Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 2010-03-01

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0049995.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0049995.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0049995-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0049995-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0049995-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0049995-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0049995-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0049995-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0049995-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0049995.ris

Full Text

 THAT STILL IN PRINT MAGAZINE FROM CiTR 101.9 FMf // supporting Vancouver's independent music communty for over 25 years
H
1 >Hh=H
GIGI /
FANSHAW / BEN FREY/KOBAN 7 F
OH NO! YOKO VS. HIGHSCHOOL I    tdrfreefdrstaiionmeniliei^l
212 Productions Ltd
454 W Cordova St.
604-685-2426
Antisocial
Skateboard Shop
2337 Main St
604-708-5678
Audiopile
2016 Commercial Dr.
604-253-7453
Band Merch Canada
www. bandmerch .ca
Banyen Books
3608 W 4th Ave.
604-732-7912
Baru Cafe
2535 Alma St.
604-222-9171
Beatstreet Records
439 W Hastings St.
604-683-3344
The Bike Kitchen
6138 Student Union
Blvd.
604-822-BIKE
Biim
197 E 17th Ave.
604-872-8180
Bonerattle Music Ltd
2012 Commercial Dr.
604-251-BONE
Devil May Wear
198 E 21st Ave.
604-216-2515
Dream Apparel +
Articles for People
311 W Cordova St.
604-683-7326
The Eatery
3431 W Broadway
604-738-5298
The Fall Tattooing
644 Seymour St
604-676-3066
Flaming Angels
Boutique
644 Seymour St.
604-689-3224
Fresh is Best Salsa
&Co
2972 W Broadway
778-737-2442
Grindhouse Video
2911 W 4th Ave.
604-734-7463
Gumdrops
2029 W 4th Ave.
604-733-1037
Hart and Sole
Clothing inc
843 Granville St.
604-630-9151
Highlife Records
1317 Commrecial Dr.
604-251-6964
Hitz Boutique
316 W Cordova St.
604-662-3334
The Kiss Store
2512 Watson St.
604-675-9972
Lucky's Comics
3972 Main St
604-875-9858
Pacific
Cinematheque
1131 Howe St
604-688-8202
People's Co-op
Bookstore
1391 Commercial Dr.
604-253-6422
Prussin Music
3607 W Broadway
604-736-3036
Red Cat Records
4332 Main St
604-708-9422
The Regional
Assembly of Text
3934 Main St.
604-877-2247
Royce Clothing
and Shoes
2817 W Broadway
604-731-4474
R/X Comics
2418 Main St
604-454-5099
Rufus' Guitar Shop
2621 Alma St.
604-222-1717
Scratch Records
726 Richards St.
604-687-6355
Spank Clothing
1027 Commercial Dr.
604-255-1131
&
856 Granville St.
604-677-3202
&
2082 W 4th Ave.
778-371-1305
Spank Shoes
1181 Commercial Dr.
604-568-1229
&
2066 W 4th Ave.
604-677-3583
Thriller
3467 Main St
604-736-5651
True Value Vintage
710 Robson St.
604-685-5403
Iwigg & Hottie
3671 Main St
604-879-8595
Vinyl Records
319 W Hastings St.
604-488-1234
The Wallflower
Modern Diner
2420 Main St.
604-568-7554
Woo Vintage
Clothing
321 Cambie St.
604-687-8200
|A Friends of QTR Card soores
you sweet deals at Vancouver's
finest small menchants and
supports QTR 101.9 FM.    J|
Show it when you shop!
Iwww.citr.ca AMS EVENTS PRESENTS:
AMSEVENTSUBC.COM
WBtmm
WNRk
?Pit Pub ::;- ,*..
BA SI A BULA T withkatie stelmanis
NATALIE
PC^MAI|fe^
SHAVED HEAP
aKhSgT., ^gc|Sf:|PAprLre
ta, Zulu Records, Red Cat Records & The Outpost EDITOR
Jordie Yow
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Reis
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Cory Bujnouricz
COPY EDITORS
D0i% Rets, Mine'Sallrin, Al Smith
AD MANAGER
David Stansfield
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Mine'Salkin
RU EDITOR
Al Smith
WEB EDITOR
Reilly Wood
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Melanie Coles
PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR
Leanna Orr
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn, Debby Reis
DISTRIBUTION
Jamie Anstey
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brtnda Granau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society 0/UBC
COVER
Image by Merida Anderson
EDITOR'S NOTE (ACTUALLY IT'S A PRODUCTION MANAGER'S NOTE)
Dear Discorder:
I've been Discorder's Production Manager for a year
now, and during this time I feel like I've been reintroduced to Vancouver's music scene. Before, I would go to
the odd show, usually when someone invited me to see
their band play, or else I'd see a bigger band I was already
familiar with.
Reading Discorder every month has kept me in touch
and connected to a community that I had always felt distanced from. I imagine it's been the same for many of
our readers, and it's a comment that turned up in the
reader survey we did last year. When you read Discorder,
you know who the up-and-coming musicians in the city
are. And this is why we think it's so important to keep
Discorder in print.
As you may already know, Discorder's had some financial difficulty this past year. We had to cut printing last
August's issue and our budget is already strained. We are
completely volunteer run, with only three staff members
earning small stipends. All the cash we generate from
ads and our grant from CiTRgo directly to printing costs.
This past year, we started organizing a monthly show,
which is held on the first Wednesday of each month at
the Astoria.
On March 5 we're holding a fundraiser at the Biltmore
to add to our printing fund. We asked some of our favourite
bands to donate their time, and together, they make up one
of the best lineups ever! To lure you in, in this issue we're
including profiles on Koban (p. 16) and Fanshaw (p. 8),
who are playing that night. In addition, you'll get to see
Boogie Monster, MT-40, Fine Mist and Apollo Ghosts—not
to mention that Japandroids are putting a DJ set together,
as are Tyler Fedchuk and Cam Dales (Discorder's covered
everyone, so get your computer out and dig through our
website to find those stories). Be sure to get to the Biltmore
early, 'cause this is sure to sell out!
The other topics you can find in this issue include an
interview with Gigi's Nick Krgovich (p. 14), whose mom
and grandma love his new album Maintenant, the revival
of the much loved Fake Jazz (p. 11) and an introduction
to Diana Leung, who may be able to help prevent you run
your new venue (p. 7). There's plenty more too, all ofwhich
will keep you connected with the scene. That's why I keep
on reading, and that's why you should too!
Bye for now Discordians—and don't forget March 5!
Love,
Debby Reis
CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!
DISCORDER.CA IS HOME TO LOADS OF CONTENT WE CAN'T FIT INTO THE PRINT ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE,
LIKE EXTRA FEATURES, REAL LIVE ACTION AND UNDER REVIEW.
CHECK DISCORDER.CA REGULARLY FOR NEW ARTICLES, PHOTOS AND ALL THINGS MUSIC RELATED!
MARCH
WRITERS
Sarah Berman, Gracelle Bonifacio, Katherine Boothroyd, Nathaniel Bryce, Slavko Bucifal, Sarah Charrouf,
Julie Colero, Claire Dickson, Bryce Dunn, Simon Foreman, Robert Fougere, Andy Hudson, Justin Langille,
Camilla Keen, Doug Mackenzie, Adam Mannegren, Duncan M. McHugh, Sean Nelson, Dorothy Neufeld,
Quinn Omori, Mark PaulHus, Debby Reis, Al Smith, Darren Susin
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Merida Anderson, Melanie Coles, Tyler Crich, Gerald Deo, Ben Frey, Karlene Harvey, Steve Louie, Michelle
Mayne, Ehren Salazar, Ryan Walter Wagner
PROOFREADERS
Simon Foreman Tristan Winch
©Discorder 2010 by the Student Radio Society of the
University of British Columbia. All rights reserved.
Circulation 8,500. Discorder is published 11 times a
year by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online
at www.citr.ca, as well as through all major cable
systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in
White Rock. Call the CiTRDJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at Cit-
rMgr@ams.ubc.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-
6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
CONTRIBUTE.
To submit written content to Discorder, please
contact:
editor.discorder@gmail.
com. To submit photography or illustrations,
please contact:
artdirector. discorder®)
gmail.com.
SUBSCRIBE.
Send in a cheque for $20
to #233-6138 SUB Blvd;
Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1
with your address, and
we will mail you 11 issues
a year to your doorstep.
ADVERTISE.
Ad space is available for
upcoming issues and
can be booked by calling (604) 822-3017 ex. 3
or emailing promotions.
discorder@gmail.com.
Rates are available upon
request.
DISTRIBUTE.
To distribute Discorder
in your business, email
distro.discorder@)gmail.
com. We are always looking for new friends. TABLE OF CONTENTS /MARCH 2010/WWW.DISCORDER.CA
//FEATURES
08/FANSHAW
CiTR expat and the newest addition to the Mint roster Fanshaw's Olivia
Featherstonhaugh is one sultry songstress.
11/FAKE JAZZ FESTIVAL
After months without a home Fake Jazz is making a comeback and they are
doing it with a fantastic four-day festival.
12 / OH NO! Y0K0 VS. HIGHSCHOOL
Oh No! Yokos are Abbotstford's newest and one of their youngest exports.
Check out the life and times of this high school band.
16/K0BAN
The duo formerly known as Manta Ray-Gun took a break from their hookah
to chat with us about being rescued by bus drivers and whether or not they're
punk enough.
18/ YACHT
Did you know there's a unexplained paranormal light phenomenon in Marfa,
Texas? If you read this interview you will learn all about it and how it relates to
the Portland band, Yacht. You will also learn tots of other things.
36/GIGI
When the Hive Studio's Colin Stewart acquired two vintage reverj^tetes, he just
had to use them. So he asked Nick Krgovich to write some songs in the style of
J?hil Spector's girl groups, and this spawned a hugely collaborative effort with
many artists signing on. Nick Krgovich joined us to discuss tjie project.
// KtaULftffii
06/TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
The Wire Primers: A Guide to Modem Music edited by Rob Young
0B/VENEWS
Diana Leung (she can help you)
07/RIFF RAFF
Indian Wars / The Nymphets / Phonecalls
20 /CALENDAR
Art by Ehren Salazar
22 /IROGRAM GUIDE
25/ART PROJECT
Ben Frey of the Shilohs and Sua Wizard
38 / CHARTS
\l I   IVLV iImII v
28/UNDER REVIEW
Bakers at Dawn / The Beige / Ora Cogan / Earistown
Winter / Hoilerado / Kingdom of the Burned /
ligatspeed Champion / OK Go / Owen Pailett / RJD2
/ Triodes / Vancouver Killing Spree / Laura Veirs / Yes
Nice / Yukon Blonde
32/REAL LIVE ACTION
Bowerbirds / Do Make Say Think / Kronos
Quartet feat. Tanya Tagaq / St. Vincent/ Vivian Girls
/Wilco
ILLUSTRATION BY BEN FREY. CHECK OUT ART
PROJECT ON PAGE 25 FOR MORE. // TEXTUALLY
ACTIVE
THE WIRE PRIMERS:
A GUIDE TO MODERN MUSIC
(EDITED BY ROB YOUNG)
Verso, 2009
BY ANDY HUDSON
TheW I RE PiMttrt
A Guide To Modem Mask
A highlighter, a laptop and The Wire Primers—you could do worse for a quick
intro to modern music.
Reading like liner notes to artists like Sun Ra, Sonic Youth and Stockhausen,
the 19 "primers" collected here are part of an ongoing series printed in The
Wire, the British magazine of "improvisation, electronics and avant rock."
First published in 1982, The Wire began as a monthly free jazz and new music
review. Since then, it has widened its range, not only by tapping obscure new
sub-genres, but also by putting the faces oflggy Pop and Grammy-nominated
Madlib on its cover.
After a shakeup in 2000, The Wire's staff writers bought out the magazine
completely—a move that lets them seek new music without much commercial
pressure. This noble outfit now broadcasts a weekly FM show, hosts mp3 features like its Invisible Jukebox interview series, and helps organize gatherings
like the MUTEK electronic music festival in Montreal.
Rob Young, the magazine's editor-at-large, basically arranged this collection so that it slides up from familiar to abstract. More familiar, pop-bending
genres (Tropicalia, No Wave, funk, dubstep, turntablism and etc.) give way
to the increasingly esoteric, experimental sounds of free jazz, music concrete
and modern composition.
Librarians could file this guide under Very Fine Arts Ref. Each primer is
just seven or eight pages long, but in that space the writers detail up to two
dozen gem recordings from a single artist or genre. The result is a highly selective collection. The noise primer covers just post-iocos and mostly Japanese
output, for example, and the James Brown primer picks out just seven of his
85 albums.
One of the book's great strengths is that it avoids the kind of OCD, record-
collector mentality you might expect from an almost entirely male cast of
dedicated music journalists. Peter Shapiro, for example, squeezes a pretty
complex and moving biography of Nigerian highlife superstar Fela Kuti into
the fixed format of a one-page intro followed by album reviews. And David
Keenan manages to cram a good survey of Sonic Youth's myriad labels and side
projects while still trying to evoke what it's like to hear the band by quoting a
sleevenote from Thomas Pynchon: "Two free men met a slave. Everyone goes
home barefoot. Right-fuckin'-on."
Really, you can only criticize this collection for what gets left in or out. The
Wire aspires to an international audience but, based in the U.K., it does have a
natural lean towards British music. Granting a primer each to both U.K. grime
and dubstep is a little hairsplitting, maybe, particularly when Shapiro covers
so many subgenres in a single primer on turntablism.
But, to steal an HBO analogy, this guidebook works a bit like The Wire on
television. After five seasons on its drugs, docks, government, school and
media scene, Obama's favourite TV show gave you a pretty good picture of
Baltimore. Some things got left out, and the parts that got in came in from a
particular point of view—a pretty angry look at the city's inner workings. A
more balanced, comprehensive take would have been boring to watch.
Likewise, I think some of the best primers from The Wire magazine (on field
recording and West African psychedelia) are missing from this collection, and
it is a bit of a let-down to include both Captain Beefheart and Frank Zappa with
no space left for krautrock. But with just 200 pages and all of post-war music
to review, editor Rob Young did not intend this book to be comprehensive.
Instead, he delivers a diverse set of punchy, well-informed pieces that ultimately
build up to The Wire's own take on modern music. It's a good angle and will
lead you strange places.
// VENEWS
BYJORDIE YOW
If you're working on behalf of an arts or culture group and trying to figure
out how you can make your event or venue legal in Vancouver, you may be
worried that you are about to step in a quagmire of cryptic regulations. You
mighttbe about to embark on a slog through a swamp of red tape—but there's
someone who can help you.
Her name is Diana Leung and she is the first person filling the relatively
new position of cultural liason at Vancouver's City Hall.
"I feel like I have a really sweet day job where I'm helping people," said
Leung over coffee. Leung's job is to help people in Vancouver's arts and culture
community navigate the difficult path to get their space or event set up. She also
helps guide city policy on how best to support artists in Vancouver.
Leung won't do all the work for you, but she will let you know who you
need to talk to.
"I really believe that anyone can do it as long as they've got the road map,"
she said.
According to Leung, she is your "insider in government" who can help
you navigate ±e tricks necessary to getting your permit. In addition to her
city hall work, Leung is a community artist who has done projects involving puppets, film, storytelling and lots of people. She still works as an artist and
has previously worked in the city's development services branch as a project
faciliatator (meaning she helped complex development projects get through
the regulatory process).
"I don't think there's another person like this anywhere," said Jacqueline
Gijssen, Leung's boss and cultural services director at city hall, referring to
Leung's unique suitability to the position because of her familiarity with the
inner workings of city hall in additon to her experiences as an artist. But even
more so Gijssen is referring to position itself, which is unique to the world of
Vancouver bureaucracy.
"It's not a normal sort of position that a municipality would create," said
Gijssen. As far as she knows, Vancouver is the only city to have a staff member to actually help the arts and culture community navigate the regulatory
process.
Though, one should note that places with less complex regulatory systems
might not need someone to do this. Gijssen noted that Vancouver's real estate
market puts pressure on the owners of low rent places used by the arts and
culture community to jack up rents or flip into new condo developments and
that puts a pressure on artists here that isn't necessarily felt elsewhere.
The creation of the cultural liason position is based on recommendations
made by the Cultural Facilities Priorities Plan that the NPA had created when
they were in power in 2008. Vision has supported the move since and even
made an exception during the hiring freeze to create the position. With the
broad support from all sides of the political spectrum this position is likely to
stay. So, if you or someone you know needs some help making a project legit,
you can reach Leung at diana.leung@»vancouver.ca.
// RIFF RAFF
IN OTHER VENEWS:
The El Dorado has been hosting shows for the last month or two, particularly
First Friday a monthly music night.
Funky Winkerbeans has patched things up with local promoters No More
Strangers who have returned to the venue. The DTES bar has renovated their
interior and now has a raised stage for bands to perform on.
Roy G. Biv has begun hosting gigs for smaller bands, but you'll have to ask
around to figure out where they're located.
BY BRYCE DUNN
i
m
j     Jfe^
Bill
M      .                  Il^p^gtfl
Hello! We are
back in black
after a wee break, but
as always ready to recognize the greatness
that is 7" vinyl!
To begin, Vancouver foursome Indian Wars are jumping head first into
the shallow waters of
the garage rock pool
already inhabited by
the Black Lips, the
Strange Boys, the
Smith Westerns and
many others, but they seem unfazed and ultimately ready to challenge. This
is thanks in large part to catchy songs and some strong support from their
brethren Dead Ghosts (whose guitarist Big Cat lends his recording skills). Songs
like "Carol Anne" and "Pockets" will get lodged in your brain and refuse to let
go with their crackling guitar breaks and rollicking drums. And they're both
saddled with reverb-drenched vocals with a penchant for '60s garage records
bolstering the whole mess. Let's hope they can keep their heads above water
long enough to outlast (or at least improve on) this current trend, 'cause right
now this hits the spot.
Also satisfying the palate recently was the latest blast of pop-infused punk
at the hands of the Nymphets, a then Montreal-, now Brooklyn-based trio of
kids who like their Dickies and Toy Dolls as much as their Troggs, as they take
a stab at "With A Girl Like You" by injecting it with surf-styled drumming and
syrupy sweet vocals. With the other two tracks, it's hard to be angry as alluded
to in the song "I Hate Everybody Else" when you hear them plow through this
barely two-minute blast—only a wide smile and flailing hands as you reach for
the turntable to spin this one over and over again results here.
Lastly, Phonecalls ring in with their mostly mid-tempo debut EP of the
Spinanes-influenced pop ("My Lullaby"), a cover of the Zombies gone goth
("Tell Her No") and a song in which the only vocalizing is two words ("uh
huh") which when matched with the title "Yeah That's Right" conjures up
two heavily-stoned friends trying to make conversation at the end of a very
long night of partying. Judging from the influences listed on their MySpace
page, they certainly prove to be a sonically interesting mixture on record, but
perhaps this local trio is more captivating and cohesive in a live setting. Why
not see and hear for yourself?
Indian Wars: Bachelor Records www.myspace.com/bachelorrecords
www.myspace.com/strangehandsband
The Nymphets: Signed by Force www.myspace.com/signedbyforce
www.myspace.com/thenymphets
Phonecalls: The Broadway To Boundary
www.myspace.com/thebroadwaytoboundary
www.myspace.com/phonecallsringring Ifll^^HHjj^k H
Par *
II FANSHAW
BY DOROTHY NEUFELD AND DEBBY REIS
ART BY TYLER CRICH
JWJ& RECENTEVENING.    \
8 v  *$#vrote half the record in a few months," Fethersonhaugh said
while wearing a casual black sweater with her hair slightly askew.
pEhftpest of the restjtd, however, took another four years to com|&i&;
? "I always intend^ ft to De a ^ length album and was willing to
wait instead of putting the early stuff in," she said. '
) if^ Over that perjld, Fetherstonhaugh has been developing the
' band Fanshaw, in addition to focusing on writing songs. Although
the band is pret^fauch a solo act, there have been appearances
~ from Larissa Loyva of P:ano, Kellarissa and the Choir Practice,
. where Fetherstonhaugh and Loyva performed together. Victoria,
Victoria and the Shilohs' Johnny Payne, Shane Turner of Love &
#Jgi%ematics an^BSa^f^rner Overdrive as well as Kyle KJM&ggf
k C. Chad Warford, Nick Anderson and Ian Somers have also played
in Fanshaw at various times.
"There's been times when band members were coming in and
- <ftj£/but I met Johnny at the Shindig finals [in 2006] when he was
^'fp|pg with Victoria, Victoria. I guess I just approached hirrfppfc
^jjll^ghow and asked him if he wanted to play drums ffijpie, and he
' never lelftPJ^etherstonhaugh said, laughing.
I lowever, Fetherstonhaugh admitted, "The past year has been
all about recording." ,
Dark Eyes was recorded at Hive Studios with Howard Redekopp, a
well known producer who has worked with the New Pornographers,
Tegan & Sara, and You Say Party! We Say Die! among others.
"I wasn't worried about having a perfect recording because I
, didn't have time to think about it The time constraint was very
liberating," Fetherstonhaugh said. This may be due in part to
the fact that when writing, she's admitted to taking over a pear to
complete a single song.
■   In Dark Eyes, FanshawfejSates an old-school feel whfle^exploring
new avenues for creating and channelling sound. The pop tunes
, Ojfvfelst and the lull ofX&*e Bush are evident compatff|jns in her
songs. Less pop than the former and dreamier than the latter,
Fanshaw's songs ate teftatttly gratifying and soothing. Busting out
with beautiful vocal lines, wie record is inherently dark and potentially dangerous, An album like Dark Eyes' draws its meat not from
its lyrical content or its effective structure, but its ability to utilize
space an#|^nd togethjp .,
I The overall tone of Fans haw's debut h that of gorgeous, melting'
drones, stepping into a world that begins and ends with rhythmic,
haunting soundscapes. Fetherstonhaugh slips in and out of the •
qualms of j^stery and the^eryday.'
The song "Rebecca,'' for instance, is based on |SI novel by Daphne
Du Mauriej&TThe book is narrated by an unnamed woman who be-.
comes the second Mrs, de Waiter, the first being Rebecca. Among
more sinister plot twists, the narrator has to deal with the ghost of
the seemin§|j|i>erfect Rebecca.
' H liked Ate character ha SUbecca because she was oppressed by
peoples' expectations of her," skid Featherstonhaugh. * -
- Despite an album title that brings to mind the shadowy fantasy
of youth, Dark Eyes has a pretty uplifting heart. Because the music is
■ so clear, the core Sows through seamless intimate melodies. With
each listen, it reveals a journey that entwines fantasy and reality. "O
Sailor" evokes amazing imagery and contains Featherstonhaugh's
best vocal performance with lines like: "1% put my red lipstick oft i„
And my red-cross uniform / Then I'll go down down down / I'll go
downtown."
Perhaps we can expect more dark melodies in the near future.
After returning from her mid-February New York debut where she
played at the Cakeshop and the Zebulon Cafe, and after playing our
own fundraising party at the Biltmore March 5, Fetherstonhaugh
will retreat to Quaiicum Beach for a month.
f^SKjlhave no human contact,* Fetherstonhaugh said, explaining
:||g^£g£p to Vancouver Island. Tat going to cat sit for my Auntie.
She has a grand piano, $0 I'm going to take some time to do some
writing."
" I'LL PUT MY RED LIPSTICK ON / AND MY
RED-CROSS UNIFORM /THEN I'LL GO DOWN
DOWN DOWN / I'LL GO DOWNTOWN." 4*
&
e
°7m ®tt?&m
-V (•( ^
presented with:
MWESTERN FRONT    \-
I
A
FAKE JAZZFESTIVAL
NOISE
A Series
the chanhing roles of noise in culture
®<
Wednesday 24 / Lick 10 PM-1 AM
FAKE JAZZ
Aerosol Constellations
Heavy Chains
Broken Sleep
Empty Love
Shipyards
MARCH 24-28
of panels + performances exploring
Thursday 25 / Western Front 8-11 PM
FAKE JAZZ
Glaciers
Archipelago
Rachel Wadham + Shane Krause
Scant Intone
THE RITA
Friday 26 / Western Front
NOtSE
Keynote: Dr. Laura Marks 7 PM
Music: KK Null (Tokyo) 8 PM
FAKE JAZZ 9-11 PM
The Sorrow and the Pity
Flat Grey
Whip of the UFO
Saturday 27 / Western Front
NOISE
Panel A    10AM-12PM
Panel B   1-3PM
FAKE JAZZ 8-11 PM
Magneticring
Empress
V. Vecker
Glass Armonica
Giorgio Magnanensi, Kedrick James, Chad MacQuarrie
1
AVJtttMtje,
^T:TBfc WESTERN •
TICKETS + INFO
FAKE JAZZ
Festival Pass $25
Single Shows $7
NOISE
Keynote/Panels Free admission
KK Null $18/15
*ti www.front.be.ca/noisenotnoise
Saturday 27 / Venue to be disclosed Doors 11 PM
FAKE JAZZ
Monarch
Shearing Pinx
AHNA
Josh Rose
Catwrangler
Sunday 28 / Western Front
NOISE
Workshop 11 AM-12:30 PM
The Empty Vessel Makes the
Loudest Sound
Casa del Artista 1 PM - Midnight
FAKE JAZZ
Pancake Breakfast 1-6 PM
Must 2 PM - Midnight
Haunted Beard
Stamina Mantis
Twin Crystals
Black Mage
Diadem
Coingutter
Ejaculation Death Rattle
>IM$iW
■ FAKE JAZZ RESURRECTS ITSELF
//A FESTIVAL AND A NEW NIGHT
BY JUSTIN LANGILLE
ILLUSTRATION BY KARLENE HARVEY
When Vancouver's premier punk pigpen the Cobalt folded in August, Bill
Battand Anju Singh were among the many musicians left with virtually
no venue to play at. [ed. The Cobalt has reopened, but without Wendy 13 running it and
nothing worth the trip has happened there yet.]
Batt, Singh and Shearing Pinx drummer Jeremy Van Wyck were the organizers of Fake Jazz, an influential night of experimental noise and punk held every
Wednesday at the defunct bar.
Arranged as an open mic of sorts, artists would apply to play and were
scheduled*in by Batt, Singh and Van Wyck on a rotating basis, ensuring that
everyone got a turn to bring ±eit htnovations to the table. Everything from
Grateful Dead inspired jams to sonic performances conducted with drills and
water were welcome.
Just as it ended, Fake Jazz was garnering a reputation in national music
press, Exclaim in particular, as a breeding ground for West Coast musical
innovation.
Six months after the Cobalt's death, an informal Downtown Eastside practice
space is now home to many orphaned Fake Jazz performers.
In early February, Singh's band AHNA had just finished playing a searing
set of their signature hardcore drone at the back alley venue when Discorder sat
down with her and Batt to talk about the past and the future of the landmark
music night they both loved.
"TJt was] a gong show, or a train wreck, but great," said Batt, recalling early
Fake Jazz days. "It was... some of my favourite people just playing when they
didn't have much of a chance to do that."
"People were doing anything they could imagine," said Singh. "It just
kind of allowed people to express things they don't know how to express any
other way."
"It was a supportive space," confirmed Batt. "It felt like home."
Time away from the Cobalt has been difficult for Singh, Batt and their peers,
but it has not been entirely defeating. In March, they will host the first Fake Jazz
Festival, a showcase of Vancouver's fringe underground community.
Running from March 24 to 28, the festival will showcase mainstay Fake Jazz
acts like Shearing Pinx, AHNA, Batt's band Stamina Mantis and Black Mage as
well as newcomers like Glaciers, Scant Intone and Cat Wrangler.
Batt and Singh think it's nice to get some attention for their bands, but for
them, organizing a Fake Jazz festival is a chance to have fun with close friends
and local musicians. And of course, putting together a festival gives them another
chance to engage in the cathartic experience of playing live.
" [It's about] staying sane in [a] twisted, shitty world," Batt said.
Batt's band mate Mike Ugly has a simpler take on the importance of playing music.
"I'm bored. It entertains me," Ugly added, giggling deviously nearby.
Recently, other good tidings have come from Battand Singh's devotion—a
new space.
On March 3, Fake Jazz will take up a weekly 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. slot on Wednesdays at Lick, one of Vancouver's premier queer nightclubs, located on Abbott
Street.
They admit that ifWendy 13, the Cobalt's former manager, were to open up
a new space, they would be there in a second. However, in the meantime, Lick's
fine cement floors and comfortable darkness fit the bill for Fake Jazz.
From the astral beats of locals Coin Gutter to the electro-acoustic nihilism of
headliner KK Null, the Fake Jazz festival will be an extended showcase of early
drum blasting as usual for Vancouver's most ambitious noise acts. Almost.
At 1 p.m. on March 28, the final day of the festival, Singh and Batt will host
a cozy pancake noise breakfast for festival goers.
They hope that the gathering will help to end the festival on a high note,
giving audience members and players a chance to socialize and eat with one
another and engage in an act of community.
"Breaking bread makes family right?" Singh asked. "We're breaking pancakes."
11 OH NO! YOKO
VS.   !
HIGHSCHOOL
BY JULIE COLERO
PHOTO BY NOAH MOORHOUSE
ART BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
ABBOTSFORD, B.C.:
Murder capital of Canada, home to many a Menno(nite) and hotbed of high
school musical talent About five years ago, You Say Party! We Say Die! busted
out of the small-town-minded city, as did Fun ioo. The next wave is now, and
it's awash with musicians who are, honestly, quite happy to stay put In the
case ofOh No! Yoko, a quirky, keyboard-laden indie pop band, they don't really
have a choice—all three members are currently in grade n, so the occasional
school-night show is adventure enough for the time being.
For anyone not attending W. J. Mouat Secondary, a first introduction to Oh
No! Yoko was likely provided by the CBC's On The Coast radio program when
they held their Best High School Band competition last fall. Shortlisted to the
top io were two Abbotsford bands, Oh No! Yoko and Christian hardcore screamo
band, We Lay Fallen. The fact that, all of a sudden, moms the province over
were into their music, had the boys in the bands pretty darn excited.
"We got lots of publicity," gushed Liam Hamilton, Oh No! Yoko's drum
mer. Bandmates EverettMorris (vocals and keyboards, mostly) and Nic Denis
(bass) are just as stoked by the way things played out. The band didn't come
away with the top spot, but they did get an envelfigre filled with $70 cash! The
band's song "Courtyard Bankrupt" received a healthy dose of CBC radio air-
time, and, at the live in-studio finals, they had a chance to play for screaming
fans and Canadian music celebrity judges like Lee Aaron and Joey "Shithead"
Keithley of D.O.A. fame.
As much as the boys really wanted to win the top prize and share a bill with
their beloved Tokyo Police Club, they're pleased with the two Feb. 13 slots they
were given at Cultural Olympiad events.
"It's during the Olympics," said Denis. "There'll helots of people from all
over the place that haven't heard of us that might just be stopping by, thinking 'There's no events going on right now. So let's just stop, have a hot dog,
and watch this.'"
12 a
WE USED TO BE A FOUR-
MCE. BUT WE KICKED LUCAS
THIESSEN OUT BECAUSE HE
PLAYS RUGBY. % J
Oh No! Yoko is a crowd-pleasing band, to be sure. With clever, at times
remarkably nonsensical, lyrics, Morris stands tall and assured at the helm of
a band that seems to revel in its goofiness. The boys are completely earnest,
however, in their love of music and are totally committed to making the most of
their current good fortune. Besides, they've worked long and hard for this.
"Liam and I had a two-man band for a little while in grade 5," explained
Morris. "We played some metal music and it was pretty fun." Somewhere
along the way, the band experienced a genre shift, and in grade eight, the two
boys asked their friend Nic to join in. "We used to be a four-piece," admitted
Hamilton, "but we kicked Lucas Thiessen out because he plays rugby."
And so it seems to go. All three have devoted varying amounts of time to
bettering their musicianship (Morris is still taking piano lessons, Hamilton
claimed he took one drum lesson and taught himself the rest and Denis admitted he only took up the bass because he knew the band needed a bassist).
Meanwhile they continue to find time to participate in track and field, work
part-time jobs and excel at their French immersion studies. Did I say excel?
Perhaps it's a good thing that I didn't actually get any solid quotes from the
boys' teachers..
But who needs good grades when you're in with the scene? The Abby scene
seems held together by the strong bonds of religion—and turns a blind eye
to musical genre. There is no shortage of churches making their gyms and
amphitheatres available for shows. Show bills are diverse, but inclusive. For
Ones Coming After (FOCA) is an organization currently putting together live
shows around the Eraser Valley. We Lay Fallen's bassist, Joel Trask, explained
the nature of this group: "FOCA is a non-profit organization that supports less
fortunate youth in the lower mainland. They also help out local bands with
things such as getting shows and T-shirts. They put on FOCA events with all
the FOCA bands in order to raise money for good causes."
Oh No! Yoko claim no church affiliation, but the band has seen nothing
but love from the local community.
"We're friends with all the other bands, too," said Denis. "We just help
each other out."
The band particularly enjoyed a recent show at Northview Church, where
getting on the bill proved quite simple. "We just go there and have fun. They
always welcome us," explained Morris.
"They asked us to not have any swearing in any of our songs, or vulgarity
or whatever, but we don't," added Hamilton.
If you're looking to listen to some of Oh No' Yoko's music, the band has
yet to produce more than a handful of CD-Rs, but they've got a ton of tracks
available on their MySpace page, which also contains nonsensical posts and
awkward/awesome photos. To provide some tangible support, you can always
wear a one-of-a-kind pin, hand-made by Hamilton in Art class (Thanks, Ms,
Lam!).
So much of what Oh No! Yoko is all about reeks of d.i.y. cuteness.
"We usually write our songs based on people in our school. Stuff that
happens to us," explained Hamilton. Morris credits lyrical inspiration to "relationships, as in friend-wise, not like passionate lovers." After making this
comment the group falls apart laughing, as they do after most questions. It
is certainly a sense of comedy, most notably a charming toe-in-the-water approach to sarcasm and cynicism, which keeps these three creative. As to where
inspiration starts, Denis explained that "a lot of it just comes out of our heads,
on the spot, and sounds like it would be funny if it actually happened. Most of
our songs, to us, are hilarious. We'll take one situation and over-exaggerate
it for an entire chorus."
According toMorris, who acts as a leader, the band's music is nevertheless
a collective from start to finish. "We just chill in Liam's basement and write
lyrics together, see what fits best and stuff." The boys have been friends since
pre-school and they're eager to see where the music will take them, but are
also realistic in their goals.
"Maybe we will tour or something, [but] I don't plan on getting extremely
famous or anything," Morris said.
"It's kinda hard nowadays," Denis said, commenting on the concept of
touring and making it as a band. "You don't make as much money. You still
have to go to school to have a back-up plan."
Sounds like somebody's been listening to his guidance counsell or! But
no doubt a good deal of credit is also due to the boys' parents, who support
what they are doing wholeheartedly, even if it means driving them down to
East Hastings, like it did for their first gig.
"It was scary!" Morris said about the area around the'Chapel, where they
played during grade nine. Apparently a trip to Subway, sponsored by Hamilton's dad, smoothed things over and paved the way for repeat big-city visits
and a fan base build-up.
What the fans love about Oh No! Yoko is their wacky spirit and catchy
harmonies—the music may even be secondary to onstage antics and online
presence. This is a band very much focused on three guys having fun. They
like their classic rock, and their metal, and are into new stuff, too ("Not like
Much Mega Hits, but, like, the Wedge and stuff," Morris asserted). And while
their sound is not necessarily ground-breaking, the seeds of good songwriting
have been sown. Morris' song-writing skills, as often as he'll stick to the story
that he "justput[s] stuff together," show incredible promise. Everything the
kid touches turns to catchy. His solo project, A Soccer Practice, demonstrates
thatcatchiness (and his Midi/Autotune proclivities) to a tee.
Oh No! Yoko has stumbled across a great deal of luck in the past year. They
came second at the Abbotsford High School Battle of the Bands last spring.
After the band's CBC win, they were nominated as one of the Top 10 High
School Bands in a YouThink/Tom Lee competition, the winner of which will
be announced early March.
This is a band that wants to play to the masses and get noticed, but they're
still happy to represent the kids on the home-front. "There's a lot of good
bands around here [in Abbotsford], just unheard, right?" Morris said. Bands
like the Birch Taxis, We Lay Fallen, Rags to Radio and Ivory Coast are all tearing it up in churches and nut barns across the Fraser Valley, so you can either
board that West Coast Express or cross your fingers that the big city'U keep
drawing them in.
13 JAI
Mi  ■■■
■hm
%
f
si^^^^^ill
NOT QUITE PUNK ENOUG
PHOTOS BY RYAN WAL mi A HIGHER POWER WANTE
TO START mm BAND JJ
Koban owe their continued existence as a band (and a fruit basket) to
some conscientious bus drivers who saved bassist Brittany Westgarth
from her burning home.
Late at night a fuse blew in the house that they shared with some friends,
which caused a fire to break out while everyone was sleeping. Sam Buss,
the other half of Koban, was at work, but Westgarth was woken at night to
discover a lot of smoke and a group of worried bus drivers who had seen the
fire from the street.
With only a short period of time to get out, Westgarth had one priority—to
save her and Buss' bass guitars and then wait for the fire department.
The fire department arrived quickly. Luckily when Westgarth and Buss
went in to survey the damage, they found their music equipment remarkably
unscathed.
"I said I was going to send [the bus drivers] a fruit basket, but I never did,"
Westgarth remarked with a bit of remorse while sitting in the waiting room of
their Gastown jam space. They chatted with Discorder in their home-away-from-
home, while smoking a hookah filled with strawberry-flavoured shisha that was
in the middle of the room and Westgarth was sipping on a vile mixture of Nos
energy drink, vodka and what was possibly Tang. After one sip of it I decided
to go without,which seemed to be the decision Buss also made. The fire was
only the second disaster the band has survived, considering their equipment
had survived a flood a few days before the fire as well.
"A higher power wanted us to start this band," Buss said stoically between
tokes on the hookah.
Koban are a two-piece backed by a drum machine. Westgarth and Buss
both provide vocals showing heavy punk influences—and the two of them
lay down some wailing riffs over top of the mechanical beats. The sound is
unique, falling somewhere between punk, metal and No Wave. Though they
don't actively emulate their idols, you can hear bits of the bands they listen
to (Joy Division, Warsaw, Big Black, Shellac, Nick Cave and Fugazi) in their
music. They had originally planned to play with a real live human drummer,
but circumstances never worked out and eventually their sound evolved to rely
on the drum machine.
"We played with probably three or four people as drummers and they either
thought we sucked or were way too busy with other bands," Buss said.
Their music is unique in Vancouver's scene and the duo feel a little bit out
of place in the city.
If you have not yet heard of Koban this is understandable. Until December
2009 they performed as Manta Ray-Gun, a name under which they garnered
some fans when they achieved semi-final status at CiTR's battle of the bands,
Shindig, in addtion to numerous shows around town.
The name Manta Ray-Gun didn't stick with the band's idea of themselves
though. "I kinda started to hate telling people we were called Manta Ray-Gun,"
said Westgarth, before stating that she thought it sounded silly. After a trip
to Japan, they decided to rename the band Koban. Kobans are small boxlike
buildings manned by community police detachments that provide assistance
in the neighbourhood. In Buss' and Westgarth's case, Kobans provided a lot
of directions around town.
The duo enjoyed Japan's music scene. "Their culture embraces fringe
music," said Buss.
Westgarth and Buss have always felt that their music is a little bit on the
fringe of what's going on.
"All the people [who were into music in high school] were really into
classic rock and we were into punk rock," said Westgarth. Even now with the
band's punk influences they don't feel like their music is punk enough to fit
into Vancouver's punk scene and too punk to fit into other scenes. (Personally, I think they fit in just fine in Vancouver's diverse music community, but
that's just me.)
The duo met in high school when Buss, grounded, couldn't play his first
show for his high school band, Shumagorath.
"One time Sam was grounded and [his band] asked me to fill in for him
and I played his first show," said Westgarth-laughing. They've been playing
together since and they definitely work hard at it.
"We practice a lot; we record a lot," said Westgarth. They have a busy
schedule with their regular week having them meet up to practice at least four
times. Though they tend to spend most of their time improvising when they
jam, it's not something they would ever do live. As a two-piece, a jam has too
much potential to go bad in a live setting.
Their performance is tight and well practiced, with the drum machine giving
a cold mechanical backing track they make up for it with their stage presence.
If you ever see them play you'll be able to tell right away that they are having a
blast According to Buss, they make an effort to make their live shows "more like
art installation with music." They've displayed visuals from the Max Headroom
TV hack that happened in Chicago in 1987, and have a strong identity with that
era's aesthetic values. Buss also likes to use images from Commodore 64 games
or the early works of bodily horror auteur David Cronenberg.
The band records a lot in their home studio. They've released an EP length
cassette tape as Manta Ray-Gun, which they've sold out of, but they've got
a split 7" coming out with Mongst and Fortress on Isolated Nowaves. They
probably won't ever be releasing CDs, but they do plan on making their music
available for download. You can find their music and their upcoming shows
at www.myspace.com/mantaraygunband. They will be playing Discorder's
Fundraiser on March 5 at the Biltmore too, so make sure you get there early
enough to check them out.
17 //BUILDING A MYSTERY
BY DUNCAN M. MCHUGH
TRANSCRIBED BY CAMILLA KEEN
ART BY MELANIE COLES
YMCHTIS—AT THE ¥ERY LEAST—AN ELEC7^>NM D',i€E BAND STARTED BY
PORTLAND'S JONA BECHTOLTIN2003. BECHTOLT WHO HAS ALSO PLACED IN THE
BLOVi$ADDED CLAIRE L E¥ANS TO THE BAND IN $08. THEIR LATEST ALBUM,
SEE MYSTEIfMGHTSjteS RELEASED ^" m LAST YEAR. THEY SPOKE TO
DUNCAN M. §CHUGH ON HIS SHt^^NCAimpNUTS JUST BEFORE THEIR
CANADIAN TOUR STARTED. |WS IS ANfXCERPT ff|f THAT CONYERSATION.
Discorder: You guys have been touring forever it seems. You went all over did you want to do a tour through here?
the place in 2009... four continents? Jona Bechtolt: We wanted to come to Canada for a long time and it hasn't
Claire L. Evans: I don't know. I think we were in 17 countries last year. Is that happened for us. It just made perfect sense. We have been asking our agent to
what we came up with? bring us to Canada for a long time and finally people asked us, and we have
D: Next up you guys are going to be doing a tour of Western Canada. Why . & policy of saying, "Yes" to doing shows.... Yeah, we're huge fans of Canada.
18 It's just been the earliest we could come up.
D: You guys do know you're coming during the Olympics here?
JB: Yeah, that part is strange for us.
CLE: That was maybe not the wisest scheduling. Although, it might be kind
of exciting to be in Vancouver during all the Olympic madness, make us feel
like a big exciting moment in time that we're a part of.
D: [Your visit] will be a little ray of sunshine for Vancouverites, 'cause a
lot of us are feeling kinda bummed out about all the craziness that's going
to be happen.
JB: Yeah, I can imagine, but we are going for the gold. Let's make that perfectly
clear, we are going for the gold.
CLE: I'm going for silver to be honest.
D: You've added some members for this tour? Tell me about the Straight
Gaze, who are they?
JB: They are close friends of ours: D. Rueben Snyder... we have Bobby Bird-
man ... and Jeffrey Brodsky. Every six months or so, we get crazy and we have
to change Yacht in some major way. And past changes and revisions have
been adding Claire, making all kinds of performance rules like never touch-
WE AM GOING FOR WE 60LD.»
ing the computer or only touching computer or touching audience members
or invading personal space using Powerpoint, focusing a lot on video at the
show, and interacting with people. Yeah, we have to make major changes or
else we go nuts.
D: Your website is exhaustive in documenting what you're doing. What inspires
you to be so diligent with keeping it up?
JB: I think it started with just having a pretty bad memory and wanting to
reference it as a resource for myself so I could go back and be like, what's
that ice cream place in San Diego that I really like? And then I have that part
documented that I can always reference. But also it came out of... wanting
to always keep up with not just playing music but doing everything else. We
consider ourselves generalists.
CLE: We see Yacht as being kind of evolutionary entity if you will, and in the
evolutionary ministry of animal and human kind, over specialization is what
causes extinction. We don't want to go extinct
D: Do you do all the web design and video stuff yourself?
JB: Yeah, we do almost everything all ourselves. We're control freaks.
D: And your mission statement [ed. It's up on their website. If you don't have the
means of checking it out think of a cryptic modern Ten Commandments based on open-
mindedness and triangles among other things.], how did that come about?
CLE: Well, uh, there's lots of reasons for it. Mainly it's because we try to build
as much community as possible around Yacht and our peripheral activities
... We make a point of talking to people about our various projects as much
as possible and shaping it to their ideas and needs ... It's like the Ten Commandments, if you will; people like having that foundation to build on, but
it's not set in stone.
JB: We live on the Internet so it's not set in stone. It's a living document that
can breathe and change, and that's something we're really excited about,
especially going to places like Canada. We want to meet new people and hear
new ideas and change the document based on that.
D: You recorded this album in Maria, Texas. Why did you choose Maria?
CLE: Marfa kind of chose us; Marfa has this phenomenon that's not unknown
in others parts of the world, but it's quite rare, a mystery light phenomenon...
It's a paranormal optical phenomenon that happens called the Marfa Mystery
Lights and every night, we'd go out in to the desert and see these paranormal
unexplained light happenings ... It profoundly spoke to us as being a very
rare example of a modern mystery, because we live in an age where there isn't
much mystery left. We live in a very scientific age, where even the most tiny
and incomprehensibly small working aspect of this universe has been rationalized and explained with profound mathematical theories. And where we have
access to information that would have taken our parents weeks or decades
to find, we have it at our fingertips. So, as sort of self navigating people, we
never sort of experienced a real mystery, we never felt like something was both
unqualifiably real and unknowable and mysterious, and so the first time we
saw the lights, it really had a huge effect on us and we decided we wanted to
go back to Marfa to live and to know what it was like
to live with that phenomenon day to day, what it was
like to live with mystery.
JB: We hadn't intended on making an album of music.
We just intended on living there and meeting everyone
we could in the town. And later, we just found an album
before us. We don't know how it got there or how it
was made, but apparendy we made it
D: Between recording the album in Maria and being
on the road and such, do you still feel a strong affinity with Portland?
JB: Yes and no. I feel closer to Marfa almost, and I know that Marfa will be a
place that we'll return to our whole lives. I think that one of our major goals
right now, as a band is to try to put up shop in Marfa, some kind of shop that
will be like a community shop where people could come and gather. But I
mean, all of our equipment is in Portland.
CLE: And we both grew up here.
JB: And we have a huge connection to Oregon and Portland.
CUE: It's hard to know, we're kind of like temporary, autonomous zones that
walk around and everywhere we go has to be virtue of the necessity of our lives,
has to be home to us otherwise we would be totally addressed and alienated
all the time. So Portland is home for us in a more profound way than other
places, but the world is kind of home to us too.
D: Yeah, great, I think that's about ft. Anything else you'd like to add?
CLE: We're very excited to see you, Canada. Thank you for having us.
—Special thanks to Camilla Keen for her help with this story
19  III fill
§3
it!
| JS :
>« 9 v
, as
<-BqfiOhu)
41      I *?
I    J IF    5w>*
II
a  a
S   S BO «
w 2      cO
o 1
l
£ 1   11  *
llJl   f:
ill
AS 8
25
■*.
8*5
f£   8   o
gfl     £ tF X Q
i ° -3 J§ .2 **
§/2; <3 "3b X <
LS    "S     W     U
s o    o S bT
.     M W B  3 •**   &
>3os2Pg j a „
Jslii-^is
1
o
8 §
JlHiih
1 S &.§
J/J5 E> Hh •
w < 5 s «
lis I a
00 .a
£ 2
1 2
•i
O   S   ©
I1 tKH ©
a
■a *
11
Is
'131*
y
v   S   V
•a </> * +*
2 a o c
■gB„
111
a w i
OCQ  «
' r3 « >
alt 8ff3i
s|S  iff
- 2 « u "3 a c« .
|| o^ §| §;
P 5
1=8
ri
I*
^ n3 a
■|i3l
"i s -9 1
^ S Q '3 u
s «« Is 0 .2
I ad 8"^
i
CO
9
1
1
8a
a *£
«^ J .v
i
'3  c
3 §
II
s I
is-
•is,
K©
(4 '
■9-2^
■ n3 00 -5
In8,
J-Skills 3
! 8 c- © « i s
« w w -S & *
Has* 5
21 //CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA, EVERYDAY.
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
11
12pm
1
2
3
Iff
5
6
7
8
9
11
11
QTR Ghost Mis
CiTR Ghost Mix
Prof Talk (Talk)
Pacific Pick! n' (Roots)I    CiTR Ghost Mix
Sounds of Africa
(WorM)
Tana Radio (World)      Breakfast With The
,       I    Browns (Eclectic)
'iMN&ookta (Talk)
KolNodedi (World)
itSko^SsSEovv,
(Reggae)
Blood On Shameless
(Room)
Chips      Saint Tro-
(Pop)      Pe2 (P°P)
Queer FM (Talk)
Rhythms
(World)
Awesome
(M)
Mondo Trasho (Eel)
Transcendance
(Dance)
CiTR Ghost Mix
Stranded
(Eclectic)
Alt Radio (Talk)
Parts Unknown (Pop)
Third Tune's The
Charm (Rock)
Morning After Show
(Eclectic)
Suburban Jungle
(Eclectic)
Pop Drones
(Eclectic)
CiTR Ghost Mix
End of the World
News (Talk)
Sweet And Hot (Jazz)
Duncan's Donuts
{Betectie)
CiTR Ghost Mix
Friday Sunrise
(Eclectic)
Synchronicity (Talk)
CiTR Ghost Mix
•4   The Saturday Edge
(Roats)
Ska-T's Scenic Drive
(Ska)
Generation Aaihilation
(Pook)
Career Fast Track
This Side of Monday
(Eclectic)
Exploding Head
Movies
{Eclectic)
The Jazz Show (Jazz)
Sore Throats, Clappinj
Hands (Eclectic)
CiTR Ghost Mix
Laugh Tracks (Talk)
Wings (Talk)
Reel to Real (Talk)
Fill In
Radio Freethinker
(Talk)
WenersBBQ (Sports)
Flex Your Head
(Hardcore)
USk Oat Jumpstreet
(Dance)
Crimes And Treasons
(Hip-hop),]■
CabaRadio (Talk)
The Green Majority
(Talk)
Democracy Now (Talk)
Rumbletone Radio A
Go 0o (Rock)
Arts Report (Talk)
Sam-
squantch
(Eel)
Folk Oasis (Roots)
Sexy In Van City
(Talk)
Hans Kloss Misery
Hour (Hans Kloss)
We All Fall Down
(Eclectic)
Japanese Musicquest
(World)
French Connection
(World)
Native Solidarity News
(Talk)
Are You Awate
(Betectie)
Exquisite Corpse
(Experimental)
Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell (Live)
Hypnotic Groove
(Dance)
Aural Tentacles
(Eclectic)
Barnburner
(Eclectic)
Radio Zero (Dance)
Nardwuar Presents
(Nardwuar)
News 101 (Talk)
The Leo Ramirez Show
(World)
UBC Sports
Shake A Tail Feather
(Soul/R&B)
The Vampire's Ball
-l   (Industrial)
CiTR Ghost Mix
Power Chord
(Metal)
Code Blue (Roots)
Nasha Volna (World)
Notes from the
Underground
(Electronic/Hip Hop)
Synaptic Sandwich
(Dance/Electronic/
Eclectic)
Beats From The
Basement (Hip-Hop)
CiTRGhostMix
9
1$
11
\1m
1
I
3
I
5
22 M PROGRAM GUIDE
SUNDAY
TANA RADIO
(World) Q-ioam
SHOOKSHOOKTA
(Talk) io-nam
A program targeted to
Ethiopian people that
encourages education and
personal development.
KOL NODEDI
(World) nam-i2pm
Beautiful arresting beats
and voices emanating from
all continents, corners and
voids. Always rhythmic,
always captivating. Always
crossing borders.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) i2-3pm
Alternatina Sundays
Reggae inna all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternatina Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
boots country.
SHAMELESS
(Eclectic) 3-5pm
Alternatina Sundays
Dedicated to giving local
music acts a crack at some
airplay. When not playing
the PRshtick, you can hear
some faves you never knew
you liked.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternatina Sundays
British pop music from all
decades. International pop
(Japanese, French, Swedish, British, US, etc.), '60s
soundtracks and lounge.
SAINT TROPEZ
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternatina Sundays
Welcome to St. Tropez!
Playing underrated music
from several decades!
st.tropez101.9@gmail.com
QUEER FM
(Talk) 6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual
communities of Vancouver.
Lots of human interest
features, background on
current issues and great
music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RHYTHMSINDIA
(World) 8-opm
Alternatina Sundays
Featuring a wide range of
music from India, including
popular music from the
1930s to the present; Ghaz-
als and Bhajans, Qawwalis,
pop and regional language
numbers.
ALL AWESOME IN YOUR EARS
(Eclectic) 8-9pm
Alternatina Sundays
MONDO TRASHO
(Eclectic) 9-iopm
The one and the only Mon-
do Trasho with Maxwell
Maxwell—don't miss it!
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) iopm-i2am
Join us in practicing the
ancient art of rising above
common ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
latest trance cuts.
trancendance@
hotmail.com
MONDAY
PROF TALK
(Talk) 7:3o-8am
Prof Talk is a radio talk
show that brings UBC
professors in to talk about
current/past events at the
local and international
level. http://ubcproftalk.
wordpress.com
proftalk@gmail.com
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 8-nam
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns@
hotmail.com
STRANDED
(Eclectic) iiam-i2pm
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present,
from his Australian homeland. And journef^ith him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores the alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Talk) 12-ipm
Hosted by David Barsamian.
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) i-3pm
An indie pop show since
1999, it's like a marshmal-
low sandwich: soft and
sweet and best enjoyed
when poked with a stick
and held close to a fire.
THE RIB
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
Explore the avant-garde
world of music with host
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
From new electronic and
experimental music to
improvised jazz and new
classical! So weird it will
blow your mind!
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live,
volunteer-produced,
student and community
newscast. Every week, we
take a look back at the
week's local, national and
international news, as seen
from a fully independent
media perspective.
THIS SIDE OF MONDAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-7pm
Fun and independent music
supported by a conversational monologue of
information, opinion and
anecdotes focusing on the
here, the now and the next
week.
becktrex@gmail.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
THE JAZZ SHOW
(Jazz) 9pm-i2am
Vancouver's longest
running prime-time jazz
program. Hosted by the
ever suave, Gavin Walker.
Features at npm.
Feb.i: This is Black History Month and our tribute
wili feature drummer/
composer Max Roach and
his ensemble with singer
Abby Lincoln plus Coleman
Hawkins, Michael Olatunji,
Booker Little and others
playing Roach and Oscar
Brown Jr's Freedom Now
Suite. A powerful and still
controversial recording
dedicated to the freedom of
people of colour.
Feb.8: Bassist/composer
and firebrand Charles
Mingus and one of his
most famous works:
Tijuana Moods. This time the
"alternate version." These
are alternate takes of the
five movements. A refreshing new look of a Mingus
classic.
Feb.15: Alto saxophone
master Jackie McLean with
trumpeter Donald Byrd, pianist Mai Waldron and others
in McLean's debut recording called Neu> Traditions.
Feb.22: A great orchestral
performance of a suite in six
movements by composer
Lalo (Boris) Schifrin dedicated to North America and
called The Neiu Continent—
with John Birks "Dizzy"
Gillespie on trumpet as the
principal soloist.
SORE THROATS, CUPPING
HANDS
(Eclectic) i2am-iam
Sore Throats Clapping
Hands relies on simple
melodies and poignant lyricism to drive our passions.
We embrace music that
takes little production and,
for that reason, is extremely
accessible to play, share,
create and enjoy—music
that can be produced with
little more than clapping
hands and sore throats.
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN"
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music,
and its derivatives with Arthur and the lovely Andrea
Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SOUNDS OF AFRICA
(World) 8-9:3oam
Showcasing music, current
affairs & news from across
the African continent and
the diaspora, you will learn
all about beat and rhythm
and it will certainly kick-
start your day.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
(Rock) 9:30-ii:3oam
Open your ears and prepare
for a shock! A harmless
note may make you a fan!
Deadlier than the most
dangerous criminals!
borninsixtynine@
hotmail.com
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) n:3oam-ipm
An eclectic mix of Canadian
indie with rock, experimental, world, reggae,
punk and ska from Canada,
Latin America and Europe.
The Morning After Show
has local bands playing
live on The Morning After
Sessions.
LAUGH TRACKS
(Talk) i-2pm
Laugh Tracks is a show
about comedy. Kliph
Nesteroff, from the 'zine
Generation Exploitation,
hosts.
generationexploit@yahoo.
com, musicalboot@
yahoo.ca
WINGS
(Talk) 2-2:30pm
REEL TO REAL
(Talk) 2:303pm
Movie reviews and
criticism.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
(Talk) 3-4pm
A national radio service
and part of an international
network of information and
action in support of indigenous peoples' survival and
dignity.
RADIO FREETHINKER
(Talk) 4-4:3opm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we
examine popular extraordinary claims and subject
them to critical analysis.
The real world is a beautiful
and fascinating place and
we want people to see it
through the lens of reality
as opposed to superstition.
WENER'S BARBEQUE
(Sports) 4:30-6pm
Daryl Wener talks about the
world of sports. Everything
from the Canucks to the
World Rock Paper Scissors
Championship.
ethanwener@hotmail.com
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore
since 1989. Bands and
guests from around the
world.
LIFE ON JUMPSTREET
(Dance) 8-gpm
23 CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) g-npm
crimesandtreasons@
gmail.com
CABARADIO
(Talk) npm-i2:3oam
For the world of Cabaret.
Tune in for interviews,
skits, musical guests and
more. It's Radio with sass!
WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information
and inanity. Not to be
missed!
dj@jackvelvet net
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) io-n:3oam
ANOIZE
(Noise) n:3oam-ipm
An hour and a half of avant-
rock, noize, plunderphonic,
psychedelic and outsider
aspects of audio. An experience for those who want to
be educated and EARitated.
lukemeat@hotmail.com
THE GREEN MAJORITY
(Talk) i-2pm
Canada's only environmental news hour, syndicated by
CIUT 89.5 FM Toronto or
tuuM.greenmajority.ca.
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 2-3 pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-5pm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
AUDIOTEXT
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
The juiciest Canadian writing: poetry readings, author
interviews, short stories,
spoken word, etc.
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternatina Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a
focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.com
THE CANADIAN WAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternatina Wednesdays
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big emphasis on our local scene.
C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997.
folkoasis@gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-11PM
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
Hans Kloss' Misery Hour
(Hans Kloss) npm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET AND HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and hot
jazz from the 1920s, '30s
and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by
donuts.
duncansdonuts.
wordpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. HosrM&y a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we interview a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:3opm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World) 3:30-5pm
French language and music.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message
behind the music: Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art,
sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended for
the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-npm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across
the country and around the
world.
HYPNOTIC GROOVE
(Techno) npm-i2am
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:3o-9am
An eclectic mix of indie
rock, hip hop and reggae to
bring you up with the sun.
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) 9-ioam
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality, health
and feeling good. Tune in
and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun! This is not your average
spirituality show.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program,
dj ska_t@hotmail. com
BARNBURNER
(Eclectic) i-2pm
The greasier side of Rock
n' Roll, Rhythm n' Blues,
and Country... Crack a beer,
order some BBQ, and get
your boogie on.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...dootdoo!
nardwuar@nardwuar. com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday description.
HOT MESS
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
On temporary hiatus. Will
be replaced with UBC
Sports.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
On temporary hiatus. Will
be replaced with UBC
Sports.
RAINBOW GROOVE
(Dance) 9-io:3opm
On temporary hiatus. Will
be replaced with UBC
Sports.
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) io:30-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampiresball.
blogspot.com.
thevampiresball@gmail.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots niusic—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac. com
GENERATION ANIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk
and old-school hardcore
backed by band interviews,
guest speakers and social
commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by
Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
, From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and blues
roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
codeblue@
buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada.com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment
and music for the Russian
community, local and
abroad.
nashavolna.ca
NOTES FROM THE
UNDERGROUND
(Electronic, Hip Hop & More)
7-9pm
v Start your Saturday night
off right with our weekly
showcase of the local
underground DJ and
electronic music scene,
notesundergroundradio.
blogspot.com
notesundergroundradio@
gmail.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-:iipm
If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www. synapticsandwich.net
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip-hop) npm-iam
Mr. Joi, being a cinemaphile
as well as a DJ, will surprise
you with the likes of:
French NewWave, Golden
Age, Noir, Action, Adventure, Comedy, Coming of
age Drama, Epic/Myth,
Fantasy, Gangster, Horror,
Romantic Comedy, Science
Fiction, Social Drama,
Thriller, The Art Film, The
Black Comedy, The Musical
and the Porno.""'
24 ART PROJECT//
BEN FREY
Ben Frey is the drummer for the Shilohs and Sun Wizard. He is also an artist
with an interest in illustrating animals, such as the Siamese monkey, the
ram manning a boat and the llamas with long pointy spears shown here. His
work has been featured in mediums as diverse as children's books, concert
posters, a Facebook application and on Sitka Surfboards (where these llamas
have previously made an appearance). He's also been published in the Walrus,
Momentam and numerous issues of Discorder. ART PROJECT //
BEN FREY
26 27 7 UNDER REVIEW
BAKERS AT DAWN
YOU MUST HIDE YOUR LOVE FOREVER
{Pepp&mt II Records)
Holy moley, Baleens at Dawn's newest
release is called You MustHtdeYeurl&Be
Forever and this title is a wee hint for
its sound. It's dark and grey, but also
ultimately searching for something
deeper, lovelier and more beautiful,
like the light at the end of the tunnel
or next summer's sunlight. Marcus
Sjoland, the only member of Bakers
at Dawn, lives in the city of Malmo,
Sweden. This is at the southern tip
of the country, and only receives up to
seven hours of daylight in the middle
of winter, inducing suspicion that Sjoland has Super Seasonal Affective Daylight Disorder, a.k.a Super SADD. His
music sounds like he spends a lot of
time in the dark, rummaging around
in thoughts, producing sounds and
questioning days throughout a season
of night. A line like "Sometimes I get
lonely at night with imaginary friends"
is just a sample of this mood.
Although the music is dark, his
voice is sultry and soft and really enjoyable. You know those moods when
you are feeling grey? One of those
days when all you want to do is be
comforted by dreary music because it
suits your mood? Well, if this is you,
then this album is perfect. Soothing
in those lone emotions, it keeps you
on your toes, because despite its depressed vibe, it still makes the effort
be a little weird. The acoustic guitar
almost sounds like it is from a small
Mexican village—as if you can hear
maracas in some songs. But in other
songs, there are electric guitar noises,
electric keyboards, strange effects and
experimental sounds. It crosses a fine
line from earthy to spacey in songs
like "Buckets" or "Opsigon."
If you like Neutral Milk Hotel,
then you might like this, he listed
them as one of his influences,
amongst others like Leonard Cohen
and the Melvins. The album consists
of 15 short songs, each with its own
little story or quirky sounds. You
might as well check out his album
for free at www.peppermillrecords.
com/pmorj.
—Claire Dickson
THE BEIGE
El ANGEL EXTERMINAD0R
(Independent)
The first minute or so of the Beige's
second studio album is indicative
of the kind of experience you might
expect through this kind of musical
journey; dark, mysterious, beautiful,
rich and interesting. The Vancouver-
based quintet combines poetry with
an eclectic mix of atmospheric ambiance, alt-country and funk-infused
jazz. While mostly organic, they slip
the sounds of a distorted viola and
the odd ambient synth monster here
and there, just to further darken the
mood. As the title of the album suggests, you are probably not going to
cuddle with someone over this one,
though it is the perfect backdrop to
write an angry letter.
Props to the band for their metaphor comparing ancient Babylonian
morality to the suburb city of Surrey
in the track "King George" with lyrics
such as "An eye's an eye / A tooth's
a tooth / We lie all night / We sleep
the truth." The song "I Got a Job in
the Belly of the Beast" is the perfect
anthem for anyone who has ever sold
their soul to make a dollar; it's what
everyone is so miserable about anyway, so we might as well tap our toes
to the tremolo. "Different Roads" is
a seven-minute epic that lulls the
consciousness then wakens it with a
catchy chorus. One obnoxious tune is
"Underground is Waiting" which fails
in its attempt at musical cleverness
by trying to build lyrics exponentially
over a looped motif. Barring that effort, the album is worth a listen for
those who like to push the boundaries of their musical collections. From
the streets of Surrey to the Fountain
of Youth in "Ponce De Leon" (which
sounds like someone may actually
be dying at the fountain, Twin Peaks-
style), El Anael Exterminador is far from
beige as the darkened lyrics emulsify
with the colorful array of instruments.
Their website claims they are an atmospheric jazz-pop quintet—but take
the pop out of the equation.
—Slavko Bucifal
ORA COGAN
THE QUARRY
(Isolated Now Waves/Borne!,
Recordings)
Time apart ftom tteat&y 1$ nafcef to
come by.
^^^^I^^^^r rflaliage*, separating one's self from the rush of worldwide goings on can yield some truly
revelatory perspective. On her latest
album, The Quarry, Vancouver singer-
songwriter Ora Cogan finds autonomy
and uses it to project moments of her
life into sonic fantasy.
Over the course of 13 tracks, Cogan
combines the inherent blues of her
brooding vocal range with evocative
lyrical imagery, creating a storybook
of song to travel through. This signature style of Cogan's is employed to
great effect on the ebbing devotional
"Glass Tower" and standout title track
"The Quarry." Accompanied by the
hypnotic finger-picking of her acoustic guitar, Cogan's reverb-veiled voice
guides us to a place in her landscape
culled from a fond, yet seemingly dark
memory. Sewn with careful composition and coloured by dissonant twang,
"The Quarry" is only the midway point
through this excursion.
The rest of the album finds Cogan
chasing oppression out with beautiful blue notes in "Blood Debt." We
find her escaping with another by
moonlight with "In the Dark," and
in "Gather," Cogan tells us of loss and
longing with the help of her melancholy strings.
Cogan's simple but sublime song-
writing is enough to make this record
brilliant, but the sparse, lo-fi production (courtesy of Cogan and Jesse Taylor) brings it an eerie and cohesive
aesthetic that sets it apart from less
considered contemporary folk variations and neo-blues iterations.
At its very best, music is an explorative expression, a highly cathartic
and transcendental experience that
drives artists outside of themselves
and inspires those around them to
see the world differently.
While a great deal of independent,
28 experimental music coming out of
Western Canada right now could be
described in these terms, The Quarry
exemplifies this often forsaken purpose of music and gifts us with a looking glass to witness Cogan's world
through.
—Justin Lanaille
HOUERADO
RECORD III A BAG
{Royal Mountain Records}
Record In A Ba# is the debut CD from
Manotick, Ontario-band Hollerado,
and iffxrstimpressions are worth anything, then this band is the money.
The album begins on sel&conscious
footing with "Hollerado Land," a
short, engaging live number that
reminds me of those dorky Michael
Cera-type kids you want to hug and
give a wedgie to at the same time.
Problem is this dorky kid is pretty
cool and can actually play a really
mean rock tune. What is refreshing
about this music is that it almost
feels as though the band hasn't fully
realized their talent, or maybe they
do and they're just being cheeky and
holding back their awkward radness.
Whatever they're up to, it works really
well and it's no surprise the attention
they've drawn to themselves so far.
For the most part, the songs borrow
from the formula that made Weezer
famous: punchy guitar and drums that
wake you up like a jump in a cold lake,
coupled with memorable sing-along
vocals that draw your attention and
sink into your core. All of this comes
together into an album chock full of
near perfect pop songs that'll grow on
you like that weird nerd kid who you
can't quite figure out but can't help
but love anyway.
Good pop music played well can
be so shamelessly good, and Hollerado definitely have the chops and
songwriting ability to sway the world
with their fumbling dorky charm.
—Nathaniel Bryce
EARLSTOWM WINTER
PORCH LIGHTS
(Worn Records)
Vancouver folfc-country artists larl-
stown Winter released their five-track
EP, which plays much in the same
vein of local group Eldorado with
their brand of sweet-loving country
music.
The opening track, "Porch Lights",
is a slow burning moody ballad about
lost love. It has a gentle, rolling, organic feel that is a perfect introduction to the band. Porch Liahts is a very
laidback affair. Each song is stripped
back in terms of sound, but they don't
suffer for it.
Singer-songwriter Jonathan True-
fitt makes it all worth listening to.
Truefitt has such a unique voice that
one must hear to believe, as nothing
is really comparable to it. Even with
a single listen, anyone would be convinced that this guy's broken heart is
authentic.
The final track "Helena" is quite
beautiful and is guaranteed to get
a tear rolling down the cheek of
those listeners with a freshly broken
heart.
Not something that regularly
comes out of the Vancouver scene,
Earlstown Winter has an unpretentious, soft and thoroughly gentle
sound. There is nothing abrasive or
earth shattering here—just some very
pretty music.
—{Catherine Boothroyd
LIGHTSPEED CHAMPION
LIFE IS SWEET! NICE TO MEET YOU
{Domino Records) -
Lightspeed Champion is comprised of
Devonte' Hynes, and with his second
album Life is Sweet! Nice to Meet You, he
delves deep into a Queen-drenched,
pop sound. With the help of producer
Ben Allen who's worked with the likes
of Gnarls Barkley and Animal Collective. Rich indie-pop with a lot of diversity is what can be expected from the
former Test Icicles singer. There are
lots of influences, plenty of musical
throwbacks to pop and rock of yesteryear, but the album lacks consistency.
Hynes' singing leaves something to be
desired, and the songwriting is soph-
omoric at times, detracting from the
production. But then there are some
really catchy melodies and compositions that make the album worth a
listen to. And Hynes singing isn't all
bad. One of the more well-rounded
tracks offthe album is "Sweetheart"
Hynes' somewhat more restrained vocals are roughly hewn and contrast to
the polished sound of the track well.
The country/western-tinged track is
full fledged, with a sparse guitar and
vocal intro, building on atmospheric
feel to a full blown crescendo. With
a couple catchy tracks, Lightspeed
Champion is a decent second full-
length. The musical interludes are
a bit of a stretch and a questionable
addition to the album. The simple
hodgepodge sound adds to the somewhat adolescent feel of the album.
—Adam Mannearen
onao— _*
OF THE BLUE COLOUR OF THE SKY
(Capitol)
Chicago band OK Go, probably best
known for their dekghtfoSy choreographed YouTube hit video for "Here
it Goes Again" (the one with the treadmills), are back with a killer batch of
power-pop songs on their new album.
Throughout, they display a willingness to keep things interesting for the
listener, with inventiveness both in
terms of sounds and arrangement
The band has a cheeky, quirky vibe
that guides them towards witty lyrics
and whatever instrumentation the
song seems to demand. OK Go can
do the big four-on-the-floor stompers
with gang vocals, stadium reverb and
fuzzy guitars (like "White Knuckles"
and "This Too Shall Pass"), but they're
also quite capable of integrating the
synthetic textures of drum machines
and programmed synths into a tension-building New Wave harmony.
The album seems to succeed the
most, though, when the band really
tries something new, as on mid-album
piece "Before the Earth Was Round."
With its insistent yet uniform rhythm,
subtly accelerating tempo, dreamy
synth layers and simply melodic vo-
coded fairy tale vocals, it's an interesting and quite pretty piece.
29 Of the Blue Colour of the Sky is the
work of a band that enjoys the juxtaposition of such a song against a folky
love song with strummed acoustic
guitars, the sound of a running tape
recorder and wistful lyrics. In many
ways, it's the work of a band not walking a line between loud and quiet,
organic and synthetic, sincere and
tongue-in-cheek, but disregarding
such a line's significance, drawing
the best things from each region and
having a great time doing so.
—Doug Mackenzie
0WIHPALHTT
HEARTIAN9
(Domino)
In case you don't pay attention to
^Ke^camgs7lct^ie^Srtbyt^u^
you that Owen Pailett produced his
work, up until this new release, under.
the artist name Final Fantasy. For four
years, Pailett has poured his energy
and sweat into Heartland, and it's now
paying off. This third album has been
well received and much of the tour
he's now on is sold-out
Heartland begins with organs and a
choir-like-liarmony. This culminates
into a peak and suddenly throws the
listener into something completely
different than what it started as. Tribal
drum patterns are matched by Pallett's
tenor vocals. The melody has a summer Caribbean feel to it while what
sounds like a string quartet balances
the tone and style of Pallett's voice.
The album is dominated by a sense
of importance. One phrase leads
into the next and it's urgent that it be
heard. Heartland will not take kind to
being turned off mid-point It appeals
to the emotions of its listeners in all
its symphonic glory. The lyrics, on the
other hand, seem dark considering
the tone of the music which is much
more light-hearted. Pailett calls out
poetry like in "Red Sun No. 5" when
he sings "Until the sun rose crimson /
Crept across my limbs and /1 saw that
they were earthen / That they decay
and worsen."
The instrumentals in here alone make
it commendable. From end to end, violin, horn, oboe and percussion greet the
listeners' ear. TheCzech Symphony, Jeremy Gara of Arcade Fire, and others have
helped to contribute to Pallett's complete
work. In its entirety, Heartland sounds like
an epic and valuable film score.
—Sarah Charrouf
RJD2
THE COLOSSUS
(Rj's Electrical Connections)
DJ/producer superhero RJDa is back
with his fourth solo release; aptly
titled The Colossus, the album offers
up 14 huge tracks that showcase his
diverse musical talents. "Let There Be
Horns" starts things offwith a groove
that will have James Brown dancing
on his own grave; tight, symphonic
horn loops, funky beats, dark riffs
and slick licks getyour head bopping.
Then our superhero slides gently into
"Games You Can Win," a slower, soulful track (the beats just as deep howev- j
er), featuring Kenna on vocals. From |
here on in, The Colossus weaves in and |
out of genres flawlessly. Tracks like
"Giant Squid" and "A Spaceship For
Now" play like symphonies, proving
RJD2 to be as much a composer as a
songwriter. The fun lounge groove of
"Tin Flower " offers a bit of a '60s feel,
while "The Stranger" focuses again
on tight horn loops and solid beats
broken up with a beautiful melodic
bridge. RJD2's songwriting talents
can be found throughout the album
on funk-R&B tracks like "Walk with
Me" and "Crumbs Off the Table" (featuring Aaron Livingston), or the dark
hip-hop of "A Son's Cycle" (featuring
the Catalyst, Illogic and NP). In the
end, The Colossus lives up to its bold
title. All 14 tracks are brilliantly composed, flawlessly executed and masterfully produced, ultimately holding
RJD2 up to his reputation.
—MarkPaulHus
SPOON RIVER
KIHG8OMOFTHEOURHE0
(Northern Electric)
The only uncertainty about Spoon
River Is how they came up with their
name. Hie rest is dirt simple; side-
bums for miles and harmonica In a
neck rack. This band has talent to
spare, namely drawing from former
membership of Montreal-based Royal
Mountain Band. Spoon River front-
man Tavis Triance lends honesty to the
band with hints of tremolo and lyrics
that speak to a life lived. The sounds of
the ensemble blend to one harmonious symphony of Americana that is
an absolute pleasure to listen to live
as it is on their debut release. Track
highlights include "Buried in the Sun"
which features melodies by Rachel
Horst on keys and in "The Wind in the
Trees." This band and album strike
a refreshing balance between radio
gold and bar room gnash that is a rare
treat. It's sure to be enjoyed on heavy
rotation by both old men and young
women alike. With such a refined
premier album, one cannot help but
imagine the directions to be travelled
by this tight tootenanny.
—Robert Fouaere
TRIODES
CHUNKED
(Modics Music)
^^xc^^o^e^^^s^^^Eor^^)oves *
and rhythmguitar, oh my! Highly
calculated jazz licks become mind
numbing in this musical version of
Seinfeld's jeans-and-white-sneakers
outfit. This is a smooth jazz 101 album. It sounds a bit like that band
that opens for Jay Leno but with some
strange modes and scales and some
esoteric, yet simple, noodling for a bit
more spice. The track "Blue Pepper"
for example features a psychedelic
and/or drunk guitar solo that is kind
of interesting, but otherwise most of
this can be found on your local TV
weather station. The self-described
"genre-jumping instrumental group"
play it safe, too safe. So safe it's almost
groan worthy. Even theedgier tracks,
like "The Kick," are scrubbed clean of
anything interesting, even with the
added distortion on the guitar. They
do dabble around other genres a lot
though. Reggae, jam-band and funk
are fit into the Triodes PG-13 formula.
Triodes are good musicians, and they
play well together, but it's just a little
too clean and boring. It sounds like
TV-interlude music. It isn't surprising
that producer Roberto Occhipinti also
writes music for TV and film. Too bad
they couldn't use their technical skills
to step outside of the broadcast-safe
spectrum and write something a bit
less like elevator-music.
—Adam Mannearen
VANCOUVER KILLING SPREE
IT'S NOT ABOUT MURDER...
(Independent)
Vancouver Killing Spree has recently
«^®thSrrlve-track EP It's Not
About Murder... The band is comprised
ofjesse Weymer, Jamieson Cleary and
Brad Anderson. VKS mentioned a fan
reviewing their music on facebook by
saying "It's not punk, it's not metal,
it's no rock, it's hdtipU, it sounds like
all those things got in a knife fight,
and punk and roll won."
This description definitely sheds
light on the band's sound. Another
way to imagine what they sound like
is to transport yourself to the now-
deceased Calgary bar The Castle and
to picture a room full of black tee
shirts and blue jeans, hands waving
in the air avoiding the inevitable point
that they spill their Pilsner or Kokanee
while sweaty bodies jump and smash
around.
Drum fills and heavy bass dominate this punk album, while the lead
guitarist pays heed to the power chord.
The lyrics, sung by Anderson, have
filled a space somewhere between
political and love poetry. More than
anything, though, it sounds like the
three of them are having fun. To get
a full grasp of this three-piece punk
band, you're best off seeing them
30 live. Vancouver Killing Spree is playing the Bourbon, March 13. Go forth
and listen!
—Sarah Charrouf
LAURA VEJRS
JULY FLAME
(Raoen Mardting Band Records)
After three years of plucking her
nylon-string guitar at a barn turned
recording studio in her current home
of Portland, Laura Veirs' seventh folk
album offers an earthy, grounded
and edgy perspective to the world
%f rnu<uc. After gaining a considerable amount of media buzz, as well
as topping Billboard's Heatseekers
and Folk charts, Veirs' album proves
that artistic simplicity can overcome
the inexorable auto-tuning and syn-
thesising that many artists have been
reduced to (no names mentioned.
Ahem, ahem), [ed. Despite this dig at
autotumna Discorder feels that autotun-
ina and otherjbrms of synthetic processing
have made, and continue to make, some
wonderful sounds.] Embodying an artistic amalgamation of Feist and Stevie
Nicks, the album creates a harmonious balance of sounds, with gentle
soothing instrumentals being complimented by raw, edgy and haunting vocals. Stripped down to its bare
essentials, there is no reverb, techno
beats or anything else to mar the tranquility of the album. It's the kind of
stuff you take with you on a summer
scenic road trip by yourself or your favourite backseat driver. The track "July
Flame" serves as a patriotic kudos to
all things associated with summer,
from July Flame peaches (which in
fact were the original inspiration for
the track), to "sipping lemonade in a
backyard." Such an album serves as
a great reminder to the thousands of
students stuck in a dreary, stressful,
midterm-laden month, that EI Nifio
levelled temperatures, sun, and a few
months of blissful nothingness is not
far from sight
—Gracelle Bonifacio
YES NICE
BUNOFQLDED
(Independent)
Yes Nice is an orchestral pop duo that
has recently escaped the tundra of
Edmonton, to attend art school and be
near the sea in Vancouver. Blindjblded,
their second album, is an intriguing
and tuneful collection of songs, full
of lush, layered instruments. In fact,
between them, Scott McKellar and
Nathaniel Wong seem to play about a
dozen different musical instruments,
bending the timbres of acoustic and
electric guitar, piano, strings, flute,
woodwinds, organ and others to the
cause of giving their music voice.
Having the option of playing
whichever of those instruments best
suits the song gives them an awesome degree of freedom in crafting
the album—they have access to many
sounds, but ±e lushness and diversity
of sound is different from that of a
band like Broken Social Scene or Arcade Fire; in those bands, a different
person is behind each instrument and
one can sense that the more unified vision of only two artists lends the affair
a more cohesive, orderly air.
But one can't compare Yes Nice to
the aforementioned bands too much.
They are an entirely different experience, this album is quite polished and
carefully arranged. There is a sense of
it being composed, of having some of
the Hylozoists' neo-orchestral sense
of harmony and counterpoint, and
some of the Beatles' episodic multisection tendencies. Though not constantly riveting and sometimes too
busy, it works well thought of as an
extended suite—several of the songs
transition seamlessly to the next and
each holds its place as a step through
the larger work.
For myself, the three-minute high
point of the album is "Horses," with
its energetic, constant syncopated
beat; its handclaps, whistling, and joyful, massed vocals, with their African-
esque melody and gospel lyrics. Only
after these catchy elements take hold
do Yes Nice tastefully embellish the proceedings with strings and organs.
It's hard not to see the album in
a different light after "Horses." It's a
question of direction really: will the
duo lock onto the energy they tapped
in that song? Whether they want to is
up to them, but next time around it
may make the difference between quite
good, and, as this is, superlative.
—Doug Mackenzie
YUKON BLONDE
YUKON BLONDE
(Nevada Records)
Innovation and artistry are often
tc^t^^^th^uu^n^tepm^rsoru^ue
achievement—which is probably why
it's difficult (at first) to get excited
about a standard, well-executed pop
record like Yukon Blonde's eponymous debut Like a vintage flannel
shirt, the sound and aesthetic are
consciously derivative. But the Vancouver-based indie poppers have conjured enough reflection and polish to
make their '60s rock-inspired album
a worthwhile listen.
Yukon Blonde are not arty or eccentric; their approach is thoughtful and inoffensive. Formerly called
Alphababy, the all-dude foursome
originally hailing from Kelowna have
crafted a crisp and accessible sound
that is unabashedly reminiscent of
long drives and beat-up furniture.
While other local bands are off experi
menting with bhangra fills and feedback noise, Yukon Blonde is carefully
honing nostalgic, light-hearted riffs
and echoey vocal harmonies. "Babies
Don't Like Blue Anymore" sounds
like a Two Hours Traffic song you've
heard on the radio, while "Loyal Man"
could easily have been written by the
Fleet Foxes.
With reverb and musicianship to
spare, the band consistently crosses
folkie guitar lines with airy synths.
Guitar and electric organ solos make
short appearances on a handful of
tracks. And while the slick, oft-repeated hook on "Wind Blows" becomes
mildly excruciating upon second listen, the clean and clear production is
an overall benefit to the album.
Taking inspiration from mid-'6os
Beatles and Fleetwood Mac records,
Yukon Blonde's unpretentious take on
cold coffee, wet weather, dreamy girls
and government offices feels oddly
refreshing.
—Sarah Berman
LIVE MUSIC
and our party never lets up BOWERBIRDS / JULIE DOIRON     JN| \jf  f   § $J | 1§
January 23 /Biltmore Cabaret
Sometimes being a concert reviewer puts you in an interest^H^osition. It
certainly did when I went to see Julie Doiron and Bowerbirds at a sold out show
at the Biltmore. Bathed in gold light, the opening half of the night's double
header, Julie Doiron, launched into a spare, intimate, yet fully $j$g$jjtfg set with
Fred Squire on drums. Doiron and Squire have a lot of chemistry together—on
the love songs, one could be forgiven for mistaking the duo for a couple. Doiron
was also accompanied by Attack in Black's Daniel Romano, which opened up
her sound and allowed for some powerful guitar duets. From the angry discord
of "No More" to the genteel wonderment of "Snow Falls in November," the
breadth of Doiron's set went far to prove that she's still Canada's indie queen
(sorry, Feist). Although it was full of highlights, including her recent title "Spill
Yer Lungs," the pinnacle had to be the cover of Sam Cooke's "Bring It on Home
to Me;" everyone knew it and obviously enjoyed it.
But what the audience enjoyed even more was Bowerbirds' set which,
judging by applause, they were clearly there to see ove^die Doiron (some
folks in the crowd didn't even know who Doiron was!). Full disclosure: I don't
really like Bowerbirds, but everyone else in attendance sure did. From opener
^Hooves" right through to their curfew-extending finale, Bowerbirds received
nothing but love from their audience—this was honestly the most applause
I had ever heard for a band in the Biltmore. The folksy band played mostly as
a trio, but opened up to a quartet several times, allowing for some incredibly
varied instrumentation. I may nothave enjoyed all of this, but, to coin a phrase,
a few hundred Biltmore attendees can't be wrong!
—Sean Nelson
KRONOS QUARTET FEAT. TANYA TAGAQ
January 30 / Chan Centre
Saturday's concert at the Chan Centre was a journey through unfamiliar landscapes. The Kronos Quartet is a string quartet probably best known for the
scores to the films Requiem For A Dream or The Fountain, even though they've
been at melpferont of modern classical music for 30 years, commissioning
over 600 works from composers all over the world.
Tanya Tagaq is similarly innovative, in that she takes traditional musical
modes to new places. As an Inuit throat singer, she's collaborated with everyone from local dubstep producer Michael Red to Bjork on the larynx-centric
Medulla.
The concert's first half was comprised of the Quartet playing challenging,
harmonically intriguing pieces by Scandinavian composers. There was pleasingly indeterminate discord similar to an orchestra tuning, spirited liveliness
emulating Swedish folk, outer-space sounds, even scary noise evoking unoiied
hinges and whispering, confused ghosts.
Next was Tundra Sonas by Canadian composer Derek Charke, wherein Tanya
Tagaq also took the stage. While the juxtaposition of the two musical forces
was interesting, the throat singing was sonically overpowering* and the piece
thrived in its less vigorous interludes, as when the quartet accompanied a
spoken-word In^^Uc-tale.
32 After Kronos' version of "Flugufrelsaf innM by Sigur, Ros came the final and
mo*t lifting performance of the evening-^sotoby Tanya Taga*|» She began
":w^t#hiiple, cooing melo^iw|^!^rl>ljnc tuated |«|rrJ^loiilc gasping, to^on?
a guttural to^-*^fbc|i^l^lke a coughing demoninterlocked with, ayelpiag
dog, evil imp or gasping g^l'i^feuftf to anguishe#3howls and the emoticp jsfee',
channeled was so isfimate and real that $£ was almost hard to watch. II-wW-
% tot to take inj super-musicians preciself tendering complex modern classical music, unchained passion and earthy power* ail in one show—it was an
f^&nsion of my musical unfverse. *
-—Doug MacleVoie
ST. VINCENT /WILOBIROS&PEA0EDRUMS
February 4 /Venu4J§
For fans of St. Vincent, Annie Clark's thin face and tousled hair are quite familiar, dominating me covers or* her two full-length albums. It's no surprise
to find your eye namrally^twftjtj^elt^uirfinga performai^i^Cl^anjII^:
-i"g^ttp> tracking her expressions and trying to gain Insight into bow tfte wity,
quiet Texas could pjoduce such wspdrous compositions. However* the feast
^;jfe^l|eyes extended far beyond Clark's visage on'tl^lnght as the dynamic
, l§g§gf&i|f at?%pue, the bookish tweed-jacl&^&drnmer and Ci-afk^^oiour-
'^^aisging dress all competed fbftisual attention^,, -.
lV;$S^re was an auiitory feast to match the visual one, feamringwo^winsis,
saxophone and electronic tricks to fill out the sound of Clark's coy vocals. $ty-
j|^igs|[riations were more pronounced than on record: a softer section might
i&gitt tp m&rph into a Load Records-style noise jam before giving way to the
;||g^ned notes of a lone t|o$iht* Cl#rk repeatedly triggered savage distortion
'^mkU on && guHalfpttcely an influence ofher tenure in afe&#fGlenn H&anca's
orchestraijf^^ng songs like "Your Lips Are Red" and "Marrow^^kaous new
edge, "Actor Out Of Work" marched along with precision, and "The Bed"
p£wMe4 a i#^urittke reprieve from the more intense moments. An encore
that concluded with vocal harmorjits rivaling Fleet Foxes only reinforced St
YirK^t'&sta&is as a live act with very little to improve upon*'   .
'^^^^^0^e evening, Wildbirds & Peacedrums used a booming drum
kitand a Jamaican steel drum to impressive effect Singer Mariam Wallentin
supplied wild gesticulations and a sonorous voice, sounding occasionally like ,
Antony Begarty [ea\ iH^fcHram as theguy umo yfavp'nfflh^Johnsons] or chan-
neiing;,t|^f&K>r of southern gospel*; Drummer Andreas Werliin's numerous
solos and overall rhythmic prowess underlaid a set that was tribal, melodious
and W£tfm$4%W0$v$ogethetf fhfei$$b$$l$ providedanfce complement to
the skewed spngwritihgof St Vincent Bntalso displayed unique, stirring
style that won't be soon forgotten.
—Simon Foreman
lEALTH/NO SENSAE/MYTHS
February 4 / Biltmore Op^m!^'
Maybe it was the fact that critical acclaim doesn't ifi&ays translate into any sort
of mass appeal, or maybe ^ was because oflhe myriad of other shows going
on this night (includmgcnfB^^te^sweetheaj^pBishaw's CD release), but
fbrwhatever reason, nobody was in* hnrsytp head down to the Biltmore to 1
catch Healt&on their latest tstop in Vancc^eiif
V* '^^^0^-jkj^zyec\ sta^lo the evening's festivities, tifee room was still
sparsely populated when Myths took the stage to kick things off. The lack of
an audience didn't weigh on the duo of Quinne Rodgers and former Mutators
singer-screamer j^&afl, who j^ff^y thanked those already in attendance
"for showing up early" bejf^f&nticiill^ f$&rtt$i£r set. Performing sans *'# ..  *---
x    i   ^
jT £25
SoHi
■i
backing band, the pair sang, screamed and, thanks to some nifty effects,
stretched and distorted their vocals over backing tracks that featured industrial drums and dark, grinding synths. Good on you, if yo^ stioWed up early
enough to catch them.
As a few more bodies started filing in, Nii Sensae Iauncheiinto an amgedip
performance that was typical for them: loud, short and sweet The band seenjlo
have taken the old adage that you should "leave them wanting more" to heart,
and my only complaint is the same one I always have when I see them liv^HM^t,
I could have used a few more minutes of Daniel Pitout's thumping, chaotic
drumming and Andrea Lukic's snarling bass and equally-snarling voice.
Health is a strange beast There's always some sort of pervasive rhythm
underscoring the squall of underwater coos, thrashing drums and squeal^
guitars that lends a strange, danceable quality to the band's compositions, but
at the same time, the noise they make seems much more visceral than musical.
That idea was evident in a performance that turned the Biltmore's stage into a
tangle of flailing hair, thrashing bodies and by the night's end, a resting place
for four exhausted musicians to catch their breath.
—Quinn Omori '^'Ki-^%-^
DO MAKE SAY THINK / YEARS / THE HAPPINESS PROJECT| f
February 6 (BilrnW^f^&ret
Forty pedals deep and two drum kits wide, a Do Make Say Think (DMiST^^^s?
set up looks more like a pawn shop than anything else. Even the Biltmore's
spacious stage barely held the gear required for the night's three bands. Opening the night were two bands made up of DMST members: Years, led by Ohad
Benchetrit, and the Happiness Project led by Charles Spearin. While Years
leans more closely to the DMST sound, Spearin's project is an experiment
with conversations set to music. Most compelling among the spoken word
riffl$&- fSanessa." The speaker is a deaf woman who experienced hearing for the
first time at the age of 30, thanks to a cochlear implant On her first description
^f^KSp^di she says, "All of a sudden I felt myjbody moving inside," and if that's
not a perfect description of musli^ fen one does not exist.
Within dtasir allowed time limit, DMSTManaged to get through 12 songs,
' pnll!hgfrom even fibek earliest albsans. "In Min^lgarnered a major response,
as did "Executioner Blues," whidhlmaintain contains one of music's ^S$^g^:
bass lines. The band strengthened as the set went on, accepting praise with
jfejmbfk hands and returning with songs that rose and fell more graciously
than the last
.doling the show past the n p.m. curfew, the band ended by launching
Ito*Auberge Le Mouton Uc$fM chngging train of a song with guitars that
twinkled, glowed and blinded ^B at once, and drmns that provided a bappSpfe
that held the beat as steady as the band wished it to be. Overall, DMST showed
why they're still able to fill clubs nearly 12 years after starting out: solid songs
that swerve and straighten, whisper and scream, and remind you why words
are often complexly unnecessafj^;- 'I
—Darren Susin
VIVIAN GIRLS / BEST COAST / COSMETICS
February 12 / Biltmore Cabaret
Riding a wave of hype thattheir lo-fi surf rock has garnered over the pastyear,
Vivian Girls hit the Biltmore for their first headlining show in Vancouver.
Local act Cosmetics started things off, kicking into a brand of slinky, dark
sounding New Wave that departed from the fuzzy, sunshiny jams that would
dominate the rest of the evening. I wasn't overwhelmed the first time I saw
them play, but picking up a live drummer between then and now has really
done wonders for their live show, giving the wonderfully nonchalant vocals
vT and syrupy synth work a contrasting kick urtne reat' tf
Recorded, Best Coast is usually § one-woman affair,, but the live incarnation
featured Bethany Cosentino backed by another gnttaostgbd'a drummer* The
guitars Were stjll awash in the lo-fi buzz that's marked her recorded output thus
%^f^-feut'unlike the headliners, there wasn't any effort to replicate the Heavily
''^rp^bed vocal harmonies. While that made the live Best Coast experience a ■
Ut^e different than the recorded one, great songs'tend tostand on their own
fcil^b-^hout any studio tricks, and Cosei^^^^^eh party anthems were no
'Jplp^t There may have been two people in tbe'toom who disagreed with
^^asi^Etement as during "Feeling&aUed Love,^C^^^^f guys got bored of
listening and decided they^father scrap (don't worry, neither^^them were
throwing the kind of punches that could hint anybody),
Vivian Girls started offtheir headlining performance by announcing the theft
(and subsequent return) ofone of their reverb pedals. With the effect plugged
>:'>|pi|||& and ready to go, the three-piece, who weise also sometimesJoined;jby:
Beth Cosentino, launched into a set of their own lo-fi girl-group tunes. They
were tighter than the last tMl^t caagjbt them, which meant that they spent less
time looking at their instruments and more time engaging the crowd, buitlbe";
stylistic similarities to Best Coast didn't do them any favours. They cei&tiii|?"
weren't bad—in fact they were pretty good—but their set also seemed a little
too much like a second-rate version of what had come right before.
—Quinn Omori
WILCO
February 13 / David Lam Park
This was probably awesome, but since we only got there twoliour$in advance,
we couldn't get in, ^Iptaybe we could have, but the lineup was seriously about
10 km long, so whatever. Instead, we watched some shitty bar band play in an
alley in Yaletown for five minutes, then wandered over to the Brickhouse and
drank a bunch of really gross beer. Maybe it's the draught lines? Those fish
tank things in the back also flicking reek.
Anyways, if you're planning on going to any of this free Olympic-related
business, I hope you don't have a job or anything else important to do, because
you're going to need to get in line the day before the show if you don't want to
get shut out Q.E.D.: it's currently around 2p,ni., and there are 17,000 folks lined
up downtown to see Deadmaus. What the fuck is wrong witjh.y$$ people?
—Al Smith
[ed, Wiico not only pMpd a spectacular set, it was also one of the longest sets I've seen
them play. JejfTweedy, Nels Cline anJTf&e rest of the hand, were in jme Jbrm. The metal
detectors at the Liveaty site that slow down entry and make the line stretch outfbr blocks
are designed to detect metal weaponry not plastic mtckeys of booze, so there was a silver
lining to the dry event. The line really isn't that bad if you're drinking with friends while
you wait.
Clearly, you are a fool for not recognizing that the Brickhouse is the best bar in town,
in which I have sampled the beer many times and never noticed any untoward jlavours
in the draught. As I have a weak sense of smell I can only say that I have never noticed
any gross odours from the fish tanks.]
SUBSCRIBr.
TODISCORDER!
1 would uni
AN ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTS 10 DISCORDER MAGAZINE
($20 N)R CANADIANS, $2$ P#tt& WH) J     $_
TO SUPPORT DISCORDER MAGAZINE WITH A DONATION OF $_
,;^    TOTAL: $_
■>€■
DISORDER IS VANCOUVER'S LONGEST RUNNING INDEPENDENT MUSIC MAGAZINE. SHOW YOUR
SDFf ORT FOR VANCOUVER'S INDEPENDENT MUSIC COMMUNITY AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF
NEW WRITERS, EDITORS AND ARTISTS. SIGN UP TO HAVE DISCORDER DELIVERED TO YOUR
DOOR!
FIU. OUT ftRt FORM AND MAIL IN CASH OR A CHEQUE TO 233-0188 SUB BLVD., VANCOUVER
1*0*, VST 1Z1, C/0 BRENDA 6RUNAU, PUBLISHER, 8ISC8RDER MAGAZINE*
that better ts&ty&ay magazine from CUR, loi.gfrn
ADVERTISE WITH DISCORDER. WSU TREAT WU RIM.
NICE AND GIVE YOtt A DAMN 8008 HAL
YWDAKA0VEmiSEWrTHB81III^MI»WSe0R^R
AND GET A DISCOUNT. WEB ADS OK OUR BRAND NEW SttE
ALSO AVAILABLE.
CONTACT OUR AD MANAGER AT:
PROM0TI0N$.DISC0R0ER@8MAIL.COI§ 7GIGI
THE TIMI
BY DUNCAN M.MCKUSH
PHOTOS BY MICHELLE MAYNE
tt MY MOM LOVES
JL JL* Jt\ JLfV*r JL® JltjLX
GRANDMA REALLY
loves il y J
GIG1 IS A COLLABORATION BETWEEN.NICK KRGOVICH Jp:ANOf NO KIDS, TO BAD CATHOLICS)
AND COLIN STEWART, PRODUCER AT THE HIVE, WHO HAS RECORDED COUNTLESS BANDS,
SUCH AS BLACK MOUNTAIN, CAVE SINGERS AND LADYHAWK. IT'S AN ATTEMPT TO CAPTURE
THE SPIRIT AND EXHUBERANCE OF '60S GIRL GROUPS AND "BACK TO MONO"-ERA POP
MASTERPIECES. MAINTENANT, GIGPS DEBUT ALBUM, HAS BEEN IN THE WORKS SINCE 2006
AND FEATURES OVER 40 PERFORMERS. IT WAS RELEASED BY GERMAN LABEL TOMLAB
IN FEBRUARY. KRGOVICH MET WITH OUR REPORTER TO DISCUSS THE PROJECT IN MID-
FEBRUARY JUST BEFORE THE ALBUM WAS RELEASED.
36 Discorder: The album's about to come out. How do you feel about it now?
Nick Krgovich: It's been rntfehed for about a year, maybe even longer, so I'm
just happ$|hat it'll be available and that people can listen to it, finally.
D: I've heard rumours that people have heard some form of this album up to
three or four years ago. What took so long?
NKsThe bulk of it was finished in 2006, and I ended up singing about 70 per
cent of it, but I always envisioned different Singers stepping in for each song. I
1 was just the only dude around for that first initial recording sessi@iiA\?ho sang or
who knew the songs. It just sat there half finished, mosdy finisl|iglf tor awhile,
then we*d work on it a littlfcbit and let it sit again. Then IM write a!new song
that I think would work. We just slowly chipped away at it. But then, I thought
it would be a good idea to replace all my vocals with guests.
D: Other than the chorus, you only sing on one song ["'Neathe the Streetlights"].
^j&flfe&t one song was recorded live to two tracks, so even if we wanted to
\;tafef ttty voice out it would be very hard to remove.
D: There are a bunch of heavy hitters that you brought in for this record; who
are some of the guests?
NJ& One of my favourite singers in the universe is Katie Eastbij^e; she had a
band called Young People, who were fantastic. I'm really happy that she's on
there. I don't know, it was mainly just friends... Owen Pailett [ofFinal Fantasy],
2ac [Pennington] from Parenthetjfc^Girls, a whole bunch of people from here,
like Rose [Melberg], Marissa [Johnsonl^ip&d Sydney [Vermont].
D: For the people from out-of-town, did you catch them on tour?
NK: None of those tracks were recorded at thej&|tye. I'd just email them an
instrumental track, they'd record their vocals and send.it back.
D: The name, Malntenant, and Gigi for that matter, what's the French connection?
NK: Gigi started in about 2005, that was right when P:ano, my old band,
released Briaadoon, which is named after a Lerner & toewe musical. And we
had the initial two songs we had recordeidjEfKnow My Heart Will Go On" and
"'Neath the Streetlights"], and I was burning it on to a disc for somebody.
Colin always referred to it as the girl group recordings, [but] 1 couldn't quite
bring myself to write "girl group," being that literal on the CD, so I put an
acronym *G«G.B Then, I thought 0^1 It was sort of a Lerner & Loewe idea.
It made sense at the time.
I vaguely remember Julia > my bandmate, hopping in my car a nd we were talking
aboutwhatwe should name tfae album, this is probably in 2006, and she said,
"It should be something French, like, Mainftaant I thought, that's perfect It's
haphazard, but it makes a lot of sense.
[ed. For rhost of yflu fflfta don't speak French "maintenant" translates to *?i#ht flow.*!
D: I've heard that the genesis for the project came from Colin finding platters
or something that give the songs that Motown sound.
NKiThey*r* reverb units. I don't know how he got them, feut he got two. One
was huge; one was not as huge. I don't know anything about it, really. As far
as I know, I£jTia big piece of sheet metal and you send tfe signal to it and it
rattles and setlsrberates.
D: You've recorded with Colin a bunch, but I guess this was a deeper collaboration?
NK: It was, sorta. We needed a practical way to frame this whole fjhing when it
turned into an album and something that was going to be releasexfcfts certainly
not a band, but we diix^t want it to be so open-e^S3 that it was just a thing.
So we had to figure out a way to present it that made sense. So It?J^ngwriter
and producer, working together.
D: Would you consider performing it live, or is It a studio-only project?
NK: I'd like to at some point, but it might be a bit of a logistical nightmare.
The simadoJi§$rould have to be right It would be run to do *« jloT the time
being, it's just a recording.
D-. Were these songs that you had before or were they mitten specifically
for a girl group/mono project?
NK: They were all written specifically for this album, about 75 per cent in the
winter of 2006.
D: How do Gigi songs differ from those written for other projects?
NKi I think I was a lot more literal about songcraft... I paid way more attention
:
*■»
llSISillil to form than I might normally, at least normally back then, in 2005 or 2006.
Lyrically, there are very specific themes I was thinking about a lot. If you listen
to, say the BackTo Mono box set or any of those girl group records, it's like a dog
chasing its tail, lyrically. It's just the same idea over and over and over.
So there's that I tried my best to make sure everything rhymed pretty well.
You know, just classic pop ideals. Also, the songs had to be simple enough
that we could learn them on the spot, play them and record them in two or
three run-throughs.
D: What has been the response to the album? Do you think people get it?
NK: I think so, I feel it's one of the less confusing things that I've done. Colin,
a long time ago, played the first two songs that we recorded for Dan [Bejar]
from Destroyer and—I don't remember exactly what he said—but it was
something like, "People are either going to freak over this or they're going
to snap it like a pencil." And I feel like that's probably very true ... We just
do what we do and hopefully people like it. It's not really a big whoop if they
don't to me anyway.
D: Your mom loves it?
NK: My mom loves it, a lot. My grandma really loves it... I think it's the simplicity of it [that they respond to]. We just did this whole thing for fun. There
was no big agenda. It was just a fun project that we worked on, and I feel that
you can hear that It's really nice that so many people got to get together. It's
special in that way to me. I think my mom or my grandma can hear that happening, in addition to the songs.
D: There was a misprint of the vinyl.
NK: There was a bit of a SNAFU. Jan [LankischJ from Tomlab designed it and
he's German and he works really quickly. He does a really good job, aesthetically,
but also he's very fast-moving when it comes to laying text in to anything. We've
had many occasions where quotation marks will be flipped the wrong way and
apostrophes would be commas, so I combed through the lyric sheet so carefully.
And then the vinyl came back and one of the publicists said, "Did you realize
the album title's spelt wrong? There's an extra T, it says Maintentant."
D: Right on the cover?
NK: On the cover, on the spine, on the labels. I just never thought to look.
And even Colin, his father's from France, he's French and Colin didn't catch
it... Now that I know that it's there, it's the only thing I see... It's Spinal Tap-
level absurdity.
D: Are the CDs okay?
NK: We caught it in time to change the CDs. We were faced with, "Do we call
it this new word that means nothing?" for archiving and cataloguing... The
French distribution called Tomlab super confused... It's turned into a bit of a
fandango, but it's cool. They'll be collector's item, maybe, in 60 years.
38 //CiTR 101.9 FM CHARTS
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF FEBRUARY
#	
 ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL   MW$
#
ARTIST	
ALBUM	
LABEL	
IPS
Fanshaw*
Dark Eyes
Mint
26
Retribution Gospel
Choir
2
Sub Pop
2
Vapid*
Practically Dead
Nominal
27
PhattyPhatty&
the Roaches*
Stanley
Independent
3
Modern Creatures/
Twin Crystals*
Split EP
Nail In the Coffin
28
The Soft Pack
s/t
Kemado
4
Owen Pailett*
Heartland
Domino
29
Land of Talk*
Fun & Laughter
Saddle Creek
5
Los Furios*
Run Devil Run
Independent
30
Massive Attack
Heligoland
EMI
6
Fucked Up*
Couple Tracks:
Singles 2002-2009
Matador
31
Fan Death*
A Coin For the Well
Last Gang
7
Make Love*
s/t
Independent
32
Lee Fields
My World
Truth and Soul
8
Spoon
Transference
Merge
33
Gil Scott-Heron
I'm New Here
XL Recordings
9
Various*
Hockey Dad Records
Compilation
Hockey Dad
34
The Wicked
Awesomes*
Punk Holograms
Psychic Handshake
10
Role Mach*
Orffesques & Fuges
GBCL
35
Underworld vs
the Misterons
Athens
!K7
11
SubtractiveLAD*
Life at the End
of the World
n5MD
36
Beach House
Teen Dream
Sub Pop
12
East Vamps*
Drunk By 6
Independent
37
Hilltop Hoods
State of the Art
Golden Rare
13
RJD2
The Colossus
RJ's Electrical
Connection
38
Woodpigeon*
Die Stadt
Muzikanten
Boompa
14
Minimalist Jug
Band*
Naive Ville
Independent
39
Bloodshot Bill*
Git High Tonite!
Transistor 66
15
Sun Wizard*
Maybe They Were
Right
Independent
40
Kidnap Kids!*
You Would Run
From Ratboy Grave
Independent
16
Elvis Bossa Nova!*
Hi, I'm Elvis Bossa
Nova!
Independent
41
Hard Drugs*
s/t
Stay Gold
17
Youssou N'Dour
I Bring What I Love
Nonesuch
42
A-Frames/Climax
Golden Twins
AFCGT
Sub Pop
18
The Endless
Bummer*
Modern American
Calypsosfor Voice...
Life's Blood Flows
43
Yes Nice*
Blindfolded
Independent
19
The Parkas*
You Should Have
Killed Us...
Saved By Radio
44
Cold Cave
Love Comes Close
Matador
20
FourTet
There Is Love inYou
Domino
45
Montag*
Des Cassettes et un
Walkman Jaune
Independent
21
Clinker*
On the Other Side...
(for L.Cohen)
Dragon's Eye
46
Yeasayer
Odd Blood  .
Secretly Canadian
22
The Slackers
Lost & Found
Special Potato
47
Charlotte
Gainsbourg
mm
Because
23
Trans Am
What Day Is It Tonight
(Live 1993-2008)
Thrill Jockey
48
Oh No Ono
Eggs
Friendly Fire
24
Martha & the
Muffins*
Delicate
Muffin Music
49
The MagneticFields
Realism
Nonesuch
25
Gigi*
Maintenant
Tomlab
50
Blitzen Trapper
Black River Killer
Sub Pop
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian. Most of these excellent albums
can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. His name is
Luke Meat. If you ask nicely he'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts atwww.earshot-online.com.
33 —'
Joanna Newsome ~,
rfmQaftOnMe&P
Brian Jonestown Massacre-
Who Killed Sgt Pepper? LP
Shout Out tourjs - Wort |f!
Jormny Cash - American IV
llp
Omar Rodriguez LopezM*^
Xenophanes9
Tindersticks - Falling Down
A Mountain LP
Pit Er Pat-The Flexible
Entertainer LP
Spacemen 3 - Sound Of
Confusion LP
Yeasayer - Odd Blood LP
Owen Pallet! - Heartland
2LP
Misfits - Land Of The Dead
The Magnetic Fields -
Realism LP i
9Ms-tt?hn6sICj|
Venorn^ Welcome to Hell
Built to Spill - There is Ho
Enemy LP
Hurse With Wound-
Space 1%^ LP:
Oollapslng Opposites-
IrHmJlp^
pm^mfc lp ^pn
J|l^ Smith's Anthology g
Edward Sharpe £ Magnetic
Zeros - Up f^^Ji^pffiP
Spacemen 8*tN| letfed
Prescriptioa LP
Basia Buiat - Heart of My Own
lit'
Exene Cervsnl^
Somewhera Gone LP h
Arnon Duui* r%llus Oei LP
Pjfrvi^tftLP
Sun Ha - Rocket Ship Rock LP
Sun Ra - The Second Stop Is
Jupiter LP
The Anals - Total Anal LP
API-Crash Love LP
pf#egaB-«/t|F^
Mid - Practically Don LP
Tfc* Now Year - Newness
Mb -Love Lost )jj f
MS Scrotum Poldb^
Auchmrthie Forever |f HI 1 \
■gbntes- Jardim Electrleo
PS
MudhGney-Every food
Bplljserves Fudge LP "j
The Futureheads -tts l#t
Not The World LP
Aidan Baker-Colourful
Disturbances LP
Eater - The Album |B0
Suhhumans - New Dark Age
Paradf|fe
Gil Scott-Heron ~.£tiitt Of
A Man LP
Mtrtantes-ESeus
Cemetas OP
Piano Magic - fafHwEF j
Sea|^ichoiasl|i|||^|
SproJrt Free Lili^fl
Butterfly LP
Aro^^^^mi^^K
Royarlljf-%i^20M P?
9dw/Boris - Golden Dance
Classics LP \
lifelltoodenSky-lflDonl
Come Hop* Y§»*11 Know LP
Caroline Weeter* Songs
Fo^piaLP
CmPeWlKra'^
Mayhem Ordo Ad Chao LP
AND MANY MANY MANY MORE/
NEW ARRIVAL NEW/USED/COLLECTORS VINYLt
K
13
111
I CSttWW COUPON! COUPON! COUPON! pOUl
|20%
ALL REGULAR PRICED
NEW, USED and COLLECTORS VINYL
With Coupon^
10%OFFSALEPRIC^>5wi^J
Until March 31, a»lfc3 '.
I
L

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0049995/manifest

Comment

Related Items