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 4, iBlttl
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WXCESvrf EDITORS NOTE
Hello. My name is Laurel. I like editing, writing, music, bands, songs, and
conceits. I like riding bikes and making beer, too. I am also the new editor of
Discorder. It's very nice to meet you.
If I had run into you on the street on a sunny Sunday or at the Biltmore on
a rainy Friday a year ago (heck, even six months ago), and you asked me what
I had to look forward to in March 2012,1 would have had a lot of answers:
celebrating St. Patrick's Day, my birthday, the onset of spring and counting
down to Record Store Day, to name a few.
Being editor of Discorder would not have been one of them; I had no idea I'd
be this position, but I assure you my giggling has been off the charts; since I
was hired earlier this month. I only wish that an Ecstatic Sans font existed so
I can better convey in print how sincerely excited I am. Because what is there
to not be excited about?
I've bathed in the glow of Discorder since my days at UBC in 2002. I've stormed
the masses of Vancouver's musical and artistic talent from the hoards ofthe
now defunct Arts County Fair, to sketchy back alley gigs at the Peanut Gallery,
to following Soul Club from the Astoria to the Waldorf to the Biltmore, and
saw as many concerts as possible in between. All these ±ings make m^liove
for Vancouver grow, and have somehow led me to Discorder.
As a 10-year Vancouver Island transplantee, I don't have the deep roots of
a home-grown Vancouverite, but this city is indeed my home. I've grown wi±
Vancouver's creative community as it has grown on me with each album, band,
artist and venue I discover. Discorder has always been a medium that fosters
and promotes that community and I'm here to carry it forward with Vi|fei,aid-
vigour and vitality.
Before burying you in a pile of things to be excited about in March, I'd like
to acknowledge a profound loss in the musical community, the recent passing
of VVomeh guitarist Chris Reimer. On behalf of Discorder, I send condolences
to his family and friends, the band, and the community and encourage you to
share your thoughts and memories at christopherjohnjosephreimer.com. While
Women are Calgary-based, we all know how tight western Canada's music
community is; there is a void on the coast too. It's a reminder to live your days
happily and fully, and there are a lot of reasons to do that in March.
In mid March, CiTR is excited to bring you 24 Hours of Student Programming. The name really does say it all. The station will also premiere The City,
a new show about urban spaces; you can catch up on that and more in our
Program Guide.
On March 29, we will host a night of butt-shakery and finger-wigglery
at the Biltmore for our spring fundraiser. If you like bands and dancing and
fun and supporting this most excellent publication, I highly recommend you
come. Plus, we can meet in person and high-five in real life. Stay tuned for
the full line up.
Finally, I hope you are as excited about this issue as I am. The past month
of Gregory Adams imparting wisdom and advice upon me has been interesting, hectic, hilarious, fun, stressful and sweaty for me; I've got some game to
bring following that guy and I am looking forward to the challenge. Also, with
features on Shearing Pinx, Nardwuar, and War Baby in the following pages,
I'm feeling a bit giddy.
In short, it's great to be here. Thanks for having me. On that note, I bid you
happy listening and happier reading. There is a lot to look forward to.
Read on and stay rad,
Laurel Borrowman
EDITOR ; Wm
1    WRITERS
•   ©Discorder 2012 by the Student Radio Society ofthe Uni-
Laurel Borrowman / Gregory Adams
•     Robert Catherall / Alex de Boer / Fraser Dobbs / Robert
.  versify of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation
ART DIRECTOR
•     Fougere / Jacey Gibb / Coleman Ingram / Tristan
',   8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR,
Jaz Halloran       -11118
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|  which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at www.citr.ca, as well
COPY EDITORS
Meza / James Olson / Jennesia Pedri / Will Pedley /
•   as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland,
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AD COORDINATOR
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UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
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• donate. M$%? -        IIP   W        '                          ,   -.. :::;-:*£
Table qfclfftents M^Rclflp^m „ -'
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te'&fS**!                        MAN YOUR HORSE
^assSk%                STEVE L0UIE
FEATURES
REGULARS
08 j Bleating Hearts
From Morocco to Vancouver, Hasan Li has
amassed an orchestral pop force to be reckoned
14 / War B#$ *$
Call them heavy. Call them funny. Call them
Nirvana-y. Discorder sits down with War Baby to
04 / The Overeducated
Grumbler
with. We assure you, bloody goats aren't a part
of it.    ' ;lPj\{                                               ^Irqfe
talk with the trio about their upcoming album
and other important things...like Phil Collins.
06/Filmstripped
10 / Shearing Pinx
The experimental-punksters are over 50 releases
deep and hitting the road again in May. Find out
how the trio continue to actively rj^t the No
Fun City.
161 Ancients
Riffs. Doobs. Smokes. Luxuriant flowing hair.
Metal groovers Ancients shoot the shit about
their miracle child, symbology, space, and yes,
lots of huge riffs.
07/Veneius
20 /Calendar/ehHom
13 /Nardum#fr.
On air with CiTR since 1987, Human Serviette
) jmd interviewer extraordinaire Nardwuar gets
Busy Doing Nothing with Discorder.
18 /Said the Whale
With a Juno in the bag and SXSW on the horizon,
the Vancouver quintet have their sights set on
conquering the U.S. Let's just hope their van is
up for the challenge.
22 / Program Guide
25 / Art PrOjeCt / Office Supplies Incorporated
~* • i&l~<:|PT^|p^!P^ +^^^^^fl^Xff^
28/ Under Review
33 /Real Live Action
38 / On The Air / The Rockers Shou,
■f^-^i
39 /Charts yjMMfilHIl
iIBril
GOING TO THE
HAIR SALON: A
TALE OF MISERY
m
by TERRIS
SCHNEIDER
This month, I was going to write about Bill C-n
(you know, the bill that could bring SOPA-like
online piracy laws to Canada), and how we all
need to put a stop to it Instead, I got caught up
in a gluten-free, non-dairy baking dork fest. If
the bill passes, I will be dreadfully sorry to all of
you.
I will regale you instead with a story about
one ofthe most awkward and terrifying experiences known to mankind: a trip to the hairdresser, or hair stylist I should say (less ofa dirty
word). If my hair didn't get afro-big or knotted
up, I would probably never go, but alas, this is
not an option for me. When I lived in Kelowna,
I always saw the same hairstylist who did a great
job so it wasn't such a traumatizing experience.
Now that I live in Vancouver, finding the right
stylist has been a daunting task. Here's how my
past year of hair adventures have gone:
SALON #1
Walk into this first salon. Greeted by
unfriendly receptionist, introduced to an even
grumpier stylist. She does my hair for over four
hours and doesn't utter a single peep. Isn't this
what you have trained for? You entered this profession knowing thatyou have to make small-
talk, or that kind of conversation where you're
just getting to know someone. If you don't like
it, why are you doing ±is? Horribly awkward hair
cut is over. My hair looks incredible! Go to the
reception desk to pay.
"Pay me $500!" says receptionist.
"Oh, dear lord," says 1.1 slump away uncomfortably, looking amazing. Next!
illustration by PRISCILLAYU
SALON #2
Checked the prices for this particular salon
and their reviews on Yelp, and head there a few
months later. This is going to be good! Their
receptionist is much friendlier, and they even sell
some cool clothes in their salon. I'm greeted by
the hairstylist and she seems friendlier than the
girl at Salon #1. Still not the most friendly, but
actually making an effort. I decide I want to cut
my hair shorter, but by no means do I want the
back to be too short. I don't think I can pull off
a bob -1 am lazzzyyyyy when it comes to doing
stuff with my hair. As she cuts my hair, she cuts
the back too short. I look like a dumpier, tomboy
version of Victoria Beckham.
salon #3
I grow out my hair for four months to try
and end the reign ofthe bob. For some reason, I
decide to trust Yelp again in making my next hair
salon decision. This place is a very cool-looking salon, with kitschy decor and Broken Social
Scene playing in the background. The stylists
kind of have an elitist attitude that trendy people
have, but it suits the setting. My hair stylist pokes
fun at my last haircut which I chime in on, but
am secretly embarrassed about. She raves about
how she's going to make me over, fix it, and give
me the best haircut of my life. She's really got me
pumped. When she's done, my hair looks exactly
the same as it did before. Luckily, I wasn't overcharged.
salon #4
I never look at Yelp again. This time I only
wait a month and a half, and find a place downtown. This salon looks like an art gallery and
has cool paintings on the walls. Everyone is
really friendly and nice, but I have another silent
hair stylist. I sit there reading a magazine for
three hours. Now I'm up to date on all current
trends, movie information and anything pop
culture related. The colour she puts in my hair
is amazing, but as soon as she starts styling it,
I go through the following states of panic: 1)
Oh, god. This woman is going to butcher my
hair. 2) Well, wait, now that she's blow drying
it, I think it will be okay! 3) I spoke too soon. Oh
no, please, not the poofy-look! Do I look like
someone who can rock the poof? I'm wearing
an over-sized grandpa sweater for God's sake.
Just because I have blonde hair and am larger in
the chestal region, does not mean I want to look
like I'm going to the Grand Ole Opry. I walk out
ofthe salon, looking completely insane. Luckily,
the prices were reasonable and the colour looks
good. I can go home and style my hair myself,
anyways (I'm not going to. See comment of me
being hair-lazy).
From now on, I think I'm just going to let my
hair flow into the crazy lion mane that it's supposed to be. AMSSiHdenfibcIeil^
ol BBC presents:
• •*
April 5th
Mclnnes Field, UBC
Thursday, 2-9m
All ages • 3M BEER
Early Bird fix - $12»> • General tlx - $18
3-JJ Tlx alter March 30 j $25
Tickets available at numerous camps outlets, and
www.nortiieniflcKets.com
MOTHER MOTHER • MSTRKRFT
HEfSPIN • MARIA IN THE SHOWER
moi TRUX-SPECIAL GUESTS
MORE INFO AT AMSB10CKPJRTY.COM
CiTR
101.9fm/CITR.ca
OWN YOUR FREQUENCY
blueprint
Red Bull
ENERGY DRINK
MOLSONi# PINA (2011), directed by Wim Wenders
by ANGELA YEN
Pina is a conceptual 3D documentary that pays
tribute to German choreographer/dancer Pihfi -
Bausch. Near the beginning, the film cuts*©";;-
archive footage of Bausch instructing her class.
She states that words cannot fully describe or
express one's feelings and so, that is when dance
comes into play. The film inhabits this motto and
expresses Bausch's persona, talent and influence
through visuals and dance rather than straight
narrative.
Pina is a stunning work that transports
the audience from one gorgeous backdrop to
another, which becomes the stage for a string
of captivating dance routines. For instance,
Bausch's troupe of dancers recreateher interpretation of Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring," where
the dancers desperately trudge through a dirt-
covered stage, while the tormented and bizarre
"Cafe Mueller" has three women clumsily walking through a sea of chairs and into the walls
like broken windup toys. The audience glides
along and moves in and out of each dance with
an omniscient presence, which is only further
enhanced by the 3D.
Wenders' film exudes the German director's
signature whimsy and surreal style. One moment
a dancer is contorting in a washed out auditorium and then in a flash, you are in the middle of
traffic observing a couple serenading their love
to each other.
illustration by AMY GOH
When a new dancer is introduced, they are
framed facing the camera in a typical talking head fashion. However, their thoughts are
shared through voice-over only, while they stare
silently back at the camera. It deliberately distances the audience from what the dancer is saying and highlights the inability that words or
talking have when it comes to fully expressing
their emotions. Their dance performance follows
and it is through the dancing that we get a better understanding of their memories of Bausch.
Dance does the talking and allows each dancer's
distinct personality and voice to be brought to
the surface.
In a day and age where figuring out a person's birthday, childhood, or favourite food is
only a click away, there is no need for the documentary to be overwrought with these easily
accessible biographic details. Instead, Wenders
combines film and dance to evoke the aura of
an artist through the art itself. Wenders pulls
in and maneuvers the viewer through magnificent scenery and literally makes the audience feel
the depth and layered beauty that Bausch's work
ignites. by CHRISTIAN
VOVERIS
It's hard to imagine the Commercial Drive neighbourhood without the presence ofthe Rio, and
yet this month the future ofthe historical theatre looked very uncertain as it continues to face
struggles over liquor licensing, including a ban
from screening films.    £ ,
The problem arose when the Rio's management applied for a liquor license that would
allow them to serve drinks to adults at live events,
with the aim of diversifying the theatre's purpose
to host more local and touring bands. What from
a practical perspective seems like a great way to
use a comtoomity space for multiple purposes
turned out to be a no show for Vancouver's ultra-
conservative liquor licensing.
On January 19, well over a year after manager and owner Corinne Lea began the hurdle-
filled application process, the theatre was finally
approved tpsgll alcohol at events, but with one
catch: they were to stop screening movies, effective immediately, due to a condition raised by the
B.C. Liquor Control and licensing Branch. Stirring up outrage and concern, the theatre's management and patrons were backed by Democrat
MLA Jenny Kwan in raising their concerns as the
issue was brought to Provincial government.
illustration by PRISCILLAYU
The answer arrived on February 9 from LCLB
minister Rich Coleman, allowing license holders to screen films outside the hours provided
in their liquor licenses. While this technically
allows the Rio to continue being an aGtualmovie
theatre by showing movies during the day, it is
far from a fully functioning solution. According
to Lea, the Rio needs to be able to screen movies
any nights that live events aren't scheduled, and
even with the modified laws, the management
can't attain the flexibility they need to remain
financially viable. In light ofthe modification to
the rules, Lea and the Rio's team are continuing
to press Coleman to lift the ban fully.
The loss ofthe Rio would be unfortunate in
a city where you can barely count all the neighbourhood theatres on a single hand, as independent theatre owners struggle to compete with the
massive multiplexes nesting in malls. Not only
would this leave cult film fans without a place to
see the Rocky Horror Picture Show every year, it robs
this city ofa unique and historical cultural venue. photos by
VICTORIA JOHNSON
lettering by
PRISCILLAYU
"There are more people here tonight than
all of our other shows combined," Hasan Li
says from a crowded Waldorf stage. It's a Friday night and the vocalist/guitarist's band—
Bleating Hearts—are celebrating the release
of their self-titled debut album in front ofa
packed audience. It's a triumphant night for
he and the other seven members that now
make up Bleating Hearts and a well-earned
step into the spotlight for a band more accustomed to playing caf& and house showW ' j?
It's also a long way from the band's genesis, halfway around ±e world—Li started
Bleating Hearts with his girlfriend, singing
saw/alto sax player Layla Gai'b, when they
were living in Morocco. Back then, Li had a
lot of time on his hands and took to songwriting.
" [Layla] would go to work, while I would
stay at home and do nothing," he says sheepishly. "I had my little computer set up and
I had my guitar and I smoked drugs and
recorded a bunch of songs. A lot ofthe songs
that are on the album were [written] there, in
Morocco."
That locale pushed the songs towards the
layered, orchestral sound Bleating Hearts now
has. In particular, the raita, "a sort snake-
charmer-flute thing," inspired Li to think big. WHAT BECOMES
OF THE BLEATING
HEARTED
by DUNCAN   gi,
MCHUGH
"I would always hear [the raita], baked out
of my head, and I thought, 'Horns! We need
horns!'"
A song like "Closer Further" does a good
job of showing what Li had in mind. The listener is hit with a wall of sounds; guitars,
drums, saxophones, brass and a galloping
group sing-along. They were going to need a
band. When Li and Ga'fb returned to Vancouver
in late 2009, they began their recruiting.
"We put out a call on Craigslist for horn
players and Michelle [Furbacher], who's in our
band, saw the ad, but she didn't reply because
she thought we might be weirdos," Li recalls.
"But then she saw us play a show and thought
we were okay."
"I found out that they were playing at a
show I was going to [at Gravelevel]," says now-
trumpeter and baritone horn player Furbacher.
"I wanted to be cooler and just meet them at a
show instead of through Craigslist"
From there, Furbacher brought with her an
entire horn section: saxophonists Aaron Cum-
ming (who also plays with Furbacher in Role
Mach) and Richard Sexton (who no longer plays
with the band), and—a bit
later—French horn player
C. Chad Warford. Eventually the band filled out with
Kevin Romain on drums,
Jay Arner on guitar, and
Rose Melberg on bass.
"Basically," Li explains,
"hdw this band works is
someone will see us at a
show and say, 'Hey, you
don't have this instrument
in your band, so can I play
with you?' and then they
join the band." That's what
happened for Melberg.
"Every time I'd see you," she says to Li
and Gaib, "you'd have a different lineup, so it
occurred to me, perhaps I could get in to this
band."
Melberg, who has also played in Gaze, the
Softies and Tiger Trap, was determined to join
Bleating Hearts, even if it took a bit of subterfuge.
"This is my favourite band in town, I want
to be a part of it I wanted to get in on it ..and
I'd never played bass before, so I just said I
could play bass and they believed me," she says
with a laugh.
With a full lineup in place, the band
recorded their album over four days in December of 2010. Arner doubled as producer (and
session bassist, with Melberg sticking to
vocals) and set a relaxed tone for the sessions
at his home studio, Tonehenge, and Romain's
house.
"It was super relaxed," Li admits. "We were
drinking coffee and beer at the same time,
hanging out."
The sessions yielded 10 songs. The album
opens with the lush, solemn instrumental
"When Those," slowly giving way to the first
single, "Walls Come Tumbling Down." It's a
beautiful moment in an album full of them.
Throughout, Bleating Hearts use the full range
of their many instruments to create a mood and
to boisterously punctuate their melodies, all
the while supporting Li, the slightly weary storyteller at the centre ofthe songs.
Now with 300 vinyl copies ofthe new album
in their pocket they plan to take their act on
the road, heading down the West Coast this
summer.
The plan, says Li, is to "visit Rose's family
in Sacramento and hang out in San Francisco
and drink lots of beer. It's not so much about
playing shows as it is getting drunk in every
town we can."
I ask one last question: Where did the name
come from?
"It was one ofthe ones that Hasan couldn't
deny," Gaib confirms. "Itwas like, 'What about
this? What about this one?' And he was like
alright alright I think he was just sick of hearing shitty names."
But the name also harkens back to the
band's Moroccan roots.
"It's also because we were in Morocco, and
there were all these goats getting bloodily murdered, with the blood running through the
streets," Gaib continues. "It really inspired us.
And the raita kind of sounds like a goat I think
that's what itwas,"  photos by
DANIEL THOMAS WILLIAMS
lettering by
DANAKEARLEY
by BIANCA and
VIVIAN PENCZ
On the edge of Vancouver's Downtown
Eastside, two members of local noise-
punks Shearing Pinx have just entered
what they call the Abbot Street Moldy
Village. The hall inside is almost bare;
only a small poster insisting "Punk's not dead"
foreshadows the rooms within.
The room labeled "Female Vocals" is the band's
jam space, where singer/guitarist Nic Hughes, and
drummer Jeremy Van Wyck take seats on dilapidated furniture. The walls are covered with art and
memorabilia: a large photo of an exploding plane,
not one but two Lost Highway posters, a Jackson
Pollock-like painting, and countless gig flyers.
"Some of it was put up by the last band, some of
it by ours," says Hughes. A picture ofa shirtless
David Lee Roth, his hands chained together, stares
down from the wall. When asked about it Hughes
shrugs, "Oh, that one was us."
Pinx had a busy 2011, which isn't surprising for
a band thafs Issued over 50 releases since Its inception in 2005, many of which appear on Hughes'
label Isolated Now Waves. Just after issuing the
Night Danger LP last summer, the band followed
it up with Rituals in September, and now it seems
they've finally earned a break.
But not for long. Pinx has j ust recendy planned
a national tour for May and June with fellow no-
wavers Random Cuts, including the OBEY Conven
tion in Halifax, and their next album is already in
utero. Meanwhile, the band is letting their current
effort set in its mould, at least for a little while
longer.
From the shambolic "Prisoner," its drums
pounding like gunfire, to the sharply cut "Sapphire," Rituals is grippingly dark and primitive.
Summoning a tribal energy perfectly suited to
the album's title, the tracks sound like they were
chewed up, gargled with gutter water and spat
back out
The songwriting process is simple. A machine
of perpetual motion, the band is constantly jamming and recording the results. "We just piece
things together until it's long enough," Van Wyck
says, only partly serious. "Ifs improv."
Collaboration with other musicians has always
helped shape their sound as well, whether local
or international. They've recorded with San Diego
band Night Wounds as Grime Hut formed a band
with Bitches for one night only in London called
FOX PISS, and collaborated live with U.S. Girls,
AIDS Wolf and Nu Sensae. "You want to interact
with your community," says Van Wyck.
"Especially sax players. Every time we find
someone who plays saxophone... 'Come on for a
song!' Then you've made something together, and
if s a tighter bond than just sharing a stage." So it
would seem; Jesse Taylor of Twin Crystals was one such saxophonist, having appeared on "Marked
Man" from 2010's Void White, and was recently
recruited by Pinx as second guitarist/vocalist
Taylor is an old friend of Shearing Pinx, a former front row regular at shows, and a bandmate
of Hughes in the on-and-off synth-punk project
Channels 3+4, whose last offering, Christianity,
made its way to vinyl in 2010. This camaraderie clearly helped make Rituals as unified as it
sounds.
In spite ofthe band's artistic openness and considerable fan following across North America, Pinx
has remained largely underground in Lotusland.
To Hughes, it's no surprise. What's surprising to
them is that someone actually created a Wikipedia
page for the band, a fact they only learned during
the interview.
"Ifs hard to be... overground," he admits. "The
music's not accessible. There's just no chance."
Rituals is a less radio-friendly unit-shifter and more
like the jam space's Pollock painting: Prematurely
judged, it might simply seem like shit thrown at
the wall, but upon closer inspection, ifs so much
more intricate and inspired.
The record's coda, "Enemy," recalls groovy '90s
grunge, but distorts this reflection with a level of
nearly industrial dissonance. Likewise, "Rituals
of Life," with its looming sludge-metal riffs and
Hughes' vocals echoing like cries in the dark, is
an album highlight that can be as repellent as it
is magnetic.
Yet alongside the band's cynicism is an unwavering need to play music. Ifs a drive that started for
each founder when they began playing in bands as
teens (Hughes in Enderby in the Okanagan, Van
Wyck in Bogner, ON).
"Even when there was nowhere to play, we'd
play parties, coffee shops or skate parks, and people would always cut us off after two songs, like,
'No! No more, you guys suck!'" laughs Hughes of
one of his earliest projects. "Back then, everyone
wanted to be Nirvana."
Taking cues from noise-rock influences like
Sonic Youth, Pinx has become known for their
earsplitting sound, built around an emotional
aggression that's the blood and guts ofthe band.
In conversation, however, Hughes is unexpectedly soft-spoken. "I'm not a violent person," he
explains—he does his screaming and thrashing on
the records. "There's a lot of heaviness, heaviness,
just heaviness all around this city all the time, ifs
so extreme. So ifs useful to have that oudet"
In 2008, Exclaim! described Vancouver punk as "harsh music for a
harsh environment" Pinx resonates
with that, and with the whole idea of
an environment shaping music, citing German industrial and California
sunshine pop.
"Ifs just natural," says Van Wyck.
"You have to fight for it not to."
Unfortunately, Vancouver tends to shape its
music scene so that it curls in on itself. Ifs earned
its embarrassing nickname "No Fun City" because
of excessively strict liquor licensing regulations,
overzealous cops and bars that consistently rip off
gigging acts. All of this makes bands like Shearing
Pinx feel like they're choking with red tape. "The
things people have to go through just to have a
space..." sighs Hughes. "Ifs so greedy."
Nevertheless, as the poster in the Moldy Village
says, punk's not dead. If you peer under the rug,
in the city's back alleys and abandoned buildings,
acts like Shearing Pinx are filling the empty spaces
with self-funded, all-ages, and most importantly,
unadvertised shows.
"It's active resistance," says Van Wyck. He and
Hughes insist that if the scene could have a place
that was legit, it would, but currendy ifs unafford-
able. Still, according to the drummer, there is a
wide-ranging alliance of people working together
to keep Vancouver's alternative scene breathing.
"We know each other, we help each other with
shows," he explains. "Healthy or not, it is a community, and it's always gonna be there." //'
TiMs
■In an interview from 2008, Lady Gaga puckered
■up and planted a kiss on an issue of DiscorderB
Magazine. The cover featured a photo of American
transgender icon Amanda Lepore, who earlier
that year played the pop star's Fame Ball. Over
three years later, I sit down to interview the CiTR
radio personality who captured Gaga and Discorder's first kiss. Pointing my audio recorder in
his direction, I start the interview. "Who are you?"
Leaning into the recorder with a smile he says,
"Nardwuar the Human Serviette from Vancouver,
British Columbia."
Sitting in the basement of Neptoon Records,
we're surrounded by thousands of vinyl albums,
alphabetized from floor to ceiling on all four sides.
It's an audiophile's paradise, and a fitting spot
to interview with Vancouver's plaid-clad audio
aficionado about his new compilation LP, Busy
Doing Nothing.
Wearing his trademark golf-style cap with
detachable pom-pom (a gift upon his mother's
return from a visit to Scotland), Nardwuar is to
the Canadian music scene what Don Cherry is to
our national pastime. After years of witnessing his
unabashed approach to interviewing musicians
and quizzing them on music-related minutia, it's
hard to picture a nervous Nardwuar's first day at
CiTR back in his early days as a student at UBC.
"I learned everything at the CiTR," he says.
Recalling those first few intimidating years he
adds, "Yeah I never really knew much about music.
I guess it was just because I didn' t know anything
that I tried to find the interesting information."
Today the inside of Nardwuar's brain is a library
of endless album info. His preparedness and
unpredictable interview material have impressed
the likes of Michael Moore, Jay-Z and Snoop
m
lettering by j
MONIQLIE JEANNE WELLS
Dogg. He's garnered a reputation for turning up
to interviews prepared with rare music artifacts
in hand and will always be remembered as the
toque-wearing university reporter who had the
guts to tell Soviet Statesman Mikhail Gorbachev
during a press conference to "keep rockin' in the
free world" in Russian.
Connecting the dots between artists and odd
bits of little-known Vancouver facts is one ofthe
many ways Nardwuar has promoted local talent
over the years. On the new album, Nardwuar, his
band The Evaporators, and a handful of other artists pay homage to some Canadian classics.
In regards to his own long-running outfit
Nardwuar traces his history with the band's guitarist John Collins, bassist/vocalist Stephen Hamm
and current drummer Shawn Mrazek back to his
early broadcast days at CiTR; Nardwuar met the
band's original drummer, Scott Livingstone doing
push-ups back in high school phys-ed class. "Your
dreams can come true in high school PE!" he says
excitedly, and we both laugh. And of course, it
was during an interview at the radio station that
Nardwuar also met friend and past collaborator
Andrew W.K.
The follow up to The Evaporators' 2009
shared seven-inch with W.K., A Wild Pear, Busy
Doing Nothing initially started off as another split
with post-punks Franz Ferdinand. The Scottish
group's proposed contribution? A take on iconic
Vancouver power pop group the Pointed Sticks'
"Real Thing."
Soon enough, though, Nardwuar had attached
UK indie-rockers the Cribs, who cover the Dishrags' "Death In The Family," and Kate Nash, who
performs a fabulous rendition ofthe 90s all-girl
cuddlecore favourites Cub's "My Chinchilla," to
the project and had to upgrade to a compilation LP.
Other guest spots on the album include Montreal's
Fuad & The Feztones covering the Evaporators'
original "Welcome To My Castle," and the package
also comes with a 40-page calendar of band shots,
both candid and in concert, by local photographer
Bev Davies.
On top of being a throw-back that tips its hat
to some of Vancouver's finest punk bands, The
Evaporators also contribute some new tunes.
The band once again work with Andrew W.K. on
opening number "I Hate Being Late When I'm
Early," which references all the times Nardwuar
has been late for his Friday afternoon radio show.
The two can be seen running through the halls
and jamming in the lounge of CiTR in a video
for the song.
"How do you end up being late when you're
early?" I ask Nardwuar.
"I get distracted!" he confesses. Finishing up
our conversation, I had to share the irony of getting trapped in traffic with the words to UI Hate
Being Late" stuck in my head, after having left
my house early for our interview. (Thanks to the
burgundy Honda Civic that pulled away, opening
up a parking spot three feet from the front doors of
Neptoon Records, I made it Justin time.) Pointing
the recorder back in Nardwuar's direction I ask,
"Should I do it or should you?"
With this he immediately responds with his
signature, "Doot Doola Doot Doo," pausing to
■ wait for my, "Doot Doot!"  story & photo ROBERT FOUGERE
War Baby is a Vancouver-based trio that smells faintly similar to teen
spirit Don't worry, they're the first to admit that the Seattle sounds of
yesteryear top their fist of musical influences-but so does the musical genius of Phil Collins. Australian drummer Kirby Fischer left the
Gold Coast and landed in Canada on a pilgrimage to find bandmates
with similar style, taste and senses of humour and was rewarded in
his efforts by making the acquaintance of Jon Redditt. The twosome
recruited a bassist to fill out what low gauge strings, distortion and
double-kick drumming could not and thus were joined by sea captain Aaron Weiss. The band is poised to release a new album in the
upcoming months, including a re-release ofthe stand out track "Black
Swan," originally from their debut EP Permanent Frown. Their Cobain-
esque vocals, simple bass riffs, eruptions, of guitar and machine-gun
precise drumming are a refreshing throwback. Discorder sat down
with the band to discuss how they to got together and how comedy
factors into their music.
Discorder: So, War Baby started out as a two-piece?
Kirby Fischer: Yeah, it started in late 2008. When I was in Australia
my friend Blake was here and told me about Jon. It was really hard
to meet anybody like that back home; everybody either liked Sublime
or... Sublime. Long story short I finally got here and got introduced to
him and had a jam. What made us rush it is that we stupidly booked
a show when we had been a band for two months.
How was the first show?
Jon Redditt: We were supposed to open for a band I used to be in
from Calgary at the Media Club, but it snowed and they got stuck
and the show was canceled.
KF: But we still wanted to play a show, so we rang Wendy 13 from
the Cobalt and basically lied that we were some crazy punk band. We
played the show, itwas fine, you know, first show jitters, over-and-
done, but she fucking hated us!
When did you decide you needed a bass player?
KF: The very very first jam we ever had was with a buddy of ours on
bass but he was too busy to do it. We could never find anybody that
had the same sense of humour, because thafs the most important,
or find someone who was cool because there's just so many fucking
asshole musicians! Itwas never a conscious, White Stripes-gimmicky
duo thing.
JR; It was'just [a matter of] finding the right person.
D: How did you come up with the name War Baby and what does
it mean?
JR: It's kind ofa cross-section of things. Its a generational term. At
our first jam, I threw out three names; one of them was Bonkers, the
other was Melting Witch, which became a song title, and the other
one was War Baby, which was by far the best
KF: We were playing all these shows and 90 per cent ofthe time we
never felt like we had anywhere, there was no place for us. It was
like, "you sound like Arcade Fire" or [you sound like] "Black Sabbath". We couldn't find the middle ground. So we were hke, yeah,
we declare war. We'll make our own spot. We're far from it, but we're
trying our hardest!
It's kind of a juxtaposition for a heavy band to say they have a sense
of humour, but it seems to work for you guys.
Aaron Weiss: Are we a heavy band? I don't really see us as a heavy
band.
KF: It depends. Back home the scenes blend, whereas here everything
seems a bit cliquey. We're definitely heavy, but at the same time Jon
and I are obsessed with pop music. Phil Collins is my hero! Pm
obsessed. When you're a band in the city, playing in the scene, having
an emphasis on pop and melody is not cool.
It's easy to see the humour and artistic sense in your YouTube videos
too. Who made those?
JR: We did, all except for one.
KF: I think the reason the humour works is because ifs like when
you meet a girl and if she's notlaughing at your jokes, you can't date
her. Ifs not going to go anywhere.
AW: You're just going to be the goof forever!
KF: I think "Goof Forever" is a good name for this album by the
way!
JR; Rat goofs!
KF: If you have the same sense of humour you're more than likely
going to have the same taste in music and you're going to at least
hate the same things. Thafs more important than if you love the
same things.
I've heard you guys have some interesting day jobs?
AW: I'm ahh...
JR: Aaron, you should be proud standing next to us.
AW: The technical name for my job is "Tug Master," or you could call
me a seaman; I run tug boats.
KF: I ruh a vintage clothing company and wholesale online.
JR: I pick vintage and do part-time pest control for the Portland
Hotel Society.
How's the vintage business?
KF: Certain vintage pieces are worth a bit of money. I found a really
old pair of jeans and got enough to pay for the recording. If I find
another pair we'll get the record out really soon.
Well, we're looking forward to it very much! ANCIENTS
by WILL
PEDLEY
photos by
VICTORIA JOHNSON
illustration by
MARK HALL-PATCH
As Ancients sit in the control room of The Hive Creative Labs in
Burnaby, mid-way through recording their debut album, the four
members of the band ponder what motivates them to play music.
After some thoughtful discussions of their passions and inspirations,
guitarist/vocalist Chris Dyck sums itup, "I just hke smokin'joints and
crushing fuckin' riffs! Big doobs, big riffs! Smokes. Doobs. Riffs."
He's only partially joking, but while there is a relaxed and jovial vibe
among the band and an obvious love for the simple of joy of playing
loud and heavy music, it is also clear that they take what they do very
seriously. This is evidenced by the focus and drive displayed as they
plough through new tune "Seeking Death Beneath the Waves," which
they nail in only a handful of takes. Ifs an impressive demonstration of
their talent considering the song's complexity and, more pertinently,
the weed that they've just consumed.
Dyck, guitarist/vocalist Kenny Cook and bassist Aaron Gustafson
formed Ancients two years ago after their previous group Spread
Eagle disbanded. In September 2010, after original drummer Eugene
Parkomenko left to focus his efforts on local stoner rock heroes Black
Wizard (in which Cook now also plays), the band was on the search for
a new man behind the kit. Cue current percussionist Mike Hannay.
"We were kinda fucked for a couple of weeks there and then the
miracle child, the golden drummer child came along," Dyck describes
ofthe situation. "We auditioned other people, and they were really
nice guys and everything..."
"Apart from the one whose favourite band was Korn," interjects Cook. ...butthey didn'treally learn the songs" continues Dyck, "Hannay
I came and he fuckin' knew the songs! There may have been little flubs
I or whatever, but he fuckin' knew 'em and we got through' one song
and then half another one and we just stopped and we were like 'Hey
do you want it? You're the guy!' It was pretty simple."
Since then the band has focused most of its energies on writing
material and jamming in their rehearsal space in New Westminster,
opting to only begin playing live in earnest just over a year ago. "We've
made it to Kamloops and the island, but we've just been trying to get
a little buzz going around home first." Cook explains.
Last summer the band released a self-titled, two song sampler.
Featuring "Humanist," a potent mixture of death, thrash and trad
metal influences, and "Built To Die", which married furious riffage
with huge melodies to stunning effect itwas a definitive statement of
intent. Despite the strength of those two songs, the band isn't content
to tread water and neither will appear on their forthcoming album.
"We're constantly exploring. Thafs pretty much our vibe and we don't
really sit in one pocket all the time, whatever sounds cool." Indeed,
the new record sees the band branching out beyond their established
template to incorporate everything from jazz-inflected guitar solos
and flashes of black metal menace, as on "Faith and Oath," to the
bluesy lament of "For Lisa", which commemorates the recent passing
ofa beloved family member of Dyck and Cook.
The band chose to record their eight-song, as-yet untitled album
with the talented Jesse Gander, who has produced records for countless acts in Vancouver, including some ofthe best local metal bands
ofthe last few years, such as Bison B.C. and Weirding.
Much like other exciting bands in the contemporary metal scene
(Mastodon, High on Fire, Kylesa), Ancients skillfully assimilate forty
years of heavy metal history, not to mention influences from other
genres, into a cohesive style that evades sub-genre categorisation I
and tedious homogeneity, resulting in a sound thafs relevant yet |
timeless. Having enjoyed the privilege of an unmixed preview ofthe I
collection^ Discorder can confirm ifs anabsolute monster. Beautiful I
acoustic passages segue into monumentally heavy riffs, and every I
song is punctuated with dramatic time changes and is brimming I
with ambitious ideas.
Dyck admits that one ofthe main reasons he's in the band is simply I
because he likes "Feeling the fuckin' pure, crippling, crushing tone
in my feet and my fuckin' eyeballs and big, heavy riffs," but what's
particularly striking about the album is the finesse that Ancients
brings to its every aspect Every song has been meticulously crafted
with exceptional prowess; never does a riff seem superfluous and
never do juxtaposed passages feel ill-matched.
The band's adventurous approach to music is carried through into
their search for lyrical inspiration. "When ifs in Ancients song, it
can't be about fuckin' boning chicks or fuckin' shotgunning beers
or something," Dyck says with a laugh. "I read tons of books about
weird shit Lately I've been reading this book about weird healing
powers of water. I've been reading the Quran, and I've been reading
Zecharia Sitchin; books about the Anunnaki and Sumeria. Me and
Kenny are into cool space documentaries and stuff like that too. I like
symbols and symbology, there's no shortage of stuff. I'll read some
weird Egyptian passage about some chant they used to do or some
hymn to whatever particular god and I'll get that line and then take
it off on my own tangent."
Now with a stunning debut album almost done, to be released
later this year, the band hopes to get signed. "We're really motivated
to go on tour this year and jost tour the shit out of it," Dyck says
determinedly, "so to have someone to put it out and distribute it
would be ideal... if s just tough coming up with that much money, you
know?0 Considering the successes of friends and fellow-Vancouver
metal groups like 3 Inches of Blood and Bison B.C., the band's
aspirations certainly don't seem too fanciful. The future looks pretty
damn bright for Ancients. jC/OA
<a/_   jt^Jls
illustration by
MONIQUE JEANNE WELLS
written by
JENNESIA PEDRI
The greats of Canadian music share the same
plight as far as catching on in the United States.
Neil Young made it So did Nickelback. As did
Justin Bieber (mind you, if Usher can't make you
famous, no one can). Then there's Celine Dion
and Shania Twain, and also Bryan Adams, whose
music isn't even considered Canadian according to the Canadian Radio-Television Commission's Canadian Content regulations (www.
media-awareness.ca). The Hip tragically never
made it in the U.S., despite taking home 14 Junos
and reaching number one in Canada with nine
of their 12 studio albums. Keeping The Hip company are an entire class of Canadian groups who,
by choice, remain content to never hustle their
talents south ofthe border.
As demonstrated by their 2011 documentary
Winning America, Said The Whale wouldn't mind
catching on down south. With their third LP Little
Mountain on the precipice of its March 6 release,
frontman Tyler Bancroft chats with Discorder from
his cozy Vancouver apartment to discuss where
the band's sights are set next
The local quintet are gearing up to get back
in their van and drive. They've spent the past five
years trekking across the country, slummin' it in
their tour van while winning over Canadian audiences one fan at a time. Their unwavering commitment to honing their music on the road and
even moreso in the studio has earned them the
coveted Juno Award for New Group ofthe Year,
which they won in 2011. And while it's "a blur
of alcohol and appetizers," Bancroft jokes, taking home a Juno has certainly done something
to solidify the group's presence in the Canadian
consciousness. With this next 42-date trip that
includes 16 U.S. stops from Seattle to Austin to
Brooklyn before crossing Canada from St. John's
to Vancouver, Said the Whale are hoping to win
over the hearts of Canada's neighbours.
"We are starting from scratch again, just
like we did in Canada five years ago," Bancroft
explains, adding they had once played to three
people in Thunder Bay, ON. "The reality is you
just have to get in the van and drive around a
whole bunch of times until you can expect to
have an audience at any place."
North of America, the buzz over the upcoming release of Little Mountain is palpable. What
you can look forward to is the familiar light-
hearted pop-influenced
folk contrasted against
some surprisingly darker
numbers, including the
sweet yet sombre final
curtain "Seasons," with
its unusually simple piano
accompaniment and the
album's lyrical lament
for Vancouver, "Big Wave
Goodbye."
Having taken a more
collaborative approach to
songwriting than in the
past Bancroft says that
Little Mountain, "may be a
little bit more representative ofthe musicianship
in our band and of everybody as a whole."
That collaborative
effort indeed extended
outside of just the musical aspect within the
band. They joined forces
with Vancouver's Amazing Factory Productions,
who worked with the
group to produce a video
for each ofthe album's 15 tracks, to be released
one-by-one via various Canadian media outlets.
A screening of all 15 videos took place February
25 at Vancouver's Rio Theatre, less than a week
before they hit the road.
"Ifs gonna take a while," Bancroft says referring to growing their fanbase in the U.S. "I think
all we can really do is get in the van and drive; go
make fans one at a time." With more than two
months, ten states and ten provinces on the road
ahead of them, thafs a pretty accurate way to put
it, and there's only one way to find out if they'll
succeed on this go. The best way? Just wait and
see.
RSVP,   PARTY  INFO,   PHOTOS   &  VIDEOS
AT  SINCITYFETISHNI6HT.COM I iMfreefor station members)
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Fiil-ln
7
Exploding Head Movies
(Cinematic)
Stereoscopic Redoubt
(Experimental)
African Rhythms
(World)
8
Rhythms
(World)
Techno
Progressivo
' Inside Out
(QaflCB) ~'.
'    Folk Oasis (Roots)
1
9
Bootlegs & B-Sides
(Dance/Electronic)
The Jazz Show (Jazz)
Crimes And Treasons
Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell (Live)
The Bassment
(Dance/Electronic)
Synaptic Sandwich
(Dance/Electronic/
Eclectic)
9
HBH|
10
10
Itecendance ■'§
(Dance)
Sexy In Van City (Talk)
Radio Nizate
11
12
fWMM
CabaRadio (Talk)
,HansKtoss Misery Hour
(HansKtess)
Funk My Life
(Soul/Dance)
Randophonic (Eclectic)
11
Student Fill-to
Canada Post-Rock (Rock)
Auraf Tentacles
(Eclectic)
The Vampire's Ball
(Industrial)
12
CiTRGhostMix
1
■
3
CiTRGhostMix
CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTRGhostMix
1
3
■
5
CiTR Ghost Mix
4
5 SUNDAY
CLASSICAL CHAOS
(Classical) 9-ioam
From the Ancient World to
the 21st century, join host
Marguerite in exploring*and
celebrating classical music
from around the world.
SH00KSH00KTA
(Talk) ioam-i2pm
A program targeted to
Ethiopian people that
j encourages education and
; personal development.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) i2-3pm
Reggae inna all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
boots country.
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) 3-spm
Alternating Sundays
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues from
the late '50s to the early
'70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
British pop music from all
decades. International pop
(Japanese, French, Swedish, British, US, etc.), '60s
soundtracks and lounge.
QUEER FM ARTS XTRA
fTalk) 6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay,
lesbian, bisexual and
transexual communities of
Vancouver. Lots of human
interest features, background on current issues
and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RHYTHMSINDIA
(World) 8-gpm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of
music from India, including
popular music from the
1930s to the present; Ghaz-
als and Bhajans, Qawwalis,
pop and regional language
numbers.
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
(Dance) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-
house and techno.
BOOTLEGS & B-SIDES
(Dance/Electronic) 9-iopm
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) iopm-i2am
Join us in practicing the
ancient art of rising above
common ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
latest trance cuts.
trancendance@
hotmail.com
MONDAY
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 8-nam
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend ofthe familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns@
hotmail.com
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) nam-i2pm
SYNCHRONICITY
(Talk) i2-i:oopm
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality, health
and feeling good. Tune in
and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun!
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) i-3pm
An indie pop show since
1999, it's like a marshmal-
low sandwich: soft and   -
sweet and best enjoyed
when poked with a stick
and held close to a fire.
THE RIB
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
Explore the avant-garde
world of music with host
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
From new electronic and
experimental music to
improvised jazz and new
classical! So weird it will
blow your mind!
NEWS 101
fTalk) 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live,
volunteer-produced,
student and community
newscast Every week, we
take a look back at the
week's local, national and
international news, as seen
from a fully independent
media perspective.
SORE THROATS,
CLAPPING HANDS
(Rogue Folk, Indie S/S)
6-7:3°Pm
Lyric-driven, campfire-
inspired: Playing Acoustic
Punk, Anti-Folk, Alt-Country, etc. Tune in for live acts,
ticket giveaways and interviews, but mostly it's just
music. Submit to: music@
sorethroatsclappinghands.
com. Find us on Facebook!
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Cinematic) 7:30-9pm
Join gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television and
any other cinematic source,
along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge new
tracks and strange old
goodies that could be used
in a soundtrack to be.
THE JAZZ SHOW
(Jazz) 9pm-i2am
Vancouver's longest
running prime-time jazz
. program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at npm.
March 5: Innovative flutist,
bass clarinettist and alto
saxophonist Eric Dolphy
and his second recording:
"Out There." March 12:
Underrated trumpet great
Carmell Jones and his
quintet* "Jay Hawk Talk."
March 19: Celebrating the
birthday of one of Jazz
Music's forward thinkers,
pianist Lennie Tristano:
"The New Tristano."
March 29: Another
birthday tribute to the late
saxophone master James
Moody: "James Moody
and his Band at The Jazz
Workshop."
CANADA POST-ROCK
(Rock) i2-i:ooam
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post-Rock now resides on
the west coast but it's still
committed to the best in
post-rock, drone, ambient
experimental, noise and
basically anything your host
Pbone can put the word
"post" in front of.
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music,
and its derivatives with
Arthur and the lovely Andrea Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM ARTS XTRA
(Talk) 9:30-io:3oam
SUP WORLD?
(Eclectic) io:30-n:3oam
Fuzzy and sweet a total
treat! Tune in to hear the
latest and greatest tracks
from independent and
Vancouver bands.
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) n:3oam-ipm
An eclectic mix of Canadian   :
indie with rock, experimental, world, reggae,
punk and ska from Canada,   \
Latin America and Europe.
Hosted by Oswaldo Perez
Cabrera.
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
(World) 2-3pm
Sample the various flavours
of Italian folk musk from
north to south, traditional
to modern on this bilingual
show.
givetheboot@gmail.com
http://giveemtheboot.
wordpress.com
PROF TALK
fTalk) 3-3:3opm
Bringing UBC's professors
on air to talk about current/
past events at the local
and international level.
Aiming to provide a space
for faculty and doctoral
level students to engage in
dialogue and share their
current research.http://ubc-
proftalk.wordpress.com
proftalk@gmail.com
RADIO FREETHINKER
fTalk) 3:30-4:3opm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we
examine popular extraordinary claims and subject
them to critical analysis.
THE CITY
fTalk) 5-6pm
An alternative and critical
look at our changing urban
spaces, www.thecityfm.
wordpress.com. Follow the
program on Twitter:
@TheCityonCiTR,
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore
since 1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
INSIDE OUT
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) 9-npm
crimesandtreasons@gmail.
CABARADIO
fTalk) npm-i2:3oam
For the world of Cabaret
Tune in for interviews,
skits, musical guests and
more. It's Radio with sass!
WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information and
inanity, dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) io-n:3oam
STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
(Eclectic) n:30-ipm
Various members ofthe
CiTR's student executive
sit in and host this blend
of music and banter about
campus and community
news, arts and pop culture.
Drop ins welcome!
TERRY PROJECT PODCAST
(Talk) 1-2 pm
Alternating Wednesdays
There once was a project
named Terry, That wanted
to make people wary, Of
things going on In the
world that are wrong
Without making it all seem
too scary.
DEMOCRACY NOW
• fTalk) i-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
(Talk) 2-3pm
Exploring the mindset of
an outsider looking in on
Earth. Featuring interviews
with leading thinkers in
the area of sustainable
economics and our global
ecological crisis. MANTIS CABINET
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
REEL TO REAL
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
Alternating Wednesdays
Movie reviews and criticism.
DISCORDER RADIO
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
Alternating Wednesdays
Discorder Magazine now
has its own radio show! Join
us to hear excerpts of interviews, reviews and more!
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
'(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
•All-Canadian music with a
focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.com
SHAMELESS
(Edectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
Dedicated to giving local
music acts a crack at some
airplay. When not playing
the PR shriek, you can
hear some faves you never
knew you liked.
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big
emphasis on our local
scene. C'mon in! A kum-
baya-free zone since 1997.
folkoasis@gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-npm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
i HANS KLOSS'MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) npm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
i on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
WHAT PINK SOUNDS LIKE
(Eclectic) io-nam
Celebrating women in
music and media who truly
kick ass. Join host Ashly
Kissman as she increases
feminist content on the airwaves one song at a time.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by
donuts.
duncansdonuts.
wordpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Punk) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we interview a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
THUNDERBIRD EYE
(Sports) 3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC
Thunderbird sports action
from on campus and off with
your host Wilson Wong.
MANTRA
(Eclectic) 4-5 pm
Playing various Mantra
music, this show is about
personal and global transformation through chanting
and utilizing sound vibration for the development
of higher consciousness.
Hosted by Raghunath with
special guests.
BUTTA ON THE BREAD
(Eclectic) 5-6 pm
It's like mixing unicorn
blood with Christopher
Walken's tears, and then
pouring it into your ears.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays 6-7:3opm
Celebrating the message
behind the music: Profiling.
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
PEANUT BUTTER 'N' JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays 6-7:3opm
Explore local music and
food with your hosts,
Brenda and Jordie. You'll
hear interviews and reviews
on eats and tunes from
your neighbourhood, and a
weekly pairing for your date
; calendar.
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-npm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across
the country and around the
world.
FUNK MY LIFE
(Soul/Dance) npm-i2am
Grooving out tunes with a
bit of soul and a lot of funk,
from the birth of rhythm and
blues to the golden age of
motown, to contemporary
dance remixes of classic
soul hits.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be something different Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie
rock, hip-hop and reggae to
bring you up with the sun.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Talk) 9-io:ooam
Hosted by David Barsamian.
SOUNDS OF THE CITY
(Eclectic) 10-11 am
Promoting upcoming live
concerts and shows in
Vancouver, be they local,
national, or international
IT AIN'T EASY BEING GREEN
(Eclectic)i2-ipm
CiTR has revived it's long-
dormant beginner's show
It Ain't Easy Being Green!
With the support of experienced programmers, this
show offers fully-trained
CiTR members, especially
students, the opportunity to
get their feet wet on the air.
HUGO
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Alternating Fridays
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment.
Doot doola doot doo...doot
doo!
nardwuar@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
STRANDED
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present,
from his Australian homeland. And journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores the alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
AFRICAN RHYHMS
(World) 7:3o-9pm
www.africanrnythmsradio.
THE BASSMENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-io:3opm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only bass-driven
radio show, playing Glitch,
Dubstep, Drum and Bass,
Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks
and UK Funky, while focusing on Canadian talent and
highlighting Vancouver DJs,
producers and the parties
they throw.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Industrial, electro, noise,
experimental and synth-
based music.thevampires-
ball@gmail.com thevam-
piresballoncitr.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half,
followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side ofthe
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by
Geoff, Marcia and Andy.*
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and blues
roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
codeblue@buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada.com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment
and music for the Russian
community, local and
abroad.
nashavolna.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic) 9-npm
If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
RANDOPHONIC
(Eclectic) npm-iam
Randophonic is best
thought of as an intraversal
jukebox programmed by a
vast alien living intelligence
system which has no concept of genre, style, nation
states or even space-time
relevance.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial side  ,
ofthe spectrum. Hosts:
Aaron Brown, Jeff "The
Foat" Kraft. Website: www.
generationannihilation.com
and www.facebook.com/
generationannihilation" Office Supplies Incorporated is a self-taught
Vancouver artist. He works in collage and
print making. He is showing new work in the
Black and Yellow Gallery at the Waldorf Hotel
March 1st-April 1st.
-► officesuppNesincorporated.com OFFICE
SUPPLIES
INCORPORATED : 1*
t
screen print
24"x36" MARCH 2012
ARTHUR KRUMINS
(Independent)
The sophomore effort from local
musician Arthur Krumins (also of
the band Murder Castle) is basically
what you would expect from a folk-
driven singer-songwriter. His second
album,The Pen ofa Ready Writer, is
mostly comprised of mellow, acoustic
songs accompanied by Krumins' light
vocals, singing about nature, love and
various forms of rambling.
Songs on the album have a Dylan-
esque quality, sounding like the lighter
side of Freemheelin', but leaving any
politics or moral messages out ofthe
picture. Like his debut Beginning Sonas,
The Pen ofa Ready Writer features an
acoustic guitar and vocal as its base,
but unlike the debut, which consisted
of only those two elements, Krumins
has stepped things up a notch gather
ing an assortment of collaborators in the studio to fill out the
tracks.
Dubbed, "the Vancouver Pop-
Music Resistors Union: Local o,"
they are scattered throughout the
album with sitar, violin, djembe,
harmonica, clarinet, flute and
even a toy piano. Krumins is also
frequently joined by soft female
backing vocals, with all elements
taking the songs just beyond the
realm ofa campfire sing-along.
This is a very gentle record that can
play quite comfortably in the background, without any interruptions or
sudden spikes in activity, rolling along
as quietly and consistently as a river.
The only detraction is how Krumins'
voice tends to falter and squeak every
so often. And with songs that are so
minimalist in nature that feature his
vocals at the foreground, this unfortunately makes these quirks the centre
of attention. Otherwise this is a very
decent slice of contemporary folk.
 Coleman Ingram
THE BELUSHIS
(Independent)
The Belushis could drive a man to
drink, fight and screw. Although
they'd probably also drive you to make
friends with whomever you dirtied
knuckles with for the sake of good
fun. Not ones to pretty-up their image,
The Belushis come from the world
of beer-stained jeans, hard work and
hard play, and the drunk, sweaty and
totally shameless Vancouver-based
four piece hold nothing back on their
latest release, Shaker.
Guitarist Gerry Clipperton's riffs
are sometimes reminiscent of Angus
Young if he had been bullied in the
schoolyard by Turbonegro, while
vocalist/rhythm guitarist Kirk
Macdonald evens out the edges
while helping to maintain the
intensity ofthe unit as a whole.
The themes of working,
drinking and good times are
favored heavily on Shaker, and
that's just fine, because it works.
"Bang Your Drink Down," one of
my favorites, is a rousing call to
stop messing around and get to
partying, and bassist Ferdinand
Belland does an excellent job of
tapping into his inner Lemmy.
What makes the Belushis good
is their unrelenting raw energy. Listening to Shaker from start to finish
is almost as exhausting as watching
their riotous, sweat-drenched live
shows, and in an evolving world of
music that is seeming to veer closer
to alienation through electronics, it
is good to know there are still some
purists out there who just want to rock
the fuck out!
—Nathan Pike
BIG NOTHING
(Independent)
Big Nothing is everything that was
good about hard music in the late
'gos. It's hard not to reflect on days
of youth while listening to Feel Friendly.
Formally a much mellower band play
ing under ±e name A Pale Blue, Big
Nothing turns the volume and tension
way up, and the shift in sound and
energy they have created is impressive.
Recorded at The Hive studios with
producer Colin Stewart, Feel Friendly
is rough around the edges without
being sloppy, and carries a quality that
the musicians understand and trust in
each other's ability. The first track, "Animal," and last
track, "Psychosomatic," could both
pass as respectful nods to Nirvana,
while "Tethered Heart" has a Mud-
honey thing going on. Certainly not
reliant on easy comparisons to the
notorious purveyors ofthe grimey
Pacific Northwest sound, Big Nothing shows off their ability to stand
strongly within their own sound
as well, which is apparent on the
easy-shifting gears of "Apathy"
and the title track, both of which
are winning my ears over more
with each listen.
If you grew up loving the
raw sounds of grunge and d.i.y.
garage rock, then Feel Friendly
will undoubtedly hold great
appeal. Big Nothing is worth
keeping an eye on.
 Nathan Pike
CLOUD NOTHINGS
(Carpark)
Sometimes it takes a fairly hard rocking album to refresh an otherwise
lethargy-afflicted music library. Cleveland, OH's Cloud Nothings returns
with his second official full-length
effort, Attack on Memory, and right
off the bat, a noticeable difference in
production and direction from past
albums can be heard.
Dylan Baldi's one-man act as
Cloud Nothings has since formed
into a full-fledged band, and the
release of their new album showcases
the band's unprecedented potential.
Studio-produced in Chicago with the
help of Steve Albini, Attack on Memory
is a sharply refined production that
still retains much of its former
lo-fi aesthetic and grit, as heard
in Baldi's previous albums.
Album openers "Not Future
/ No Past" and "Wasted Days"
seem a little disjointed in relation to the rest ofthe album, but I
each successive listen appropriates that sensation as a deriva-  !
tive embodied in the album's  '.
other six tracks. Closers "Our  !
Plans" and "Cut You" are the  [
more pop-punk-oriented and hook-  !
driven tracks, and carry the album  j
into a classic Cloud Nothings fin-  j
ish.
It's quite apparent that Baldi's j
take on garage punk had always cir- .
culated around a raw, angst-driven j
delivery, and this album proves to be j
no different, except that everything j
has been taken up a notch: higher
fidelity, lengthier songs and a more
sincere and. plaintive demeanor
that's drenched in minor keys, and
propelled by bolder guitar and drum
work. The result can be described as
an emphatic aural assault to the ears
that Cloud Nothings followers will
find fully satisfying.
I -—Sonia Sophia
DOGWOOD AND DAHLIA
(Independent)
Dogwood and Dahlia's five song EP,
The Sea, released in December, is the
followup to last year's Nice to Meet You.
The EP opens with an upbeat, exciting mood that praises the beauty of
the Vancouver ocean-scape. Singer
Sydney Torne expresses her gratitude
to live in the beautiful place, as she
repeats "You look beautiful today" in
her cheerful tone, which emphasizes
the appealing beauty ofthe sea. The
Sea seems to track the growth from
cheerful childhood to mature adult
hood, while the music turns up perfect j
pieces of melody.
On "Wild Oats," Neil Smith I
recalls his rebellious youth, when
he indulged himself with smoking j
and drinking. In the song "Lancaster
Bomber," Dogwood and Dahlia sing
an ode to the bittersweet history of j
the Vancouver sea, as the expressive j
lyrics mix with the sound of a trumpet
and banjo, carrying a mood of deep
meditation.
Throughout the EP, both male
and female voices are playful, and
together relieve the overall sorrowful atmosphere. This is emphasized
with lyrics like, "We joined the choir
/ We sang aloud together a song/ That
made the fire lighter." The fifth song
"Whoso List" is referenced from the
story of Sir Thomas Wyatt's poem
"Whoso List to Hunt" It expresses
the singers' passion in pursuing their
beloved, but ultimately, fell short.
—Liya Zhuang
(Arbutus)
Grimes, a.k.a. the Vancouver-raised
Claire Boucher, has been getting
lots of hype in the press, and deservedly so. Visions is one of those game-
changing albums that will have untold
influence on everything relevant that
comes afterward. Boucher has stated |
her desire to fuse the pop star and the j
producer, and Visions is the proof in j
the pudding that she has succeeded. \
You need to see a video of her per- l
forming to really grasp what is going ^
on; the way she juggles sequencing, \
playing the synth, and looping ;
her ethereal vocals is truly awe- i
some.
The beats are groovy and
complex, combining elements  ;
of dancehall, hip-hop, house
and other bass-centric styles,  j
But it is Boucher's growing mas-   j
tery of her own voice that really  j
makes Visions shine with such
sonic brilliance. This album has   i
a shape-shifting versatility that
makes it equally appropriate for
an all-night rave as for tripping out on
the couch with your headphones on
and the lights off.
Unlike many artists who seem
to transparently create for the sole
purpose of being praised by others,
Boucher's work feels internal and
transformative, even—dare I say-
spiritual. This music is the diamond
fruit of the soul, both an offering and
an invitation. Visions is not looking for
attention, it's more like the desire to
share awareness of something precious and ephemeral, Mke having a
stranger approach you on the street
and point out a beautiful rainbow you
hadn't noticed the moment just before
it fades away.
—Andrew Reeves
MAC DEMARCO
ROCK AND ROLL NIGHT CLUB
(Captured Tracks/Green Burrito)
Following his departure from Vancouver to Montreal early last year,
Mac DeMarco (previously Makeout
Videotape) has finally compiled his
efforts into a proper release for Brooklyn label, Captured Tracks. The album
cover—a mirror image of DeMarco
applying deep red Upstick—alludes to
the 30 minutes of lo-fi gender crisis
and uncomplicated jangle pop that
elaborates on Makeout Videotape's
motifs of masculinity, prolonged ado- WW*
.Mm***
lescence and blue jeans accompanied
by hypnotic reverb.
Rock and Roll Nightclub is a focused
realization of DeMarco's new age
crooning. His languid melodies
are strikingly seductive with their
patient simplicity and uninterested
demeanour. Here, DeMarco has mastered the essence of charm, playing
hard to get for half an hour and leaving you with an inexplicable craving
for more.
The EP begins with the title track,
a sleazy recollection of DeMarco's
search for love in a lonely city. This
theme extends into "Baby's Wearing
Blue Jeans," an upbeat tale describing
the sex appeal of specific jean characteristics rather than sex itself. An
awkward rhythm similarly guides the
playful conception of urban masculinity rooted in cigarettes, and again,
blue jeans on "I'm A Man."
But it's not all honky-tonk for
DeMarco, as the pop lullabies of
"One More Tear to Cry" and "European Vegas" are perfect companions
to a dejected, sleepless night Be sure
to note that the extended CD version
includes two bonus tracks originally
released under the Makeout Videotape
moniker. "Only You," a forlorn
tale of love lost drenched in pop
decadence, makes the extended
version a worthwhile purchase.
Otherwise buy the vinyl; it'll be
worth money some day.
—Robert Catherall
OLD MARE
(Independent)
Old Mare's You Deserve More serves
a multitude of purposes, including
being a soundtrack to driving around
your hometown or writing a sincere
letter to a former flame.
Predominantly country, but without the overwhelming sap that usually
comes with the genre, the five-man
band from Abbotsford have a tendency to wear their emotions on their
sleeve. The opener, "Pistols at Dawn,"
is a prime example of this, introducing the listener to a simpler time full
of gendemanly gestures and falling in
love under the cherry blossoms.
While the majority ofthe album
maintains a gende feel throughout which lulls the listener with
soft guitar chords and lingering trumpet sounds, the penultimate track, "Cloak and Dagger," fills the necessary quota
of songs that allow the band
to just simply rock out which
fittingly leads up to the closer,
"Waiting," a somber serenade
seemingly tailored to personally address whoever happens
to be listening; an appropriate
conclusion for such a heartfelt group
Although its songs are honest a
recurring theme that the album could
do without is the frequent repetition
of song names in the majority ofthe
choruses. Without using the track
listing as a cheat sheet one can listen
to the entire album and be able to
accurately pick out the line that makes
up the song's name.
Song title repetition aside, You
Deserve More acts as a sincere collection
of emotions paired with the appropriate musical accompaniment Ifs an
album that makes you feel homesick,
even when you're still living in your
parent's basement
—Jacey Gibb
SEVEN NINES AND TENS
(Independent)
With their latest release, Habitat 67,
Seven Nines and Tens offer a visceral
fusion of progressive metal and ethereal space rock, and the amount of
innovation and talent that this trio
brings to their compositions is simply
staggering.
To call their riffs titanic would be
an understatement. The closing passage of "Crystalline Xanthine Alkaloid" threatens to crush the unprepared listener under its sheer colossal
heaviness. However, the album finds
its dynamics with songs like "I Grow
MBVHL
HflBITfIT S?
Tired," the most melodic track on
the record, which recalls Porcupine
Tree via its great sense of quiet/loud
dynamics and winding, intertwining soft passages.
The group keep things interesting by occasionally trading
off their heaviness for more
subtle jazzy jams, like "Retrograde Orbit" and by utilizing
their great ear for dynamics to
mix in gentle, almost soothing,
shoegaze inspired guitar-work
within their brutal, sonic heaviness.
The addition of keyboards
also deserves notice as it adds
immensely to the intergalactic atmosphere ofthe album, providing an
ambient yet simultaneously melodic
backdrop for the group's twin guitar
attack.
Habitat 67 is eclectic, challenging
and at times and strikingly beautiful.
With this latest effort Seven Nines
and Tens prove without a doubt, that
they are a force to be reckoned with,
in this, or any other galaxy.
—James Olson
VISTAVISION
(Independent)
These days, bands that specialize in
folk-rock are about as unique as a
pair of blue jeans. What started out
as a refreshing hybrid revolution has
fallen into a slump where it's hard to
distinguish one plaid-clad artist from
the last But then a band like Vistavi- :;
sion comes along and reminds us of
why they were so drawn to the genre
in the first place.
Vistavision's self-titled
debut EP starts off traditionally
enough, with minimal instrument accompaniment and
echoey vocals that send shivers throughout your nervous
system. "Cold Ropes" showcases J.M. McNab's hollow
voice exquisitely with a gradual
incline, slowly working in commanding drums and more guitar prominence.
A welcome change of pace
immediately follows the opener with
"A Death in the Family," a number
that forces you to air-drum the shit
vistavisisn
out of any nearby surface. "Black Cat"
follows in a similar manner, but the
rest ofthe album takes after the first
track, putting out songs that are a
healthy combination of part foot-
tappers, part soul-searching slow numbers. Clocking in at just under
26 minutes, the album's diversity is
impressive without sounding scattered.
Comparisons are inevitable when
any band emerges onto the scene,
with McNab's vocals in particular
causing me to think of Fleet Boxes.
But Vistavision manages to brand
their music with a more aggressive,
jauntier vibe. Think Robin Pecknold,
if his testosterone doubled and he saw
some guy hitting on his girlfriend.
Like a thunderstorm, Vistavision
finds a way to mix a powerful barrage
with a calmness that drenches the
listener in a satisfying musical experience, leaving them wanting more.
—Jacey Gibb
YOUNG LIARS
(Nettwerk)
Vancouver quintet Young Liars'
seven-track EP, Homesick Future, is
pretty good for what it is. Which is
to say, it is competently executed,
danceable, synth-infused hipster
disco pop. It is well put together,
and suitable for parties or cruising
around in nice weather. It does
not however, come across as  j
particularly innovative or deeply '[
meaningful.
Whereas albums considered
to be "great" seem to possess  j
an ineffable quality, where
each listening tends to reveal
previously unnoticed layers of
depth and nuance, Homesick j
Future comes across too much j
like a book of crosswords with  j
the answers printed before the puz- ,
zles themselves; or like it's telling a j
joke to which you've already heard j
the punchline. There's something \
about this EP that feels finite and
non-refillable, like a Bic lighter: once !
exhausted, it becomes just another j
empty shell of cultural debris to throw \
on the ever-growing heap of dispos-  \
able crap.
To be fair, Homesick Future was
digitally self-released by the band
almost exacdy a year ago, and is being
re-released now that the band has
been signed by Nettwerk. There are
intimations ofa proper full-length LP
slated for release later this year, and
hopefully Young Liars will continue
to refine and develop their considerable potential. As it is, the tracks on
Homesick Future are slick and predictable enough for commercial radio
play, while the crowds present at the
band's live shows prove their appeal
to the Facebook generation. Whether
they will be a flash in the pan or a star
in the sky remains to be seen.
—Andrew Reeves
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©THE MI1Q13 CABARET
^fc"^Ml   ^B^^^Efc- WL   fvL *. 2755 Prince Edward APOLLO GHOSTS /
JAY ARNER / MOVIELAND
February 10 • The Zoo Zhop
It seemed like everyone at the Zoo
Zhop knew someone in upstarts
Movieland. It wasn't that hard; the
all-girl four-piece have their hands
in a lot of honey pots, like Aunts &
Uncles, Thee Ahs, Kidnap Kids! and
Narwhal. Fast, catchy songs give
nods to Plumtree and even a younger
Sleater Kinney. Like so many bands at
their first show, Movieland suffered
from lack of confidence and it was
only towards the end of their set that
some louder, raunchier tracks (particularly "He Cares More IfYou Forget
AboutMe," which is about one-night
stands) got the girls moving with just
enough riot grrl bite.
Moving from cute, angry girls to
lush pop, Jay Arner and his as-yet-
untitled backing group knew how
to draw a crowd—more people had
been turned away at the door due
to capacity as the band got ready to
play. This time around, Arner was in
front ofa distinctly '60s affair, filled
with jangly guitar hooks. While I was stranded behind several rows of ;
heads, the group played a tight and |
mostly well-orchestrated set, replete
with between-song banter as Arner \
and his keyboardist traded off gui-
tar duties. It may be too much to ask
, iijjfhi Second guitar, but it seemed a
little silly trying to watch a six-string
change hands on the small, crowded
stage.
The quick break between sets let I
the crowd gulp down some fresh air ;
outside the air-tight venue. I've got [
a confession: I'd never seen Apollo I
Ghosts before. Yes, I'd heard the
buzz after every one of their sold j
out shows and I'd listened to Mount j
Benson when it was long-listed for I
the 2010 Polaris Prize, but fate had
always conspired against me when it :
came to seeing them live. Thankfully,  !
despite being packed like sardines the |
crowd responded so enthusiastically
to everything Apollo Ghosts did that \
their set, collaboratively, was nearly j
perfect Frontman Adrian Teacher
skillfully blended art-rock, punk and a
litde introspective pop into something I
beautiful and beautifully entertaining.
By far my favourite part of the show j
was the deceptively opaque lyrical
content, simply delivered but full of j
poetic meaning, and the band blew my i
expectations out ofthe water without i
blowing my eardrums. Standouttrack \
"For What They Do, They Do" was |
lightning-quick but lovely, encased in
shimmering guitar riffs and alternat-  \
ing smooth-sung and shouted verses.
Even when songs threatened to spill
over into lunacy, the band showed \
a marked level of restraint, choos-
ing to end their set by enlisting the \
crowd to sing the chorus off a song :
on their upcoming LP instead of blasting everyone away in a wall of guitar
rhythms. Suffice it to say, I won't be j
missing another Apollo Ghosts show,
even if it's stuffed to the rafters.
—Fraser Dobbs
GREENBACKHIGH/
THE JOLTS/REAL PROBLEMS;
CRYSTAL SWELLS
February 4 • The Railway Club
Itwas the conclusion to a ridiculously
sunny winter's Saturday at one ofVan-
couver's oldest venues, the Railway
Club. It felt like summer again, packed
to gills with a pile of people ready to
drown their work week in noise and
draft beer. What better conditions for
a sweaty night of punk rock?
Crystal Swells hit the stage around
ten with the three-man team doing a
brief but awesome set of catchy, surf-
infused post-punk. I was instantly
hooked by their high-energy show,
which had them cracking jokes and
clearly having a good time. Aside from
a few technical difficulties, the solid
set finished with guitarist/vocalist
Nick Price playing an outro whilst
being hoisted up by the crowd and
carried around on a friend's shoulders
a la Ozzy and Randy Rhoads. Tons of
fun and a great warm up.
Real Problems were up next,
delivering their greaser-meets-punk
brand of rock 'n' roll and generating
the first mosh pit ofthe night. They
pummeled through a set sounding
hke Supersuckers-meets-Nashville
Pussy, with the occasional breakdown
riff and loads ofwah pedal. Itwas also
a bit ofa red letter day for the band
as they announced it was to be the
last show for drummer Jonny Two
Sticks. Thankfully, it's not the last
for the band.
Up next were the Jolts, who did
not disappoint in their Ramones/
Hellacopters-flavoured, balls-to-the-
wall rock. Turning up the heat in the
already hot as hell bar, they ripped
through tracks from last year's critically praised 8%, including "I Wanna
Dig" and "The Dabbler," as well as
older tracks like "Gimmie Gasoline"
and "The Bar Again." They also threw
in a cover ofthe Joneses' "Pill Box"
and finished the set with a rollicking
sing along ofthe Stones' "It's Only
Rock m Roll (But I Like It)." Itwas a
really tight set by a Vancouver staple
with swagger and style to spare.
After a short breather, Jolts members Joshy Atomic and Matt Snakes
went back onstage to play with
Greenback High bandmates Beardo
(ofVicious Cycles) and former D.O.A.
drummer Floor Tom Jones. Despite
playing to a smaller crowd, the pop-
punk supergroup kept things rocking.
Influences ranged from Against Me!
to the Ramones to StiffLitde Fingers
(due in part to the fact that there is no
discernible frontman and all members share vocal duties), while always
maintaining a kind of '90s alt-pop
groove. Their lone dedication ofthe
night, "Bombs Away," was made out
to Stephen Harper. At one point I saw
two girls having a full-on makeout
session before also noticing a couple
almost boning near the table behind
me. It was a hot night in the city for
sure. Thank God, or more appropriately the devil, for rock 'n' roll.
—Coleman Ingram
KHINGFISHER / WATERS/
SHAUNN WATT
February 9 • The River Vintage
As I walked into what I imagine Neil
Young's living room would look like,
I arrived at the River Vintage shop on
a rainy Thursday evening. Housing a
calm folk/country urgency, the western textures and plaid coat-patterned
walls set a defining atmosphere for
the evening's acts.
Shaunn Watt (Red Cedar singer/
bassist) was the first to set the audience under a sad spell. With well commanded vocals, Watt's high falsetto
empowered his painful lyrics. The
lament in his first song, "In the light
ofthe morning /1 knew I would sacrifice you," presented a grand honesty,
owing much to the tenets of country/
folk tradition.
Conscious of this sorrowful tone
and after playing a Red Cedar cover,
Watt declared to the audience that
he was going to try to make his set
more "upbeat." A girl sitting near
me responded with a rejecting, "No,"
and I couldn't help but agree. Thankfully, the songs that followed, "Every
Golden Age" and a Joanna Newsom
cover of "Does Not Suffice," continued the pleasant, down-beat trend;
heartbreaking like the vocal styling of
Leonard Cohen and comforting in the
universality of that heartbreak.
The voice of Lindsey Hampton
(performing under the moniker
Waters) filled the room next, reminding me immediately ofthe hollow
cries woven into Bruce Springsteen's
acoustic album Nebraska. Transitioning from that sound, Hampton and her
accompanying guitarist Andrew Lee
created a soundscape of thick reverb
similar to the electro-acoustic sound
of Portland's Grouper. The consistent tempo and angelic vocal layering in Waters' songs allowed them
to roll forward as if fixed to a track.
Despite a distinct similarity amongst
all five songs, Waters demonstrated
an appreciated ability to create both
beautiful and menacing tones, giving her music the most powerful of
ambient appeals.
lastly, appearing before the audience with a classical guitar in hand,
Khingfisher (Hallow Moon singer/
guitarist Craig Alan Mechler) began
his set singing, "Come to me my ocean
breeze," in a sandy, personable voice.
Pursuing a similar thematic conviction, he then performed another six
songs, exerting a folk authenticity
confirmed most symbolically by the
twine string holding his guitar to
its strap. As the audience listened
intently to the poetry in his second
song, "Good bye my love, hello sweet
lonesome harmony," even the loveliness of his lyrics could not prepare
me for what was next.
Attaching words to Villa Ix)bos'
"Scottish Choro," Khingfisher sang
his third song, "Speakin' Easy (Prohibition Blues)." Like a melody floating
out ofa Parisian cafe, Mechler's lyrics,
paired with Lobos' melody, gave this
song all the charm ofa classic 1920's
blues tune. His gentle proceedings
concluded with a cover of "Georgia
on My Mind," and a few of his own
pieces like "Deep Blue Sailing Wind."
After an urged encore, the audience,
some sitting cross-legged in front of
the stage, some standing framed by
the merchandise, clapped and seemed
pleased with the night's events. Truth
is, sometimes songs about liquor and
heartbreak are just what you need to
hear.
—Alex de Boer CHAINS OF LOVE/
LOST LOVERS BRIGADE/
VILLA KULLA / SUM FATHERS
February 16 • The Biltmore Cabaret
It may have been a typical chilly and
wet February night out for Vancouver, but inside the natty and nimble
Biltmore basement, the mood was
tender and welcoming for Chains
of Love. Headlining a busy bill, and
keenly aware ofthe buzz that's been
building behind them for a year now,
Chains and their musical playmates
were poised to melt the winter tide.
Admittedly, my tardiness caused
me to miss the first couple of acts—a
shame as Slim Fathers made their live
debut and Villa Kulla had previously
left a lively impression on me in—I
really had no one to blame but myself.
But I arrived as the Lost Lovers Brigade
claimed the stage and I was quickly
smitten by the eclectic ensemble, who
offered instant gratification. Normally
a four-piece, and adding a violinist for
a few numbers, their earthy post-rock-
steeped-in-country zeal was playful
and excited.
With a new LP, Little Skeletons, to
hawk and with lead vocalist Elisha
May Rembold channelling the grit of
Buffy Sainte-Marie and Patsy Cline,
the Lost Lovers Brigade are a band to
keep a close watch on. Their songs of
insomnia, heartbreak and shadows,
occasionally in three-part harmonies (Rembold, joined by drummer
Adrian Burrus and keyboardist Larissa
Loyva), up the choral ante considerably. Closing their set with a shout
out and dedication to Phil Spector,
complete with a "Be My Baby" drum
intro homage, the Brigade segued
pitch-perfectly into Chains of Love's
main attraction.
It's been exciting to watch Chains
of Love grow, in a relatively short
period of time, into one ofthe city's
sans pareil performers. It wasn't that
long ago that they made their live
inauguration on the same stage they
graced this night, and in the months
since they haven't missed a move.
What's immediately apparent from
this snappy six-piece is their flare for
the dramatic. Vocalist Nathalia Piz-
zaro's arresting presence and stirring,
red-hot vocals, were rife with tremor
and sensitivity, and kept the band in
motion. Chains of Love doesn't do
anything in halves; they go all out,
near-symphonic and full tilt for the
duration. Any ink that's spilled on
them invariably mentions the girl
groups they carefully emulate; the
Ronettes, the Chiffons, that whole
marvellous milieu. Tracks like "Breaking My Heart" and "All the Time" certainly hold a strong Wrecking Crew
tactility to them that's fully realized
by the momentum behind their stage
show. Playing songs mosdy from their
forthcoming release on Dine Alone
Records, Strange Grey Days, the presence of Phil Spector loomed over
much of their performance.
In a live context, seeing Pizzaro
and guitarist/vocalist Rebecca Law
Gray together, radiant and bewitching, with locks flowing to match their
moving harmonies, it's easy to fall
under their spell. Combined with
Steve Ferreira's brash and buoyant
drumming, it's a nostalgic throwback, sure, but not camp, and not
the least bit pedestrian. There will
always be a musical revival of some
sort taking place, however, it would
be a mistake to lump Chains of Love
in with anything that's superseded
or passe\ This is one chain you'll be
thrilled to be tethered to.
—Shane Scott-Travis
VERONICA FALLS /
BLEACHED
February 20th • The Media Club
Walking through downtown Vancouver on a miserable, rainy Monday
brings me to the sanctuary of the
Media Club. Entering this rectangular room, only the Persian rugs and
gold framed mirrors leave a decorative
impression. Mosdy there seems to be
a lot of open space to shrug at (and not
enough tables or chairs). I do however
quickly start to consider the intent
behind this aesthetic; perhaps to provide the live acts with the freedom to
impress their own personality onto
the place; to let their sound clutter the
walls and pattern the seats.
Lead singer/guitarist Jennifer Clavin
is the first thing I notice as Los Ange
les-based Bleached begins their set.
Sporting velveteen pants and a muted
orange shirt, she seemed effortlessly
cool standing front and centre on
stage. Accompanied by her sister Jessica, both girls strummed black and
white guitars as they deliver danceable
garage rock to the audience. Formerly
known as MikaMiko, the duo, combined with their current bassist and
drummer, move their music forward
with a catchy consistency. Playing
their well-reviewed single "Electric
Chair," third in the set, Bleached demonstrates the effectiveness of letting
their simple lyrics float over weaving,
fuzzy guitars. Next they played the
bouncy tune "Think of You," with
its charming "ooh ooh" pulse, transitioning soon after into the catchy
favourite, "Searching Through the
Past." Ending their set with "Ain't
No Friend of Mine," Jennifer's vocals
demonstrate an energetic pitch control, which adds character to the
band's grungy noisescape. Not relying much on instrumental buildups
or melodic changes, Bleached's
success comes mosdy from their
"less is more" edge; decorating
the venue with an accessibly cool
rock 'n' roll sound.
As headlining band Veronica
Falls got on stage, it's immediately apparent that they're a
far more complex band than the
openers. That's not necessarily
meant as a criticism of Bleached,
but more as a comment on style.
With the combined talents of
Roxanne Clifford and James
Hoare on vocals/guitar, Marion Herbain on bass, and Patrick Doyle on drums, Veronica
Falls presents a melodic ghost
chase.
Their sound is an alliance of tempo shifts. It relies
on the coordinated back and
forth between the drums and
the guitars with the collaboration of ±eir signature girl/guy
vocalizing. As their set builds,
there is a noticeable clarity to
each tune. Every note is audible,
moving in pattern and collecting
to accumulate in a larger sound.
Within their first few songs, the band
established a kind of dead-pan groov^
ness, which may be considered at least
partially the product of their dark lyrical content. Indeed, playing some
of their hits like "Bad Feeling" and
"Found Love in a Graveyard," Veronica Falls reminds everyone that their
foot tapping and head bobbing is to
the tone of something rather sinister.
Ultimately though, they communicate an overall dreamy charm, with
their pseudo surfer-chant vocals and
reverb-rich guitars.
And with the show coming to a
close, the encore played by Veronica
Falls seemed ornate, a final coat of
paint to colour this previously plain
venue.
—Alex de Boer
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IjSSAl I.LA m  POLYTECHNIC^,  Sunday. 12:00 p.m. Nota soul atCiTR, I was sitting
in the lounge, waiting for a tentative Discorder
meeting. I heard what I thought was the ghost mix
emanating from the on-air studio. Suddenly, the
studio's music became louder. I heard laughter and
a merry Jamaican voice. I realized someone might
actually be on the air. I smiled as I turned up the
lounge radio. What I heard for the next three hours
were positive vibes that would keep me smiling for
many Sundays to come.
Fueled by the rhythm ofthe show's ska and reggae beats, I did some research on the awe-inspiring
host By 3 p.m., there was only one thing left to do:
an interview. And even though that meeting was
postponed, I didn't wait in vain, because I've now
met a man who loves reggae with every inch of his
soul: George "Reggae" Barrett, host of The Rockers
Show since October, 1982.
[Interview has been condensed]
The Rocker's Show
with GEORGE BARRETT
intro and interview
by CHIRAG MAHAJAN
illustration
by MARK HALL-PATCH
photo
by CHIRAG MAHAJAN
Discorder: The Rockers Showls among Vancouver's longest running reggae shows, second only
to The Reggae Show, which you started in 1976
on Co-op Radio. Since then, you've received many
awards for your broadcasting work. How does it
feel to receive such praise from the community?
George Barrett: When I started The Reggae Show, it
wasn't that popular because a lot of people didn't
know reggae music. Some people even called it
"reggie" [laughs]. Still, the community really enjoys
what I play on both these shows; Now, many people
know there are stations they can tune in to on the
weekends to hear these vibes. I'm very proud of
myself for starting something from scratch, like
watering a plant and seeing it grow for 30 years. It
feels so good to be a part of this community.
Over the years, you've collected over 4,000 seven-
inch singles, over 3,000 LPs, and over 10,000 CDs.
How do you select your playlist from this massive
collection?
I have so many records. Too much! [laughs] I still
get vinyls from people almost every week, especially
from England. I listen to so much reggae that I am
reggae. That's why people call me George "Reggae" Barrett, [laughs] I select the music when I'm
at home. I sit down on Saturday night and listen
and select. Some songs are good for some days,
like February was black history month, so I try to
pick songs for that. It takes some time to select my
show, but I try to do it right, because sometimes
there can be some swearing in the songs, so I have
to listen carefully. On a Sunday, everybody wants it
nice, warm and easy.
Few people here know that you've met the King of
Reggae. How did that happen?
Bob Marley! Yes, he came here in 1978 [on the Kaua
tour]. I left Jamaica in 1972, so when I heard that
a band that we cherish over there was arriving in
Vancouver, I was so excited! Bob played two sold-
out shows in the same night at the same place, the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre. I stayed for both shows!
And when Bob was on stage singing "No Woman,
No Cry," everyone had their fighters out! It was
overwhelming! After the second show, I was in
the dressing room with all of them: Bob, Carlton
[Barrett], "FamilyMan" [AstonBarrett], everybody
was there, chanting and talking about Jamaica.
Carlton asked me, "George, what're you doing
in Vancouver? There's nothing here!" And I said,
"You're joking!" [laughs]. I hadn't started The Rockers
Show yet, but they were a big influence. I played a
lot of Bob Marley on-air to show how happy I was
that Bob had come to town.
What has been your most memorable broadcasting moment?
There are several. I interviewed Burning Spear; I
interviewed Joseph Hill from Culture. Another was
when I received the Peter Tosh Memorial Award at
the Canadian Reggae Music Awards.
If you could only bring one album to a deserted
island, which would it be?
Bob Marley's Catch A Fire.   |fj|||
What is your favourite CiTR radio show, besides
your own?
I really like the Friday night shows, like African
Rhythms with David Love Jones, and The Bassment.
What does the future hold for The Rockers
Show?
The future holds a lot, because CiTR will be moving
to the new studios in the new building, so I'd like to
stick around for that. The community is changing,
too. New vibes are coming in, because younger
people now love the roots and dancehall. Even dub
is rising up, and they're calling it dubstep. I like how
they do it. They're using the same old dub, but they
speed it up, put those effects on, they add in more
bass, and then you hear "WUB-WUB-WUB-WUB."
[laughs] I love it!
The Rockers Show airs on Sundays from 12 p.m.
to 3 p.m. //CiTR 101.9 F
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF FEBRUARY
MCHAR
TS |||
#
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
#
 ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
IIe
Rae Spoon*
1 Can't Keep All Your
Secrets
Saved By Radio
26
Bleating Hearts*+
Bleating Hearts
Independent
2
The Rain And The
Sidewalk*+
Stuck
Independent
27
Various*
Bloodstains Across
British Columbia
Mammoth Cave
3
A Place To Bury
Strangers
Onwards To The Wall
Dead Oceans
28
Black Bananas
Rad Times Xpress IV
Drag City
4
Young Liars*+
Homesick Future
Nettwerk
29
Cloud Nothings
Attack On Memory
CarPark
5
Colourful
Language*+
This is a Test
Independent
30
LOOM*
Epyllion
Independent
6
Yamantaka //
Sonic Titan*
YT//ST
Psychic Handshake
31
Various*
Bloodstains Across
the Prairies
Mammoth Cave
7
Elizabeth*+
Hazards, Horrors &
Liabilities
Independent
32
Sissy*
March Of The Humans
Four O'Clock Sun
8
Phedre*
Phedre
Daps Records
33
Various*
Have Not Been The
Same Vol. 1
Zunior
9
Grimes*
Visions
Arbutus
34
Threat Machine*
Threat Machine
Independent
10
D-Sisive*
Run With The Creeps
Urbnet
35
The Diodes*
Action/Reaction
Bongo Beat
11
Dixie's Death Pool*
The Man With
Flowering Hands
Drip Audio
36
Wooden Shjips
Remixes
Thrill Jockey
12
Howler
America Wake Up
Rough Trade
37
Animal Bodies*+
Kiss of the Fang
Sweating Tapes
13
Cate Le Bon
CYRK
Control Group
38
Bare Wires
Cheap Perfume
Southpaw
14
Leonard Cohen*
Old Ideas
Sony
39
BryWebb*
Provider
Idee Fixe
15
Lost Lovers
Brigade*+
Little Skeletons
Independent
40
Wintermitts*+
Oceans
Independent
16
Long Weekends*
Don't Reach Out
Noyes
41
Of Montreal
Paralytic Stalks
Polyvinyl
17
• The Asteroid
Galaxy Tour
Out Of Frequency
BMG
42
Imperial Teen
Feel The Sound
Merge
18
Redrick Sultan*+
Trolling for Answers
Independent
43
Gotye
Making Mirrors
Universal
19
Trailer Trash Tracys
Ester
Double Six
44
Duchess Says*
In A Fung Day T!
Alien8
20
Charlotte Gainsbourg
Stage Whispers
Because Music
45
First Aid Kit
The Lion's Roar
Wichita
21
John K. Samson*
Provincial
Anti-
46
Crystal Stilts
Radiant Door
Sacred Bones
22
ivardensphere*
APOK
Metropolis
47
The Black Keys
El Camino
Nonesuch
23
Strange Boys
Live Music
Rough Trade
48
Hospitality
Hospitality
Merge
24
Portage and Main*+
Portage and Main
Independent
49
Nun Un*+
Nun Un II
Independent
25
Coeur De Pirate*
Blonde
Grosse Boite
50
Cowpuncher*
Call Me When
You're Single
Independent
CiTR's charts reflect what's b
Most of these excellent album
at (604) 822-8733. Her name
www. earshot-online, com.
een played on the air
s can be found at fine
is Sarah Cordingley. Ii
)y CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) ai
ndependent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find t
you ask nicely she'll tell you how to find them. Check out otf
e Canadian and those
lem, give CiTR's musi
er great campus/comr
marked (+) are local.
c coordinator a shout
nunity radio charts at
39 Mature with Zulu
Serious music for serious people.
mm
LEONARD COHEN
Old Ideas CD/LP
LANA DEL REY
Born To Die CD/LP
KATHLEEN EDWARDS
Voyageur CD/LP
KIS5CS )N
CARTNEV
THf BOTTOM
5^J
paulMcCartney
| Kisses on The Bottom CD I
GRIMES
Visions CD
LAMBCHOP
Mr. M CD/LP
20% OFF when you bring in this a J!
HJS... excitingfnstore announcement; coming ^"JJJ^J
performances and instore interviews with MEM^UKE SWIMMER
THE WAR ON DRUGS and FISH AND DIRD!
Check www.zulurecords.com tor fuHjrtetails.
twrrrer.com/zulurecords
*,   t, «tr    facebook.com/people/
raceoook    zuluRecords-Store/680210042
iliHiblfc  zulurecords.tumblr.com
I K£0)*RV£A
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver. BC
tel 604738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS

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