 3 there are a
lot of phonetic references to the way the
rhythm goes. Some pieces name themselves. In the studio one has to use all sorts
of strange code words, especially when
you're using fairly abstract things. For
example, when you use a tape loop of some
birds coughing there isn't enough room on
the label to say 'loop of birds coughing'!
You give it a code name. Quite often things
arrive like that, anagrams, the atmosphere
of the piece, and soon."
The first Dome records were remarkable
for their modest packaging and minimal
approach to producing music (there is no
intent here to associate Dome with the
'minimalists' and their attendant schools of
thought). Imaginatively titled Dome 1, 2,
and 3, these releases were about the most
obscure-looking discs to grace the import
record bins, despite the rewards contained
inside. Mr. Gilbert explains, "Not intentionally obscure, just the minimum amount of
information. I tend to not like covers which
are full of writing. I think the object was to
make things as simple as possible and avoid
some kind of identity with, or cashing in on
the fact that we were bits of WIRE, which
had some notoriety which we could possibly
have used. Obviously the access to doing
those projects came through being in WIRE,
but one should take opportunities where they
arise."
"The idea we both had was to do something
a little more spontaneous and, perhaps, not
entirely to do with music."
One of the most interesting Dome projects
was the gallery installation project that Bruce
and Graham worked on with visual artist
Russell Mills (who's been in great demand
recently for album cover artwork as well).
The project, circa 1982, was known as
MZUI, a truly environmental work and one
pointing to an area'that suggests endless
possibilities. Bruce is explicit in detailing the
course of events. "We got friendly with
some people who shared what had been an
ex-biscuit/porkpie factory. There was quite
a large gallery and studio space for painters
as well. It was sort of an 'official' squat
situation. They actually managed to get a
grant of some kind from the local council.
We loved the acoustics in the place and we
also managed to borrow a meat safe in the
cellar to do another project, so we knew the
place fairly well. We'd made some money
from the first two Dome LPs so we thought
we ought to put it to good use, so we hired
a sophisticated PA/talkback recording system
and put in a very minimal amount of
so-called 'exhibits' in the gallery. To begin
with, it was basically four steel cables under
tension from the floor to the ceiling.  We
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SEPTEMBER 1987    27 attached contact mikes which fed into a
small studio that we had in one of the rooms
off of the gallery and then fed back out into
the gallery via eight large speakers.
"Because part of the factory was semi-
derelict, there was quite a lot of raw material
lying around to use not only for 'instruments'
but for a general sculptural environment
exploration. We were there for a month and
it was a bit like having a job. It was 9 to 5
and we added something new every day.
This included smells as well as polishing the
floor and adding home-made instruments
that members of the public weren't invited
to use, but no one was stopping them.
Some people were more enthusiastic than
others, to the point of destruction. It was a
very good experience for us. We had lots
of visits from the local health and safety
experts who said part of the exhibit had to
be roped off. It consisted of about 500
broken wine bottles smashed into small
pieces. It was rather beautiful, actually.
And they were rather suspicious of these
smells of bleach, industrial disinfectants,
and polish.
"The very last night was the most exciting
part of it. We'd found some wooden splints
on the roof which were very fine, and rotting
badly. We scattered parts of the floor with
these splints and, rather irresponsibly, set
fire to them as they were the last thing in the
gallery to be moved and it seemed too
tedious to bag them up.  Nobody saw it
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Colin Newman of WIRE
except for the people who were helping us
clear away. There was no real set intention
except to see what happened and how
resourceful we could be.
"There were also two formal pieces by
Russell Mills who was collaborating with us
on this project. Somebody assumed that the
pieces he'd done were exhibited under the
same conditions as the others and moved
them around, rather beautifully I thought,
but Russell didn't approve. Afterwards, we
all looked as if we'd been on a very long
holiday."
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In addition to' working on installations and
performance soundtracks for events at the
Museum of Modern Art (Oxford) and Notre
Dame Church Hall (Leicester Square),
Bruce Gilbert has done some scoring for
dance pieces by British choreographer Michael Clark. Again, Bruce spares little
verbiage. "I first bumped into Michael when
WIRE were in full flight in 1978. He was
visiting London when he was a student of the
Royal Ballet. He was invited to do a piece
for a London contemporary dance group and
he based it on about seven tracks from Pink
Flag (the first WIRE album, 1977). He
phoned me up to see if I minded and to see
if I'd be interested in going to rehearsals as
he was choreographing the piece. When
he started his own dance company he asked
me if I would do the music for part of the
debut. It was a very good way of working,
as there were no specific plans or plots. It
was the result of continuous conversations,
really. It was done a piece at a time while
he demonstrated, with one of his dancers,
the kind of movements, references, and
atmospheres he was interested in exploring
with the piece.
"There were one or two other bits and
pieces I did with Michael. We did get a very
interesting project from Rudolph Nureyev
who'd seen the piece Michael and I had
done at the Edinburgh Festival. He commissioned us to do a piece for the Paris
Opera/Ballet. They have an experimental
offshoot which has a show every year in the
mm
used & old
#5 5 West Pender
^   Vancouver
II-   661-7654  J middle of which they have a gala piece
where the main stars of the Paris Opera/
Ballet join in with the experimental side of the
company. Obviously it's an attempt to
encourage the people who don't normally
go to the ballet, but who have heard of the
stars, to go see experimental dance. It was
a very interesting project because Michael
asked me to do the design as well, which
means one can have more of an involvement
over the tone of the piece. And in an orgy
of nepotism, I got my friend Angela Conway
to design the costumes. It was all very tightly
knit, a close way of working. The Parisians
hated it. I was delighted, very pleased with
the work."
Seeing as he is the 'guitarist' from WIRE,
it's curious to note that most of his solo
material, including his latest record on
Mute, The Shivering Man, is mostly comprised of tape manipulation and electronic
processing. I ask the inevitable "how do
you get that sound" sort of question. "I
have been using quite a lot of sampling, but
I'm still a great fan of tape loops. I was using
tape loops before WIRE started, but in terms
of sampling, I haven't gone too far into the
technology. I still have a great love affair
with the crudity of echo machines and digital
delays which can be triggered. It's a
discipline for me, as I do have access to
sophisticated sampling technology. When I
go into the studio, my basic equipment is a
carrier bag full of cassettes of various
collected sounds. I've also collected records from garbage bins. One finds the
strangest things on the street. I've found
quite a few cassettes on the street with totally
inexplicable sounds on them. Obviously the
tapes have been stretched, maybe thrown
out of a car. It's been something else once
but its now an interesting sound which I can
use."
So how does all this get back to the
subject of the 1987 edition of WIRE? Well,
for example, Daniel Miller of Mute Records
fame and several Dome, Gilbert/Lewis
projects has produced the new WIRE LP The*
Ideal Copy. "In terms of WIRE, we had to
find a producer who was acceptable to
everybody. Graham and I had worked with
Daniel and I think Colin was slightly nervous
about this, that perhaps his [Daniel's]
neutrality would be questionable. As you're
probably aware, three people in WIRE had
done production work [which has included
Colin's recent work with Minimal Compact
and Gilbert/Lewis's work with The The]. If
we'd attempted to have done a WIRE
production, it would have been total chaos."
Very rarely do you get to meet a person
working in these areas who doesn't put a
damper on the occasion with ego and
pretension. Bruce, Graham, and the other
members of WIRE, Colin and Robert, have
produced an incredible wealth of excellent
material over the years. One rather hopes
that they meet with every success in their
future endeavours. Now if only we could get
Bruce to pose for a photograph.
Mark Mushet
• * THEATRE • •
16th & Arbutus 738-6311
# * * * * * * jf jf ******>;** * * + + v ******** *
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!
GATES OF
HEAVEN
7:30
. . One of the most brilliant. . .
wierdest and most unusual
American documentary films
I've seen in a long time."
—Roger Ebert
Gates of Heaven is the
only authentic state of the
union address."
—Werner Herzog
AUG, 28 - SEPT. 3
SPALDING      BRAYS
SWIMMING
A JORATHAI  DEMME PICTURE
FROM THE DIRECTOR OF
SOMETHING WILD &
STOP MAKING SENSE
9:3C
THISJ/VON ALL THE MONEY!
THIS WON ALL THE PRIZES
«8?i_^"i__!7*i
J- S^AK
pp>ev.
r'£tys
SEPT. 4-10
9:30
cZ funny.
7i30
SEPTEMBER 18 -
OCTOBER 1
THE THIRD ANNUAL
MELLOW MANOR
^EFYlWlStWTW^S CHANNELS KLUB
The Alternative • 860 Denman • 669-3448 •      <S^
THE ALTERNATIVE
UNDERGROUND    DANCE    CLUB
;Vo Cover
MONDAY Tj' PT WEDNESDAY
LIVE BANDS
TUESDAY       ASA and the Ogedengbe Drummers
THURSDAY REGGAE NIGHT
FRIDAY SATURDAY
FAMOUS GEORGE
Back To Black
CITR MOBILE SOUND
What You Want, Where You Want Hi
From Neanderthal cave stomps
to the latest computer chip
cha-cha, CITR can deliver
it right to your next party
with its Mobile Sound System.
And the rates are great!
CITR MOBILE SOUND  228-3017
The tradition
continues...
the finest in
jazz, blues, r&b,
folk, ethnic
and the
avant garde
2936 W. 4th Ave.    734-2828 ®SyjB
VERDICT
Various Artists
The History of Vancouver Rock
and Roll, Volume 1
VRCA
At last! This is the one I personally had been
waiting for: all that early good stuff. However, I must confess that I have a couple of
reservations about this much-awaited
release. First, there is the booklet that
comes with the album: although the pictures
are great fun, Michael Willmore's know-it-
all conceitedness and obnoxious intrusions
detract from what could otherwise have been
a highly informative and enjoyable read.
Second, and this is inherent to compilation LPs, there is the problematic choice of
material. In this case it's further compounded by the intricacies of licensing
(which excluded Bob and Lucille, and the
Canadian Sweethearts, perhaps Vancouver's
best-known export of the period), and the
question of 'historical relevance'. The latter
supposedly justifies the inclusion of such
lame novelties as The Valentines' The Sock
and Patty Surbey's Hey Boy, as well as
picking Les Vogt's wimpy generation-gap
ditty The Blamers over its far superior flipside
Moon Rocketin'.
Why not also have included (instead of
the ones just mentioned!) the other side of
The Stripes' great primitive single Boogie
Beat, since it is so hard to obtain, and The
Chessmen's first effort, Mustang, which is
every bit as good as Meadowlands. And
where are Guido D'Amico (Jimmy Boy),
Sandy Marino and The Sandmen (Hopin'
and A-Praying'), Del Erickson [Rockin'
Band), or even Evan Kemp?
On a more positive note, this LP has easily
the best-looking cover of the series so far.
It also has the great merit of making its share
of gems, whose reissue has long been
overdue, accessible to music fans rather
than   just   rabid   collectors.   Among   these
choice items are The Prowlers' hook-filled
second single Get a Move On, The Canadian VI.P.s' version of Lucille (embellished with screams worthy of Gerry Roslie's
kid brother), and Stan Cayer's harp-driven
Three Wild Women. The Hi-Fives' sheer
instrumental grittiness rescues Fujikami The
Warrior from the abyss of goofiness where
the novelty interjections would have relegated it, to accede to the Pantheon of Trash
inhabited by the likes of The Trashmen.
The welter of fine rocking tunes on this
platter more than make up for the weak spots
on side two, which makes this a record worth
having not only for collectors or local music
chauvinists but for everyone. Volumes two
and three, equally worthwhile, are still
available, a fourth (reportedly to feature the
mythical Misty Deep), and a possible video
are in the works.
The VRCA largely finances these releases
through its bi-annual swap-meets. The
next one is on September 13th, at the
Kitsilano Community Centre, so mark your
calendars and come out to support this
worthy effort.
Marc Coulavin
Cannon Heath Down
Heart-throb Companion
Bongo Sunrise Records
Who? Local band? Never heard of them,
you say? Well, it's true: Cannon Heath
Down are not that well-known yet, but this
record should go some way to change that.
It is encouraging to see a band with so little
live exposure put out a good album right off
the bat. Originally formed in late '85 as
Bayou Drachma, they played a few gigs,
made this recording in spring '86, went
through a few name changes and have now
reappeared as Cannon Heath Down.
Heart-throb Companion is thirteen original
songs of dreamy, jangly, melodic guitar
pop-rock in the vein of Game Theory/Larry
Norman/Three O'Clock/REM. Having said
that, though, they are no mere clone
band—they have plenty of their own fresh
ideas. The songwriting, arrangements, and
playing all show a surprising amount of
originality, depth and inventivenss for a
band this young. Cannon Heath Down have
a talent for writing great, catchy melodies.
While most of the songs here are good in
their own right, the fact that there are so
many is the weakest part of the whole
recording. The album could be better
focussed; it lacks a cohesiveness that
should carry the listener from song to song.
Yet, Cannon Heath Down have already
come some way toward having their own.
distinctive style. Heart-throb Companion is
a good first offering, and I look forward to
more good things from this band.
Mike Harding
Skinny Puppy
Cleanse, Fold and Manipulate
Nettwerk
Looks like death by overmixing is gonna be
the '80s answer to overproduction.
- John Leland
John Leland writes for Spin. The remark
above is from a review of a Skinny Puppy
12-inch. If a hotshot New York crit finds the
Puppy interesting enough to write about,
they gotta be doing something right, eh?
Maybe yes, maybe no. Maybe nothing.
Who can tell? SP throws so many different
things into one of their "audio sculptures"
that the result is more of an "audio morass".
To be fair (although there's no need to
be), it's not the individual elements of the
mix that are to blame (even if it has been
argued that the Pups view originality as an
unholy crime, the original sin if you will).
No, the real problem is that these guys just
don't know when to stop. Just 'cause
you've got 412 abandoned tape fragments
of found sound, sampled voices, synth
noises and disco beats lying around doesn't
mean you gotta put them all in one song.
OK, maybe not 412. But a lot. I guess the
Puppy's just gotta say yes to another
excess.
Actually, I'd rather listen to Yello. At least
they don't give you any bullshit with pseudo-
intellectual significance. Yello just wanna
make you dance and they'll use every disco
beat in the book to do it. And, hey, the only
thing SP mixes audibly above their black pit
of industrial wanna-be pretensions is the
ubiquitous synth-drum pound-beat. Why?
First, to make it a hit in the clubs. This will
in turn increase media awareness by getting
their name in the Rockpool (probably), the
Gavin Report (hopefully), and even, some-
SEPTEMBER 1987    31 day, Billboard (ha!!). Never mind that the
Puppy's rhythm section is as inventive as
Culturcide's on Industrial Band. Of course,
SP's trying to be serious, or so they would
have us believe, but then a lot of dancers
won't care if the BPMs are right and the
band is eyelinered, black-garbed and big-
haired. Second, if a disco beat dominates
the mix, it can obscure the woeful lack of
anything vaguely intelligent being said on
the record. Growly vocals have never really
impressed me, but at least some people
have something to say and let you hear it.
Not these boys. Nope, the Pups, obviously
aware of their painful inability to say anything
worth hearing, have once again growled
and mumbled a variety of unintelligible
sounds onto tape, buried them suitably
deep in the mix, and passed them off as
lyrics. OK, so this is no crime, I mean, lots
of people do it, but, geez, only Skinny
Puppy gives us a "lyric sheet" to go with it.
Ah, shit, never mind. After all, Skinny
Puppy is not about music or art or even
dancing. Oh, no: Skinny Puppy is about
image. Make that IMAGE. To sell records,
IMAGE helps a lot. Having one artist do all
the covers makes the band and the label
instantly identifiable, thus increasing Media
Awareness and Brand Recognition. So what
if all the records look exactly the same,
making it impossible to tell them apart since
they all sound alike to begin with. We're
talking Market Penetration here, and sometimes things like inventiveness, originality
and honesty just gotta be sacrificed for the
greater good.
Now, being calculated and contrived is
not necessarily an awful thing. Nobody gets
annoyed about Madonna (well, almost
nobody) 'cause she's never pretended to
be anything but calculated and contrived.
But the Puppy, well, the Puppy purports to
be dangerous, exciting, new, significant,
when they're not. They're a sham, the
Twisted Sister of industrial dance music.
SP is an IMAGE with nothing behind it, which
is why their intellectual posturing is so
irritating. And never forget that others, more
talented and more honest, trod the turf
before the Puppy had been weaned.
In short, the Puppy has no bite(s). Yah,
John Leland writes about 'em in Spin, but
I'd say that's got more to do with Nettwerk's
marketing savvy than any skills Skinny
Puppy's  got.   Cleanse,  fold  and   manipu-
IMPORTS       LOCAL
COLLECTOR'S R.P.M.
RECORDS     ELV/S
PUNK
LU
<
in
CD
Ui
S
i
LU
X
SPECIALIZING    IN RARE   MARILYN MONROE   MEMORABILIA.
(604)685-8841
498 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6B 3H1
MOD
30
o
O
+
CO
C/5
W
X
<
u
o
2
<
O
O
S
X late? Far better to fold, staple and mutilate
these dogs before they get too big.
Iain Bowman
Editor's Note: The opinions expressed in the
preceding article are those of the writer, and do
not reflect Discorder as a whole. Discorder
likes Skinny Puppy, and tells you to buy their
records.
Bill Bruford
Earthworks
Editions EG
From the rock drummer who refused to be
pigeonholed comes an exciting new album
excellently produced and sounding distinctly JAZZY. Not JAZZOLA as in Jeff Beck,
not YUPPIE JAZZ like Michael Brecker, but
something new which does not "sound
like..." anything else but a logical, learned
progression of style Bill has been developing
over his "solo album" projects. This album
is titillating in its vision, colour and performance (sorry, kiddies, no vocals). If
your stereo is up to scratch, feast mightily
on REAL ACOUSTIC STRING BASS served
up steaming, among other treats. Bill is into
some heavy electronics now, but why does
it sound so damn tasteful? The word is
TASTE.
Colin Robhins
Jeff Berlin
Pump It
Passport
Jeff Berlin is the best player in the world.
Forget your Pastoriuses, your Jack Bruces,
your Alphonso Johnsons, your Eberhard
Webers. Jeff can light people's ears on fire,
or make love to them (no rude jokes from the
rabble). His only problem is choosing
material that pleases both audiophiles and
groupies alike. He'll never find his Holy
Grail, but along the way he does stumble
across some interesting stuff. GLARING
EXCEPTIONS: Cream's classic Crossroads
is played nearly verbatim including Eric
Clapton's guitar solo which is transcribed
note for note to BASS! Even the Bruford/
Berlin classic Joe Frazier is copied (Round
2) but for a slightly more solid backbeat.
Why bother? Jeff Berlin has a lot to offer,
but shines brighter as a sideman. TRUST
ME.
Colin Robbins
^r?
W™ i »« °«t ^ "** 2 3* *** *   tier** «*
^_ *awi* 5_-«2—*
COMMONWEALTH
DRUM
FESTIVAL
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
Museum of Anthropology,
Grand Finale                      Tickets at VTC and CBO outlets.
October 6-10
The Great Hall
ORPHEUM THEATRE For complete information
Simon Fraser University Theatre
October 11
October 13 & 14                 about Festival events
call 254-9578.
October 8 & 9
Commodore Ballroom
October 11
A Magnificent
Spectacle of Music,
Dance & Sound
Canada
vfl/fatf^
SEPTEMBER 1987    33 ON
THE
DIAL
CITR fm 102
WEEKDAY HIGHLIGHTS
MONDAYS
RANDOM DESIGNS
7:30-10:00 am
Yup. It's true. Lobster hell has arrived. (Just look
in the mirror). Bop shop tunes and DJ-Speak by
Melissa. Wow.
FINE LINES
10:00-11:00 am
A new feature on CITR, courtesy of the fine folks
at CFUV, U. of Victoria. A literary program featuring readings and interviews with known and
obscure poets and authors. Produced at CFUV
and heard across Canada. Hosts are Jim Andrews, Barry MacDougall and Rick Andrews.
Tune in and get cultured!
SOUP OF THE DAY
11:00 am-1 pm
Comedy, jazz, 'punk,' bootlegs, oldies, post-hip
pre-punk, pre-hip post-punk, etc... You may not
get your fill, but this soup will wake you up and
get you started on your week. Hosted by Kevin
Williams.
DOGS BREAKFAST
1:00-3:00 pm
Each time you open the box something different
comes out. Could be Jazz, hardcore, country,
metal, rare oldies or even schlock. Your quess
is as good as mine! Frank Sivertz  .^ois.
WAYNE COX'S BRAIN
5:30-8:00 pm
An intensive purblind vetting of post-chilliastic
putative unctuous ossified cross-cultural idioms...
ya, right.
MORE DINOSAURS
8:00-9:00 pm
Host Marc Coulvin takes you back to the dark
ages when mutant breeds of giant grungemeis-
ters roamed the earth, savaging Beatleclones;
when twangy guitar sounds and primitive drums
pounding infected the minds and bodies of young
long-haired degenerates and sent them into catatonic trances with funny names like The Frug.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00-12:30 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time Jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
34    DISCORDER
occasional interview, and local music news.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
07 Sept.  Today is Sonny Rollins' birthday. To
honour this great man of the tenor
saxophone, we choose one of his greatest albums. "Newk's Time" recorded in Sept. 1957,
thirty years ago; it still sounds modern. Sonny
with Wynton Kelly, Doug Watkins and "Philly
Joe" Jones.
14 Sept.   "A sound for sore ears" is a good way
to describe this week's feature. Three
great virtuosos combine to perform "Trio Music;
Live." Chick Corea (accoustic piano), Miroslav
Vitous (accoustic bass) and Roy Haynes (drums).
One of the best albums of the decade.
21 Sept.  Thomas "Fats" Waller was one of the
most entertaining musicians of this
century. One of the finest and most influential
of the early piano players. He was also a great
vocalist and songwriter. Enjoy the humour and
wit of Mr. Waller with his working band of 1935/
1937.
28 Sept.  Part II of "Miles Davis in Stockholm."
Miles with a great band including Sonny Stitt (alto and tenor) (the man who replaced
John Coltrane), Wynton Kelly (piano), Paul
Chambers (bass) and Jimmy Cobb (drums) (one
of the finest rhythm sections ever). Inspired
Miles!
TUESDAYS
ELECTRONIC SMOKE SIGNALS
10:00-11:00 am
Electronic Smoke signals will provide reviews,
updates, commentaries, news and information,
public educational programing produced to
bridge the gap between native, non-native, and
natural people and to create awareness and
forbearance in our attitude toward nature and the
creation that we share perspective with.
PEST CONTROL
11:00-1:00 pm
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
1:00-3:00 pm
GET SERIOUS
3:00-5:00 pm
RECTAL RECTITUDE
5:30-8:00 pm
Are you suffering from burning rectal itch? Well
then—tune in and expose yourself to a long-
playing laxative and an aural enema.
SOUL GALORE
8:00-9:30 pm
Steve and Anne spin soul platters conveying an
extraordinarily intense sensitivity and emotional
fervour. Wipe away those lonely teardrops and
twist the night away, you red-blooded boys and
girls.
BUNKUM OBSCURA
9:30-1:00 am
Norm Narley presents tunes for the afterbirth of
the Pepsi generation.
AURAL TENTACLES
Midnight-4:00 am
Pierre Huish provides an after midnight musical
smorgasborg for animals & things lost in space
with strange nocturnal tendencies. Requests
available upon request.
WEDNESDAYS
ANOTHER KIND OF WEDNESDAY
7:30-10:30 am
Feeling tired and run down in the morning? Let
Sidney Killpigge into your home and he will be
more than happy to kick your lazy ass out of bed.
NERVOUS NORBERT
1:00-3:00 pm
September means anarchy and chaos at CITR.
Beat the rush and get your memberships asap...
pdq...anallthat...The Norbert Show awaits you.
LOUIS LOUIS
3:00-5:00 pm
Sporadic appearances are the rule once again
this month as your host searches (vainly) for the,
uh, 'light.' As Graffiti once mentioned: "...the first
to go and the last to know."
THE LIONS DEN
5:15-5:30 pm
Neil Davis will interview players, coaches and
special guests on The Lion's Den. There will also
be a trivia contest, the prizes being gift certificates for the Fogg 'n Suds Restaurant.
Oral Dave welcomes you to...
MY WONDERFUL WORLD
5:30-8:00 pm
This month featuring segments from Oral Dave's
audiobiography "Confessions of an Acidhead,"
or "Is That My Beer?"
THE AFRICAN SHOW
8:00-9:30 pm
The latest in modern African dance music plus/
minus a few oldie but greats and extras. Your way
we come every Wednesday at 8:00. Information
—News as they come at 8:30 pm. Possible
special features at 9:00. Your host: Umerah P.
Onukwulu. Welcome.
ARE YOU TALKING TO ME?
Midnight-4:00 am
Sick and tired of all this punk, new wave, underground bullshit? Elevator music is where it's at...
Travis B. lights up your life and plays the best
Montovani and Muzak.
THURSDAYS
EXCITED FIRST DJ-ESS
7:30-10:00 am
Got the bye-bye beddy blahs? Wake up to the
sweet sounds of morning-breath with CITR-oons
and CocoPuffs...an important part of your morning start.
THE VINYL FRONTIER
5:30-8:00 pm
The Spinlist will never be the same again! Tune
in. Turn on. Drop out.
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00-9:00 pm
"I was kidnapped by aliens from outer space who
took me back to the fifties in their time machine,"
claims host Marc Coulavin. "Fortunately, I had
the presence of mind to raid the record stores
for stuff to play on the show." Of course, you can
choose to disbelieve this far-fetched tale, yet the
results of these alleged forays are there for anyone to hear. Hearing is believing.
MEL BREWER PRESENTS
11:00-Midnight cinnR
7:30
8:00
9:00
110:00
11:00
12:00
1:00
2:00 H
3:00
4:00 -
5:00
6:00
7:00 s
8:00 -
9:00
10:00 i
11:00
12:00
1:00
2:00
3:00
4:00
MONDAY TUESDAY       WEDNESDAY      THURSDAY FRIDAY
I
I
NEWS. SPORTS, WEATHER GENERIC REVIEW,   INSIGHT
RANDOM
DESIGNS
FINE LINES
SOUP OF
THE DAY
Jennifer Chan
ELECTRONIC
SMOKE SIGNALS
PEST
CONTROL
ANOTHER
KIND OF
WEDNESDAY
TNT COMEDY SHOW
^
EXCITED
FIRST
DJ-ESS
FINE LINES
FRIDAY
MORNING
MAGAZINE
TRIBES AND
SHADOWS
Joanna Graystone
DOG'S
BREAKFAST
Stacey Fruin
CITR NEWS, SPORTS, WEATHER
BLOOD ON
THE SADDLE
GET
SERIOUS!
NERVOUS
NORBERT
LOUIS
LOUIS
^
PARTY WITH
ME, PIERRE
& JACQUES!
THE
ED.D.J.
SHOW
Peter
Courtemanche
NEWS, SPORTS, WEATHER  GENERIC REVIEW, INSIGHT, DAILY FEATURE
WAYNE COX'S
BRAIN
MORE
DINOSAURS
THE
JAZZ
SHOW
JUST
THERE
RECTAL
RECTITUDE
SOUL
GALORE
BUNKUM
OBSCURA
AURAL
TENTACLES
MY WONDERFUL
WORLD
THE
AFRICAN
SHOW
PERMANENT
CULTURE
SHOCK
ARE YOU
TALKING
TOME?
THE
VINYL FRONTIER
TOP OF
THE BOPS
TEENAGE
TORPOR
MEL BREWER
PRESENTS
EXHIBITIONISM
CRAPSHOOT
NEOFILE
CRACK
RHYTHM
THE
VISITING
PENGUIN
SHOW
WEEKDAY REPORTS
SATURDAY REPORTS
8:00
10:00
1:00
3:00
5:00
MAJOR NEWS/SPORTS
NEWSBRIEF
NEWSBREAK
NEWSBRIEF
MAJOR NEWS/SPORTS
Noon
6:00
MAJOR NEWS/SPORTS
SATURDAY EVENING
MAGAZINE
TALK OF THE TOWN
FM102
SATURDAY SUNDAY
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE
POWER
CHORD
CLOCK
THE
BEAT
SAT. MAGAZINE
T.O.T.T.
THE
MEAN
TIME
WATCH
THE
LANGUAGE
TUNES
US
MUSIC
OF
OUR
TIME
T.O.H.
THE
ROCKERS
SHOW
BLUES CITY
SHAKE DOWN
STUFF
SUNDAY MAG.
TWW.S.I.
JUST
LIKE
WOMEN
PLAYLOUD/
THIS IS
NOT A TEST
LIFE
AFTER
BED
FLOYD'S
CORNER
SUNDAY REPORTS
10:00 VAN. NEW MUSIC CALENDAR
Moon NEWS/TALK OF THE TOWN
6:00 SUNDAY MAGAZINE
6:30 THE WAY WE SEE IT
SEPTEMBER 1987    35 EXHIBITIONISM
Midnight-3:30 am
"Take off your panties and listen to the window."
(Langley Strood). Diamonds and vinyl—Matt
Richards.
FRIDAYS
FRIDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
7:30-10:30 am
The re-emergence of New Souls. Sacred Dates,
Times, Points in History. Overthrowing history.
Plus what's going on in Vancouver.
04 Sept.  Michael Elliot Herst on the Fall Film
Series at the Pacific Cinematheque.
New Jazz emerging with Metheny, Miles and
Marsalis. Special guest at 9:00: Dramadillo
Theatre Co. from New Zealand. New music from
Joe Ely & Jan Garbarek. Firehall Theatre news.
11 Sept.   Survival in the New Danse: Judith
Marcus interview. Preview: Montan-
ero Dance. The Voodoo Soul of Miles Davis.
North, South, East and West. Fringe Festival update and info. Joy Coghill as Emily Carr (an exploration). Last chance for CATS.
78 Sept Fringe Festival networking. Profiles
of New Dance, Performance Art and
Experimental Theatre. On-site scouting and in-
studio infamy. Plus regular features.
25 Sept. Reworking the creative process and
looking at October's events.
TRIBES AND SHADOWS
10:30-11:30 am
A program that explores "New Consciousness."
Dreams, myths, cultures and rituals all take context, bridging the gap between Dark and Light.
Featuring the innovative, the eclectic and the stirring diversities inherent in the musical fabric of
our world. Hosted by Kirby Hill.
04 Sept.    Sacred Dance, Sacred Dums. New
directions in music and dance.
Witches and Healers.
11 Sept.    A special profile of the Gitk'san Wet-
suweten Tribal Land Claim court-
case; interviews with Band Leaders plus a look
at the latest production of Headlines Theatre's
"No 'XYA' ."
18 Sept.    The New Danse of Judith Marcuse.
Reinterpreting the Western psyche.
Paul Plimley and percussion.
25 Sept.    Egypt:  The  Pyramids.   Plus  new
music in Jazz, electronic and new
music forms.
NEOFILE
6:00-9:00 pm
More new records than you can shake a stick at,
while Kevin Smith suffers extreme humiliation.
CRACK RHYTHM
9:00-midnight
A large, messy, enigmatically entertaining eve-
ing program, highlighting the hefty sounds of
exotic beats and the malicious chunk of modern
funk, with constant and current info on the Vancouver alternative music scene supplied by those
who should know. Hastily hosted by Robert Shea.
THE VISITING PENGUIN SHOW
Midnight-4:00 am
Once again, Paula, goddess of the airwaves, is
beset upon by hapless villains, obnoxious band
members, and mindless phone-calls from piss-
drunk party-ers. It's a good thing she's such a
good sport about all this.
WEEKEND HIGHLIGHTS
SATURDAYS
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8:00 am-noon
I know it's a bit early to wake up at 8 on a Saturday morning, but it's even worse for me. I have
to wake up at 7 just to get here and do this show,
so is it too much to ask for you to leave your radio
on all night, patiently waiting for CITR to get back
on the air? Yes, I suppose it is... Nevertheless,
I will be here every Saturday to present "Brits
Go Home," with lots of roots music and British
, comedy from 8 to 10. Then it's the cutting edge
of folk music on "The Edge on Folk" from 10 to
11:30. Features during September are:
05 Sept. Capercaillie. A big hit at the Mariposa,
Winnipeg and Vancouver folk festivals
this summer. Their new LP is now in the stores,
and I spoke to them while they were in town.
Great Scots!
12 Sept. Spirit of the West play The Commodore tonight. This is their first Vancouver gig in ages, and they have a new line-up, as
well as lots of great new songs. Perhaps they will
be in the studio, too...
79 Sept. Jim Keelaghan from Calgary returns
to The Rogue Folk Club tomorrow
night, this time with a fine backing band. Tune
in to hear songs from his new LP "Timelines."
Maybe he'll come in to CITR as well...
26 Sept. The Oyster Band were the biggest hit
at the Vancouver & Edmonton folk
festivals. Their new LP "Wide Blue Yonder"
should be out by now. I'll play tracks from all their
LPs, as well as "live" stuff from their gig at The
Rogue in July. Also aired will be an interview with
two members of this, the finest folk rock band
around.
At 11:30 The Edge on Soccer provides scores,
updates and reports from the day's games in the
U.K. as well as reports on the Canadian Soccer
League, with the playoffs about to start. Vancouver's definitive soccer program is followed by the
Compleat Monty Python at 11:45.
POWER CHORD
Noon-3:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring the
underground alternative to mainstream metal:
local demo tapes, imports and other rarities, plus
album give-aways.
CLOCK THE BEAT
3:00-6:00 pm
I am convinced that my time is desperately short.
In fact, I know is is. So tune in soon for three
hours of Saturday PM music that's as heavy on
the variety as on the beat. With your host lain
Bowman. Thanks a lot; it's been fun.
SATURDAY EVENING MAGAZINE
6:00-6:30 pm
Featuring news, sports, weather, Insight, Generic
Review, Today in History, Across the Atlantic.
TALK OF THE TOWN
6:30-7:00 pm (& Sundays at Noon)
Join hosts Libbi Davis and Brad Newcome for
conversation that's informative, jovial, exciting,
surprising and fun. It's all here! It's the TALK OF
THE TOWN.
THE MEAN TIME
7:00-9:00 pm (sometimes)
Lodged between the flight paths of the UBC
Thunderbirds, Paul Funk presents music by
which to dodge guano. Watch your step, please.
NOCTURNES
9:00midnight
From nightmares to dreamscapes. Be careful
what you dream for it may come true. Host: Paul
C.
TUNES R' US
Midnight-4:00 am
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
8:00Noon
Modern 20th Century classical music ranging
from the tonal to the avant-garde. Commentary
on the historical, technical and latest fashions
with regards to all genres. Requests taken. Your
host, Wolfgang J. Ehebald.
TALK OF THE TOWN
Noon-12:30 pm (repeat)
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12:30-3:00 pm
Reggae, Rock Steady and Ska. At 1:30, Reggae
Beat International Hour: news and interviews
about Reggae music worldwide. Host: George
Barrett.
BLUES CITY SHAKEDOWN
3:00-4:00 pm
Finally, a tasty Blues show again on CITR. Everything from early Delta Blues to Chicago Urban
Blues to contemporary blues-influenced rock.
And anything in between. Tune in weekly to get
your shot of the blues. Your host: Mike Dennis.
STUFF
4:30-6:00 pm
Poetry and music stuff. Hopefully most of it
choice. Hosts: Kevin Smith and Julia Steele.
SUNDAY MAGAZINE
6:00-6:30 pm
THE WAY WE SEE IT
6:30-7:00 pm
Join the CITR News Staff as they discuss a week
of events and issues, causes and consequences.
Learn all there is to know about a world of happenings, as each reporter gives story details and
discusses its implications.
JUST LIKE WOMEN
7:00-9:00 pm
Tune in for invigorating and stimulating interviews, news and music for anyone interested in
women's issues or learning more about them.
PLAYLOUD/THIS IS NOT A TEST
9:00 pm-Midnight
"Voltaire announced the Age of Reason two
centuries too soon. We are still in the Dark Ages."
R.A. Wilson.
LIFE AFTER BED
Midnight-Whenever
FLOYD'S CORNER
2:00 am-Until Jeff fades...
Jeff G. pulls the cowshit from his boots and slings
it on the turntable every Sunday night for all you
funny-walking, shit-disturbing, cattle-riding winos.
36   DISCORDER LIFE   AMONG
THE  EARTH LINGS .
WAT.-A*-'*"   ™**
fine    M J*>T ' m '
„ WITH S0METHM*.
ThAr'3 au-
T4K£ TH/S MMN C£g£&Mi
OFF. SP1K£.   I'M HAY/AJ-r IT WASWffc
7WS INSTANT.'
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HONTmHEU-'b   _£_f
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WKA/M4 SELL NVTHlN'
75 Noeocxj.
TOP AIRPLAY ALBUMS
ARTIST
Yello
Nitzer Ebb
Einsturzende Neubauten
Various Artists
Various Artists
Wire
Various Artists
Steven Brown
Graeme Revell
Eugene Chadbourne
The Replacements
Warren Zevon
Tuxedomoon
Young Fresh Fellows
The Waterwalk
Skinny Puppy
Danielle Dax
The Cure
Michelle Shocked
Various Artists
That Petrol Emotion
The Coolies
Soviet France
Manu Dibango
Trouble Funk
Change of Heart
Ravi Shankar
Professor Longhair
Scruffy The Cat
X
My Dad Is Dead
ARTIST
The Jesus & Mary Chain
SPK
Moev
Prince
Chris & Cosey
The Residents
Tackhead
Ma ceo & The Macks
That Petrol Emotion
True Mathematics
TITLE
One Second
ThatTotalAge
FuenfA ufDerNach...
Potatoes
Lonely Is An Eyesore
The Ideal Copy
StraightToHell
Search ing For Con ta ct
The Insect Musicians
LSD C&W
Pleased To Meet Me
Sentimental Hygiene
You
The Men Who Loved Music
The Waterwalk
Cleanse Fold and Manipulate
Inky Bloaters
Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me
The Texas Campfire Tapes
Smack My Crack
Babble
Digit
A Flock of Rotations
Afri-Jazzy
Trouble Over Here...
Slowdance
Tana Maria
New Orleans House Party
Tiny Days
See How We Are
Peace Love & Murder
LABEL
Polygram
Mute
Torso
Ralph
4AD
Enigma
Hell
Play It Again Sam
MusiqueBrut
Fundamental
WEA
Virgin
Crammed
Popllama
Nettwerk/Capitol
Nettwerk/Capitol
Awesome
WEA
Cooking Vinyl
Giorno Poetry Systems
Polygram
DB
Red Rhino
PolydorUK
Island
Fringe
Private
Aural Tradition
Relativity
WEA
Birth
TOP AIRPLAY SINGLES
TITLE
AprilSkies
OffTheDeepEnd
Wanting
If I Was Your Girlfriend
Obsession
HitTheRoadlack
The Game
'Cross The Track
Big Decision
AfterDark
LABEL
WEA
Nettwerk/Capitol
Nettwerk/Capitol
WEA
Nettwerk/Capitol
Torso
4th & Broadway
Urban
Polygram
Champion
%%W%tf
SEPTEMBER 1987    37 ■:■:■:■:■»•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ •"■ ■■■-■■--.•.-.-.
IT'S THAT TIME OF YEAR AGAIN—ALL'
the local musicians are just coming back
from tree-planting, CITR and Discorder
are gearing up for back-to-school {I'm
starting to worry about my thesis), everyone's exhausted from the whirlwind Canadian Independent Music Festival, and it's
time for Shindig again. Yes, CITR's own
Friendly Competition of the Bands is still
looking for entries, so send a tape of four or
so original songs (clearly marked "for
Shindig") to Linda Scholten or Jerry King,
so you can be part of things. (Remember,
winning isn't everything, either—this could
be your big chance to play for a completely
different audience and convert new fans.)
Send your stuff in quick—it won't be long
before all the slots are filled up!
Three of the best gigs of the summer, all
within about a week, happened at the
beginning of August, unfortunately to quite
small audiences. (I'm talking about The
Dead Milkmen, Firehose, and Mr. T Experience.) The only thing sadder than watching a band play to only a fraction of the
people that should be there is when no-one
catches the stagedivers.
CITR should soon be getting demos from
Oversoul Seven (more like their powerful
stage show than the record) and Victoria's
Bedspins I heard Bruised and Stupid,
also from Victoria, have broken up—it
appears that their local scene suffers as
much from a rhythm section (especially
drummer) shortage as ours does. But then,
Victoria bands have been enjoying the
benefits of CHEK-TV's Beat Goes On for a
couple of weeks. If only there was a local
station willing to put local bands on TV here.
Here are this month's demos:
Silent Gathering—We Have Always Lived
in This House and My Law. Although their
name sounds familiar (maybe they gave us
another demo once), I don't know anything
about Silent Gathering. These are both really
long songs loaded with sloppy guitar and
rhythm, but there's something about them I
like. My Law starts kind of slow metal and
degenerates into screams and (a little
subdued) wildness; This House is sometimes almost a Cure parody, sometimes
psychedelic, and sometimes the vocals
sound a mite like Cory Hart. Not slick, not
groundbreaking, but what I'm assuming is
a few young guys having a good time.
Big Electric Cat - Poltergeist Waltz. The
first demo I've heard in 3/4 time. Our
program director, Kevin, says it's about
what he expected, but I think this song
works. The ambience is definitely there—the
sound and feel are a lot like the calliope part
in For the Benefit of Mr. Kite, and you can
almost sing along ("one two three, one two
three . . ."). More ghostly than like a
poltergeist's scratch-thumps on walls and
furniture moving. I haven't seen this band
in a long, long time, but I think this is a bit
of a break from their usually heavier (Kevin
says Gothic) sound.
Ultramarine—Down the Years. Ultramarine
is Blair Petrie's latest project, more pop-
oriented than his earlier ones—they've been
playing a lot locally too in the past while,
but I haven't seen them yet. Anyway, the
keyboard sound on this song is a bit thin for
my taste, but Down the Years has a couple
of good hooks. (Hopefully this'll win Blair a
few new fans.)
The Paladins— Hold On. From San Diego,
these guys really know how to get into a
groove. Of course that's no surprise to the
people that pack the Railway whenever
they're up this way. It's not fair to call this
rockabilly—it's a solid, sexy, happening
song.
Technotribe—Life of Crime and / Walk the
Line. Technotribe is led by Gus Vassos,
former singer of the Actionauts, and boy,
does that voice ever sound familiar, especially on / Walk the Line. But what really
separates this band from all others is their
use of a female backup singer who doubles
almost all of Gus's parts, not in an X or
Jefferson Airplane sort of laid-back commenting style but right on top of the lead
vocals. This really cool, often happy sounding effect, plus horns, violins, and other
stuff, makes Technotribe, while far from
soulless, one of the slickest demos CITR's
heard. And while the cassette the band's
giving to friends is called Live at the Smilin'
Buddha, I hope I'm not giving too much
away when I say that's not Igor and the gang
applauding wildly between songs.
The Hip Type—Hush. Now here's a band
that knows which songs to cover. The first
time I saw The Hip Type, there was Tracy
(possibly her first time on stage) trying to
get the audience to punch the air to this
song. I guess no-one at the Railway Club
that night knew quite what to make of Tracy's
humour. Anyway, here's the song at last,
recorded live in the studio with the help of
Ian Noble (drums), Steve Quinn (guitar),
and Gord and Shelagh Badanic (percussion
and backing vocals, respectively). Because Ian, Steve, and Gord are all in Go
Four 3, some people will make too much of
the connection between the two bands—the
real connection is between the long -
lamented Debutantes and The Hip Type, via
Erica Leiren, bassist and back-up singer.
(Remember, all of Go Four 3, except Ian,
started out with the Debs.) This is a fun
version of what some radio stations would
call a "rock classic"—maybe someday the
rest of this tape will show up on a record. /'//
buy it! Janis McKenzie
\t>0O4ltf?
AX HIT M6 U<6
38   DISCORDER savoy
SPECIAL EVENTS
COUNTRY MUSIC WEEK
SEPTEMBER 7-12!
San Francisco Invasion !!
Sept: 22 - DOT 3
Sept: 25, 26 - FLAMING LIPS & THE FURIES
SUNDAY EVENTS
Sept: 6-TBA
Sept: 13 - TBA
Sept: 20 - ROGUE FOLK CLUB
with JIM KEELAGHAN/
Sept: 27 - ROGUE FOLK CLUB   II
JB     A
HAN/i
SHOWCASE
WEDNESDAY    THURSDAY
SATURDAY
ELLEN MclLWAINE
TERILYN RYAN
& THE HEN PALS
11 12
GREAT WESTERN ORCHESTRA
with STEWART McDOUGALL
WATER17 WALK ,8    &
SCOTTY, SPOCK & BONE'S
s From Montreal
DEJA VOODOO
"HAM>N«i!Pi
FOR^S
s
E
P
T
<P
OPEN AT 7:30 - MONDAY — SUNDAY !!
THE SAVOY NIGHTCLUB     6 POWELL ST.       687-0418 Every
Monday
Starting
September 14

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