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DISCORDER
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and Gallery    \                 UBC, AMS, 6138 Student Union
316 W.Cordova
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1    2    May 2008 editor's noleB
Editor
Nat Jay
Art Director
Cole Johnston
Production Manager
Kristin Warkentin
/UN
f
Copy Editors
Nat Jay
Brock Thiessen
Regulars
Ad Manager
Catherine Rana
Under Review Editor
Nat Jay
Datebook Editor
Editor's Notes
Riff Raff
Film Stripped
The Biz
3
5
6
7
Kristin Warkentin
RLA Editor
Brock Thiessen
Layout + Design
Cole Johnston
Calendar + Datebook
Under Review
Real Live Action
Program Guide
14
16
20
24
Contributors
CiTR Charts
25
Chris Brandt
Bryce Dunn
Simon Foreman
Daniel Fumano
Darren Gawle
Mark Hewitt
Peter Holmes
WV_
r
Ronny Jotten
Features
Mark Richardson
Mine Salkin
Terris Schneider
Adam Simpkins
Brock Theissen
Stacy Thomas.
The Highlight - Hawksley
Workman, that is. -He discusses the highs
and lows of being a producer.
6
10
Cheyanna Turions
Andrea Warner
Joride Yow           js^a*^,-^
Photo & Illustration
New Music West
It's that time of year again. What you can
expect to see this year at Vancouver's next-
big-hit showcase.
12
Cole Johnston
Jordie Yow
Christa Couture
Program Guide
Bryce Dunn/Kristin Warken
Christa Couture talks about the meaning
behind her music and some of the ways life
tried, but failed, to keep her down.
tin
Charts
Luke Meat
Distribution
Peter
Adaline
Vancouver's newest hot female talent talks abc
her new album...and why music is her boyfrie
13
ut
id.
CiTR Station Manager
Alison Benjamin
Publisher
Student Radio Society
of UBC
22
Hawaiian Bibles
1.      A song by song interview.
Cover Art By:
Cole Johnston
- There is no doubt that each and every one of us experiences adversity at some point in our lives. In the
music industry, these obstacles seem even more apparent, likely because^they are lived and conquered in the
public eye. At.the height of a successful artist's career, the ups and downs can make headlines. But even as
an up-and-comer, songwriters bare their souls onstage, sharing their innermost thoughts and feelings with
whomever chooses to listen. I watch my talented friends in the^ industry struggle daily with personal and
©DiSCORDER 2008 by the Student Radio Society of the University of
British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Subscriptions,
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but not limited to manuscripts, artwork, photographs, compact discs,
reviewmaterials, or any other submittedmaterials. From UBC to Langley
and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be heard at 1013 FM as well as
through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in
White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at 822.2487. our office at 822.3017, or
our news and sports lines at 822.3017 ext. 2. Fax us at 822.9364, e-mail
usat:citrmgr@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at www.discorder.ca or
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CANADA. If you would like Discorder Magazine in your business, email
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:ason, an artist feels the
a very bad place, and at the
of the world at a
time, it can (and
at all stages in their career, each having been
•or our Highlight story, I had the pleasurable
professional demons, and it seems to me that, for somi
hightened level.For some.it can (and often does) lead
often does) lead to the creation of brilliant art.
In this month's issue oi Discorder, we encounter
through difficult times, and triumphed musically a:
opportunity to hang with the captain of Canadian quirk, Hawksley Workman. As successful and celebrated
as his career has been so far, Hawksley has faced adversity professionally (because he insists on going against
the grain on a regular basis) and personally (he admits to taking on a lot of the negativity around him). But
he is humbled by his struggles and uses his experience to create unique work. In conversation, he is engaging
and laughs often, and I enjoyed discussing his contribution to the industry as producer to many of Canada's
rising indie stars.
On a local level, Discorder caught up with folk darling, Christa Couture, who has seen more than her fair
share of trials and tribulations, and who shares this with the world through her upcoming release,1he Wedding
Singer and the Undertaker. Adaline, one of Vancouver's finest female vocalists, has come through everything
from breaking away from a sheltered childhood to legal battles in getting her music out to the world. The result
is Famous for Fire, her debut full-length and a sold-out CD Release at the Biltmore on April 25.
' As an artist myself, I can attest to what I call a kind of darkness that sits in the back of my own head and
certainly looms in the eyes of many of my most talented friends. But I think that it is there that we find what
we need to express ourselves as musicians. Without it, I feel like we would be less, and we would not reach
as many as we do with our art. I threw the wisdom (or perhaps naivety) of my 25 years out to Hawksley
Workman, and our conversation went something like this:
Nat Jay: "I think most artists are dark inside, but I think it serves a purpose still. And if i
don't think that most artists would be nearly the artists that they were."
Hawksley Workman: "Probably you're right."
Nat Jay: "I dunno. That's my take on it."
Hawksley Workman: "No, I think you're probably right."
I'll take his word for it.
~i._t]«y, Editor
The AMS represents over
44,000 UBC students as
well as students at
affiliated colleges.
The AMS operates student
C\ \Wft    services, student owned
student society    businesses, resource
ams.ubc.ca      groups and clubs.
't there, I
lllfi®   ff\
ADVOCACY      ^mW
jMm
irstwedk
*£.y- *9 jHS'^
■■■■■HI
Discorder   3 by
BRYCE DUNN
RIB
The month of May is upon us faster than you can say, "Let's have a party!" or perhaps
more specifically, a "teabag party" according to everyone's favourite Everly Brothers
from another mother, The King Khan & BBQ_Show. But before you bust out the
fine china, have a proper listen to the lyrics and you may be surprised by what you
hear. I will say no more on that subject, but I will let you know that what should
be a patented rock 'n' roll doo-wop duo has never sounded so good as it does on
their latest offering for Crypt Records, no less. An amazing feat, considering the
last "new" band the label signed was nearly a decade ago. Title track aside, the boys
manage to eek out two songs of the same design, namely "Larry Is A Gay Blade" and
"Gangbang Gordon," both containing King Khan's ascerbic wit and vocal delivery,
and will draw the ire of anyone with that name, to be sure. But the highlight has
to be "What's Mine Is Yours," which showcases BBQls uncanny knack for fifties
balladry and will make girls cry instantly. Another winner from the dudes who can
do no wrong even when questioning their own dudeliness. Sorry, inside joke,but for
a clue look at the cover. (Crypt Records, cryptrecords.com).
Another duo that makes beautiful music together, and probably looks the part too,
is No Age, two semi-pro skaters from L.A. who decided to drop their boards for
guitars and drums, thus making the foray into shoegazer punk. Equal parts hazy
and crazy, No Age have nearly perfected their space jams on their latest EP. And not
only that, but they managed to manufacture a record cover you can drop acid to as
well. "Eraser" takes a My Bloody Valentine-esque guitar loop and layers it with lo-fi
drums for a dizzying result. The flipside is their distinctive dabbling on three covers:
"Don't Stand Still" (originally by Nate Denver's Neck) takes a fellow L.A. troubadour's tune and packs a psychedelic punch; "Male Masturbation" is an homage to
L.A. punk legends, the Urinals, which stays true to its original form of minimalist
teen skronk, complete with an edited live ending; and an unrecognizable version of
the Nerves' power pop classic, "When You Find Out," perhaps giving it a twist and
nod to M83's synth drone sound. This EP precedes their highly anticipated full-
length on Sub Pop so fans just getting a taste with this release will be salivating like
Pavlovian dogs at the mere thought of what happens next. (Sub Pop Records, 2013
Fourth Ave. Third Floor Seattle WA USA 98121).
The sight of meth teeth is disturbing to say the least, as I found when googling for
more info on the duly named trio from Rose City (that's Portland for all you un-hip
types). But on record, Meth Teeth are much easier to stomach, thankfully, and with
their debut waxed for a local label, the scuzz-folk vibes these guys are putting out
fits well with the imagery of a tweaked out user crawling the streets looking for the
next big score. Songs like "Bus Rides" and To My Good Friend" sound gritty and
earnest, sometimes dark, but determined to stay stuck in the brain with the occasional melodic hook. The closest thing I can liken this to is Haunted George, but
swap the sun-baked desert scene for a rainy alleyway with trash piled high along its
narrow, crack-tiled path. You'll be hearing a lot more of Meth Teeth in the future
with an LP and more seven-inch output in the works. (Sweet Rot Records, myspace.
com/sweetrotrecords).        £04$$^
We end with a four-song affair from a foursome from the Windy City of Chicago
called The Laureates. Feet firmed planted in pop territory, they seem comfortable
in displaying both Kinks-inspired riffs ("I Want To Miss You") and Bob Pollard-
isms ("The Warm Son") without so much as blinking. They also aren't afraid to keep
songs short and full of dense guitar, sprightly bass and snappy drums so it has just as
much spit as it does polish Beat boys for the new age, The Laureates have achieved
a small victory with this release, (www.laureatesmusic.com).  b
4    May 2008
LIVE
JUNE 10 m PLAZA CLUB
NEW ALBUM AVAILABLE MAY 20 FILM   STRIPPED
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He was the poster boy for the punk movement, as famous for his politics as he was
for his snarling stage presence. Now, the lead singer of The Clash is the subject of
Julien Temple's fascinating but spotty Joe Strummer: The Future is Unwritten.
While Unwritten effectively illustrates how a collection of moments can affect the
Zeitgeist of a generation, it never quite gets inside the mystery of the man himself.
Born to a diplomat father who was known for challenging authority, Strummer and
his older brother, David, had lived in five different countries by the time they were
in grade school. Temple gets the details right and lingers for the perfect amount of
time on some of the tough spots, such as David's suicide and Strummer identifying
his brother's bpdy, all by the age of 18.
The large midsection of Unwritten is devoted to The Clash, and there is plenty of
volatile material here that should have been covered in an entirely separate film.
There was more to Strummer than his politics, which provided the thrust of The
Clash's power-to-the-people message. Still, Unwritten devotes more than half of its
running time to The Clash's hirings, firings and ego explosions, while the ten years
Strummer spent trying to exorcise that band from his system is wrapped up in about
six minutes.
Referring to it briefly as the "wilderness years," Temple treads very lightly on Strum-
mer's dark period following the breakup of The Clash, when he retreated from the
public. The film hints that he may have become a preacher for a short time. Say what?
This is the consistent frustration with Unwritten: the dots aren't connected enough
to fully realize Strummer as an icon and as a person. Friends, musicians and a variety
of celebrities appear throughout the film, but Temple makes no attempt to identify
individuals beyond their names, and offers no explanation about their connection to
Strummer. It's distracting when Johnny Depp suddenly shows up, but it's downright
disconcerting when Matt Dillon comes aboard.
00
That said, Unwritten has plenty of momentum, and there are many r
recommend it. The imagery is wonderful, interspersing archival footage, animations
of Strummer's art, scenes from Orwell's Animal Farm and interviews taken around
the campfire with a truly varied assortment of people. Throughout, Strummer often
acts as a narrator to his own life, with sound clips culled from interviews and his
popular radio show, London Calling. Like The Clash's music and the do-it-yourself
punk ethos, Joe Strummer: The Future is Unwritten colours outside the lines of the
traditional documentary form, and this is where it succeeds as a fitting tribute to the
original "punk rock warlord."    fa
Discorder   5 ___ he music biz is dead. Not dying, dead. Oh I
know, here we go again. Not another doom
■■I and gloom article with overly dramatic assertions for shock value. In journalism these days, it seems
more important to be first than to be accurate. This
is essentially because most people will only read one
article (if that) on a subject, so it is key to grab people
with a tasty morsel before the opposing opinion serves
something up. It's about instant gratification, then we
can go back to being blissfully ignorant. Is music the
same? Hell ya.
When the effects of Napster and the like were kicking the shit out of the music industry, it reacted by selling the farm. An intelligent, proactive strategy would
have been to ensure that as "many retailers as possible
had healthy businesses, seeing as how they are the institutions that actually get the product into the hands of
the consumer. Instead of investing in long-term relationships, the major labels all hired hookers: big box
stores like Best Buy, Wal-Mart and Future Shop that
provided the labels with a quick fix when they needed
it. Keep in mind that, like most industries, music is
filled with publicly traded companies that have quarterly targets. When faced with declining revenues and
given the option to invest time and marketing money
into partners that have CD sales as their bread and
butter, or pick up the phone and close a million dollar
PO with Future Shop, the labels picked the latter. I've
been in .those conversations. I've been the guy ordered
by Toronto to get $500,000 by 5:00pm.
If the big box stores carried every CD, then this
wouldn't be so bad. However, we all know that they
don't. Why? Because they don't care about music.
Music for these retailers has been a means to an end — a
complete loss leader. New music releases every week,
so Best Buy has an excuse to send out a weekly flyer
to try and bait consumers into the stores with a 19.99
price on an A-list artist. Public perception over time is
that because CD prices are so low, the big stores are
probably the best place to buy big-ticket items like TVs
and refrigerators. This is why these stores only focus on
the Top 30 CDs in the marketplace. They don't want to
educate you on who an artist is, they want to show you
that they are carrying the ones that you already know
by displaying a postage stamp album cover next to an
X-Box game in their flyer. They would rather sell 1,000
copies of one title, than 20 copies each of 50 titles.
The obvious result is that while business measured in
dollars might remain steady, the amount of different CDs ,
sold declines rapidly. Neglected music stores see their
business decline because they cannot drop their prices to
compete with huge retailers that can make up the lost
margin on dishwasher sales. In one year, 1,000 music
retailers closed in the U.S. On the home studio front, the
advent of Pro Tools and other home production software
has increased the amount-of music being produced to its
highest point in history. More eggs. Less baskets.
The. labels are 100% responsible for building the
beast. Extra deals and payment terms' were offered as
incentives for large purchase orders, further widening
the competitive gap from stores that still have customers passionate enough to call the labels asking to please
send five copies of Glen Phillips' solo album. They
can't get anyone on the phone, so they leave a message.
Karma, as we all know, is a bitch.
Big box retailers gained massive power over the labels.
Threats were issued, bills were sent, and rabbits started
winding up in boiling pots. Major retailers further
reduced the amount of shelf space given to CDs, and
began spreading their staff across the entire software
department. An April Rolling Stone article suggests
that Wal-Mart has gone so far as to threaten to stop
selling CDs entirely if the labels do not reduce their
wholesale prices. Do you think they is regretting who
they got into bed with now?
The labels couldn't right this ship if they wanted to.
The Titanic had a pinhole compared to this business
model. They have essentially sold themselves into slavery
and there is no micro-credit model that tan help them.
There is no Hollywood ending to this story. I sat with
the intention of closing with a positive spin, but the walls
are too thick. Sure you can get closer to your favourite
bands than ever before because of the internet, but there
is no solution to save the day. Call it a No Country For
Old Men ending. The major label presidents won't be
winning any Oscars for this one though,  fa
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Discorder   7 As proj^kr to some of Canada sfinest indie talent*
Hawksley Workman successfully bridges the gap
between hisJmiO extremes. SSli
natjay
To call Hawksley Workman an extrovert would be an understatement. As a songwriter, his work
is laced with uninhibitec! quirlc;I as a performer, his overwhelming talent and presence run from
his lips to his fingertips and into the spirit of every audience member in attendance. But today,
sitting in a chapel pew at St. Andrew's Wesley Church, he is the definition of calm. The truth is, he's
tired. He's a dedicated worker and has been toiling incessantly to promote his recent release, Between
the Beautifuls. He's quick to liven up, however, when he starts talking about his work as a producer,
something for which he has developed a solid reputation over the years. Hawksley Workman has
produced many of Canada's top talents, including Serena Ryder, Tegan and Sara, Hey Rosetta!, Great
Big Sea, Sarah Slean and Vancouver's own Jeremy Fisher. And of course, he has produced his own
celebrated records, like 2001 's (Last Night We Were) The Delicious Wolves. Today, he is modest and
quiet, but his personality is warm, his laugh is unbridled and he speaks passionately about his extremely
varied work as one of Canada's biggest indie producers.
t of come in and add my colour.
!uld, Is producing others' work a way for you
i, but
nth a major
way to be involved
xgetically in other
1. What do think artists expect of you as a producer?
I think when people hire me, they're expecting me to s
2.1 read that you'd put out three records a year if you
to put out more records?
It is a little bit, yeah. I mean, I have the songs to do that and th
record label at the moment and they don't do that very well. As a producer, it it
in other records and absorb other influences, and to be able to involve myself"
things. It's really sagfe-,***^"
3. For your January release, Between the Beautifuls, you stepped out of the producer role. Was thi
the first time you've done that? •S*,*3S***" . ■AsmssSSg^ijil
Yeah, which was nice. It wasn't eveoJ|hgk.J needed an artistic preMfafijH!. With Andre (Wahl) I got
great engineer and someone with real work ethic that allowed me to just show up, sing and pi:
go home. And he did the work of putting things together and worrying about how things were goi
to get finished. All those producerial things that are a pain in the ass—it was really nice to just gi
4. Do you think that this record sounded different than all your others as a result?
It's maybe the most polished recoSflVe ever made. I have my cooky-ness that's in then., but it's not as
obvious because the production isoY^ftky. IFS not lo-fi or odd in any way. It's very straight-forward.
5. How many albums did you produce last year? . ^|^113fe?i
I did too many records last year. Besides mine, I did g|ferhers in about 14 months.'I think I did a
good job on them, but it drained me a lot .f.5iSKilPlS^
6. How is it different producing other people's records rather than producing your own?
When I produce other people's records, I take more time and energy with theirs than I would with my
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"May2Q0&.. have, ever since I was a ldd. When I cut the lawn fosr^te3eighbours, I was the best lawn-cutter boy
they ever had. For me, I don't know how toItoajobother tnartjtBt ff^TTmtooiMO^rfe^'tofiSrH
like I'm just slacking off. For my own music, it's like, "Fuck it. .^XijSB.what just falls out of my hands.
Usually it s like, "Aw, that's fun! No, I wasn't in tune, or maybe 1 should have worked harder at the guitar
part, but whatever." It's just me being me, which is what I think people like. But when I'm hired to do
a production, it s more like, "Ok, It's a job now, and I really want to do it right."      £ _"*
7. What was it like working with Great Big Sea?      O^tH
Great Big Sea wanted to do something different. They were BlS^^Ws're getting tired with wfaljsii^pj
always do. We like what you do, so just do it. Do somethin' different." So I was involved with taking ,
apart something that was really well-built and putting it back together.
8. What was one of your favourite parts about working with these industry veterans?
I like to start at ten in the morning because I'm a morning person and I don't like to work late. Most
people are like, "Ten in the morning? Fuck off." Great Big Sea was like, "Alright, what are we &0[&ij*
Let's start at nine." It's encouraging for me when I see people with that kind of work ethic.
9. Was it different working with a developing act like Hey Rosetta!?
_i______]_\_______$____$^^ wanted somebody they respected giving them
the yes or no, and my |stH&F#!feafWS§'JSBrK> soylDta^S'^^^TTv^^^^me^TOr^wjtn mlsmv^
because ttevjfi&gung and have not had any sort of public..affirmation. They've not had a hit record or
been on the cover of Spin magazine. They't%^ySLweak in heart, and 1 just had to remind them, "You
guys really are the shit, so don't worry. Just play like you're the shit."
10. What's something that excites you about a production project?
When I wofltiid with Sarah Slean, I think she is an incredible songwriter. Same tiling when I worked
;' with John Southworth—when I get to wojfc alongside people whose torfj^wnting I reaJlv icspett *
AwTthat fe®; of "songwriting cfcseftft htppea 'ever^S^, $&■__&_&_?* a songwnte r who is innovative, u
bordering on genius, I'll work with that any pi&K  "
- $1.'Where's your ideal place to record?
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^tiW^^^^ of the place, ia^&gf$fc§fa»t Cana&ti^^tbe Canadian, "Oh, you eagi^E:
l^*,*Gte.&_tytfo-*vtebtAy$ti %S8_X feels like, "Jus* gig-sick. Go out and fuckm" do it" \nd Thar1*"'
what I love about that place. ,   £>
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Thursday, May 8
RUN GMC
LIONS IN THE STREET, GRASS CITY
ppijpn  Thursday, May 22
l^^1 BEYOND THE FALL
!|    |   WHITFIELD, RALLY CAR
TICKETS: CLU8ZONE.COM, & ATTHE DOOR
■Kjl       Thursday, May 29
TEENAGE HEAD
.-Mm   ORCHID HIGHWAY
Thursday, June 5
*-* EMERGENZA BAND SEARCH
GRAND FINAL
H«VSE   EI.ECTRA
:0.'PMRT¥K:liMSIC
1   I getw:
tf» da&s. list: Mo@ht-wta6.ttet
SATISFACTION
rilllATOROAYS
&S- Hip Hop -Dance
ililyNNER
Discofder   9
SB®T\liteiii *£_+   - ^SstMSK§_%9&Stii
- ^ap^^wp^
Everyone loves to be able to look at a hugely
famous bufff'-Vrhen it's selling out stadiums,
appearing ori Letterman or feeing high-profik
criminal charges, and say "I saw that band back
when it opened for the Slippery Nipples at a
second^stosftey karaoke bar on East Pender." New
' Music West might just be the best chance for
local music lovers to have that opportunity a year
or two fro&«nN|
* S^Mtt May 14 ft'lfraew Music West will bring
over 200 arifists to the best live music venues
I^SBpfr^fiiefflp^t. Since its inauguration in 1990,
the festival Ife seen local and non-local acts the
likes of Hot Hot Heat, Matthew Good, Liz Phair
and the Flaming Lips-, offering Vancouver music
fans a chance to see these acts before they get big.
In a hitlist of acts from all different genres,
Discorder •#§|@Qt to highlight some of the variety
at the city's biggeslN^fiWcase of music on the rise.
viihvvx mm %
om^'O^
th&UfaR
bidjprk
Whistler-based jazz-pop singer Ali Milner is the
definition of a great young artist at the age of only
17. In a phone conversation, she mentions that sh*
will turn 18 later this month — the day before her
prom. But before Ali and the rest of the 2008 graduating class of Whistler Secondary School enjoy that
wonderful tradition of corsages and slow-dances,
Milner will be performing at the Libra Room on
Commercial Drive, sharing a bill with three other
talented songwriters.
For that show, Milner will-lb® accompanied only >
by her piano, performing wfjjj&cshe calls a "pared- '
down, loungey set* She'll ife eschewing the jazz
^ttdttds and covers that she^ffen performs during
her weekly gig at the Four Seasons Hotel in favour
ti!f fata own original songs. She'll also play a few
Written by her uncle, Canadian Country singer John
Howard, "His lyrics are really! amazing, but the
songs don't sound like couatif* anymore,' Milner
says of her jazz renditions. 0' "f-
This promising talent^haS ^ag^dy played for some
pretty impressive crowds, including a performance at
astadluM £j3 the city of Guangihou/Qblna, where
she appeared as paft^af $.> futeral fosjSvat. There,
she flayed to is audience of fiOfOOC *lleyond epic"
is ^fs&W* Milner describes the $$iow, which featured
fireworks, pyrotech^^-'-|^t&imers from several
different countries and none other thaa Jackie Chan
onstige Siftgmg a Chinese pap fang, When asked .
to evaluate Chan's pigpsoiianeq 4S a singer, Milner -:
psp<lnds, "Hie was al|Ight...:Jbut ft was Jackie Chan! -
pjppgrts self-titled debut ^IMbi was released on
Venus/EMI and is nowfi^tt|hle'through-her
Website, www.alimilner.c@^M;:iShe has already
tecotded some new material, ^^^Jfc^^iot certain
when, or how the fo^fl^ft^HS^^^ped. In the
pteanttae, thoughj^tf^^l^^lsi^^^is summer
attending Bostotfij famed BerkHe College of Music,
lb .the taos& fffffc^ttSefc performance jarogram that
wa$ CoRipleted %oto_W9^B^^Mf JS^S^ BC-bred
jazz phsnom, Dianaj^ai|£  ;.
pidilfter rrtsry &t31 bell yea* *0^^from being able to
Ist^^oG^t^^^S^br^f^^butfae^Ncvv Music
West a^peatatJCe.tfefe monsh wil, be a great opportu-
: mty to show that slfe is a -soul&t, oldrfoshioned jazz
singer, with style ar^taleatbey<i*xl net year$> . ^V&^'-^^K'
"I guess ihe cowboy label fits ok,* saV? singer/song-
-|wr^er Cariier^ff Latimer, ftbut my rjqjjasic's sort of aU
•0_fst theplace.* Indeed, Latimer's solo debut, Fallen
Apatt has a lot more going on than straight country
tunes. The alburn, which will be released in August *
by Black Hen Musk, featufes pop Spngs and hard-
driving rock numbers alongside the country songs,
reflect! ng;ai^iie:r^i^e of influenqjejiO "
In fact, oneofLatimer'S'earitest and^oost significant
musical influences was his fathsr, *Tony Latimer.
*He*s a country-folk singer* explains the proud:
son, "and I've played five with him affew times. He's
■been a huge influence on me/'He is&es aU different
kinds of tunes: Caribbean, Celtic, sis a shanties. I've
,' always loved all kinds of musk?.*    1
Though h& music draws from all pf these diverse
inspirations, it has. a basis in country find roots music
Latimer is* part of an emerging alt-country scene' in
Vancouver, alongside acts IBke'Ridley Bent, Kent
McAlister &the Iron Choir, Dustin $entall and Ryan
McMahon,' aU of whom Latimer hastshared the stage
with- "There's about five or six bands that make up
*hat scene, and they're afi very different,'' he explains.
"Over the past six or seven years, vff sort of built up
ua bit of an alt^country scene where *here wasn't one
'before, and it feels cool to bearpart ot that"
"In fact, Latimer's first ever lwe .performance was
alongside Ridley Bent, playing jif&ar for ■ biai at,
the RailwayChib. "I was realty nefyous,* he laughs,
"but I Jove that place! I Ve played |here lots' of times.
l& OQe'of tbtf5r"only" cool'.venues left in town now)*
Fittingly, Cameron witt be appea|ing at the- Rail- -'
way on May:14 as part of New-Mu^ic West Fpr the
showv Latimer and his longtime collaborator/guitar '
player, Adam Dpbres, w,ill perform an acoustic set -
Watsw>*-0iece. " ' *0-'«"'"' ■
' After the release of Fallen Apart (which also includes
the playing t»f drummer Pat Stewart and bassist Rob
'Becker) in August, Latimer and Dobres will take to
; the road aspart of the Home*Roufes Tour of House
Concerts. In a truly original-and intriguing endeasf;-
% our, Latimer and Dobres wiltbe touring from Mani- •
toba to Alberta, appearing and playing in people's'
homes. While the dates haveyetsto be confirmed,J
the boys will show up wi^i their|guitar$V$et up in
someone's living room; grab a seat fcnthe couch, and *,
play for an audience of friends andneighbours..   . <!:.
The Hdfloe Routes Taur isr the brainchild of Mitch
"Podolafej'the" founder ^TtHe Vancouver and Winni-.
">peg Folfe; Festivals,, Whe®, asked if he's ever done
anything like these shows before, Latimer replies
3*Htb a bif of a chucKte* "Ne. 1&ptt resdly think that
anyone has," "•   .0>O v--*' *
I THE FOLKIES   T
Lily Come|3P^s;n|^^*» feise^iece led by vocal-
ists/multi-instrujrnentalists/songwritf^ Melissa
Bandura and Joanna Chapman-Smith, along with*
Chris Suen onlbanjo and, vocals, Justine Fischer
on bass, and vofcalist/percussioni'st Kenton Wiens.
, The band plays a root«y style of music that they call
"feisty folk,9 a term invented by Wiens. As Bandura
explains, the term .feisty folk "really describes our
Savour: folk-With some driving, sometimes Celtic,
sometimes funk rhythms, along with strong, Story*-
telling lyric*,*
Looking to similar acts like the Be Good Tanyas,
the Wailin* Jennys and Po' Girl, Bandura says that
Lily Come Down hasn't played, with these bands
yet, although .she points out, "They have influenced
us beyond, measure,*' She goes on to sav, "We are
looking forward to. the hopeful day when we do getj
• to play with them, arid that will be another personal
milestone forfrffe."!,'  "
' The group formed around-the duo.of Bandura and
Chapman-Smith, who; onh/last year decided to do -
some recording, but wanted to flesh'out their sound
with a full. band. Novfr/ jhey almost .always appear
. wHh. a full line-up, and' will-do so at then CD
release party, May 15 attfie^WlSE^Hatlj jhe night
before their NMW "showCasje. Both shows should
.'feature "some -heavy ipot-stomping, two leading'
'-gals on stage with an endearing s^nse of humour;
'and an energy-from the band,'that's highly contagious because it's so real." Bandura quickly adds,
v- "And, don't forget the four-part harmonies!*
' Between the cwo leading gals, they have guitar,',
mandolin, fiddle', pennywhistkj and clarinet covered: '
While they, both share $ special affection for the
guitar, Bandura singles out the violin as her favourite'
* instiument. "IfeaUy feel like the fiddle is an exten- ,
v'siofr of my ayrij. I l&ve dac sound of a bowediri^titta/
ment." And speaking on behalf of Chapman-Smith ,
{who is out of tfewri on a solo tour), Bandura says,*To"
me, her voice ii her instrument. She has trained her
body to project her vocal expression since 'a youngs
age, and it sh&ws with the precision and emotion '.
that comes fro&j her mouth when t.he sings." '   * **"*
I J*«OCKERS . ,
A Saturday night rock show at the Bourbon in !
Gastown has all the right ingredienMp|a big night, j
andjason Corbett, the frontman of^|al rock band |
TV Heart Attack, wants you to l^^^plactly what j
s0jj_w080&l is in for at their New Mulic West appear-
$$_$00ki_hl_ay 17. TV Heart Attack sounds like a
hard rock version of David SHfe, updated for 2008
of course, and in addition to their catchy, sy|tth-
drenched tunesr, "You can expect s|rnf nearing loss.
You might lose your virginity top-^f you're lucky."
Statements Iffe that one seem to be^e^tesentative of j
TV Heart Attack's attitude — thejf #i|pheir music j
:£ei3dtt|ly, but they hke to have a little fun toonm.
M^^p^ag of Corbett on vocals and guitar, Arthur
Guest on lead guitar, Dave Andersbi^Mjbass, Ryan I
McDonell on keyboards, and Doinjofl-Coletta on
drums, the band has an ojfihne bio that makes several d
eye-catching claims. It states that"Ogp&'s "family
was instrumental in the building! of tille panamak
Canal," that Guest has 35 gujtju^tfe^^fcDonell
moonlights as a TV actor ("mostly|plS|iirlg tortured |
teenage angst roles") and that he ajffdrw5ibett actu-
^H^lmet on the set of Look Who's jfalking 3.
Asked about that last one^pArbett replies, "You
can't make up a story like that!* l|i£&oe$ on to
.a$d, "We did leave^ip that I sold my soul to the
devil when I was 12-years-old. We jugtdidn't have
enough room*to go back that far." j
' TV'Bearit Attack's bio also oulliaes the story |
of^how tf^lfiind formed oversetei^Sile all. the
membersi^^^-l^ing in Europe,Js^M"returning
■ home to Canada because of "the m#J£al chmate."
"There's a5 r^BenCf:*^"the Vancou|e|Jfiusic scene,"
says Coriaett^ e^aining vvhat dre&-the ^afidpa^K
td C^nwa-.^Just when you^lMtt^'fliken its last
^eafnj'ifallof a sudden ge^^ssjitihg again. I guess
it^s .eyej^cai, l-kt anything else. ^LmS^^k just a
matter ofpar^etwwf *• CHRISTk
COUTURE
SINGER. SONGWRITER. WARRIOR.
i^HHi irista Couture deserves your respect. At the
j§«g|s   ;c of 29, the girl has faced more adversity than
^BHmost people do in their lifetimes, but she refuses
to play the victim. Couture's experiences have made
her empathetic beyond her years, and she communicates what she has learned through her music.
A cancer survivor, she prefers not to be defined by
what others may see as a disability. She was diagnosed
with bone cancer when she was eleven, and her leg
was removed above the knee. After spending four
years in a hospital undergoing treatments and dealing
with mortality, watching her friends die and feeling
guilty for surviving, Couture entered high school
with a pronounced limp and lacking the usual social
development of someone her age.
But she sees the positive side of her experience: "I
couldn't imagine going through adolescence without
cancer," she says. "Chemotherapy is so primitive, but
there is this sense of living with cancer and being
grateful for it."
Despite dealing with body image issues, Couture
still managed to find her way on to the stage, performing in choirs and in musical theatre throughout her
childhood and into her teens. Born to a folk singer
mother and a Cree healer father, Couture was raised
spending weeks living in teepees in the Albertan bush,
watching her father lead sweats and sing in ceremonies.  The Native outlook on spirituality and nature
remains an influence for her today—so does her father.
"He had an amazing voice, he was always singing and
drumming."
At 18, tired from rigorous auditioning and performing, Couture left Edmonton to attend film school in
Vancouver. However, the call to perform did not leave
her for long, and she began to write her own songs and
think about performing solo. Seeking a place where she
could introduce herself as a musician in a less intimidating atmosphere, she moved to London when she was 22
to "earn her stripes."
"I couldn't do it in Vancouver," she says, "it was such a
good year." She played small gigs and open mics around
the U.K., getting used to playing her guitar and being
solo on the stage, before heading home to try out what
she'd learned.
In 2005, she released her first album, Fell Out of Oz,
which is about the transition from adolescence to
adulthood. The album prompted comparisons to Tori
Amos and Ani Difranco, although Couture's singing is
revealing in an entrancing, non-aggressive way.
After the release of Oz, the emerging folk singer
experienced falling in love and marrying, going through
pregnancy, and the loss of her child shortly after he
was born. Couture found solace in songrwiting, and a
second album began to take shape.
"Making this album was the only thing I could do. I
wrote these songs while I was pregnant. Once he died,
the songs took on a different meaning. I learned so
much about loving someone, he changed the shape
of my heart." The title of the album is The Wedding
Singer and the Undertaker, which for Couture illustrates the idea that love and death are inseperable,
and explores a time of her life when love and grief
were so intertwined.
"When, people found out what had happened, so
many [people] came to me with their own stories.
It seems hke the dark side of childbirth is ignored-
—nobody wants to hear about that." Couture sees
performing as a way to identify and give hope. The
traumas of her own life have given her insight into
the problems that other people have in their day-today lives, a rare apathy. "Everyone has weird shit in
their lives, and grief is a complicated emotion. That's
one thing I love about music. If I can help someone
go through that, that is most important to me."
For now Couture is focussing on plans for her next
tour, her longest one yet, to promote The Wedding
Singer and the Undertaker. The tour kicks off in
Nanaimo on May 1 and will take her across Canada
and to the end of the summer. What does Christa
Couture have to say about what's upcoming? "It's
exciting," she says, a knowing smile on her face.
Christa Couture's CD Release Party is on May 20
at the Wise Hall in Vancouver,   fa
12    Jvlay 2008 •s she breezes into the coffee shop, apologizing for running three minutes behind schedule, Adaline radiates cheer, excitement, and
graciousness. She warns that, she's a "chatter" and
that she's working on showing a bit of decorum, not
wanting to divulge anything that would "make her
parents die." But her natural friendliness and enthusiasm make withholding almost impossible, and
frankly, all the better. _t^^^_$
Adaline in person is a stark contrast to the woman
in her songs. The most haunting of the 12 emotional
and evocative songs from her debut album, Famous
for Fire, deal with betrayal, confusion, sadness and
heartbreak. And, while she's pleased with the album
and proud of the outcome, it's still a tough place to
journey back to every time she gets on stage.
"It was a really scary time. I am the most even-
keeled, positive, outgoing person," Adaline says. "And
to know that I could go through a time that was that
^lodMWftkes you realize that everyone can."
With nothing to lose, Adaline decided to hold a
concert—a sort of career launch—at a church to see
if she had the chops to make it as a performer. She
played for about 250 people that night, and hasn't
stopped yet.
Part of Adaline's universal appeal might be the
breadth of her influences. When she was younger, her
father was a minister, and together with her mom and
brother, the four would travel around and play music
together—a Canadian twist on the Partridge family.
Raised on a diet of church-based gospel and soul, the
classically grained pianist eventually discovered Pearl
Jam's Ten, a moment that shattered her preconceived
notions of music. It also inspired a defiant streak, as she
bought and hid a new copy every time her parents found
the CD and threw it out.
Her sheltered childhood couldn't keep Adaline from
indulging in her love affair with pop culture. She wasn't
allowed to take dance, but she made up her own routines
to songs hke "Baby Got Back," recorded on secret tapes
made from the radio.
"I was 17 or 18 when I heard Radiohead for the first
time. And Tom Waits. People that everyone else knew
of except for me," says ths songstress. "I was like* This is
so amazing,' To hear people be creative and thoughtful
about music in a way that I'd never heard before—it was
absolutely mind-blowing." And, while most people can't
recall hearing "Tiny Dancer" for the first time, it's in
part her perpetual wide-eyed awe that lends her darkest
songs a lift up.
She admits her folks weren't-thrilled with the idea
of her playing shows io dingy bars, but they haw come
around since her career launch concert. Musically, her
parents have a lot to be proud of with Adaline's debut.
Strongly influenced by women like Sarah Slean and
Fiona Appkr^ the album's chilling piano beautifully
underscores her slightly smoky vocals.
And already Adaline is trying to mentally prepare
for writing her second album, which will come from a
vastly different place than Famous for Fire, although
she won't forgo her sulky tone entirely. Adaline is
more than a little cynical when the topic of love
comes up, and she admits that all of her energy is
intensely focused on her career. But this is part of the
reason Adaline is poised to become a huge hit. Her
sweetly self-deprecating candour is refreshing in a
world of sound-bite ready bombshells. "Honestly, I'm
a bit of a geek right now. I'm really social, but I have
found that lately the most exciting thing to do on a
Friday night is to plan my tour. Music is something
that is so stable. It's not like basing your happiness on
a person or a situation. I often look at it as-*-and this
is going to sound crazy—but as a romantic situation
for me. Music is kinda my boyfriend, which is a little
weird," she concedes with a sheepish laugh.
Christa Couture's CD Release Party is on May 20
at the Wist Hall m Vancouver,     fa
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you bright minds
MATTHEW MEI AND YOU BRIGHT MINDS
(Independent)
Hailing from Vancouver, Matthew Mei has created a
brilliant album that combines a hard rock edge (reminiscent of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club) with a delicate
touch. Following his 2006 solo debut,The Preachers Son,
Mei joins forces this time with You Bright Minds (Matt
Piatt, along with bio and sis, Nate and Jeannette McKay)
to produce another energetic album infused with gospel
roots. The self-titled record blends intensity with a soulful sound, with the opening song, "Truth," as the powerhouse track that sets the tone for the entire album.
In contrast With the rockier tunes, some of the tracks
are beautiful ballads, but still carry the resonance of
the dynamic group. "Railroad" is one of the strongest
tracks, showing off Mei's powerful vocals, harmonizing
effortlessly with You Bright Minds and forming a truly
impressive number. Each song is memorable, distinct
and exciting.
This album showcases how Matthew Mei and You
Bright Minds have a promising future ahead of them.
Mei's sound has matured from his debut in 2006, and
the collaboration with You Bright Minds has created a
truly unique and remarkable collection of songs.
Terris Schneider
JUSTIN RUTLEDGE
MAN DESCENDING
(Six Shooter Records)
Justin Rudedge is too alt for the country music realm
(thank god), and too country for the indie-kids. Fortunately for you, listener, this means that you'll never feel
any stigma for enjoying his music, and that he'll always
be a litde bit un-hip. It also means that his career will
have longevity, carrying him on a slow incline to subde
legendry.
Man Descending is Rutledge's third studio album and
contains songs written loosely about characters from a
collection of short stories by Guy Vanderhaeghe. Along
for the ride is a large cast of Canadian troubadours lending their respective hands, including Jim Bryson, Jenn
Grant, Melissa McLelland, Oh Susanna, Ron Sexsmith
and Hawksley Workman. Ihe album is quiet, slow and
beautiful. Rutledge is one of those writers who only needs
six chords to make a record, and somehow each song is
just different enough to fit nicely into the progression
between the beginning and the end. Man Descending
is story-based lyricism at its loveliest, *and you will no
doubt hear these songs recorded by other artists decades
from now.
Tne only downfall to this record, as with his previous two, is that every time he enters a studio, the sound
engineer turns down the "balls" knob. If you've seen him
Uve, you know that there is an intensity in him that is lost
in recording—missing is the fiery delivery that merits a
pin-drop audience. Nevertheless, Rutledge is one of the
country's finest songwriters, and this piece of Canadian
Americana deserves your attention and a spot in your
iTunes —listed just Below Jeff Tweedy and Jose Gonzales,
to be sure.
Ronnyjotten
16   May 2008
UNDeF
The Television Personalities
the good anarchist/
She's always Been There For me
- (Elefant Records)
The Television Personalities have had their fair share
of ups and downs. With front-man Dan Treacy's various
battles with drug addiction, mental illness and the law,
the band has been unstable at best and plain disastrous
at worst. Despite this, the group has made some of the
finest pop records of the last three decades, and like all
TVP releases, their latest proves that, at the end of the
day, it's the music that counts.
Following 2006's My Dark Places and 2007's Are We
Nearly There Yet?, the 30-year-old UJC. indie act's new
7-inch shows Treacy and his revolving cast of players
creating pop in its purest and simplest form.The A-Side's
"The Good Anarchist" features little more than a clumsy,
childlike guitar Une, some organ drones and a Ught, floating voice, courtesy of Swede, Johanna Lundstrom. It's a
track that puts a Uttle innocence back into the musical
equation, bringing to mind the halcyon days of indie-
pop before twee became just another four-letter word.
On the flipside, "She's Always Been There for Me" puts
Treacy front and centre, his vulnerable voice riding high
above a rousing Northern Soul-tinged dance number.
And unlike "The Good Anarchist," the song brings out
the Television PersonaUties'weU-practiced scrappy side,
as a fuU band pounds in time to Treacy's ever-honest and
unguarded words. 'O-
Combined, the tracks prove these modern-era Television PersonaUties have a lot offer, with the band's latest
chapter being just as exciting as those previous.
Brock Thiessen
Apples in Stereo
Electronic Projects For Musicians
(Simian/Yep Roc)
There's been a constant debate throughout the ages as
to whether one bad apple reaUy can spoil the whole bunch.
Wars have been fought, children slain, churches torched
to the ground, and yet, the argument stUl remains one of
Ufe's great quagmires. With that preamble in mind, it's a
smaU wonder how the Apples in Stereo can retain such a
great wealth of unreleased material in its basket - could
these tracks reaUy be considered unworthy of a place on
official albums? Simple answer: yes and no.
It goes without saying that lead Apple, Robert
Schneider can write a perfect pop song in his sleep, and
probably has on a few occasions, but such is the case with
many perfectionists: it'seasy to find fault in what others
would deem brilliant. So what we have here is another
coUection of odds and ends from the Apples'vault (their
first coUection being 1996's mealy Science Faire). The
disc contains songs that either weren't suitable (stereo-
phonicaUy or thematieaUy) for proper albums or tracks
that were simply laid as one-off recordings. Either way,
each previously notsready-for-primetime gem on Electronic Projects for Musicians is more interesting than
the bulk of the barely hummable pap that is spewed out
by the majority of indie pop bands on today's waning
circuit. With not a single rotten track here* W. doubtful
anything could ever spoil this band.   0
Adam Simpkins >
iii
Culture Reject
Culture Reject
(White Whale Records)
Twangy and eclectic, Culture Reject is but a antidote
for BeUe and Sebastian fans, as weU as those who are
looking for something less mainstream than Broken
Social Scene. Singer/multi-instrumentaUst Michael
O'ConneU samples-from his weU-versed musical train-
ing,Aising pretty much any instrument that makes a noise,
and adds his knowledge of african beats acquired from
his travels. His whispery thin vocal deUvery is particularly noticeable in tracks such as "Museums" and "Oh
Remain," giving it a soft, jazzy sway at times.
LyricaUy, the self-titled debut is evocative and humble.
Lines Uke "I wanna go home/ and get myself stoned,"
exemplify an honest, bohemian attitude that is lacking
from a lot of Canadian music these days. In the track
"Overflow," O'ConneU croons softly about a cruel, spontaneous woman, bewailing his unrequited love in a way
that gets into the Ustener's heart—a melodic and soulful
musical base mixed with a bitter taste of rejection.
This album as a whole is fitting for aU occasions,
encompassing eveiything from jazz to random, rhythmical melodies. Culture Reject is designed with the sensitive of heart in mind, Uving in a cruel, cruel world.
Mine Salkin
The waifs
Sun Dirt water
(Jarrah Records) ,
The Waifs' first record in five years was, according to
the Western Australian band itself, a difficult album.
And unavoidably so, as it aspires to more diverse territory, breaking the hiatus since 2003's Up AU Night.
Recorded in NashviUe, Tennessee, Sun Dirt Water
is a set of immaculately executed, lush folk sounds, aU
poUshed and warm; very easy on the ears. The band's
unpretentious blues convey the slowness of their own
desert outback remarkably vividly—a knack equaled
perhaps only by their wUder countrymen The Drones. But
they're not explosive. Instead they simmer and saU along
with sparse, soft rock, incorporating lapsteel guitars, a
Hammond organ and an upright bass, aU chipping in to
create tasteful, albeit predictable, chord progressions.
The lyrics seem to be where Sun Dirt Water puts the
naU in the coffin. In true folk fashion the music seems
ultimately to be a backdrop, secondary to the stories and
reflections it underwrites. The album is a mix of complex
love songs (as in the soulful hit tide track) and scenes
of road tripping, nowhere men, booze, and harsh, pretty
landscape (notably "Get Me Some," with Josh Cunningham's monumental lyric "I'm free when the sun shiries
down on me"). AU of these songs are as compelUng as
they are soothing, and make up a cohesive, mature and
very Ustenable folk-blues record.
Mark Hewitt
Four Tet
Ringer
(Domino)
After various stints with various coUaborators, Kieran
Hebden has finaUy gone back to what he does best:
working solo as Four Tet. And as always, his latest release
under the moniker—the mini-album Ringer—continues to showcase his distinct brand of headphone-geared
electronica as Hebden again refuses to repeat himself.
Unlike the chaotic free-jazz swirls of 2005's Everything Ecstatic and even more unlike the chiUed-out
"folktronica" of the project's infancy, Ringer'9 four tracks
push forward, embracing a simpler, more unfurnished
blueprint. Each of its slow-building epics clears the clutter for exercises in speedy minimalism, where sequenced
loops interlace with deep 4/4 grooves of a very techno,
yet very Four Tet, nature. The jazz breaks, the bUssed-
out harmonies, the computerized noise—they're aU stiU
here, but less present than in the past, functioning only
as window-dressing to the crisp, cycUcal patterns. For
once, you can isolate each of Hebden's instruments—
electronic and organic—allowing you to chart their
course as they enter and leave the mix. It's a welcomed
relief from the indistinguishable layers of commotion
usuaUy linked to Four Tet, and gives backing to the old
adage of less is more.
In many ways, Ringer is the most electronic Four Tet
offering, yet it's also Hebden's warmest, making aU 31
minutes essential for fans of his past, present and future.
Brock Thiessen
ELIZABETH SHEPHERD
PARKDALE
(Do Right! Music)
After her hugely successful Start to Move, EUzabeth-
Shepherd has returned with her foUow-up album, the
highly anticipated Parkdale. Once again, Shepherd has
produced a magnificent jazz record that displays her
incredible musical talent. She has trained extensively
in conservatories from Alberta to France, completing a
degree in music from McGiU University, and her expertise unravels throughout this album.
She combines funk, soul and blues, captivating the
Ustener with her enchanting and swooning voice. The
opening track, "Shining Tear Of The Sun," is a styUsh,
unforgettable tune that perfectly displays Shepherd's
vocal abiUty. The title track, "Parkdale," is a catchy song,
reminiscent of Feist's earUer works, uniquely blending
together samba music with skillful jazz trumpet and
piano. The album brilUantly concludes with "Mirror
Living," a sultry and vibrant hit that leaves the audience
pining for more.
EUzabeth Shepherd continues to produce timeless
music that is refreshing the world of jazz. The hard work
and dedication on this record shine through, and it would
be no surprise if Shepherd repeated as a nominee for best
Jazz album at next year's Junos with Parkdale.
Terris Schneider
Discorder   13 th special guests Modest Mouse I~
plus The National m\
: friday, may 23s
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SATURDAY, MAY 24
PNE FORUM
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DIYSNE+ftERESY
MAY 26
y-dftilriAN
CULTURAL CENTRE
W  GHOSTLAND   fe^SS
i   OBSERVATORY ».-,J%
MAY 27
RICHARDS ON
RICHARDS
CULTURAL CftilflE
KASKADE MAY 18 | COMMODORE BALLROOM • RUSH MAY 29 I GENERAL MOTORS PLACE • STATE OF SHOCK & ECONOLIME CRUSH MAY 30 I COMMODORE BALLROOM
:riflTIOn.com
18    May 2008 n
Lfve nRTiorrl
Do Sale!
Discorder   19 \
m
BOfcN RUFFIANS
+ Said The Whale
The Media Club
March 26
Ontarian trio Born Ruffians packed the Media Club
to near capacity on their recent Vancouver stop. And
just like their album, in concert the band's musical
architecture came together like a well-lived-in country
home: hardly squeaky clean, but tidy. Each note, chord
and snare hit acquired its own space without regard for
getting the place a little dirty. Steve Hamelin's tight
and structural percussion framed Mitch Derosier's
smooth and rhythmic bass. Upon this foundation, Luke
Lalondes nailed his guitar and delivered thesaurus-defying spasmodic vocals.
Opening for Born Ruffians was local band Said the
Whale. It took them a while to warm up the crowd but
by the time they finished, they had made a solid connection, with the audience up against the stage, primed and
whetted for Born Ruffians.
Early into* the Toronto band's set, whUe tuning,
Derosier snapped his bass string for what Hamelin
said was the fourth time this tour. After a quick fix,
the band dropped an old favourite, "This Sentence Will
Ruin/Save Your Life," a quick, catchy and honest take
on high-paced modern life. If the crowd had cooled off
a little, they were reignited at this point with wave after
wave of unrelenting vocals, back-up shouting and rolling drum successions.
Throughout the show, musical ability and good, honest
effort poured off the stage—literally. Sweat rained from
aU three of members, which almost (but not quite) overpowered the urinal-cake smeU of the bathrooms at stage
left. At times, the artists were so caught up in the music
that it seemed like a "who can keep your eyes closed the
longest" contest. *^^^
With a greatly heralded encore, Born Ruffians proved
they have built their fan base on some very solid musical ground, which is good, because their style tears the
house down every time.
Peter Holmes
20    May 2008
Bruce Springsteen
General Motors Place
March 31
Where is a girl to cast her eyes? Entering a musical
spectacle, surrounded by thousands of people -104 rows
of them in front of me, one tiny man dancing around
on stage. Reproduced on a giant stadium screen above
him, the man's face hovers in mythic proportion. And
so, where do I cast my eyes?
I am given two obvious options: I can watch the small
indistinct image of Bruce Springsteen on the stage, or
I can watch the high-definition Jumbotron of parts of
him. Turning my head to and fro I can follow him with
my eyes; the real Bruce skipping across the stage, so
small and so indistinct. Or, I can watch an equal-sided
square of frightening detail, images mixed in almost-
real-time, "real" life yielding to the mediated experience of a one-time-only music video. If I choose the
latter, then why not save the money of the very expensive, faraway seats, purchase a live DVD and watch it
on a friend's living room Jumbotron? What would be
the difference? Str^lill IIP^'-"'
Perhaps the difference is in the reason I go to see
music live in the first place: I go to hear the ways it is
different. I go to eye the way musicians respond to their
day, to participate in a reciprocal exchange of energy; I
go to heed the perfection or imperfection of reality. All
these things are tied up in the sensory affair of gathering
together—of watching, hearing, breathing hot, stinking, mingled air. But in this modern age, the camera's
eye and aU. the accompanying bru-ha-ha machinery
catch my attention in a way that reality cannot. If I
choose not to watch the absurd, backlit image of The
Boss's "Born to Run," I have to exert a real effort to
ignore the Jumbotron. It feels like a matter of science
that the ambient equivalent is less enticing. And yet, I
came here for the guffaws, for the sweat, for the unme-
diated space between me and The Boss.
Even wanting what I wanted, though, I gazed at the
screen, as if it gave me somehow more of him. But it was
when I diverted my eyes that I was rewarded with the
whole spectacle of his rock-star posturing. He raised his
arms in a caU to action but aU the screen got was the shape
of his shoulders. In that synchronized moment of bUss
The Boss left me no choice. I was dancing with him.
Cheyanne Turions
THE BLACK KEYS
+ JAY REATARD
The Commodore Ballroom
April 6
It seems only a short time ago—four or five years,
in fact—that Akron, Ohio's Black Keys found themselves playing to a smaU, devoted crowd in Vancouver's
tiny Red Room. Nowadays, when they come to town,
the Georgia Straight promotes the show, they book the
Commodore, it seUs out, and the band brings a stadium-
sized light show that rivals any other major spectacle in
recent memory. Thus, part of the Keys' charm is gone.
They belong in a tighter, more intimate setting where
their amplified blues-rock makes the place burst at its
seams, not in a cavernous hall where they're forced to
supplement their stripped-down sound with excessively
energetic Ughting.
That being said, the guys haven't lost any of their skill
at stomping out track after track of catchy, bluesy gems.
Rockers like "Set You Free" and "10 A.M. Automatic"
were larger-than-life thanks to Patrick Carney's thunderous pounding on the drums, while Dan Auerbach
had more than sufficient chops on guitar to screech out
riff after swaying riff. There's little more to say about
' it—the songs didn't stray much from recorded versions,
but with the power and punch of live performance
behind them, it didn't much matter.
Opening for the Keys, Jay Reatard and his backing band (a bassist with huge, Melvins-like hair, and
a drummer in what had to have been a blonde wig)
hammered out a wonderfully old-school parade of lo-fi
street-punk. Little touches, like having no stage banter
except for introducing each song with its title, made
the performance a great throwback to honest, gritty
Ramones-style punk rock. However, a distinctly gnarly
touch was the bassist being so drunk that he kept spitting huge wads of mucus into the air, and sometimes
directly at the crowd. Pretty gross—but sometimes
that's the price of rock and roll.
Simon Foreman I^SsIf''*'
WOODHANDS
+ The Clips
The Astoria
April ? ] Sflll
Woodhands kicked out some great indie dance tracks
before an eager audience at the Astoria, April 11th. Dan
Werb, bearing a striking resemblance to Thomas Dolby,
led the duo, playing keytar, a heavily processed synthesizer and providing most of the vocals. Paul Banwatt
played a fast-paced rhythm on the drums and filled the
role of rap MC on one song with surprising talent.
Coming from Toronto to Vancouver for the second
time, Woodhands has cemented themselves as one of
Canada's best acts to get the dance floor going. They
don't quite approach the all-out balls-to-the-waUs
atmosphere that Shout Out Out Out Out can achieve,
but if you want a live act to dance to, you can't do much
better than this duo.
Their energy almost masks the fact that Werb and
Banwatt are also very talented musicians. With Werb
choosing to rock the keytar, you might think he was
all energy and irony, but as anyone who has seen hirh
play solo can tell you, he is an accomplished, classically
trained pianist.
Opening for Woodhands was local indie dance rockers the Clips. Playing songs from their recently released
Matterhorn, Edo Van Breemen and co. got the crowd
warmed up with a high-energy performance. They're a
lot jammier than your average dance band and, at times,
step away from the standard synth lines to replace them
with a more traditional piano sound. This breaks down
into a looser sound, which has some appeal in that it
stands out from most dance acts.
Between the two bands the crowd was thick and
eager to dance, if you were thinking of seeing this one
and missed it, you missed out.
Jordie Yow m
DANIEL JOHNSTON
Richard's on Richards
April 19
Daniel Johnston hasn't had what you'd caU a smooth ride. Multiple stints in mental
hospitals, brushes with the law and chronic bi-polar disorder have all plagued his life,
making a stable live show unlikely at best. Surprising then that Johnston treated a
sold-out Vancouver crowd to a moving, as well as solid, performance that went far
and beyond expectations. *., ^
The hour-long set by the Texas musician—who continues to grow in popularity and
physical size—came in two parts: a touching opening segment with simply Johnston
and a guitar, and a second more rockin' half, complete with a full band. Johnston
started the evening with his own bumpy guitar rhythms, but quickly brought on
a hired hand to strum his songs for him. This let 47-year-old Johnston centre his
efforts on his off-key, but always charming, vocals, as the backing guitarist, as well
as the four-piece band that followed, brought a welcomed polish to Johnston's usually
rough-and-tumble songs. However, it was unclear whether enlisting the musicians
was a matter of choice or necessity; Johnston's hands suffered from uncontrollable
tremors throughout the evening, and seemed to need all the power he could muster
to keep from losing his voice, chugging bottle after bottle not of Mountain Dew but
simple water.
.Yet despite Johnston's struggles and obviously uncomfortable stage demeanor, he
managed to cover a lot of ground with his set-list, which very much played as a greatest-hits collection. AU the classics were there: "Living Life," "Walking the Cow,"
"True Love WiU Find You in the End," "Silly Love" and even the song about that
famous ghost. Also, mixed amongst the songs was an interesting tale or two about
AstroWorld, plastic frogs, Star Wars videos, and a morbid dream Johnston had where
he was sentenced to death for trying to commit suicide.
When it came time for the encore, Johnston held the stage on his own, leading the
crowd in a moving rendition of "Devil Town." It was a powerful end to a powerful
performance, and one that reminded you why a word as bold as "legend" so often
applies to Daniel Johnston.
Brock Thiessen
SEX NEGATIVES
+ YELLOW SWANS, SHEARING PINX
Richard's on Richards
April. 19        . 3Pgg&
. The Strathcona Youth Centre was packed to the gills with noisy fans, hipsters and
some confused kids just looking to dance 'til dawn. This was to be the last show at the
centre for the next while and what a memorable send off it was. In the early hours of
night, the mighty Shearing Pinx tore through a tightly wound set of their energetic
brand of feedback-driven tension punk. It was amazing the Pinx were able to play as
tightly as they did, what with all the kids up at the front pinballing each other into
the band, who, like every other group that night, played in the middle of the floor,
makingibr a bit more of an "intimate" show.
Portland's D. (decayed, dying, dead, deceased?) Yellow Swans took the stage soon
after and played what was to be one of their last shows ever before calling it quits.
The duo of Pete Swanson and Gabe Mindel sent the crowd careening just above the
clouds with their all-too-brief set of wavy bliss drones. Their stretched-out 20-minute
piece sent out an all-enveloping hypnotic vibration, which rattled the entire room and
silenced anyone who dared try to talk through it. The performance was a fitting exit
from one of the most prolific and well-loved noise/drone groups of the last 10 years.
You wiU be missed, guys. •
Vancouver's Sex Negatives finished off the festivities, pulling off the most impressive and memorable set of the night and standing tall against the juggernauts of the
improv and noise scene. Sex Negatives did have some help from local noise guru the
Rita, though, who provided the white-noise jet fuel for their jaw-dropping hypno-
jam. The Rita was flanked by the four members of the group, which included two
feedback/distortion wielding guitarists, a howling vocalist and a thunderous force
from behind the kit. All five coalesced together and concocted a swirling tower of
howling feedback, finishing off a truly great night of noise.
Mark Richardson
CLUB 23 WEST
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Discorder   21 with CiTR's Ma;
%u would think that a two-piece band that had one member living in Port
Coquitlam and the other in Delta would ^ontain enough suburban angst
to make you ditch all your Minor Threat |||p|bs for good. Not true. The
Hawaiian Bibles want you to have fun. L^^jWF>t.T}us summer, tlie Bibles
^p|#ianning a tour where they play (uninvited) in undisclosed parking
Jegiisf public places across B.C. until the cops arrive. Their self-released
debut album, There's Good People in the City, sounds like two pop-loving
maniacs let loose in a warehouse with a whole bunch of recording doodads-
-which is pretty much exactly whatlffi^^e^TOBjiawaiian Bibles are the
'^^H^k^S^^  Here's a run down of There's Good People in the City, according to Devin
|||  Boquist (Vocals, Bass, In$tjr*i||^§if$, Programming) arid Jordan Gervais
(Vocals, Drums, Percussion, Instruments).
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Song: There's Good People in the ^^
^'*|3^vul^^qmst: It's a ro^fel^tSI^&J The very first time Jordan came over
0io1i^l$Bi|i|§.we just started playing this song. The opening bass riff is the
very first rain^i^^er played together. The original lyrics were something
completdyatiifferent.    .,^^|
Jordan Gervais: [The lyrics] were "Who's fighting, what are you fighting
for?" and then we changed the lyrics, which became about gender issues.
This tag line, "There's Good People in the City," I came up with, wi^@bi/
 w?.. ifacjiyjftgi ffiwca^idJtjfa)^ p*opip ■
around.
,,  . ■<■■*>■ Igg  Song: The Corner
I J.G.: I had a dream where my ot^^^^-old nephew was dying of cancer. I
f* woke up in tears and I had this sor|Bpfriy head off of one of Devin's derjacf*
fwjF" tapes called "The Corner."There is a Une in it which goes "I've got news for
H you, and you get it," and he kept repeating it, and it related to this horrible
pi|s? dream I had.
■    D.B: "The Corner" is the only fgfeg. on the album that is originally one of
K^j§fflJtoies» It changed3i&fei$,l>ut it is a Billy Shadow [solo project] song.
IIS  Song: Don't Wanna Give It Up
Bi*p3§B.: That is essentially about drug abuse, (lagghs) I still dont wanna give
Sill ** up'
5  Song: Hearts for Money
Sst   J;GbiSame with "Hearts for Moli^^te^f^bnt vices. "Looks hke everyone's
m   selling their hearts fofcaaoi^^n^r
&" S©h§: Experiments with Oxygen
K?LfeB.: That sqagHis an experiment$|pfc itself.
ISf**   J.G.: The more you listen to the lyrics, the more it makes sense. "Look at |
j* isgj|^p!igf!i£ skin is suffering." I^gtbout not taking care of oneself.
Turn -*r    D.B.: The thing about .all of our lyrics is that they come out really quickly*
E   They're about the life that we've lived so far. . -
Hs Song: Movie Roll-        £3j&S
IBB  J,<^^^i^ about workjnjg/i^;'^fe-set of a porn film. A woman being
|||§|   fili^e-cj m, a Ygry |«^fcative mami^ but the only villain is the viewer. 0
HB   Sof^.iSSf&fC^fijt'''?'
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llpf!   seconds..     , J, ,0^ -
§81  J.-^J^^^^fes^ _%_^^i.t_ttmZPt^^^^A^^ concept album for $J$e first 8
Sill   songs, they^ie about fighting wim Jstjjpgd^ fighting ad^^pon, and "Close  i
HfSr. to "Vou" is tfcpSil^fflK^p^l^-'^^SlEi''
■HL Song: Main and Hastings
BfiBjl   J.G.: That was originally &2$j$% J^^gatt^^^&^^ould Live in CasttesO*
H j%  TBat^my favourite song o^%hifj^_^StJ.
|1||||   DSEKl 5||K$^!i$ic is realfy ia^or^p^^^ for a title like "Main and jH^t$ftgs* q
Warn   --it's another add^i^-sel^^
||||  Sor^Cheap Shliliv;
Hill t$pG,: A standaj$.guy/girl ^WJjp^^^fes-'f ^^4'"^fT'^<^^feASOjI
mSi   D.B.: It's about a relationshlpfwh^^p.'girl takes a cheap shot at a guy.
J Song: She Stays tormf^^A
p ~ J]Xx.fDevm's lyrics are very, personal about his life, his r^laftonsfejp, his kids, ]
^^   and {this song] is an extensi^fit'df-B&at'—it's super iKJpesfcO'OV
jjjj   D.B.: I actua_ly.^^^t^^^Ss^0.g to go on the s^^^j^^because its
■jit -4£$y^??li|i^^
^^SvXi^f^^* song is almost like a mac^for-TV movie! (laughs)
r^B , D.B*- I* sounds like when we taEfaabout our songs, we sound so serious,
tff|j§ ^*fe^^S^^^eri°us- '^1*s 1S jus* a l°t of life gql^ift^^^Ht we love. Wg
oSf - Jp^B8wi|s(>& love playin|^^^toT^s *sn^ an album that had to be made,
j|j& It^Jpst a collectiqfc^f life experi^j^^ji^jujt fei&tog music. I just want-.
lilt?   Pe^^^^^^'^^rtfer'' ? 1'r 'i
The Hawaiian BtBles areptaymg Path PuJ. on M&V 20.
JOHNNY   DOVITD
a DrunkarDs masterpiece
     •••• 4 STARS. MOJO
"A Drunkard's Masterpiece is a creative car crash
of Americana, beatnik rock, poetry, prose, jazz
rock, rap, screaming metal guitar, retro pop,
spoken word and country noir.
The whole thing was recorded in three days, on 8
track tape, live in the studio...
The lyrics, like the music, are classic Dowd -
sex, marriage, more sex, adultery, original sin,
unoriginal sin, God, Mary, Jesus, more adultery,
death, iove, masturbation."
MORE INFO.
_.!..___,_._._____._.,
LiveMusicVancouver.com
comprehensive live music listings
Discorder   23 ©ora n@n,
PROGRAM GUIDE
YoucanlisteatoXilRari^ air at 101.9 FM
Sunday             Monday            Tuesday         Wednesday        Thursday            Friday             Saturday
6am (j
7am |
BBC
PACIFIC PICKIN'
BBC
BBC
BBC
BBC
JC
8am I
BREAKFAST
WITH
THE BROWNS
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
FILL-IN
THE SATURDAY EDGE
TANA RADIO
THIRD TIME'S
THE CHARM
SHOOKSHOOKTA
FILL-IN
SWEET AND HOT
SKA-TS SCENIC
DRIVE
11am|
GROUND CONTROL
MORNING AFTER SHOW
ANOIZE
12pml|
1pm ■
2pm I
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
PARTS UNKNOWN
LAUGH TRACKS
THE GREEN MAJORITY
WE ALL FALL DOWN
THE BROADCAST
POWERCHORD
FILL-IN
DEMOCRACY NOW
INKSTUDS
RADIO ZERO
REELTOREAL
3pm ■
4pm H
SHAMELESS
LETS GET BAKED
FILL-IN
RUMBLETONE
RADIO A GO GO
CRIMES & TREASONS
CODE BLUE
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
*   THE RIB
WENER'S BBQ
•■ CHIPS WITH
KJ LililEVERYYTHING
NEWS 101
WINGS
MY SCIENCE j      PEDAL
PROJECT    j REVOLUTION
NEWS 101
LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
CAREER FAST TRACK
CANADIAN VOICES
6pm II
7pm ■
FLEXYOURHEAD
STEREOSCOPIC
REDOUBT
FILL-IN
•      NASHAVOLNA
SOME SOUND
AND
SOMETIMES
SAMSQUANCHES
HIDEAWAY
SHADOW JUGGLERS
RADIO FREE GAK
EXCUISITE CORPSE
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
8pm 1
SALARIO MINIMO
FOLK OASIS
MONDO TRASHO
THE JAZZ SHOW
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
RAINBOW GROOVE
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
10pmH
H
CAUGHT IN THE RED
JUICEBOX
HANS KLOSS'
MISERY HOUR
FILL-IN
SHAKE A TAIL
FEATHER
BEATS FROM THE
BASEMENT
VENGEANCE IS MINE
AURAL TENTACLES
BBC
I LIKE THE SCRIBBLES
I     SUNDIAL FLOODLIGHT
BBC
CITR RE-BROADCAST
CITR RE-BROADCAST
CITR RE-BROADCAST
=   £   E   E
CITR RE-B
10ADCAST
■■■■SUNDAY
TANA RADIO (World) 9-10am
SHOOKSHOOKTA (Talk)
10-11am
A program which targets Ethipian peo- "
pie and aims at encouraging education
and personal development in Canada.
KOL NODEDI (World) 11am-12pm
Beautiful arresting beats and voices emanating from all. continents, comers, and
voids.. East Asia. South Asia. Africa. The
Middle East. Europe. Latin America. Gypsy.
Fusion. Always rhythmic, always captivating. Always crossing borders.
THE ROCKERS SHOW (Reggaej
12-3pm
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Real cowshrt-caught-in-yer-boots country.
Alternates with:
SHAMELESS (Eclectic)
Dedicated to giving any local music act in
Vancouver a crack at some airplay. When
not playing the PR shtick, you can hear
some faves you never knew you liked.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING (Pop) Wpm
British pop music from all decades. International pop (Japanese, French, Swedish;
British, US, etc), 60s soundtracks and
lounge. Book your jet-set holiday now!
Alternates with:
SAINT TROPEZ (Pop) Kpm
Welcome to St Tropez! Playing underrated
music from several decades!
sttropez101.9@gmail.com
. QUEER FM (Talk) 6-8pm      W%$&.
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and
transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots
of human interest features, background
on current issues, and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RHYTHMSINDIA (World) 8-9pm
34    May 2008
Rhythmsindia features a wide range of
music from India, including popular music
from the 1930s to the present, classical
music, semi-classical music such as Ghaz-
als and Bhajans, and also Qawwaiis, pop,
and regional language numbers.
MONDO TRASHO (Eclectic)
9-1 Opm
The one and the only Mondo Trasho with
Maxwell Maxwell—don't miss it!
TRANCENDANCE (Dance)
10pm-12am   f \ '^-ph*!*
Join us in practicing the ancient art of
rising above common thought and ideas
as your host DJ Smiley Mike lays down
the latest trance cuts to propel us into
the domain of the mystical.
trancendance@hotma i I .com
SUNDIAL FLOODLIGHT (Eclectic)
12-2am
i to all things drone
MONDAY
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 8-11am
Your favourite Brown-sters, James and
Peter, offer a savoury blend of the familiar
and exotic in a blend of aural delights!
breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmait.com
GROUND CONTROL (Eclectic)
-.11-12pm
Fun and independent music supported by
a conversational monologue of information, opinion and anecdote focussing on
the here, the now, and the next week.
becktrex@gmail.com
ALTERNATIVE RADIO (Talk) 12-1 pm
Hosted by David Barsamian.
PARTS UNKNOWN (Pop) 1-3pm
Parts Unknown, an indie pop show that
has been on CiTR since 1999, is like a
marshmallow sandwich: soft and sweet
and best enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
LETS GET BAKED (Talk) 3-4pm
Vegan baking with "rock stars" like Laura
Peek, The Food Jammers, Knock Knock
Ginger, The Superfantastics and more.
THE RIB (ECLECTIC) 4-5pm
Explore the avant "garde world of
music with host Robyn Jacob on
The Rib. From new electronic and
experimental music to improvised
jan and new classical! So weird it
could blow your mind!
NEWS 101 (News/talk) 5-5:30pm
Vancouver's  only  live,  volunteer-produced student and community newscast.
Every week, we take a look back at the
week's local, national and international
news, as seen from a fully independent
pm
SOME SOUND (Indie Rock) 6-7:30pm
RADIO FREE GAK (Indie rock)
7:30-9pm
THE JAZZ SHOW (Jazz) 9pm-12am
Vancouver's longest running prime-time
Jazz program. Hosted by the ever-suave
Gavin Walker.
Features at 11 pm.
May 5: Pianist/composer and near genius,
Elmo Hope lived a short life and his career
was blighted by narcotics and neglect.
He grew up with Thelonious Monk and
Bud Powell but unlike them never got the
critical recognition. Tonight we present
his masterpiece: The Elmo Hope Trio"
with bassist Jimmy Bond snd drummer
Frank Butler. Seven originals by Mr. Hope
and one great standard....the legend lives
May 12: Drummer/composer
Tony(Anthony) Williams was a musical
adventurer right from the beginning
of his career and this album reflects
that fact. It was his second Blue Note
recording-done when Williams was only
20. "Spring" is amazing!
May 19: A big band album by tenor
saxophonist/ composer/ arranger Oliver
Nelson is always a treat and this one
called "Fantabulous" is no exception.
The album was recorded in Chicago and
mixes New York and Chicago based players in a program of Nelson originals plus
one by pianist Billy Taylor. Solid stuff.
May 26: Drummer/bandleader Art Blakey
needs no introduction but this edition
of The Jazz Messengers was only represented by one domestically produced
recording until the release of these tracks
recorded at the "Club St. Germaine" in
Paris. VENGEANCE IS MINE (PunkJ
12-2am
Going on 8 "years strong, this is your'
home for all the best the world of punk
rock has to offer.
_W_m___m TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN' (Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and the lovely Andrea
Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
GIVE 'EM THE BOOT (World) 8-9:30am
Sample the various flavours of Italian
folk music from north to south, traditional and modern. Un programma
bilingue che esplora il mondo della musica folk italiana.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM (Rock)
9:30-11:30am
Open your ears and prepare for a shock!
A harmless note may make you a fan!
Hear the menacing scourge that is Rock
and Roll! Deadlier than the most danger-
borninsixtynine@hotmail.com
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) 11:30am-1pm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie with
rock, experimental, world, reggae, ounk.
and ska from Canada, Latin America and
Europe. Local bands playing live on the
Morning After Sessions.
LAUGH TRACKS (Talk) 1 2pm
Laugh Tracks is a show about comedy.
Kliph Nesteroff from the 'zine Generation Exploitation, hosts.
generationexptoit@yahoo.com
musicalboot@yahoo.ca
FILL-IN 2-2:30pm
REEL TO REAL (Talk) 2:30-3pm
Movie reviewsandcriticism.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS (Talk) 3-4pm
A national radio service and part of an
international network of information and
action in support of indigenous peoples'
survival and dignity. The show is self-
sufficient, without government or corporate funding.
WINGS (Talk) 4-4:30pm
WENER'S BARBEQUE (Sports)
4:30-6pm
Tune in each week to hear Daryl Wener
talk about the world of sports. I
everything from the Vancouver Canucks
to the World Rock Paper Scissors Championship. Your calls are welcome and I
hope you enjoy listening.
ethanwener@hotmail .com
FLEX YOUR HEAD (Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rockand hardcore since 1989. Bands
and guests from around the world.'
SALARIO MINIMO (World)
8-1 Opm
The best rock in Spanish show in Canada since 2000. None of that tropical
stuff here. No aceptes imitaciones!
CAUGHT IN THE RED (Rock)
10pm-12am
Trawling the trash heap of over 50 years'
worth of rock n' roll debris. Dig it!
AURAL TENTACLES (Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be punk, ethno, global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something different.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacfes@hotmail.com
■■■WEDNESDAY
JUNGLE (Eclectic)
Live from the Jungle Room in his Top
Secret Eco-Pod complex high in the
Cascade Mountains, join radio host
Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information and inanity.
Not to be missed!
dj@jackvelvet.net
FILL-IN
ANOIZE (Noise) 11:30am-1pm
An hour and a half of avant rock, noize,
plunderphonic, psychedelic, and outsider aspects of audio. An experience
for those who want to be educated and
EARitated."
lukemeat@hotmail.com
I MAJORITY (Talk) 1 -2pm
"I NOW (Talk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO A GO GO
(Rock) 3-5pm
Primitive, fuzzed-out garage mayhem!
WINGS (Talk) 5-5:30pm
CANADIAN   VOICES   (Talk)   5:30-6-
:30pm
AND SOMETIMES WHY (Pop/Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
First Wednesday of every month.
Alternates with:
SAMSQUANCH'S HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
All-Canadian music with a focus on
indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.com
FOLK OASIS (Roots) 8-1 Opm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, - CITR CHARTS!
CiTR's £harts reflect what has been spun on the air for 2007. Artists with stars alongside then-
names (*) are from this great land o' ours. Most of these platters can be found at finer (read: independent} music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them.there, give our Music Director
a shout at 604-822-8733. His name is Luke. If you ask nicely, he 'II tell you how to get them. To find
other great campus/community radio charts check out www.earshot-online.com.
101.9FM i
tt>n>to>.M$c<>rtor.ca
with a big emphasis on our local scene.
Don't own any Birkenstocks? Allergic to
patchouli? C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997.
. folkoasis@gmail.com
JUICEBOX (Talk) 10-11PM
Developing your relational and individual
sexual health, expressing diversity, celebrating queerness, and encouraging pleasure at all stages. Sexuality educators
Julia and Alix wil! quench your search for
responsible, progressive sexuality!
www.juiceboxradio.com
HANS KLOSS MISffiY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) 11 pm-1 am
This is pretty much the best thing on radio.
■THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS (Talk)
8-1 Oam
SWEET AND HOT (Jazz) 10-12pm
Sweet dance music and hot jazz from the
1920s, 30s and 40s.
DUNCANS DONUTS (Eclectic)
12-lpm
Sweet treats from the pop underground."
Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN (Eclectic) 1 -2pm
Punk rock, indie pop, and whatever else I
deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd..
www.weallfalldowncitr.blogspot.ca
INK STUDS (Talk) 2-3pm
Ink Studs focusses on underground and
indie comix-from publishers like Fantagraphics, Top Shelf, Drawn and Quarterly
and more. Each week, we interview a
different creator to get their unique perspective on comix and discuss their own
interesting and upcoming works..
CRIMES & TREASONS (Hip Hop)
3-5pm
crimesandtreasons@gmail.com
MY SCIENCE PROJECT (Talk) 5-6pm
Zoom a little zoom on the My Science
Project rocket ship, piloted by your host
Julia, as we navigate eccentric, underexposed, always relevant and plainly
cool scientific research, technology, and
poetry (submissions welcome), myscien-
ceprojectradio@yahoo.ca
Alternates with:
PEDAL REVOLUTION (Talk) 5-6pm
pedatrevolutionary@gmail.com
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT (Rock)
6-7:30pm
Psychadelic, acid punk, freakbeat, prog
and other grotesque and socially relevant artifacts from 1965 to today, with a
particular emphasis on Vancouver's freak
flag with pride.
www.myspace.com/stereoscopicredoubt
EXQUISITE CORPSE (Experimental)
7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art sound collage,
field recordings, etc.
Recommended for the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
UVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-11pm
Featuring Jive band(s) every week
performing in the comfort of the CiTR
Lounge. Most are from Vancouver,
but sometimes bands from across the
country and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
FILL-IN     -
BBC 11:30pm-1:30am
__________________ FRIDAY
FILL-IN (Eclectic) 8-1 Oam
SKA-rS SCENIC DRIVE (Ska)
10am-12pm
Canada's longest running Ska radio
program. Email requests to:
THESE ARE THE BREAKS (Hip Hop)
12-lpm
Top notch crate digger DJ Avi Shack
mixes underground hip hop, old school
classics, and original breaks.
beatstreet@telus.net
THE BROADCAST 1-2pm
Betti Forde has been a pro DJ for over
a decade. She's deejayed throughout the
world in places like Paris, Berlin, Rome
and Malmo. From 1998-2002 she hosted
the infamous Stand & Be Cunted (as DJ
HancuntTon CiTR, and she couldn't be
happier to be back with The Broadcast,
showcasing women in music.
RADIO ZERO (Eclectic) 2-3:30pm
We play an international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams from new-
wave to foreign electro, indie rock, baile,
booty, club rap, juke, disco, Bollywood,
dancehall, and whatever else we feel
like.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN
SERVIETTE PRESENTS (Nardwuar)
3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette
for an hour and a half Manhatten Clam
Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
nardwuar@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101 (Talk) 5-6pm
FILL-IN
AFRICAN RHYTHMS (Wortd) 7:30-9-
pm
RAINBOW GROOVE (Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
Getting you in the mood for the weekend, DJ BFAD presents a kaleidoscope
of funky grooves for your mind, body &
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R'n'B) 10:30-12am
The finest in classic soul and rhythm &
blues from the late '50s to the early 70s,
including lesser known artists, regional
hits, lost sould gems and contemporary
artists recording in that classic soul style.
I LIKE THE SCRIBBLES
(Eclectic) 12-2am
Beats mixed whh audio from old films and clips
I SATURDAY     «
THE SATURDAY EDGE (Roots)
8am-12pm
Now in its 22nd year on CiTR, The Saturday edge is a personal guide to world
& roots music—with African, Latin
and European music in the first half,
followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-1 pm
A fine mix of streetpunk and old school
hardcore backed by band interviews,
guest speakers, and social commentary.
crashnbumradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD (Metal) 1-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show
on the air. If you're into music that's on
the heavier/darker side of the spectrum,
then you'll like Power Chord. Sonic assault provided by Metal Ron, Gerald
Rattlehead and Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE (Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-down slide to
urban harp honks, blues, and blues roots
with your hosts Jim, Andy antfPaul.
codeblue@buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW (World)
The best of mix of Latin American music.
leoramirez@canada.com
NASHA VOLNA (World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for
the Russian community, local and abroad.
http://nashavolta.ca
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(Dance/Electronic) 7-9pm
This eclectic show welcomes you to
braoden your musical knowledge with
DJs MP, Socool, Soo & guests. We work
across musical genres including electronic and club-based music, which are
rarely introduced into mainstream musical culture. Travel through world sounds.
myspace.com/shadowjugglers
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-11pm *    0
Every show is full of electro bleeps,
retrowave, computer generated, synthetically manipulated aural rhythms. If
you like everything from electro/techno/
trance/Sbit music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(HipHop) 11 pm-1 am
Hosted by J-Boogie and Joelboy,
promising listeners the latest tracks,
the classics, the rare and the obscure,
current events, and the special features
of peeps coming into the studio. Most
■ importantly listeners can expect to be
entertained... church.
klymkiw@gmail.com
Artist
The Ravonettes
Fake Shark, Real Zombie*
Sudden Infant Dance Syndro
MGMT
Plants And Animals*
Forest City Lovers*
The Superfantastics*
Dirtbombs      .  l"^__ ."■
Various*
DJ Co-Op*
Thee Silver Mt Zion Memorial...*
The Breeders
The D'Ubervilles*
M.I.A.
Black NI
Danava
The Better Beatles
Adam Green
Goldfrapp
Jason Collett*
Nihilist Spasm band*
Fink
Chris Walla
The Creepy Creeps
Vampire Weekend
Collections Of Colonies Of Bees
Chris Walla
Xiu Xiu
British Sea Power
Growing
The Sword
SamShalabi*
Title
Oracular Spectacular
Pare Avenue
Haunting Moon Sinking
Choose Your Destination
We Have You Surrounded
Trouble In Dreams
Let The Blind Lead Those...
Love and Circuits...
Co-Operation Version 4.0: AYO, Technology
13 Blues For Thirteen Moons
Mountain Battles
We Are The Hunters
Paper Planes
Somethings Just Stick In Your Mind...
In The Future
Earthbound
Unonou
Mercy Beat
Sixes And Sevens
Seventh Tree
Here's To Being Here ■
Vapour Trails
Shots
Flowers Forever
Live @ The Western Front
Distance and Time
Field Manual
Last To Leave
Vampire Weekend
This Gift
Had To Be
Rip It Off
Bottled Lightning Of An All Time High
For Emma, Forever Ago
Birds
Annwn
as an ex-anorexic six sicks exit-
Field Manual
Women As Lovers
Do You Like Rock Music?
Gods Of The Earth
Label
Secret Chy
Out of This Spark
Independent
In The Red
Cardboard
Independent
Constellation
4AD
Out Of This Spark
XL
Dicristina Stair...
JagJaguwar/Scratch
Kemado
Hook Or Crook
Rough Trade
Mute
Arts & Crafts
Crammed Discs
Jagjaguwar
Team Love
Independent
Ninja Tune
Barsuk
Green Door
XL
Matador
Independent
Jagjaguwar
Radium
Hydra Head
Independent
Barsuk
Kill Rock Stars
Rough Trade -
The Social Registry
Kemado
Alien 8
Discorder   25 ncted by Carolyn Mark ,     - ® THE RAILWAY CLUB!
Cameron Dilworth of The Mains circa Larissa Loyva
Caleb Still of The Parlour Steps ortWaJw ,
Paul & Lucy
of Young and Sexy
Rodney Oeeroo
Cameron & Charla ot Beiia
Adam' Nation of The Great Outdoors
Shane Nelken of The Awkward Stage
'JJj*JJUJJJMJJJJ
J±UJjjU££UJJl.
BMTUTmm MAY 17™
The Parlour Steps
The Awkward Stage
Vonnegut Dollhouse
Rebekafi Higg$fromHaii?ax
fOUNQipD/SEXY
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CD/ftPtSjTMAY 13 '§j
i^ECIALLY PRICpsAOED«Xf,;ZULU & SCRATOfl
ALBUM-fer-ASBrlARTY: 4
FRIDAY/MAY 23 @ WE BILTMORE    ($.
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SATURDAY IViAY 24
PUB 340
with SO COW & NO BUNNY
26    May 2008
mth .ooooo,; by
not jay
In this time of re-invention in the music industry, there is an ongoing question
of who is winning out in the battle between major and independent record
labels. Shquld an artist go major or indie? Which is suffering or benefiting
most from emerging technologies? What lies ahead for each and how are
majors and indies dealing differently with the changes in the industry? We
witness the war from both camps:
BATTLING FOR THE MAJOR LABELS: SCOTT JOHNSON, BRANCH MANAGER
OF WARNER MUSIC CANADA
WHAT IS THE ROLE OF A MAJOR LABEL IN TODAY'S MUSIC INDUSTRY?
Simple. Market, promote and sell our artists and their music. We continue to build new
alliances and partnerships with companies with the goal of enablingTans to have their
music wherever they want, whenever they want. Our role is to ensure we reach that
goal for our artists and for their fans.
DO YOU THINK MAJORS HAVE ONE-UP ON INDIES OR VICE VERSA?
The majors represent 80% of the music sold in Canada. As physical sales continue to
decline, major retailers are lowering their sku counts and are choosing to work with the
companies who carry the products that the majority of their customers are looking
for. Additionally, they look to those companies for marketing support to promote their
products, usually at a cost which an independent cannot readily afford. Internationally,
Warner has affiliates and licensees In over 50 countries worldwide.
IS IliEGAL DOWNLOADING DESTROYING THE MUSIC INDUSTRY FROM A MAJOR LABEL PERSPECTIVE?
Illegal downloading is definitely a tough subject, but most would agree that it has
devalued music overall, regardless of your stance with file sharing. Artists, producers,
engineers, label reps (those selling and marketing the music and the artist) all need
to get paid for their craft. It is tough seeing artists living out of their cars and talented
people losing their jobs and changing careers because of what is happening in this
regard. I believe the revenue model will continue to evolve and more stringent controls
will be put into place for file sharing, but in the meantime, as the format changes, the
perception continues to be that music should be free, and that spells trouble for the
artists and for music in general.
BOB LEFSETZ RECENTLY STATED THAT "MAJOR LABELS MADE MUSIC FREE BY REFUSING TO
AUTHORIZE NEW DISTRIBUTION TECHNOLOGIES." WHAT'S YOUR TAKE ON THIS?
Bob is a colourful guy and is well known for his hard stance against the major labels,
despite his involvement in the industry. That being .said I would agree that the labels
as a whole did play a role in the situation that faces the industry currently. Ultimately
the consumers will find a way to get what they want, and so it is up to the labels now to
ensure we can deliver the goods to them. The ongoing question is, at what cost?
WHY WOULD AN ARTIST WANT TO SIGN WITH A MAJOR LABEL?
A major label not only has the financial backing necessary to build the brand needed
to take an artist from infancy to stardom, it has the International reach that an indie
simply doesn't have. AMajor label has the tools and components necessary for taking
an artist from a local to a world-wide success, and can ensure the support is in place
regionally, nationally and globally.
WHAT DOES THE FUTURE OF THE INDUSTRY HOLD FOR MAJOR LABEL MUSIC?
That's anyone's guess I suppose, and I think it is the same for all labels whether you are a
major or not. The labels that are successful will be the ones who embrace and develop
both the technology and the infrastructure to deliver the best music to the public, with
a revenue model that allows both the artist and the company to continue to give the
people what they want: great music at the best possible price. We are signing bands
and including new components such as tour support and merchandising, and will be
more involved with funding and supporting their business as a band. Our distribution
systems will continue to evolve, and our focus will continue to be music.
BATTLING    FOR   THE    INDIE    LABELS:
OF BOOMPA RECORDS
ROB   CALDER,    VICE-PRESIDENT
WHAT IS THE ROLE OF AN INDIE LABEL IN TODAY'S MUSIC INDUSTRY?
I think we are the only sane developers left. We take risks with the music and the artist.
We tend to try to hear something special before it is tainted by the money, the machine,
and the ego. We want long-term relationships with our artists, yet understand that we
have our limits, and an artist can move on. We try to spend and develop responsibly. I
really believe ittake seven years minimum for an artistto just "get it," to define themselves,
to sacrifice and explore the possibllities.-lndies can help facilitate this process.
DO YOU THINK INDIES HAVE ONE-UP ON MAJORS OR VICE VERSA? HOW SO?
They are such different structures and strategies which makes it hard to compare, I think
the real challenge is now going to be competing with the Majors as they become more
indie. I have already noticed these changes over the past few years. I don't think the
indies have a one up really. We are just more flexible and adaptable. One major head
of a corporate company once told me that it would take him 5-10 years to change the
structure and message of his company. That is just slow and bulky—we are quicker and
more adaptable.
IS ILLEGAL DOWNLOADING DESTROYING THE MUSIC INDUSTRY FROM AN INDIE LABEL PERSPECTIVE?
No, not really, it is truly creating a massive challenge to engage the fan and keep them
respecting the craft, the art, and the power of the music. It is a combination of being
more aware of what is going on from a consumption level with your artists' fans, and
trying to create more value for them, using all of the information that you have. For
example, if you figure out how many illegal downloads are happening in Chicago—
and It is a lot—you need to help your band get there to play and sell some vinyl or CDs
or t-shirts or bottle openers.
BOB LEFSETZ RECENTLY STATED THAT "MAJOR LABELS MADE MUSIC FREE BY REFUSING TO
AUTHORIZE NEW DISTRIBUTION TECHNOLOGIES." WHAT'S YOUR TAKE ON THIS?
Bob is great but I stopped subscribing a while ago because I think he loses the
plot sometimes. The music became free because the distribution systems and new
technologies were better, more convenient and easier. You could sit at home and browse,
listen, download, share, discover. I don't feel like blaming or pointing fingers at the Majors..
They didn't cause anything. The fans and users made music free—it was their choice.
WHY WOULD AN ARTIST WANT TO SIGN WITH AN INDIE LABEL?
Flexibility, creativity, aesthetic, friendship. A lot of bands like the roster of artists on
a particular label, or they might have a direct connection to the community that
surrounds a label. Indies should be treated like your mom's lasagna or chocolate chip
cookies. We are warm and comforting—or something like that...
WHAT DOES THE FUTURE OF THE INDUSTRY HOLD FOR INDIE MUSIC?
Weneed to hold on to our role In putting out challenging music and art. Some of it will rise
up to the top, some will hold fast with steady and lengthy careers, and some bass players
will quit or sleep with the lead singer's girlfriend. In many ways, it-Is so unpredictable that
you need to let go of the analysis and do what seems natural and truly comes from the
artists. Then the line up at the show will be around the corner, the orders for product will
start coming in and things just work. That has always been the indies' roll.
~ Discorder   $17 MAY ALL YOUR DREAMS
COME TRUE WITH ZULU
NO AGE
Nouns CD
Zulu faves No Age return with their Sub
Pop debut! Nouns is succinctly all
passing, from the faux-simplicity of the tit
to the beautiful distortion of its sound, to the
packaging that includes a 68-pa;
book packet) with photos and art pieces. The
record opens with a symphony of nose (both Dean and Randy use
samples alongside their main instruments) and sometimes creeps,
sometimes smashes through a sonic headlock befitting Baidroiwi
Nation-era Sonic Youth, Kiwi pop, My Bloody Valentine, and experimental noise. There's bit of an art-punk rennaissance in LA. right now
and No Age are right in the middle of it. Don't miss out on one ol the
year's most exciting albums. AVAILABLE MAY 6m
CD 14.98
BORIS
Smile CD
Boris is not a sorely underappreciated or
sadly overlooked group anymore. Thanks
, in large part to critics' fondness for Pink in
2005-06. the Japanese rock giants finally 0
gained more than a faithful following in Norm
America for their brutal take on drone and
psychedelic rock. This is a band that has been steadily releasing sterling material since their inception in 1992, and it feels like they've covered every aspect of stoner-rock and doom-metal and Jap-psych and
on and on and on over 17,18 albums... But never before has anticipation been as palpable as It is now. Smile is more of the same, but only
in the loosest sense; this is a grower with shades of sludge, shades of
punk and, perhaps most strangely, shades of pop. It's the closest Boris
has come to combining rts three artistic directions on one release. This
is Boris as deliciousiy schizophrenic and ambitious as they've ever
* BBSS. 'JujjroWt leave the earplugs behind. AVAILABLE MAY 1st
CD 14.98
BRIAN JONESTOWN
MASSACRE
My Bloody Underground
CD
I'M t#» four-years since that documentary
rocketed him to infamy, Anton Newcombe
hasn't made many moves to belie director
Ondi Timoner s portrayal of a self-sabotaging Colonel Kurtz-styled
maverick, turning his band into an almost-endlessly touring gong show
that s made a couple Vancouver stops that either pissed everyone off or
gave everybody what they wtmsfj (one and the same thing, really). So.
further complicating that legacy, the new BJM (notably including Ride's
Marie Gardener) delivers an expectation-defying album ol hallucino-
genically lo-fidelity speaker-blowers, broken up with drunken stabs at
avant-classical piano interludes and Revolution Number 9"-style sound
collages. Its another schizophrenic disc, but the rewards are undeniable: much as previous incarnations of BJMbhave effortlessly projected
the spirit of The Byrds, Dylan and the Stones, this particular version
WalkSfialks and breathes the aesthetic of its influences (more hevily-
WigWe^fowards shoegaze fuzz than drug-addled mod this time
around) with a satisfying level of grit and c<
endlessly interesting conversation piece.
CD 14.98
CONSTANTINES
Kensington Heights CD
As the biggest thing to ever come out of
Guelph. Ontario, the Constantines' matu-
' ration into Canada's apocalyptic poet laureates of hard work and commitment has been
particularly gratifying. Their early albums
were too glibly tagged as Springsteen-
meets-Fugazi, but with 2005's Tournament of Hearts, the music turned
into someming'.)Bei8htier, brawnier, and more satisfying as frontman
Bry Webb hit his stride, growling about growing up and working full-
time. New songs like Time Can Be Overcome' or Trans Canada" possess the kind of muscularity that makes the Constantines more punk-
fnflected songs so exciting,' but also the tendemejsfthat shades their
more ostensiblygenUe mrlmrtfs. Jt^W^f makes them one of the few
Next Big Things with staying power, arid the'Way I
walks that delicate line with aplomb makes it the band';
CD 14.98
MATMOS
Supreme Balloon CD
The new album from Matmos finds the dynamic
duo takings holiday from conceptual responsibility, skipping the outre sampling antics in favor
of a lighthearted "cosmic pop" record made entirely
out of synthesizers. Leave it to Matmos to invent a
hard and fast rule that they hava to follow even
when they're just having fun: the creative restriction fJilstlme an&mcFtethat" -
Supreme Balloon is an ALL synthesizer album and no microphones were
used at any point. That's right no household objects played in a percussive   ■
manner, no snails or blood or amplified semen, no acoustic instruments, no
voices of famous people for five seconds, not even any half-way cheating
with Vocoders, just synthesizers of all shapes, sizes, eras and nationalities
being snipped, folded and reshuffled by an arsenal of samplers and computers into colorful sound-origami. Though it was recorded all over tbe world
over the last two years, the whole shebang was finished in Baltimore,
Maryland (the band's new home, at least as long as Drew Daniel is a professor in the English DepartmentatJohns Hopkins University), and comes
encased in some truly gorgeous watercolor artwork by Robert Syrett
AVAILABLE MAY 6™
CD 12.98
THE LAST SHADOW
PUPPETS
The Age Of
Understatement CD
"The Last Shadow Puppets are Alex Turner
I (from Arctic Monkeys) and Miles Kane (frc
The Rascals). Firm friends ever since Arctic Monkeys toured with I
previous group, The Uttle Flames, the pair were so inspired by listening to
the likes of Scott Walker, early Bowie and David Axelrod, that they hatched
a plan. The result, The Age Of The Understatement, is an album of 12 full-
blooded songs, bold and brassy, full of drama, wit and melody, that source-,
the past but avoid falling into pastiche. Both Miles and Alex are 22, and this
is a youthful record, full of life and the sheer pleasure of music making. The
Last Shadow Puppets recorded the songs at Black Box studios near Nantes,
France in two weeks during the summer of 2007, with, producer and drummer Jams Ford. The band then approached Final Fantasy's Owen Pallett
to arrange and conduct the orchestration of the tracks, which were recorded
by the 22 piece London MetropoiaaiSrchestra at British Grove studios in
London over Christmas. AVAILABLE MAY 6"1
CD 14.98
THE LONG BLONDES
Couples CD
What's in a name? A lot. in the case of the second Long: Blondes LP. The title, you'see,
gives the game away completely: since 2006s
debut album Someone To Orive Yon Home, you
see, the two couples in the band have split up,
■ while singer Kate Jackson has started dating their
ex-tour manager after her previou&*fcng-distance relationship ended. Hence
the quotation marks around the title. That said, it's lyrical ground they've trodden before. A lot of songs g/ffleir first album dealt in similar currency, and
the real new here isn't a Himaflc; revolution but a musical one: led by producer Errol Alkan, The Long Blondes have orchestrated a slick collision of floor-
filling, big-chorus indie-pop with ihe new school of disco. The result is as
"* close to Italians Do It Better acts Hke The Chromatics as it is to Blondie:
Where they go from here is anybody's guess but with Couples they've managed to turn two years of inter-band heartache into an ambitious, forward- •
thinking pop record that tops their debut by quite some distance. AVAILABLE
MAY 6"'
CD 12.98
ATMOSPHERE
When Ufe Gives You
Lemons, You Paint that
Slit Gold LTD. CD
The prolific duo of Slug and Ant offer their sixth
studio album, presenting their storytelling,
songwriting, and musicality at its finest. Limited
deluxe edition (25,000), packaged as a 40-page, gold-embossed hardcover
book featuring an illustrated children's story written by Slug. This time
around, Slug is coming with ajpfly different approach from the sharp-witted
misanthropy that's charactejpierj AtmoSpherialbums for most of his career.
As the title suggests," the|P more optimism'in the mix and the album's main
theme is Slag's drivej^be a good father (hence the kids' book). Bonus DVD
i footage and extras.
EL PERRO DEL MAR
From the Valley to the Stars
CD
Two years after the grand. Spector-esque flourishes of
I the debut, From The Valley To The Stars sees Sarah
Assuring (aka El.Perro del Mar) strip away the layers to
reveal a stately simplicity and an album with an underlying
theme — a personal reflection on the idea of heaven. Sarah explains, "I wanted to
make something as unfashionable as an album in the classic sense of the word — in
terms of its composition and the idea of a theme. In the same way that 'folk music'
works I wanted to make something timeless, that in its character might appear- like a
collection of hymns or psalms, but in a pop costume". Recorded at home by Sarah
with assistance from members of the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra the result is
an album that like, say, Robert Wyatt's Rock Bottom or Virginia Astiey's From
Gardens Where We Feel Secure, creates its own universe, a wonderment for the
CD 14.98
ANIMAL COLLECTIVE
Water Curses CDEP
This fantastic EP features four unreleased songs from
the Wavelab session that spawned last year's clebrated |
Strawberry Jam. but rather than b-sides or studio floor
cuttings, Water Curses is another one of the fully-realized   I
between-album teasers that Animal CoUective do so well.
Highly reminiscsljtof the excllent Prospect Hummer EP
they recorded with Vashti Bunyan, these songs represent the band at their mellowest and most playful, balancing sonic experiment with breezy accesibility in a way
that few (if any) other bands can manage. From the frothy bossa swing of the title
track to the creeping chorus of Cobwebs", Water Curses is sure to delight every
variety of AC fan.
CDEP 7.98
YOUNG AND SEXY
The Arc CD/LP
Local ensemble Young And Sexy have returned with a
set of songs destined to appeal to the true music love
a listener who, in this digital age of restlessness, is willing I
to spin a record in its entirety and take the time to enjoy a
complex and rewarding audio experience. These eleven
new songs wield the rare gift of both artful experimentation and strong melodic invention. The Arc is full of classical, baroque pop and prog
rock influences. Songs move from one movement to another cradling lyrics that
focus on medieval and pagan inagery and a touch of spWtoalfern. Recorded and produced at The Hive Studios in Vancouver by Colin Stewart (Black Mountain, Cave
Singers, ladyhawk. Swan Lake) The Arc fits securely into Young And Sexy s ever-
changing musical canon. AVAILABLE MAY 13*1
CD 12.98
THE INCOMING DREAM!
The Sword- Gods of the Earth (Kemado] Krtfrienos (Last Bang]
Acid Mothers Temple and the MeKing Paraiso    The Kooks -Konk[AsbahWHksJ [North
D.F.O.   -
M83- Saturdays = Youth [MuteJ
Auburn Lull - Begin Civit Twilitfrt Jtterla] Portishead-Third [Island]
Boredoms -Super Roots 9 [Thrill Joekeyl yampire Weekend- "A-PurT/'lhtord Corona''
Clinic-Do tt [Domino] (rehearsal verskm)r (XL)
Cut Copy -mehost Colours [Modular] Billy Bragg -Mr. Love & Justice [Anti-]
Eric Avery -Help Wanted [TJangerbfrd] The Cinematic Orchestra- Uve at the Royal
Fleet Foxes -Sun Giant EPfSub Pop] Aftert Hall [Domino]
Foars-Antidotes [Sub Pop] [North American _*m-_ TheSeldom Seen Kid [Ftetton/Geffen]
LTD. CD 14.98
-SYR7{SYR)
Thalia Mak Band - liars and Prayers [Thrill
Shout Out Louds - Impossible EP [Merge]
S«r«oneSflliU««sYouBorteYe«sln- 1l*1bi-*riilil»IIWi**|l
PersrwBlPolyv&ryll ■'^r^B^VIj^matmi*
Spoon -Donl You Evan (single) [Merge] Creek) |lr*^ielease]
TheeOhSees-The Master's Bedroom Is Worth Oo»llaBdC*W-UBblUgM8&^
Spending a NigM In rjoinlabl JaedeUM- JknfJKarp]
Wye Oak-ri Children [Merge]
Air - Moon Safari: 10th Anrwersary Edition
- Bubble and Scrape reissue [Dommol
Christopher Bissonnette -In Between Words     JUKrefeaseJ *>-\?-y"'.
JKranky] Vetiver- Thing of the Past [pi
ZULU ART NEWS: MAY 1-31
Face the Music II
Portraits of Musicians by
Mark Mushet
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS

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