Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Feb 1, 2005

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0049972.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0049972.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0049972-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0049972-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0049972-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0049972-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0049972-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0049972-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0049972-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0049972.ris

Full Text

 T^l*    **^ry *£*£/* DiSCORDER - February 2005 POPLIN'S
IRISH PUB
Monday,
Feb 14, 2005
3rd Annual
Anti-Valentine'a
Day _
Saturday, Feb 26, 2005 @ 11:30 am
RE/MAX Sea to Sky Hookey Challenge
Team Burke vs Team Nonis
Tickets $45.00 includes:
Saturday Dublin Brekkie Buffet
Transportation to and from Pacific Coliseum
Great lower bowl seats
After party at Doolin's for beers
Hockey highlights
Presented by:
£3W|»oHSBC<»
To purchase tickets or info please contact Brad Toews 604.306.6177 or brad@doolins.ca
Body Painting, Beach Balis, Bathing suit
Corona, Mikes ai|d
•Jm& Party Music Nightly. 1
^^» - Tees: Joe's Garage Tuss: Canadian Conten|n^^^l|pgg;
& - Fri: Dr. Strangelove Sat: Sees Your Monkey Bite / DJ Junior tTorttiacH fjjjs.
Son: Campground "C Country that rocks with Byron James from*JWl^g
032 Granville st | 604-3^9hS[ www.roxyvan.coin   * gj
DiSCORDER
That magazine from CiTR 101.9fm.
February 2005
EDITRIX
Kat Siddle
AD MANAGER
Jason Bennet
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Graeme Worthy
ART DIRECTOR
Dale Davies
TA EDITOR
Vampyra' Draculea
RLA EDITOR
Kimberley Day
REVIEWS EDITOR
Mairin Deery
LAYOUT & DESIGN
Dale Davies
Graeme Worthy
Jason Bennet
Kimberley Day
Vampyra Draculea
Dory Komteld
Jordie Sparkle
PRODUCTION
Graeme Worthy
Dale Davies
Kat Siddle
Kimberley Day
Vampyra Draculea
Jason Bennet
Jordie Sparkle
Chris Walters
Dory Kornfeld.
Mairin Deery
Nick
Parmida Z.
Roast Beef
Saelan
Susy Webb
Caroline Walker
Kim Cook
Michelle Mayne
ON THE DIAL
Bryce Dunn
CHARTS
Luke Meat
DATEBOOK
Kat Siddle
Jordy Sparkle
Chris Walters
DISTRIBUTION
Matt Steffich
US DISTRO
Frankie Rumbletone
PUBUSHER
Student Radio Society
FEATURES
Arcade Fire
§$§888^
Dandi Wind
P. n
■■ -' T£?ang Bang
p. 14
Dose One
p. 15
V x Mariana's Trench
..p...tMH
REGULARS
P€fi^f6tyotty Ifwnnent Disaster
mSHm
Riff Raff
P5
Db it Youf O^m Ddjrnn Self
m4P5
Strut, Fret & Flicker
P.7
-\   textuaffyActtv®
P-ffP
Calendar
p. 12-13
Ffad^ Ji§y", V
■•'tfiflls;
Charts
p. 17
rv:B!e^Uye,A0rOn
p. l|ll§
Under Review
p. 20-21
Program-Guide '■
p. 22%
FRONT COVER
Owen is the founder and creator of the Rubber
Popsicle Factory that has self-published over 80 zines
on the Marching Chicken Press {marchingchickenpre
ss@hotmail.com) and is repsented by Perro Verlag
(PeroVerlag@Germanmail.com). Owen currates art
shows at Lucky's Comics on Main Street. Owen's art
has been shown around Vancouver, Seattle, Toronto,
Montreal and New York and can be seen in the
Infinity Project show at the Helen Pitt Gallery currated
by Jo Cook. Owen draws with Puffers and paints with
James Whitman of the Lions fame. Owen lives with his
lovely wife Terry in Mt. Plesant but would rather live in
the heart of Strathcona.
© DiSCORDER 2005 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All
rights reserved. Circulation 17,500. Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents are
$15 for one year, to residents of the USA are $15 US; $24 CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to
cover postage). Please make cheques or money orders payable to DiSCORDER Magazine. Please
note that my birthday is February 15. DEADLINES: Gopy deadline for the March issue is February
7, 2005, not that any of you win care. Ad space is available until February 24 and can be booked
by calling Jason at 604.822.3017 ext. 3. Our rates are available upon request. DiSCORDER is not
responsible for loss, damage, or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork
(including but not limited to drawings, photographs, and transparencies), or any other unsolicited
material. Material can be submitted on disc or in type or via email. As always, English is preferred,
but we will accept French. Actually, we won't. Send email to DiSCORDER at discorder@club.ams.
ubc.ca. From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be heard at 101.9 fM as
well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Cat
the CiTR DJ line at 622.2487, our office at 822.3017, or our news and sports lines at 822.3017 ext.
2. Fax us at 822.9364, e-mail us at: citrmgr@nrwfl.gms.ubc.ca, visit our web site at www.cirr.ca or
just pick-up a goddamn pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1, CANADA. THE   FIBRES
BURN  THEMAPS
DiSCORDER - February 2005 FOLK & ROO
I
Perpetually Imminent Disaster
ptr mm
:X COKCSRT jsg£
fe^f&aay 2© # llie Railway
-skg^^gO
MEMONESH0W
features WAGONWJU£7>^'
andTELLITTOi^Bp
hash's spirit fives QKajNSf:
a young and rowdy Nashville
quartet tliat pulls back-oofch - i^pffS
banjos and frenetic fiddles    |
down from tike mountain^ aBiljfjB
and onto the doorstep of
CBGB's." - Esquire       m mL*** *&$?!£
$t&98
NITHAN h
©
"If David Lynch had .*.J|
directed O Brother    *ofl
Wkem Art Tkau$f: *JtH
Nathan's music               1
would he the
soundtrack .*                  .L*
GBCJtafio
El
$16.98                              ~ j
Br*
Greetings readers. .
This month, I feel its my duty to share a personal
lecdote with you. Not because I want to. Not
icause it satisfies me. It's for your own good, all
THE ANECDOTE:
So one night, a couple weeks ago, I went to
this boy's house, hoping that after a little beer and
a lot of awkward pauses he might want to make out
with me. We're standing in his kitchen talking about
people we know and I'm paying a little too much
attention to how I'm standing and how I'm holding
my drink, like that's going to make any difference
now, like he's going to be struck with a sudden
epiphany and think, "Wow, I thought she was a
repulsive little troll until I saw how alluringly she holds
a glass. I must have her, now."
Things were going pretty well until, he
announced that he wanted to watch a funny
movie. He queued up the film and sat on the far
end of the couch, chortling and snorting through
the first half hour. I sat on the other end, aware of
the 2 feet 5 inches between us, but more aware of
the fact that I'd lost his attention, and the movie
wasn't keeping mine at all. I got bored. A friend
called my cell phone from Pat's Pub: "We're at the
Hank and Lily show. It's going to be really good. You
coming?" I looked at the TV screen and the way the
light reflected on the boy's face. "Yeah," I said, "I'll
be right there."
Stepping off the bus, I felt a heartskip of glee.
I'd saved my night from the lameness of being
ignored. I was out in public; I could meet people
and talk with them. I had resigned myself to a night
without kissing, but I could find out about new books
and bands, swap witticisms, hear funny stories I'd
never been told before.
I bought a cheap beer and greeted my
friends a couple minutes before Hank and Lily hit
the stage. Their exuberant swampditties, sweet
costumes and strip-tease dancer fueled my social
mood. I smiled at a few people I recognized from
seeing at ©ther shows. They looked away. Weird,
I thought. It happened again a few minutes later.
"Is it me?" I wondered. "Do I have a disfiguring
rash on my face or something?" My friends hadn't'
mentioned anything. Maybe they were being nice?
I looked in the large mirror near the stage (you know
the one I mean). Eyeliner, coif, and teeth were ali in
order. I looked like my usual self. I glanced from my
own reflection to that the people standing behind .
me. They were all either looking at their hair too, or
staring at the ground. Every last one of them.
My purpose in telling this unflattering anecdote
is this: you people are going to die out if you don't
start breeding. And I tell you, that is NOT going to
happen unless you stop looking at your haircuts and
-shoes and starting talking to each other. You may not
realize it, but like the mighty Panda, the scenester is
in decline. You won't see evidence of it now. You
won't see evidence of it two years from now. But
without a scenester generation to replace ours,
symbiotic species like musicians, t-shirt makers, and
one-inch button designers will also face extinction.
An entire ecological niche is in grave danger.
This Valentines' Day, when you're sitting all alone
listening to depressing music, pretending you "don't
believe in commercialized holidays," keep this in
mind. Forget the haircut. Talk to someone. Breed
like there's no tomorrow. Because if you don't, there
won't be any tomorrow for the common scenester.
You alone can act to save it.
Thanks you and goodnight,
Kat Siddle
Red Cat Records
4307 Main St.
HTTWIHI.CBK • IITTf lfiKfl0BT8.aM
<**.
1972 West 4th Ave
604-738-3232     f       »
**w*
New & Used CD's & Vinyl
ph. 708-9422 * email buddy$redeaiea Riff Raff
by Bryce Dunn
My stereo spilleth over with 7"
abundance ■ this month, and
we've no less than ten (!) entries
to pontificate and deliberate on,
so let's get spinnin'l
Our sojourn begins with a
picture disc or two, and it's always
a bonus when you get to make
yourself sick watching the rekkids
go round, IMHO. Scratctvlhat,
let Mike Wiebe of The Riverboat
Gamblers do that for you—he
received one nasty gash to the
hand at a show; it now graces one
side of a new single w/ Electric Eel
Shock. The RG's rock surprisingly
*~at mid-tempo with a tune called
"That's Entertainment!" that
speaks to the average Joe about
the spoils of rockin' so hard your
hand nearly falls off; our Japanese
friends entertain us with "Rock
And Roll Can Rescue The World,"
which is a pretty lofty goal, but the
trio aims for the rock funny bone
and succeeds without going too
over-the-top. There's some witty
referencesto Van Halen and The
Ramones in there, so I'd like to see
what else these cats are capable
of, and if they can indeed save
our world with their lock and loll.
(Gearhead Records, http://www.
gearheadrecords.com).
Belgian instro-beat band The
Fifty Foot Combo deliver a visually
stunning   three-song   affair   that
fans of exotica and the surf-styled
among you will enjoy. "Jennifer
Jennings" has a seventies soft-core
soundtrack feel to it, while "Theme
From F.A.C.T.S." and "Banana Split"
are caught live and in the red for
maximum drinkin' and dancin'
pleasure. (Delboy Records, http://
www.delboyrecords.net).
The aforementioned label is
also responsible for a gear-grindin'
new split 7" from San Franciscan
heshers Drunkhorse, who turn in
"Independent Type," a teenage
anthem for a bygone era, and
Belgium's bastions of boogie.
The Feather, who sound a lot like
Glueclfer, The Hellacopters et al.,
so if your guitar's loud and proud
and your pedal's to the metal,
then "Joint Of Lamb" is what you
want to be chewin' on.
Seems that since ol' Dubya
has been officially been back in
office, the music scene has been
rife with protest songs, (and not
in the folkie, flowers-in-thenr-hair
type), so The Earaches decided
to horn in on the action and
record a garage-rockin' pissed
off rant, about El Presidente called
"Freedom Fries," expressing their
distaste for the way they've been
cut, deep-fried and eaten up in
the disposable consumer culture
called warfare. Pretty deep, huh?
Well, thankfully on the flip, we can
shake a little frustration out on
"Too Hot To Taste" which gives Girl
Trouble a run for their money, to
be sure. (Steel Cage Records, P.O.
Box 29247 Philadelphia PA USA
19125).
Seems the kids today aren't
just pissed off about presidents,
but also the style-conscious
and the TV-obsessed, so says
Knucklehead. Calgary's answer
to Social DistorHon-meets-Stiff LitHe
Fingers punk rock deliver a brass
knuckle or three to the "Cosmetic
Youth" to get them out of the
"Prime Time Reality" they're stuck
in, and even though it's a "Long
Hard Road," the boys have been
round the block a few times to
know that music sends a powerful
message, so listen up. Sparky!
(Longshot Music, PMB #72 302
Bedford Avenue Brooklyn NY USA
11211).
The anger continues with
Hong Kong Blonde, a powerhouse
hardcore unit from right here in
Rain City, who have a four song EP
out for your consumption. Bringing
to mind Poison Idea, Black Flag
and other like-minded outfits,
what's noteworthy of the four
songs like "Hell Is Alive" and Knives
Of Twilight" is the not the atypical
"shout along with melody" style
of hardcore, but instead more of
a storytelling style that provides a
little more depth, even if the songs
themselves are a little same-y,
with the exception of "Two Black
Guns." Still, a worthwhile debut
and if nothing else, a reason to
support what appears to be a
fairly miniscule local hardcore
scene. (Ugly Pop Records, http://
www.uglypop.com).
With all this hate, it's good
to have something to make you
smile once and a while, and The
Suspicions fit the bill nicely with
their debut vinyl. A lo-fidelity cross
between Nikki And The Corvettes
and the poppier side of the garage
is how best to describe the tunes
"We're All Wrong" and "Memory"
off this record. The trio plays with
spunk and seems like they'd be
a fun band to catch live, and
judging from their website, folks
from Seattle to parts unknown will
soon have that pleasure. (Nerve
Wracking Records, 425 Bolyston
Ave. E Seattle WA USA 98102).
The Sultans of San Diego offer
more stripped down garage pop
on a recent effort for the crowds
across the pond. Head Sultan The
Slasher (aka John Reis, rocketeer
from the crypt extraordinaire)
churns out his patented guitar
chops whilst Tony Di Prima kicks out
the jams and Black Velvet soothes
his fans with sultry bass action.
"Walk Of Shame" is a speedy little
number from their most recent
full length, and they do an ace
version of The Dlls "Blow Up" and
an unreleased track "Permission
To Bored." I would think our English
friends would heartily grant this
request. (Sweet Nothing Records,
info@cargorecords.uk).
We wrap up this extra helping
of vinyl vittles with a double scoop
of Francophone rock et roll,
courtesy of Midnight Tramp and
Skip Jensen & His Shakin' Feet.
The former are a quartet outta
Chicoutimi, with a refreshing
sound that lies somewhere
between The Long Ryders and
Flaming Groovles. There's a great
roots-rockin' feel to "I'm Back"
and "Higher And Higher," but they
infuse a sixties folk-punk influence
into "In Spite Of Appearance" that
doesn't lose any momentum and
begs for repeated spins. (Zaxxon
Virile Action Records, http://www.
zaxxonvirileaction.com).
One man band SJ fuses
the blues. Back From The ©rave
garage punk and hillbilly country
into his four song EP, the standout
here being "Take My Time" as
it pounds and drags its hairy
knuckles across the cave floor.
He's got a whole mess o' trouble
out on a number of different
labels, but you can find this one
on...(Delta Pop Music Ltd. 663 S.
Bernardo Ave. Suite 113 Sunnyvale
CAUSA 94087).
Whew-what a stack o' wax
that was, I be fully spent. 'Til next
time, record houndsl D
DiSCORDER - February 2005 Do It Your Own Damn Self
stencils
iy Georgie of the Seamrippers Craft Collective
You will need:
image: start simple, one colour, high contrast.
card stock: not so strong that it will be difficult to cut but thick
enough to hold its own shape. Think greeting card.
scissors: sharp but not your sewing scissors... there are also scissors
with fancy patterned edges that you may want for your image.
Places like Michael's and most office supply stores have these.
x-acto knives/utility knives: the more detailed the cut, the smaller
the blade you will need.
cutting mat: these are self-healing and stop your blades from going
dull. You can get them from art or office supply stores but they are
a bit pricey. Daiso in Richmond sells small ones (and everything
else) for $2.
hole punches (optional): there is now a wide variety of shapes and
sizes that may enhance your image. Find them in large craft stores
or places like paper ya on Granville island.
metal ruler for straight edges.
tracing paper: optional
removable textile adhesive: most art supply stores will have this. It
will hold your stencil in place. Very useful if the surface you are
stenciling is vertical.
pins: will hold fabric in place and flat but you may need something
to pin it to. fabric paint (or other paint, depending on your
surface); Michael's store carries fabric paint in handy pump spray
bottles. Otherwise, most art stores carry fabric paint that can be
thinned. Follow the instructions for airbrushing and use your own
spray bottle.
spray bottle: small ones are. available from dollar stores and
sometimes from the travel-size section of drugstores.
The stencil:
This is a craft technique that can
be readily adapted to a variety of
surfaces depending on what type
of paint one is using. The example
given here is mainly for fabric but
even this medium holds many
possibilities. To begin with, choose
an image that has one colour, no
shading and a simple shape. You
will want to decide whether you
will be painting the positive or
negative space. To transfer the
image to your cardstock you can
trace it on using tracing paper
(just turn it over and scribble onto
the back, transferring the image
backwards onto the card.) you
can also place the image over
the card and trace it with a sharp,
hard pencil. This will leave an
impression that you can retrace
over. There are also printers and
photocopiers that will print directly
onto cardstock and can then be
cut out.
Remember that you can
make your image either way
round and can change your
mind at the last minute just by
turning the stencil over. You can
also use mylar or another plastic
transparency as a stencil because
you can easily see through it, but It
is a bit more difficult to cut so you
may want to start on cardstock.
Cut as much of the stencil
out with scissors as you can. It is
The paint:
easier on your hands and you will
probably have more control. Take
your time cutting. Its not worth
almost finishing and then ripping
your stencil. Although that is what
tape is for.
If the item that you are
painting has to be pinned flat to
avoid wrinkles or expose a hard
to reach place. You will need
a surface to pin it to; a piece of
Styrofoam or a really firm pillow is
good. (Make sure that whatever
you use has been properly
protected if you want to avoid
getting paint on it.) Once the
surface has been secured you will
want to anchor the stencil. If you
use removable textile adhesive
you will want to spray the back
and then let it dry a little. You can
also blot the back so the area
isn't too sticky. Adhesive assures
that the stencil won'4 slip when
the paint is sprayed on and also
prevents paint from running under
the edges of the stencil. You can
also pin the stencil in place, just
make sure that the pins don't
overlap into the painted area. If
your stencil is of the positive space,
you will want to mask off around
the outside edges of the space
to avoid this area accidentally
being painted.
Fabric paint in spray bottles is
available in a wide variety of
colours. You can also buy other
fabric paint and dilute Ihem
yourself. When you dilute it don't
add too much water as the paint
may become more translucent
that you expected. You will want
to experiment with light colours
on a dark surface as these can
sometimes be unpredictable. Both
types of spray bottles will produce
a splattered effect depending "
on how far they are held from
the surface. Between six to eight
inches should be good.
If you are radically opposed
to sparing the paint you can
stencil with a brush. The best way
is to get a round, stiff brush with
short bristles (a stippling brush,
available at any art store). The
paint that you use should be very
thick. Put a small amount of paint
on the end of the bristles and
apply them with a sort of stabbing
motion. The ends of all the bristles
should contact at the same time.
You will have to be careful that
the layer of paint is not too thick,
or it will crack. Fabric paint is the
best but regular acrylic paint can
be used with fabric medium. This
prevents the paint from cracking
when it dries.
You can also use an airbrush
(costly and complicated, only
invest once you have established
your stenciling skill). Or you can
use spray paint, but only outdoors.
You must make sure that the layer
is thin and it may not be machine
washable.
Fabric paint will need to be
heat set. Once it is dry, use an
iron on the highest setting that the
fabric can handle. Iron the no
painted side for a few minutes.
There are lots of websites with
information on stenciling but most
of them are graffiti centred. There
is some DIY irrformation on wv
stencrlrevolution.com. With a little
ingenuity, the information can be
readily adapted.
Stencilling can be applied
for all sorts of different results.
Experiment, have fun, and if
you have any questions please
contact DIY@seamrippers.ca. I
Seamrippers is starting
our new workshop semester
on February 13th. For more
Information or schedules check
www.seamrippers.ca. the release
party for the calendar is Saturday
January 29th starting at 7pm. 436
West Pender (at Richards).
This Is also the opening
night for 'Self Love' the latest
Seamrippers craft exhibition.
Some of you may even read this In
time... Knot come down anyways.
theexhibit runs until February 16th.
Call for open hours: 689-SEAM. j friday, february 4, 2005
a citr 101.9fm ALL AGES benefit
Strut, Fret & Flikr
SAY PARTY! WE SAY DIE!
UBC SUB Ballroom
tickets at zulu, scratch, red cat, noize and citr
8pm info at www.citr.ca
by Penelope Mulligan
THE BLACK RIDER: The Casting of the Magic
Bullets
November Theatre
Tuesday 11 January
Waterfront Theatre
Arrghh... that nagging uncertainty over whether a
problem lies in the piece itself or in the production.
To be honest, I'm leaning toward the latter here,
only because it's hard to believe that anything
hot off the brain-pans of Tom Waits, William S.
Burroughs and avant-garde theatre guru, Robert
Wilson could be anything but stupendous. Still, I
was nowhere near Hamburg when the original
production opened in 1990, so have no basis for
comparison—only the sense of having watched
a tamed beast.
Inspired by several incarnations of an
early 19th-century German folktale. The Black
Rider is an operetta whose narrative unfolds in a
carnivalesque procession of cabaret numbers.
The tale is ripe with allegory and is very Faustian:
In order to win the hand of a forester's daughter,
a city clerk must prove himself as a hunter. Striking
the proverbial deal with the devil, he learns that
magic bullets come at a tragically high cost.
Edmonton's November Theatre delivered
the piece with leering precision, but by about
fifteen minutes in, I had to admit that I wanted
to be liking it more that I actually was. There was
something self-conscious and laboured about the
performance, particularly in the opening scenes
which were awash in strident singing, agape
mouths and tensely-flexed feet. What should
have been effortlessly macabre felt perilously
close to cliche.
Fortunately, the show gathered momentum
as each of the marvelous songs took its place
in the fable and individual performers revealed
their strengths (the cast of six was usually
strongest when not working ensemble). As the
bullet-peddling Peg Leg, Michael Scholar Jr. was
an iconic, seductive MC with a poignant limp;
Clinton Carew was a powerhouse in his spoken
word performance of "Crossroads"; and while
Rachel Johnston was sometimes too "look-at-
this" deliberate as the daughter Katchen, she
had physical and vocal chops aplenty. In the role
of office geek Wilhelm, Kevin Corey ended up
stunning me with his drunken rendition of "Lucky
Day" and an explosion of acrobatic skill.
The show's music component was killer and
it came courtesy of the three onstage musicians,
Liz Han, Dale Ladouceur and musical director
Conine Kessel. As "The Devil's Rubato Band", they
gave accordion, bass, chapman stick, clarinet,
percussion, piano and trombone a fearsome
workout that would have had Mr. Waits himself
growling with glee.
In the end, there were enough high points to
earn my heartfelt applause, yet I still came away
underwhelmed. So what the hell did I want? More
reckless, tumbledown insanity, probably. This
Black Rider needs to lose the training wheels. D
THE PLUGHOLE
Until recently, I'd only had the pleasure of viewing one of Dylan Cree's films, so when the Pacific
Cinematheque announced that it was devoting a whole evening to the Vancouver filmmaker's work,
I played catch-up with a few video screeners and then invited him over for tea._
The most striking thing about Cree's oeuvre is that it's rude, explicit and at the same time,
hilariously formalistic. He samples the conventions of transgressive cinema while taking the robust piss
out of them. When I asked if he was actually somewhat attached to the very things he lampoons, he
replied, "My films are constantly attempting to deal with interruptions". I took that as a yes.
_ It wasn't surprising to learn that he's an admirer of Pasolini and Fassbinder, who hover over some
of his earlier pieces—the former in the scatological ending of 1997's Perversions: 4 little deaths and the
latter in the hideous family dynamics of vulgar...incomplete 'n yet whole from 1999. His most recent
work, 2002's Of Pomology (from which the evening takes its name) is a hyper-literate send-up of
academics debating pornography as a legitimate field of knowledge.
According to Cree, the Cinematheque felt that his work would provide a bit of relief from "all that
Swedish angst" on its current programme. Of course he's more that happy to be a palate cleanser. Of
Pomology: Films by Dylan Cree screens Wednesday, February 23 with the filmmaker in attendance.
Speaking of Swedish angst, the films of Ingmar Bergman will continue to glower at the
Cinematheque until the end of February, so do try to inhale some of their depressing magnificence.
Nestled among them is a mini-festival dedicated to contemporary Swedish filmmaker Roy Andersson,
whose Songs from the Second Floor is a surreal howl of socio-political distress and one of this decade's
most unforgettable films so far. He also makes commercials^-which are revered as art films that
eviscerate the consumerist society that they're supposed to be serving. All this, plus his two other
features and a pair of shorts will screen as APOCALYPSE ad absurdum on February 11,12, 13,19 & 20.
Phone (604) 688-3456 or visit www.cinematheque.bc.ca for more details.
DiSCORDER - February 2005 Textually Active
Books Books Books Books Books
Care of the Professional Voice
D. Garfield Davies and Anthony
FJahn
A&C Black/Raincoast Books
Singing and the Actor
Gillyanne Kayes
A&C Black/Raincoast Books
I've decided to do a
combined review for these
two excellent works since they
dovetail together so nicely. Care
of the Professional Voice focuses
mostly on theory and medical
background information while
Singing and the Actor takes you
from theory into practise with
various exercises to get the tone
and quality you want out of your
voice.
Care of the Professional
Voice gives you all the information
you need (and then some) to
understand the mechanics of
how sound is produced. It also
gives details of various potential
problems and prevention and/
or treatment thereof. While its
content may be primarily of
interest to doctors, there is also
plenty of practical advice for
singers, actors and others who live
off their voices. Topics covered
include precautions and tips for
reducing the impact of travelling
on your voice; multidisciplinary
management of stress and stage
fright; special demands and
advantages of musical theatre
and popular music versus the
classical world; how to match
repetoire to the condition of
the voice, especially as it ages
and changes; dangers of overly
high decibel levels in amplified
music and how to protect your
hearing and technique; issues
of toxic chemicals in stage fog.
pyrotechnics, and other dangers
your voice teacher never
anticipated warning you about;
and the ubiquitous problems
of the voice's interactions with
medications, both legal and
otherwise. This is just a brief
overview—this book is absolutely
packed with useful, and
occasionally icky, information,
most of which I hope I never need
worry about. (Except, of course,
for the travel tips. I do hope to
require those in my career.)
Singing and the Actor
focuses on how to get the
idealized sound you imagine you
will have out of your brain and
onto the stage. It covers most
of the basics of vocal training,
including developing range and
different qualities such as twang,
operatic, and belt. It also covers
how best to learn songs, audition
tips, and character development
with the varying voice qualities.
The aim is two-fold: a hands-on
approach with several exercises
per section so you learn by doing,
and an emphasis on not just doing
but feeling. Can you feel how your
throat and mouth may shape
themselves differently for different
sounds? Can you replicate this
at will so you always sound the
way you intend to sound? To a
beginner, this sounds insane, but if
you apply Kayes' suggestions and
pay attention to yourself, you will
eventually pick up some of the
subtle clues.
It is worth noting that while
her exercises and visualizations are
great, there is some controversy
about her suggestion that the
cricoid cartilege moves, even
if you think you feel it. This has
not been shown to be actual
movement of the cricoid,  but
may be a sensation originating in
tendons and muscles surrounding
it. That said, if visualizing the
cricoid moving helps you get the
effect you want, great. And if
you have no clue what I was just
talking about, get these books
and find out.
Certainly, texts like these
are no substitute for a qualified
voice teacher, but I did find them
a useful additional resource, and
I have noticed huge gains in the
development of my voice in terms
of controllable tone and clarity
since I started working with Kayes'
book on my own time in addition
to similar exercise my teacher
was having me do during lessons.
Care of the Professional Voice
has also helped me in terms of
being more aware of some of my
bad habits (caffeine, late night
snacks, etc.) that may have been
not-so-beneficial to my voice,
and therefore cleaning those up.
Highly   recommended   in   both
The Villain's Guide fo Better
Uvlng
Neil Zawacki (Illustrated by Bill
Brown)
Chronicle Books/Raincoast
Books
Well, now here I was thinking
my depraved life didn't need
improving much, but I figured
why not? One can always use
some new tips on dungeon
maintenance and finding new
adoring slaves. I must say, Neil
Zawacki gives some excellent tips
for all aspects of a wickedly good
—er, I mean bad—life. Health
tips, home decor, socializing, and
conquering the working world
(only as a cover in case anyone
asks what you're up to, naturally).
And he has such a delightfully
devilish sense of humor. I simply
must have him over for dinner.
I especially liked his tips for
getting on with the mortals - from
using a dart board to decide which
ones to fire, keeping the mobs
from one's lair, to mind control.
All very useful indeed. Also useful
were the tips for keeping those
pesky pixies and fairies out of the
house—they're always sneaking
around in here, and I was pleased
to learn that there's a better way
for removing them than the old
fashioned broom method (which
really just spreads them around
differently anyway.) Now I have
my choice of making pixie shish
kabobs or simply poisoning them
with brewer's yeast.
And the art is lovely too, I
simply must have this Bill Brown
do some murals for my haunted
chateau getaway in the
Carpathians.
One might say there's a
problem with the mass release
of this volume—if it were to get
into the hands of the minions,
they might seek to improve their
lot and move up the corporate
ladder and usurp your power. Be
sure to use some necromantic
invisibility charm so they can't
read this book, or else make sure
it's thoroughly secured in the
oubliette.
I am slightly suspicious how
Zawacki got some of his tips,
however—I suspect his spies stole
my beauty secrets. (Damn pixies.)
I mean, how else did they find out
about the CSPAN trick for getting
that sickly death glow? Really.
Drake.
Locas: The Maggie and Hopey
Stories
Jaime Hernandez
Fantagraphics Books
I dove into this beautiful
hardcover collection completely
unfamiliar with the legendary
Love & Rockets comic series.
Created by Jaime Hernadez
and his brothers Glibert and
Mario in 1981, it ran until 1996.
Locas represents the bulk of the
series, but despite its impressive
size, isn't a complete collection.
This volume reproduces the first
fifty issues of the comic, which
focus on the story of a young
Mexican-Amercian woman,
Maggie ChascamTIo, and her best
friend/occasional lover Esperanza
"Hopey" Glass. Outsiders in their
own communities, the two girls find
solace in the emerging California
punk scene of the early eighties.
The story proceeds in real time as
the characters grow up together
and apart.
The early installments of
L&R add a heavy scoop of pulp
romance and science fiction to
this premise: we first meet Maggie
fixing rockets deep in a dinosaur-
infested jungle^ Political intrigue,
superheroes, and other classic
comic book elements mark
the first third of the book. As the
story progresses, L&R settles into
realistic, character-driven stories
of life, love, and Mexican wrestling
in Latin American neighborhoods.
Surprising plot twists remain,
though, and you never really
know what's going to happen
next. The artwork changes with
the tone of the series, and one
of the best parts about reading
an entire series is watching this
slow transformation. By final
issues, Hernandez's visual style is
gorgeously classic and adept,
at no expense of expression,
imagination or nuance.
Perhaps even more
striking than the artwork is the
characterization. Hernandez
treats his creations with love,
intelligence and respect, and
though the series throbs with all the
conflict and heartbreak of a soap
opera, the stories are presented
with a deftness that makes them
completely compelling. Selfhood .
and sexuality are treated
like dynamic elements of the
characters lives rather than as
"issues." Hopey, Maggie, et al are
fully sketched out and reassuringly
three dimensional: it's rare to see
female characters so realistically
rendered. I have to say that the
sexy drawings threw me initially—I
don't have much tolerance for the
traditional male-penned comic
book's view of women (as it's
mostly boobs). But after reading
the whole series, i concluded that
the abundance of curvy female
flesh didn't indicate a creeping
misogyny. I even came to enjoy
the cartoonist) sexuality of Penny
Century.
Reading L&R in one fell
swoop, instead of issue-by-issue,
is an intense and fully enjoyable
experience. Don't shy away from
buying it just because you don't
know the comic: I have a feeling
that this is the perfect way to get
to know it. By the end, you'll feel
like Maggie and Hopey are new
old friends. D
KatSiddle
Images from Locas: The Hopey m
a BY JAIME HERNANDEZ W^rm
'JUP:
The Arcade Fire is one of those extremely hyped
bands that people of a certain temperament will
automatically disregard. In my humble opinion,
however, this is one of the few instances in which the
hype is justified. Their debut album, Funeral, is stellar
(and Pitchfork's #J album of the year) and their
Commodore show was my favourite of last year.
The following is an abridged transcript of
a conversation with Arcade Fire guitarist and
percussionist Richard Reed Parry, conducted via
telephone as he sat in a van, driving through Seattle,
on his way to San Francisco. Some of these questions
were provided by a DiSCORDER Montreal music
scene informant. Hopefully his contribution made this
interview slightly more interesting than the Arcade
Fire interviews in every single other Vancouver
newspaper. Questions about Howard Bilerman,
Mormonism and Merge Records had to be cut to
make room for pictures of insect heads, and this
exessively spaced text.
DiSCORDER: How's it goin'?
Richard Reed Parry: It's goin' well.
DiSCORDER: How did the Vancouver shows go? At the
Commodore show, you said that it was your biggest
show yet.
Richard Reed Parry: It's true; it was by a couple
hundred people. The Vancouver shows were good;
the Victoria show was a disaster.
tl was a disaster? I thought the baby Jesus saved it.
Ha ha. Well, sort of. If by saved you mean ruined.
I think a lot of people were surprised at the incredible
response to you guys, selling out the Commodore—
which is quite a feat—and Mesa Luna.
Yeah, it's pretty crazy. It's surprising for us, too.
I read that you signed to Rough Trade In the UK. How
did that come about?
They approached us and said they really liked the
record. And the «bold2»Hldden Cameras signed
with them a year ago and we're kind of mutual
fans of the Hidden Cameras and I know they were
speaking really highly of us.
And it's pretty good cred, signing to Rough Trade.
They're nice people. So they got wind of our record
and they got a copy of our record.
You joined the band in 2002?
Is that right? 2001, 2002. 2002 I guess. Maybe a little
bit earlier.
You're also in the «bold3»New International
' DiSCORDER - February 2005
Fea (ie L'CLreaile
QtGcide Fire
by Duncan McHugh
Standards...
That doesn't exist anymore.
Or you used to be. And you're in, uh. Orchestras
des...Sorry I don't have it written down.
[unintelligible]
What are those bands like? How did they compare
to Arcade Fire?
It's quite different. It's instrumental. It's kind of
chamber music meets, like, electronic music and
jazz, or something like that. It's all orchestral and
instruments.
Is it true there used to be a big rivalry between the
New International Standards and the Arcade Fire?
[Laughing] No. We were really good friends. We
use to go see each other play and then the New
International Standards fell apart. And me and
Tim [Kingsbury, bassist] joined the Arcade Fire and
Jeremy, our new Arcade Fire drummer was in that
band also.
I notice you sometimes use the name Richard Reid
Parry and sometimes just Richard Parry. Have you
dropped the 'Reed' because of fhe Shoebomber?
Was that a factor?
Because of what?
Because of Richard Reid, the Shoebomber, the guy
with C4 in his sneakers? You weren't worried about
touring in the States or anything?
[Laughing] No, it's on my passport and everything. I
guess some people don't write it or something. It's
my real name; my name is Richard Reed. That's what
my parents called me...People are like, 'What's your
name?' and I'm like 'Richard Reed' and people are
like, 'What?' 'Richard Reed' and they're like 'What?'
so I'm just like, 'Richard.'
Some people have suggested that you bear a
tremendous likeness to Napolean Dynamite. Have
you heard that?
Oh god. Yes.
What would be your response to someone who said:
'I caught you a delicious bass'?
I haven't seen the movie. But people just tell me that.
At every show there's somebody who tells me that.
You're much, uh, better put together than Napolean
Dynamite.
[Laughing] Thank you.
You have a music degree. Do you feel your music
degree is being best served by banging some a
bunch of drums and yelling?
[Laughing] I didn't get, like, a music performance
degree, I got a degree in electro-acoustics sound,
which is, like, sound art. So, yes.
In terms of electro-acoustics, they're being well-
served by banging drums and yelling.
I didn't go to school to have school tell me what to
do and then go do it. I went to school to explore and
learn and, it's like, through my whole schooling, still
sven or eight times out of 10, my favourite music to
listen to is still, like, pop bands.
Someone wanted me to ask about [ex-Arcade
Fire member] Brendan's departure from the band.
Apparently there was a big break-up show in which a
viola was broken.
It's true.
And someone wanted to know if that was staged
at all, if there was any planning or if that was raw
emotion.
That was totally raw disaster.
Raw disaster. And you weren't in the band at that
point were you?
Sort of. I played at that show. I wasn't performing at
every show. That was when I started performing at
every show actually. That was when we released the
EP. I played on a bunch of the EP and then I came
and performed at the CD release and at the CD
release the band sort of totally fell apart. I played
at all the shows after that, when there was no band
left. Well, there was a band left, but it wasn't the
band that it was before, it had totally fallen apart.
We played a bunch of shows.
What brought you guys back together after that?
Well, it wasn't like being brought back together, it
was a new band. Win and Regine were still at the
helm of it, but...
So, it was a very different band that recorded the EP.
Yeah, it was different.
Yeah. What are some of the differences between the
old band and the new one?
I don't know, it's more together. It was kind of a
dysfunctional community back then. It's more
functional now, for sure.
So there haven't been any stage tantrums on this
tour.
Will [Butler, drummer/shit disturber] dropped me on
my head at the Commodore show.
Did you have a helmet on at the time?
No, I took the helmet off, I was hitting it. And then
I fell onto my head on the helmet and broke the
helmet.
Fuck.
It wasn't even on my damn head. Awful.
Were you okay for the rest of the night?
I was okay enough to perform. I had a huge bump
and cut on my head. It really hurts right now. It
sucks.
And what's next? You guys are touring and then
what?
We're going to take a little bit of time off. And then
my other band «bold2»Les Orchestras is going
to go to the Banff Centre for about a month. Then
we're going to go to England, I think, and play some
shows.
You guys played one new song at the Vancouver
show, are there a bunch of them?
We have a few, a lot of incomplete stuff. We have
two new ones we've trying out on this tour. They're
not quite there.
Any plans to go back to the studio?
Yeah, but there's no date on it or anything.
Anything you'd like to say to the people of
Vancouver?
Clean up your act. The city is in trouble.
What makes you say that?.
I don't know, there's a lot of people on drugs.
At least you didn't get your equipment ripped off, like
other bands do.
That's true.
Okay, well, I've got to get my haircut. Have a good
drive.
Thanks. Take care. D "Blown &vvaq bu Dandi (jt/ind
Bv the lovely Miss Susv Webb ^ M
It's great being among the first to write about an
artist. You get to sound like you're cool and down with
the scene, whether or not this is actually true. You get
to interview them in person, and maybe even hang
out. But most of all, you can make obvious puns with
the band name before everyone else does. Such is
the case with 2004 Shindig winners Dandi Wind. Hot
on the heels of releasing their new EP Bait the Traps,
I was able to indulge in all of the aforementioned
perks. Dear reader, bear with me as together we ride
the torrential force of... Dandi Windl (Ahem.)
A Dandi Wind performance is an unforgettable
event. Szam Findlay is dapper and reserved in a
dark suit, competently manipulating his Korg and
sequencer while contributing occasional backup vocals. Physically and stylistically somewhere
between Bjork, PJ Harvey and Peaches, enrapturing
vocalist Dandilion Schlase dances, shrieks and flails,
each performance an impassioned, cathartic labor
of love. Both band members come with a history in
theatre, and it shows.
On record, the music holds its own even without
the consummate show. Made "with a few unpopular
decade old synths, a single mic and a monophonic
Pentium 2 soundcard," Bait the Traps fuses industrial,
IDM and rock, striking a satisfying balance between
unpredictable rhythms and delicious melodies.
Dandi's vocql style flies above it all, reminiscent of
'80s new wave greats like Lene Lovich, Kath Bush or
Lora Logic.
At this point in their career, Szam and Dandi are
still obliging enough to invite a humble local writer
into their private digs in the north-east of Vancouver.
Dressed in a one-piece '80s short-suit number, Dandi
ushered me graciously into a spacious studio. I was
impressed to note that her wild on-stage steez is not
a stretch from her everyday loungewear. The live/
work space was stuffed with their tools of one of their
many trades: selling clothing on the internet. While we
chatted they jumped up more than once to show me
items of interest, ranging from a set of buttons about
eating meat (Szam: "Here's a really cool one: It's two
people with aerobics outfits on, and the guy's holding
a tray. He's putting a fork of meat in her mouth! Its
totally new wave."), to Dandi's current sculptures
(gleefully ghoulish heads, self-contained in glass-
topped wooden boxes), to Lene Lovich's 1978 record
Stateless.
As we talked, Dandi Wind revealed an Industrial
aesthetic. Vancouver electronic-rock greats Skinny
Puppy came up more than once, as did plans for a
"MirtSry-inspired" record after their upcoming fuit-
length release. White their music strikes a balance
between heavy and dance, Dandi Wind's lyrics
reveal an underlying darkness. Szam told me that,
"We have some songs that are political, but only in the
sense of day to day life inspiring us to feel something
politically." Of course, the sights and sounds of life in
Vancouver's eastern harbor can be depressing. From
their new EP, "O Todo o Dia," depicts the suffering
of low-wage laborers, and "Ms. 45" describes a sex
worker killing her clients ("Thanks for letting me fulfill
a dream / Watching you beg is such a scream / I've
always wanted to use my crossbow / To kill a John like ,
you driving by real slow.")
While Dandi Wind may be newcomers to the
local live scene, they are old hands in the world of
art and creativity. Szam has been playing piano and
writing music since childhood. As he told me, "I've
always been creative, but it's not hereditary. My
parents don't even Dice music. They put me in piano
lessons. I did ice-skating, I did swimming, and none of
them had any influence on me, but I liked piano. I
hated the lessons, I hate playing transcribed music,
but I enjoyed making noise."
According to Dandi, "I had an alternative
childhood, and worked on lots of stuff with my
dad." Like her father, Dandi's first and eternal
love is sculpture. While she studied at Emily Carr,
Dandi created a series of elaborate sculptures to
accompany Szam's music. They were photographed
and included as the artwork for his 2001 release. Die
Hautfabrik, (translation: "Skin Factory") released on
UK-based Resonant Recordings.
Following the record's UK release, the BBC's Colin
Buftimer wrote a lengthy and poetic review: "Melodies
appear to be always on the edge of nightmare: as the
Golem escapes the rabbi's servitude to spread fear
and chaos, so does Szam Rndlay's music threaten to
run amok into dischord. The photographs on the CD
booklet appear to capture inbred plantlife, effigies
erected by superstitious peasants far from big city
'civilization', folk memories of the victims of natural but
inexplicable disasters." The album received attention
from The Wire, All Music Guide and Muzik, but not
much local coverage. While the response may have
been disappointing. Die Hautfabrik firmly established
Szam's solid musicianship.
The current EP is a teaser for the upcoming
full-length, which will contain other songs recorded at
the same time, as well as several videos. The film for
"Another Side Effect" on Baft the Traps features Dandi
in one of her trademark leotards stumbling through
an alleyway, eventually collapsing, vomiting blood.
We can only imagine what the future will hold! Other
long-term plans include "an album of synth covers of
Canadian pop songs, from Skinny Puppy and then
more and more obscure from there." Dandi mentioned
an album made with all hand-made instruments, and
more collaboration wtth other musicians.
In the very near future, I predict tours, record,
sales, and many more articles about this fledgling
band. I also predict that they wiH get very tired of
articles titled with lame-ass puns ("The Dandi is Btowrn*
in the Wind." etc.). D
Do yourself a favor and check out their website, www.
dandfwfnd.com, for glorious photos of Dandi and
snippets of their music. "O
OJ
|i i
ABOUT
THE
ARTIST
h
i
3 Si
MI
ill
111
Hi
iz   ail
i ill
ft III
3    S
a %
2 I
c «
if
o 5" q
13 8
Q I S
oil-
o«g
l!l
ff III
lilN
I Ml1
til !■
as||f
«8lH
§1681
S§ 3 •
f •=§ si
fya *£
IkJyyl II
^    fa
w
^
'^ ?S fi
it Ii   1
f?ki! I!
 +
PIS
ii
I©   n|
il    fa
hi    I*
I    If
CR
^J
CW
•o>
8-^
irfsii
"• § as-s
^rHi!
-n
m
DP
D
C
>
33
o
o
D
m
3D
ro
ls5
^1°
o>3 8-
Off a
Sgf
^  O  3
5< O
D 7 >
5<?
i^>CTg>y»2?oo2
Q. 3. 3j 9 r* ff s- g JT s
x^»a
|tf
«5 O 3
"" 3 -8 % H5
§ s-f-f
•IPS-
(D q <D Q   O
|-ial
2 I i
00
1
z.
a
3
O
HH
W
m
00
H
5
W
D
D
HH
a
H
H
3
HH
O
r
o
ci
00
fe
1 o
C
fi)
<
O
CD
CD
35
o
fi)
CO
"U
O
CD
fi)
.; By Ben Lai
An old DiSCORDER editor, Merek, once said of Gangbang, "I quite
like the idea that the best band that I ever saw in Vancouver was a
band that was intended as joke (or at least a band that didn't take
themselves seriously). Most unintended things normally turn out great-
it's the intended things that turn to shit."
Gangbang have been the darlings of the local music press
ever since their first gig at Ms. T's about two years ago, and for good
reasons. No one wffi argue the fact that they write unbelievably funny,
catchy songs, but it is an art to be able to deliver these lines on stage
in a charming and non-gimmicky way. People should laugh with you,
not at you. It's a fine line to tread and they succeed admirably.
One snowy Vancouver night, I spoke with the two very nice
ladies of Gangbang, Andie Maddalozzo (vocals, guitar) and
Sarah Campbell (drums, vocals). Be warned: while there will be no
talk of excessive copulation or extreme hairstyles in the following
interview, there will be a brief mention of Wil Sasso at the end.
DiSCORDER: How did you get started?
Sarah: Andie and I worked together. She and Reggie started to write
songs, and then I came aboard pnd put some beats to them. Then
they added Taunya, Jen and Rory. And then we decided to strip it
down and make it two.
Andie: Due to circumstances, but then we liked it. So we kept it.
Circumstances?
Sarah: Everybody went on vacation one night when we had to
play a show. We wanted to do the show, so we decided to do it
anyways.
Andie: We don't say no to anything.
So after the show you thought "Oh, this Is way better?"
Sarah: Well, it wasn't necessarily better. [Laughs]
Andie: It wasn't much worse. It was fun. Challenging, but in a way
easier, because when you don't know how to play, not having to
coordinate with anyone is way better. You are your own team.
Sarah: We can just go for it and not worry about being in tune with
anybody else.
Andie: I don't even have to tune my guitar. It rules. [Laughs]
Was there any drama or resentment when you let the rest of the
band go?
Andie: Not really.
Sarah: They understood. It didn't have anything to do with them, of
course. It just felt right.
Andie: It kind of just kept going like that. We booked so many shows;
everybody saw that we were a two-piece so they were booking us
as a two-piece.
I have to ask, I guess-^where did the name of band come from?
Sarah: I had nothing to do with that.
Andie: Me and Taunya drank one bottle of wine each one night.
She was like, "You know what would be a good name for a band?
Gangbang!" and we were like, "That's awesome!"
DiSCORDER - February 2005 _t%^ '"
Your album is doing really wen at CiTR. Who did It? What's the story?
Andie: Chris Dang {from] Depth Charge Studios... He's so cool. We
did [the album] in three hours. We were like, "Don't spend too much
time on it." He did everything pretty much in an hour after that. All
the mixing and producing.
Did Chris come to you?
Andie: I've known him for a while, so he offered to do it. I was giving
him free haircuts for studio time, but now he shaves his head, so I
should give him some money. Chris if you read this, call me and I'll
give you money. [Laughs]
How many copies did you make? I see that they are CDRs; you did
them on your computer?
Andie: Yeah, whenever someone wants one. People email me for
them so I just bum them. We burned 50 to start. I don't have any
money, I don't know how bands can afford CDs and stuff.
You mean manufactured CDs? Do you think that would make a
difference if you have a "rear CD? You think people will be more
willing to buy it?
Andie: No, but it wouldn't be as irritating. My computer doesn't work
so I have to find people's houses all the time and burn [the CDs
there]. And buy CDs from Future Shop,
. Sarah: You know I have a CD burner.
Andie: Yeah, I didn't know you did until today. [All laugh]
Sarah: I haven't been doing my part.
Andie, you drew all the different covers too. I have the hockey one.
What other covers are there?
Andie: There's Ninjas with Attitude, Keeping it Riel... Oh, Chucky
Nufs, a peanut driving a car, that's personally my favorite. One that
people really like is the one with the mime in the front and it's called |
Hard Rockin' Gentle Talkin'.
Are you happy with how the album turned out?
Andie: I don't know about you Sarah, but hearing [my] voice on
recording was disgusting. I sound like a fat prepubescent boy. I like
Sarah's voice a lot though. She can sing.
Sarah: I sound like Jewel.
Andie: Like Jewel on crack. [Laughs]
What do you sound like to yourself. In your head?
Andie: I sound way hotter inside my head. Way hotter. Sexy.
Sarah: You're a sexy prepubescent boy. [Laughs]
Your songs are really funny. It Is hard to come up with them?
Andie: I don't think there's a serious bone in my body.
Sarah: There isn't.
Andie: I want to be all gay and happy. I don't want to be
sentimental or anything, there's already enough of that. 1 don't like
depth and meaning, although it's not a bad thing.
Sarah: It's just not you.
It's safe to assume that none of the songs are real life stories and
experiences then?
Andie: None of it. Except for the one about the robot. [Laughs]
I think it'll be weird to put anything personal into it. I'd feel very
, uncomfortable if I did that.
Sarah: I think the hardest thing is to put your
personal thoughts into music. Then everyone
knows what your feelings are.
Andie: No one needs to know that. People should be there to have
a good time, not feel my pain.
What's the Chinese Song about?
Andie: That's all the words I know in Chinese. My friend Alan gave
me a few Chinese catchphrases, and then my friend Jermaine gave
me a couple more.
What do the phrases mean?
Andie: I think Alan's was "Why are you so ugly? Why are you so
homy?" and Jermaine's was "Why are you so stupid? Why do you
smell so bad?" or something.    ,
So they thought these would be useful phrases tor you to use In the
future?
Sarah: Really eh, who's she hanging out with?
Your songs have a fair amount of swearing In them. Have your
parents heard your music? Have they been to your shows?
Sarah: My parents did. My mom liked it a lot, but I don't think she got
it necessarily. She was dancing. She wasn't very happy about the
name choice.
Andie: I didn't give my parents my CD ... when [my dad] heard our
radio show with you he was like, "Blah, why did you have to use
those kind of words?" ... As far as my dad's concerned, we don't
even have a CD.
Do you have a favorite place to play?
Sarah: I really like the Railway.
Andie: I know we've had bad experiences at the Lamplighter, but
we've always play good shows there.
Bad experiences? You mean the Infamous Wil Sasso incident when
you played with Unclean Wiener?
Andie: Well, that guy broke Sarah's ankle.
Sarah: He didn't break it, just sprained it. It wasn't WD Sasso. It was
one of his lackeys. He was unplugging the amps from Unclean
Wiener, and somebody tried to plug them back in, and he started
beating him up. I happened to be standing next to him. I got
knocked over and got beer poured all over me. Twisted an ankle
and I had to play.
.What were you thinking when that stuff was happening? All those
drunken idiots from Wil Sense's posse screaming at Unclean Wiener?
Sarah: I was kind of worried about how they're going to accept us.
Andie: I got really mad. i just wanted to go up there and have them
hate me. You know what I mean?
Hopefully that kind of crap doesn't ever happen again. Have you
ever been heckled in any extent?
Sarah: No. We should though. D
Gangbang win be playing at the ANZA Club February I Ifh and the
Railway Club March 3rd. eone
By Mike Barrow
With each passing year the boundaries of hip-hop become more
loosely defined. Artists have been experimenting more with the
medium by incorporating different concepts that transcend the
"beats, rhymes and life" aesthetic that has been the backbone
of most hip-hop music for so long. The collectively owned Anticon
Records has exemplified this genre-transcendent qualify since
its beginnings in 1998 when co-founders Sole (Tim Holland) and
Dose One (Adam Drucker), after fruitlessly distributing their demos,
decided to form a collective record label of their own. I had
the opportunity to catch up with Adam "Dose One" Drucker (of
Themselves, Subtle, and Clouddead) here in Vancouver (the city he
now calls home) to discuss his beats, rhymes, life, and side projects.
Discorder: Where were you living before you came to Vancouver
and why did you choose Vancouver as your new place of
residence?
Adam: Oakland [California]. I lived there with everybody from
Anticon, pretty much. But my girlfriend of over two years is here. She
was in Guelph so she moved out here and so I moved out here to be
with her.
What's up with fhe hands and arms in the artwork for the Subtle
record?
I just totally got stuck on it, I realized I've always been a body
mutilator in low-key nervous child ways.
Fingernail biting?
Yea, things like that. I realized that there's something about taking
the whole arm off, thoughts about wilted suicide at a ripe age.
Because it is about winning when you're quitting. Quitters win:
quitters get rest, quitters get to fall asleep on the job. I just realized
that there was something about giving the whole arm. I'd like to
see myself give the whole arm in this. Instead of slitting your wrist
you just keep going, you give the whole arm and finish life with one
arm, strong. And you've actually spent that much of yourself on
something, it seemed very relevant to me.
Subtle has remixed a track for Beck and now there are rumours
about the possibility of being Included on a tour with him.
It's up to him, if he wants to put us on. He really likes us; it's
apparently one of his favourite remixes. We'd love to tour with him
but y'know, he's on a massive label and if they want to pick us I
don't know how that goes. But the remix was a blast.
Is that remix out now?
That's coming out on his release first in early spring. Then we're
[Subtle] gonna put out this Plus CD with all our other mixes that
are on vinyl that we are just putting out. Mike Patton did this all a
cappella thing. We did an instrumental of "I Heart LA.."with Hrvatski
playing guitar. "Swan Meat" is sort of the end of "A New White," the
last song on the record that's not on the record—we're putting it out
as the last single. There's a remake of that that's JO minutes long with
Andrew Broder from Fog doing all the vocals and he re-wrote all my
writing kind of in his own way.
That's "the long vein" remix that Patton is working on. Are you in
contact wtth Mike Patton at all, are you guys going to try and get
some more stuff happening?
Yeah. The reason I met him is that he's doing this thing called
Peeping Tom and he has all these producers making sort of his
adapted rap. So it's got Jel and Odd Nosdam doing beats on it and
pther people also. I did some vocals that Jeff [Jel] and Nosdam are
doing and 1 did this Fresh Prince cameo verse and a couple other
verses. We're gonna work together, we're very similar. A lot of what
he's doing is very inspiring, just as a person, because he was thrust
out to the world and he was successful-and-then he made the
most of it for himself and now I see where he is. So I think it's really
interesting to meet someone like him.
n Lex Records. Why didn't
Subtle's latest album "A New White"
Anticon handle it?
Subtle is almost four years old now. When we started doing Subtle,
Anticon didn't have the space for it and it didn't have the space for
Anticon.
Would you say that Lex is bigger than Anticon?
No and yes. I don't think that it's really relative. But the funding is
healthy and there're opportunities to open up different avenues
that I think add to Anticon. I've enjoyed very much stacking their
expenses so that they are interested in pushing the record. It's good
faith and it's good music, which is the bottom line for me.
Has Lex been able to back you wtth more money for recording?
A little bit more, but not so much. Anticon could do the same but
then I would feel tike I was asking a lot because it's my collective. It's
heavy. It involves me asking for a massive amount of money from a
stockpile that my best friends and favourite artists all draw from.
So Anticon is totally a collective. If you are taking money from
Anticon to put Into recording you're reducing fhe amount available
for someone else?
Right. And I think it should be an even and healthy distribution.
Something felt healthier and more even about putting Subtle where
there's room to develop. It's not an overwhelming amount of money
that I'm privy to at all, but I'm really into the jump in size. If you're
not going to hand me a tree that money grows on, I'd really like a
little Chia Pet that I can grow. At first I thought it was just my luck,
like, "I can never win at anything." There're aH these elements to my
personality that are still that. But then I realized it just the pace that
I'm comfortable with. It's working on a lot of art all the time and then
my progress with success and the world is aMhfc buffer distance.
What about selling up an Anticon studio?
That'd be cool if we did that but it's better off that people invest
personally in their home studios and then one day when you have
a little bit more of a home that you own you stick a room on it and
put your home studio equipment-in there. Having a home studio is a
very elaborate exhibition of "I make music sometimes" unless you're
scheduling time in it.
Are you ever apprehensive about lyrics? Do you ever write
something and go "shit, that's a little much."
Everybody has their own way of letting in weak unfortified thoughts.
Thoughts that don't have a form, that can't stand alone. You can't
hit it all, when you first write it down, so you have all these lines that
are in the stages of weak and in the throes of being great. The earlier
stuff was a lot like that; I smell it on all the other writers out there.
That's why I like or dislike any music: it's the lyrics. What really makes
me love a band is good lyrics and what really quickly makes me
hate a band is non-existent mumble. '
You wouldn't say you're concerned with alienating listeners then?
I don't know. You kinda alienate yourself when you listen to fuckin'
music that's like [sings] "in the summer when love is shining."
If you see someone rockin' to that in their convertible, it's like
nowadays you can honestly judge someone when they're eating
at McDonald's. You look like you're full of shit, you probably feel like
you're full of shit. But I also don't want to judge all these people. It's
relative, it think, all that stuff.
I've heard you refer to your music as masturbatory. is that still
relevant now?
I don't know. There's a truth to that, but that's like saying it's self-
indulgent. All things are. We make music selfishly, the pace of our
music is dictated only by our own concerns, palates and aesthetics,
and by what we know we've done before. That's a very selfish way
to make music; that's why it's not under everybody's Christmas tree.
It remains built in this peculiar way, it goes places that maybe you
don't want to go. It's highly fashioned in that sense, and so it's totally
masturbatory.
Clouddead, and Themselves to a certain extent, seemed to have
an affinity for odd Items. Lots of blenders and ambient sound—the
subtitle for "You Devil You" is "Bang on Shit fill it Sounds good." How
important has experimenting with sound been for those two projects
and other projects in general?
Well, I'm finishing a solo record, like a Slow Death II, of all my
own production and stuff... It's still very much "Bang on shit tiU it
sounds good." It hasn't changed too much. We don't have great  •
equipment and we have big ideas... A lot of times our best ideas
come out of humour and jerking off together in the same room.
Especially "You Devil You." When we did that song we were fuckin'
going nuts, it sounded like shit and then Jeff [Jel] starts playing the
sink to piss me off because I was trying to record something. And
then alt these things start sounding good and he moves a mic and
we record aH this great shit. It's always like that... It's a lot more
human, it's a lot more errored. D
Subtle's latest record A New White is out now (www.fexrecords.com).
For all other things Dose One. visit www.anffcon.com. epitaph.com • sagefrancis.net
Blame it on the mash-ups: where differing styles
are woven together to create something familiar
yet new. They're even showing up on MTV, with
big time acts like Jay-Z and Linkin Park put head to
head. Which leads one to ask, what if you had a
mash-up between the Foo Fighters and The Beach
Boys? What would that sound like? It might sound
like Marianas Trench and their blend of melodic
alternative vocal rock. This Vancouver band took a
moment from their December recording schedule
to sit down With DiSCORDER for a chat in their chilly
downtown rehearsal space.
Though it's not technically a soda-pop, bassist/
vocalist Mike Ayley says their sound is "like Pepsi but
more like Pepsi Twist. It's Rock Twist." Lead vocalist/
guitarist Josh Ramsay takes another approach and
describes by what he would like to be known fon
"It's punk rock, meets rip rock, meets tons of vocal
rock like Queen and the Beach Boys." Vocal rock?
It's not a term that's thrown around a lot on playlist
categories these days, but then, what other band
can say that they all share the same high school
choirboy pasts?
Oh, they don't don gowns like the Polyphonic
Spree to display their vocal roots, but at concerts,
they've been known to treat the crowd to an a
cappella ditty or a little "Good Vibrations." Josh
unabashedly admits that, "at the heart of every
band, there's a band dork somewhere. And I'm a
band dork AND a choir dork." Once a choirboy,
always a choirboy; the group continues to take
voice lessons to maintain their tight harmonies.
Marianas Trench invests this time and effort into their
voices in the hopes that this will set them apart from
the rest of the music scene.
Drummer/vocalist Ian Casselman believes that
"[the vocals] sound like nothing that's out there right
now." Ramsey adds that "it is all real—live, not fake,
not digitally doctored—so it's got a real live, good
energy."
Their first full-length album will be released this
spring by 604 Records, the large indie label owned
in part by Nickleback's Chad Kroeger, and home
to local gloom-stars The Organ (speaking of strange
musical Mash-Upsl).
Though they've only recently been signed, the
band isn't overly naive about the business. Josh's
lyrics already reveal some frustrations with the music
industry. He explains the song, "Shaketramp," and
its chorus "slap you like a bitch and you take it like
photo Patrick Blaeser
a whore." He explains, "I was feeling a little bit like a
sell-out and the idea was not like "bitch" as in girl or
in a hip-hop 'money on my mind, and my bitch is on
my money' kind of way. It was more like I felt like a
whore, 'cause I was whoring out for the industry and
being somebody's bitch, more like in a prison kind of
way...I dealt with it by writing that song."
But they're happy with their producer,
former Matthew Good Band guitarist Dave Genn.
Keyboardist/guitarist/vocalist Matt Webb can't
believe that they get to work with "somebody I
personally look up to and have looked up to for a
long time." Josh believes that Genn's influence will
help Mat Webb's playing skills "become godlike...or
Genn-like anyway. [He] is really an artist-friendly
producer so we're gonna sound like a band and
not just cookie-cut and mechanically perfected in
a computer."
There's more to the recording process
experience than just turning knobs, and Ian feels
that "the band has a sound right now whereas
before you're always trying to find your sound."
Not being rushed in the studio. Josh says the band
is "taking time to get the right takes as opposed to
the other school of recording that's happening now
[which is] just recording on the first take and that's
that and you digitally fix it all."
With the release of their first official album on
the horizon, there are other "firsts" that the group is
looking forward to. Josh, deadpan shared this wish:
"I'm hoping to lose my virginity soon." Other definite
"firsts" for the band include the filming of their music
video for "Fix Me" and soon after, a national tour.
If they had it their way, Marianas Trench would
have a tour that incorporated everything. Josh
proclaims, "I wanna get a tour bus but not a normal
one...I want it to be painted in rainbows and say,
'Reading is fun' on the side...we could give out
books to people after shows and stuff. Like copies
of Hemingway and Steinbeck...but as a pop-up
book." Talk about promotion mash-ups. Sadly, this
is just initial brainstorming. At least, the long days of
tburJng,ahead shouldn't be boring. D
Cfieckoufwww.604records.com for Info on Marianas
Trench's official release and tour dates.
DiSCORDER - February 2005 Charts
Beginning with January "Long Vinyl"
Continuing into a second column of "Long Vinyl"
m
Artta
Recording
tqtMrt.
01
Vancougar*+
s/t
Indie
t&&
Gangbang**
frfeotturrO'
Indie
03
Bel!a*+
pretty mess
Hideout
j&Sj
Bakefite*+
iS^^SMSi
Sound Document
05
PHiHip Jeck/Jara
kSchaffer
songs for europe
Asphodel
Guitar Vfolf
foveroe*   "
Namack   "
07
Doers*+
ready set...do
Red Cat
08
Stars'
set yourself onftre
Arts and Crafts
09
Lesbians on Ecstasy*
s/t
Aliens
fS*"
The Go! Team
thunder ilghtning strike *
MerrphsfrtdusMes
Red Light Sting*+
The Radio Dept.
Neko Case
20
Negativtafitt
heifer stupid
Seetand
21
Black Mountain*+
s/t
SecretyCanacBan
^fCT
^^^^^^M
on unsert letter
vinviRepubig:
23
DACM
stereotypie
Asphodel
24
Canned H«1»^^^
erotic thriller
Pro Am
25
' Tussle
Uingklang
Troubleman   •
H *   T*e:* ;                                     ^TiE2^                                   Com,efc*^"?!
27
R.LBurnsfcfe.:
a bothered min
Fat Possum
•fti
.-•.The. Cape May*
cerstrat cfy: may riseagain
Catch and Release*^" fe;
29
junior Boys*
last exit
Domino
30'
Ted Leo cmaW*Pharmacists
||3j|fcp the sheets
1SSS9HE3
31
Connecticut**
moss
Dehausset
32 ■
3t^fti83
rendezvous
JetSet
33
Three Inches of Blood*+
advance and cc
nq
jer
Roadruhner
34
-lilliRSJ
foliage
Cognition Audtawom^^
35
Elevator*
august
bluefon
aH these interruptions
* INDICATES CANADIAN CONTENT
And Ending with January's "Indie Home Jobs"
01 Raised By Wolves EP 02 Fun J 00 "Greatest Hits" 03 WPP "he has the technology"
04 Mitchell Bedermon "Addicted to E" 05 Gangbang "Keepin it Riel" 06 Vancougar "Demo"
07 The Tomster "Haa lah lah" 08 Joey and the Instapunks EP 09 Mandown EP 10 The Mockers EP
-find I
{f\9  ^pip
4><f  LukJi Rims*Cf -"«*%*«• Hell of Shows
Live reviews, some pictures, occasionally a pseudonym?
SwHchfoot
Acceptance
December 06
Croatian Cultural Centre
The glory that is known as the "all-ages" show; many
people talk about it, seldom people attempt it. After
a summer visit, SwHchfoot returned to Vancouver for a
sold-out show at the Croatian Cultural Centre.
Oh, the humidity. Big props to anyone who can
survive a sea of sweaty, hyper kids. Someone must be
eating his/her vitamins or hormone-injected produce
because it was hard to see past the towering heads
on the floor.
Acceptance had the golden opportunity to
open the show. It was fitting since they're living the
. teenage-angst mantra that a lot of emo-punk-rock
outfits are wearing out these days. Live, the guys gave
off a pretty polished sound and the majority of sounds
were catchy. They had the hard guitar riffs, and the
vocal styles ranging from raspy vocals to can-you-
hear-me-shout? choruses. Acceptance even showed
their softer side by playing a rock staple power
ballad lead by keyboards; this prompted lighters
to be whipped out and a question: how young are
the kiddos smoking these days? The lead singer was-
pretty energetic and the drummer pounded out the
tunes. The band managed to keep the attention of
the crowd for their whole set. They'll be sure to be
on the Much Music rotation faster than you can say
George Strombolopogus. [sic]
And on the 6th Day, God created the concert.
Okay, so He didn't, but promoters have learned that
if you book a Switchfoot concert, they will come.
The band certainly has a faithful and devoted lot of
fans; no other concert could fill a parking lot with a
church school bus. Not sure what to expect from a
Christian rock band, the sushi waiter that served the
group earlier said it best, which lead singer Jonathan
Foreman shared with the audience: "Rock first". And
they did.
Switchfoot opened with a bass intro and guitar
pedal effects, fit for any Radiohead fans, which
segued into "Ammunition", a heavy rock smasher.
Most of the setlist was taken from their latest release.
The Beautiful Letdown like the slow-burning "On Fire",
to older songs like the energetic "Company Car".
It was nice to see the band alter songs especially
the radio hits; the hard metal-like outro from Beautiful
Letdown merged into a harder version of "Meant to
Live". "Dare You to Move" featured playing around
with the vocal timing but that didn't stop fans from
joining in. They debuted a few new tracks like the
tamborine-happy "Easier than Love", but the songs
that had the most impact during the show were the
slower ones.
The highlight of the night had to be the much-
requested number song, "24". Foreman appeared
solo on stage with just an acoustic guitar; his only
backup was a lone stage spotlight aided by cell
phones display lights and lighters to light up the
simple-but-moving song which the crowd lovingly
sang along to.
Plain and simple: Switchfoot is very appreciative
of their fans. They would bend over backwards to play
song requests they don't normally play like the poppy
Everclear-sounding "Like Everybody Else" during the
encore. Foreman would take every chance to stand
on the rails to be closer to the crowd and hold up the
mic stand to amplify all the voice's singing along.
By the end of the night, it was a teenage
wasteland of happy souls, ready to take on a brand
new (school) day.
£m/7y Khong
Jimmy Eat World
Smooth
December 07
Commodore Ballroom
The only thing that could have toppled the crowd's
excitement   over   Jimmy   Eat   World's   sold-out
appearance at the Commodore tonight was if school
got cancelled for the rest of the year.
DiSCORDER - February 2005
No one seemed to know who the opening
act was. When two young girls, barely 12-years old,
walked onto the stage to take their respective places
behind the drumkit and keyboard, it looked as if they
had taken a wrong turn on their way to the mall. It
wasn't until the duo began playing that we learned
what Smoosh was. They had a mature sound, taking
cues from quick '80s New Wave dance tunes. The
drummer seemed to use the same drumbeat for
more than one song through, which 90t tiring real
fast. The vocalist's thin voice wailed over her manic
keyboard playing. The only times where the group's
sound became childish was during the pseudo-rap
numbers, but that didn't stop the audience from
happily singing along to their choruses of "yo, yo".
The girls were given a lot of support, ending with
cheers for an encore. Here's proof that not everyone
grew up listening to Britney.
The kids are alright. All the pent-up energy (and
fake IDs) was reserved for Jimmy Eat World's arrival. As
soon as the band came on, they wasted no time and
tore into "Bleed American"; it was no talk, just rock.
There was just a little chit-chat in between songs and
quips of songs like "Beautiful People" were thrown in for
fun. The band got through almost 20 songs, featuring
mostly tracks off of their latest release. Futures. One
of the night's finest moments was the title track; its
crowd-friendly chorus and catchy melody was hard
to beat. Vocalist/guitarist Jim Adkins was the ying to
vocalist/guitarist, Tom Linton's yang. While Adkins was
drenched in sweat from frantic playing, Linton was
perfectly cool, standing his ground.
It seemed like nothing could calm this crowd
down. The band changed the pace with the crowd-
pleaser, "For Me This is Heaven", playing a more rockin'
version but keeping the bittersweet lyrics of "Do you still
feel the butterflies?" intact. These teenage anthems
had massive live sing-alongs that rivaled the Death
Cab for Cutie crowd. Other highlights included the
slow, moody "Polaris" and "Get it Faster". The latter
had a great spacey reverb guitar intro, followed by
pounding guitars and spitting vocals. Major moshing
and crowd surfing ensued. Kudos to the dude who
rushed the stage to hit the drum kit cymbal, then tried
to escape security by diving back onto the floor, to
un-open arms. That scene was taken right out of a
movie, complete with the pause of silence and the
singer saying "he's alright".
The band was in the holiday spirit of giving
because they gave out treats like the hit single, "The
Middle", and the appropriately timed "Last Xmas"
but without the campy sound. They touched upon
some older material like "If You Don't, Don't" and
"Sky Harbour". After chants of "Jimmy", they played
a wicked 2-song encore of opposites: "Pain" and
"Sweetness". The harsh dueling guitar riffs of "Pain"
demonstrated how strong their new material is live.
"Sweetness" was oh-so-sweet with Zach Lind's mad
drumming feeding off of the deafening crowd.
The tire-laden floor got a massive workout. There
must have been some good girls and boys at the
Commodore 'cause Christmas came early.
Em/7y Khong
Swayzak
Matthew Dear
December 08
Sonar
I haven't been to a show in a while. Ask me six months
ago, and I could have told you about a number of
shows I would have seen on any given week. My
absenteeism from the Vancouver live music scene is
due to many not-worth-mentioning factors, the most
significant of which is that post New Forms Festival,
there hasn't been too many significant electronic
shows to see. To be honest, the last two electronically-
inclined shows I saw in 2004—Books on Tape, and yes,
Swayzak—both landed in the shoulda-stayed-home-
and-contemplated-my-navel category (although the
line art of Olo J. Milkman's at the Books on Tape show
was definitely noteworthy). But I'm supposed to write
about Swayzak, aren't I?
The date was December 8th, and as far as I was
concerned, the bill was a double line-up with minimal
techno darling Matthew Dear. For me, the venue.
Sonar, was a bad omen to begin with. If you've never
been to this bastion for suburban kids and (on this
particular night) place for aging electrona-hipsters,
then you're in for a night crapper to say the least.
Imagine a place with the maze-like feeling of an
Escher painting where you end up walking around
looking for but never actually seeing the people
you came to the gig with until the night has finished,
and you have the not-so-pretty picture of one of
Vancouver's "premier" bars. Determined to have a
gay old time despite the venue, the night started off
well. In case you didn't know, Matthew Dear is riding
high on critical acciaim, not to mention being the
darling of one of North America's hottest electronic
labels. Ghostly International. Basically, think Warp
records if they didn't get crappy post-millennium and
you have Ghostly. Matthew's set was as expected:
a nice mix of minimal techno with electro elements
thrown in for good measure. If Matthew decided to
give the Swayzak clan the middle finger and worked
the Techniques all night, I would have bought the
man a drink or five. Unfortunately, Matthew was
finished all too soon.
Swayzak are one of those groups who have
' achieved legendary status but perhaps need to.
throw in the sampler. With their genre-mutating (tech-
house, dub, micro-house, etc.) critically-acclaimed
studio albums and multiple 12"s under their belt, they
seem to have run out of ideas. Still riding high after
their 3rd full-length Dirty Dancing, their latest Loops
from Bergerie is, frankly, flat and not representative
of the masterful production that the Swayzak duo
of James Taylor and David Brown have come to
be known for. Boasting of a live band performance
equaled by no other electronic act (who make the
jump from geeks in the studio turning knobs to a full-
live band) my expectations were sadly unrealized.
When the quartet that is the touring Swayzak
took the stage, the half-full Sonar seemed ready for
greatness. What we got was something different. A
few songs in, I quickly realized that this wasn't the
Jonathan Richman
December 11
Richards
Three days after this show I had my parents over for
dinner and put some of his mp3's on the playlist.
It rujned my night. I couldn't hold a decent
conversation, I'd be in the middle of discussing
BC politics or What I Am Doing With My Life or life
insurance or something, when I'd trail off and be
"and then when he played this song he did this
little dance..." Because he was always doing a
little dance, just shaking his hips and moving his feet
so much that sometimes he wasn't even near the
PHOTO MICHELLE MAYNE
microphone. This is a lapse which I normally would
have griped about and been all "The music was
okay, but It bothered that he didn't sing into the
microphone," because I was the captain of my
Intramural hatin' team.
This time though. He was so thoroughly
charming—I've never met someone so charming—
that I didn't care a whit whether he sang into the
microphone or not. I was totally sucked in.
Graeme Worthy Swayzak on the records. All my
posturing about how a full band
can often flesh out synthetic
sounds live was lost on the friends
I dragged along. There was a
drummer, but I couldn't hear any
of what he was doing due to the
drum machine drive on almost all
the tracks, coupled with the simply
retched sound quality of the room.
This was unfortunate since the
man on the skins really looked like
he was enjoying himself. Maybe
having a mixer as the focal point
for a live performance isn't the
best thing for sound despite its
uniqueness.
The highlight of the night was
the band's nod to electro-clash,
"In the Car Crash" (which is a
local favorite due to Vancouver's
own March 21 having worked
on the track with the Swayzak
boys), which was thumping, but
somehow they managed to
shit on this solitary gem through
vocals sounding like 'Bom Slippy"
era Underworld, not to mention
playing the song fucking twice
over the course of the nightl I
doesn't matter how much Ecstasy
or overpriced Stella the crowd
had consumed, not even low
rent one hit wonders try to play
the same song twice live. I tried
to give Swayzak as much of a
chance as I could, but in the end,
their anthem of "In the Car Crash"
was too much of an analogy for
the show in general.
Robert Robot
Arcade Fire
December 12
Commodore Ballroom
My introduction to The
Arcade Fire came through a
webcomic called Questionable
Content; the author put up a
comic about how, at their live
shows, one of their members'
entire function was to bang a
large drum, dance around, and
rock out at appropriate moments.
His name is Will. He did exactly
that, and he did it very well. Also
there was Richard, who looked a
bit like Napoleon Dynamite, had
bells attached to one leg and
played aH sorts of instruments. The
two of them fed off the crowd, the
music, and each other to produce
spontaneous displays of energy
and emotion, sometimes with one
wrapping the other in a towel while
the one being wrapped plays
a guitar, sometimes playfighting
between songs, or dancing with
Sarah, the guest violinist
During "Neighbourhood #2
{Laika)", they donned motorcycle
helmets, grabbed drumsticks, and
made noise off of any hard surface,
including the plastic cow taped
to the kick drum, the proscenium,
the motorcycle helmets, each
other, the glockenspiel on stage,
and ending with Richard perched
atop a chair drumming his sticks
off each other while Will looked
around, then tackled Richard,
crashing down to the floor,
where they wrestled for a bit
before slumping, drained from
the exertions and the emotional
content of their performance.
Moments afterward, they rose,
embraced, and prepared to
launch into the next piece. And
this was the second song.
They followed it up with a
pair from their ealier EP, before
leading into a new song and
then the mostly-French "Haiti".
The band infused their songs with
life, both by virtue of simply being
there and pure musicianship,
and despite their claims to have
"never really toured before",
the band knew how to get and
keep a crowd moving. "Une
Annee Sans Lumiere" provided a
breather before "Neighbourhood
#3 (Power Out)" segued into
"Rebellion (Lies)", and the
normally stonefooted Vancouver
hipster crowd became a sea
of bobbing heads and twisting
bodies, abandoning themselves
to the emotionally charged
music and mirroring the actions
of the band, who, despite
looking like they were going to
pass out at any moment, powered
through, taking a welt deserved
rest before "Neighbourhood #4 (7
Kettles)".
The show closed with the
energetic "Crown of Love" and
"Neighbourhood   #1    (Tunnels)"
which featured the crowd singing
to the band, and Will wrapping
Richard's head in a towel before
simply collapsing.
Hampered by a midnight
curfew, the encore almost didn't
happen; luckily, the band waited
patiently for the filler music to
stop, dancing to it while they
waited, before surprising us all
with a cover of the Talking Heads'
"Naive Melody". Another round
of applause and trepidation
went by before the band
assumed their positions for "In
The Backseat", fhe last song on
the album and a fitting, cathartic
closer to an emotional show.
After the concert, I walked out
of the Commodore; sweaty,
hoarse, exhausted, and wearing
a ridiculous grin. I wasn't alone in
doing so. D
Gerald Deo
VANCQUV
"The greatest scene
compilation ever'
—Jack Rabid,
The Big Takeover
VANCOUVER
COMPLICATION
CD Release Party!
with DOA  No Fun
SubhumansMe Norton Revue
fe?J« The Shades * Dishrags
Tlttl Roy « 4 r ond olso performing
members o( The Pointed Sticks
hxotone M K-tels U-J3RK5
IrVosfed lives *Acfive Dog* Mwte$fj»ol
(or fo 90 to
FebcuctryQS^
Hidd^"Cd*Yi$rfcts :''}
Richard's cm RichoitliC-
JU*Oj$|:   „
l^r^pWght Movies
Richard's on Richards Hell of Albums! 1 00k
Two whole pages of reviews, some intellegent and articulate, some not. You get to decide which is which.
Oh man, alphabetical order is so great! If it weren't for alphabetical j
I order we wouldn't know that potatoes come before Plato or that a
! C+ in organic chem isn't so stellar after all...and how would you ever j
know who to sit next to during, graduation! The horror! Here are the
albums reviewed this month, in alphabetical order, for clarity and j
. convenience.
The Anomoanon
Balacade and The Sunbeam Tigers
Black Mountain
Cursed
Dandi Wind
John Frusciante and Josh Klingheffer
Ghostsfor
Hood
Shuyler Jansen
Lee Livingston
Maps of the Night Sky
Roses are Red
Yohimbe Brothers. ^
James Yorkston and the Athletes
i
The Anomoanon
Jo//
(Temporary Residence)
The Anomoanon's second offering
of 2004, Jo// is a decent enough
album in the tradition of Neil Young,
CSNY, and the Grateful Dead, etc,
etc. Not that it's a straight copy or
anything, but the heavy influence
is there, no mistake about it. This
isn't necessarily a bad thing, mind
you; it's when Ned Oldham and
Co. wear their influences on their
sleeves that they shine most on
this record. Songs like "Mr. Train" or
"Green Sea", with their multiple-
part harmonies and jangly guitar,
could make me smell the country
air in the middle of downtown
Toronto. It's a good thing too,
because the trod-through-the-
mud of the opening song "Down
and Brown" damn near ruins the
record right from the get-go.
Thankfully, the next four songs
form the core of the album, and
save it from what I thought would
be certain doom. So be patient,
OK?
Speaking of patience, the
following two tracks, "Wedding
love" and "Nowhere", last a tad
too long past the "OK, 1 get it"
point. This is a minor complaint,
though, about these otherwise
solid songs. The last song, "Bird
Child" closes the album on an
upbeat note, in contrast to the
brooding way the record begins,
much to my liking. Jofi. while not
a masterpiece, is a perfectly
capable bluesy roots-rock record
that will probably make its way
into the car stereo during a drive
on a country highway, but to be
honest, probably not as often into
my stereo at home.
Robert Ferdman
Balacade (And The Sunbeam
Tigers)
The Sunbeam Tigers
(The Deer Records)
The Sunbeam Tigers takes
this Vancouver artist from his
acoustic guitar-based, Eliot
Smith-like beginnings into a
more experimental phase in his
recording career. Both organ
and drum parts are integrated
much more effectively in this,
Balacade's, (correct us if we're
wrong) fifth release to date. The
Sunbeam Tigers join Balacade
(usually a solo flyer) on more
tracks than have ever previously
been recorded as group projects.
The record's cover is reflective
of it's inner musings, taking on a
lighter, more peaceful tone than
Balacade's previous offspring;
his youngest child promises to be
a congenial one. The frustration
present in earlier releases has
subsided as he and The Sunbeam
Tigers take on a more introspective
tone; contemplation winds its way
through all 12 diverse and melodic
tracks. This record is something
we'd never be ashamed to say
we'd fistejfed to countless times
on repeat (unlikei say, "Drop it Like
It's Hot"). This stellar EP belongs in
the CD players of people like us;
of coastline highway drivers, of
sunny day bus passengers, and
people who contemplate their
navels all too often.
Mairin and Phelps
Black Mountain
s/t
(Scratch)
Finally! After first experiencing
Jerk With a Bomb, then The Pink
Mountaintops, we are all blessed
with the wonder that is Black
Mountain. Stephen McBean is the
voice behind all of the action,
and while there are similarities in
all three bands, Black Mountain's
self-titled album is an entity on
its own. Sprawling 60's and 70's
nostalgia may openly display
some of the band's influences
fled      Zeppelin,      The      Velvet
Underground), but there is >|fifl
something new and fresh in their
song structures. Typical chorus-
verse-chorus songs are given new
life by blending sounds overtop
one another. Guitars coalesce
with horns, and vintage pianos;
and Amber Webber's soft vocals
float perfectly overtop McBean's
bluesy delivery. The buzz
surrounding this band is huge, and
my guess is this is going to be the
west coasts answer to Montreal's
Arcade Fire so make sure to pick
up this local debut before they
get signed to Warner records and
totally change their sound (a la
Hot Hot Heat).
Chris Walters
Cursed
Two
(Goodfellow Records)
A BRIEF RECAPITULATION OF THE
DRAMATIC EVENTS:
Police are called to the
scene of a "domestic disturbance"
where witnesses were said to have
heard "ungodly screams, followed
by deafening roars like nothing
I've ever experienced." Upon
entering the house in question,
officers found a man splayed on
the floor, arms akimbo, almost as
if he were shielding himself from
some impending blow, blood
trickling from his right ear. With no
signs of forced entry and no visible
weapon in sight, the officers were
drawn toward the bedroom
where what sounded like fhe
apocalypse was emanating from
behind the partially unhinged,
paint-chipped door. Scouring the
room for evidence of a struggle,
the officers spied a CD cover
from the band Cursed displayed
on the stereo, witlr a demonic
visage paralyzing' the officers'
gaze for a brief moment, but as
they passed over it, it was already
too late. As the eruption of guitars
roaring, drums pounding and
bass rumbling in an unparalleled
fury swept over the room with a
metallic vengeance, there was no
escape. The officers barely made
it out with their sanity intact, and
the coroner was later quoted as
saying, "A suicide note set to music
was what killed this tortured soul."
Soon after, other reports of Cursed
and their destructive impulse had
been reported in cities across the
country. Scientists, intelligentsia
and other pundits were-calling it
an "...epidemic where no one is
safe. God help us all."
Bryce Dunn
[This review was found scrawled
on the walls of his office, in blood.
Bryce has not been seen for
several weeks. If you know of his
whereabouts, please contact
DiSCORDER Magazine.]
Dandi Wind is the work of two
very dedicated pioneers, who are
bending the rules and embracing
not only.jMsic, but art as well.
Dandi Wind are changing the
way posgje^should view music-
, ■#&**?jjohj}' I- said view music.
Sometimes there are albums that
give you a visual experience as
you listen to it, and that's what Bait
the Traps does. Thick synthesized
beats sit atop even more artificial
instrumentation tb^% fitted to a
rough vocal delivery that makes
your hips shake. Instantly, Dandi
Wind wants to persuade you to
dance, they want you to get off
your ass and move: not just hear
the music, but feel it and see it.
Dandi Wind's debut is a wonderful
step in an artistic direction,
blending music and performance
art into one beautiful listening
experience.
Chris Walters
John Frusciante/ Josh    k
Kllnghoffer
A Sphere In the Heart of
Silence
(Record Collection)
One of my friends whose taste in
music I share and trust continually
insists that John Frusciante is, if not a
genius, an artist worth recognition
and respect. Thinking back to my
earlier alt-rock days of listening
to the Red Hot Chili Peppers, I
realized that the idea of revisiting
these moments didn't necessarily
sound appealing. There were,
however, two factors that pushed
me to give Sphere a chance.
First, John Frusciante is one of.
the most prolific artists out there
today, this being something like
his sixth album of 2004. Secondly,
Frusciante was chosen by Vincent
Gallo to write the soundtrack for
maybe there was some promise
hidden here. On fhe third listen I
dawned that I was listening to c
Gallo's latest romantic comedy.
The Brown Bunny (and even
though Gallo didn't end up using
any of the songs, that's still an
honour, right?) Keeping in mind
that Sphere isn't just Frusciante
on his own, but atso features the
electronic artist Josh Klinghoffer,
I approached the album with
a bit of caution (oh, and I also
tried to forget the comment that
Sphere was Frusciante's Kid A).
Though I would like to see more
experimentation still (beyond the
pretty standard electro-beats
offered), Frusciante's strength is
prevalent in his own individual
and recognizable style. This isn't
the most intellectually challenging
rock/electronic album out there,
but it's not weak either, and
there's a lot of variety for such a
prolific composer. While it's still
commercial enough sounding to
attract adventurous RHCP fans,
Sphere is also just strange enough
to raise some other eyebrows as
well.
Soren Bros.
Ghoststory
Befom the Night's Around Me
(Bluefog)
Unfortunately, I'm not
familiar .with The Deadly Snakes,
and I'm not familiar with Andre
Ethler's solo work, so please don't
ask me for any comparisons. As far
as Snakes' bassist Chad Ross' side
project Ghoststory is concerned,
though, I can point y'all in the
right direction. Right off the bat,
it's hard not to feel cheated by
the rootsy, pointless jam ethic in
effect, which is probably fun to
participate in, but meaningless as
far as an audience is concerned.
On the second listen, I noticed that
the first song is about a captain
who fell off his ship, drowned, and
washed ashore, and I realized that
less fun Sadies coupled with a less
interesting Red House Painters.
Well, Before isn't a total loss—the
^instrumental moments are great,
and the song about the captain
that drowns and washes ashore is
entertaining (for the lyrics alone),
but there just isn't enough heart
or variety to pull it all together into
anything greater.
Soren Bros.    '
Hood
Outside Closer
(Domino)
The orthodox and banal way
to start this review would be to
describe Hood's new album as
"the much anticipated follow-
up" to Cold House, but artists do
not always lay some clear, linear
progression in the course of their
life. That old notion of assembling
one's oeuvre piece by piece, from
humble beginnings, pathetic and
uninspired in someone's garage
until you hone your skills, perfect
your individual style—to put it
lightly, it's a crock of shit. [That's
because a artist's first album is
always their best. The ability to
produce two or more albums
makes you a sellout. Seriaasly.
-Ed.]
If you want evidence of this,
just look at Outside Closer. This
latest release by the Leeds-based
musicians known collectively
as Hood does a great deal of
what their audience has come
to expect. Dub-like grimy reverb
blends a hushed British accent into
the background of swirling pedal
distortion; the drum kit reterrtlessly
rides and crashes while soft atonal
horns, gentle guitar picking,
and the occasional accordion
embellish the songs rather than
construct them. It doesn't sound
Hke much, but for me it's enough.
But it looks like Hood had
set their sights a little higher this
time around. In the promo for
this release, glaring emphasis is
placed on the homage that Hood
would pay to their much beloved
and revered fellow artist, Scott
Herren. And certainly laptop-style
electronic noodling has been
characteristic of Hood ever since
their 1991 conception, so why
shouldn't they update their sound
a bit and incorporate a few new
DiSCORDER - February 2005 elements into the scheme?
One rationale comes to
mind. There's a reason why
Hood is most often described as
a lo-fi outfit—it's not due to their
technical mastery over studio
equipment, I can tell you that
much. Whereas Scott Herren and
Montreal's Akufen both seem to
possess some intrinsic aptitude
for translating William Burroughs'
concept of cut-up into its rich and
innovative musical manifestation.
Hood's attempts are more
reminiscent of early Joan of Arc's
bedroom studio masturbations.
Fortunately this is just a
minor stain on an otherwise solid
recording, but if you believe in
linear progressions then Hood is
one band that, if you can pardon
the clich, has already passed their
prime.
Benjamin Ralston
Shuyler Jansen
Hobofron
(Black Hen)
What would Grandaddy sound
like if they were from Edmonton
and listened to the Corb Lund
band? Well, one listen to Hobofron
would at the very least be a start.
From the beginning, it becomes
evident that even though this
is Shuyler Jansen's debut solo
album, he isn't new to the scene.
As the lead man of Edmonton's
Old Reliable, Jansen has also
played with enough big name
acts (Gord Downie, Calexico,
Tegan and Sara, and Green
Day just to name a few) that it's
almost a wonder that his name
isn't better known already. Even
though his allegiance is closer to
the alt-country than it is to 4he
electronic, Hobofron walks the
electro-country line in a stately
manner, flushing out walking-pace ■
songs with synths galore. Hobofron
isn't the most immediate album
(outside of perhaps the first two
songs. Whipping Boy and Write
your Will), but it's the best thing
I've ever heard to come out of
Edmonton, and its many subdued
moments hint at something
greater than just a few listens'
offerings.
Soren Bros. {
Lee Livingston
Morning/Afterlife
(Short & Sweetie Music)
For months I've been noticing
the mysterious double EP by Lee
Livingston, but knowing nothing
about her I always opted for
something more familiar. Luckily,
I finally took a chance on the
bass player for local Vancouver
artsies The Radio, and I'm not
just impressed by the results, I'm
astounded. How come nobody's
heard of her?? It's one of those
crazy mysteries of life maybe, and
these CDs are a perfect example
to prove wrong those critics who
still feel as though any musician
who's worth listening to has a
healthy hype to boot. I mean,
seriously. Each CD is four tracks,
presumably with Morning to be
played before Afterlife. Morning
spans styles from deceptively
simple acoustic and alt-country
to a rocking experimental
melodrama reminiscent of Blonde
Redhead. Both Morning and
Afterlife share a dark current that
feels like a hand gently tugging
the listener downwards, though
Morning has a sense of peace
and happiness that distinguishes
it from its sister album. Both also
share a wonderfully rough level Of
production that only emphasizes
the quality of the songwriting.
I don't know where this album
came from, or what it's supposed
to mean, but I know that without
it my new year may have already
been much rougher.
Soren Bros.       Oll|t|l
Maps of the Night Sky
Twilighters EP
(Locust Mount?)
Emokids at their finest. Maps Of
The Night Sky's new record puts
the likes of Matchbook Romance
to shame with a sophisticated and
refined take on the genre that was
driven to infamy by its incessant
acoustic power chords and
whiney tortured middle class kids.
The Twilighters EP, a melodic, beat
driven brand of piano based...
what I hesitate to call "emo" for
fear of invoking prejudice of the
readership, is taking this whole
"emo" business in a simpler,
melodic direction. Both naturally
and possibly intentionally following
the vocal stylings of Isaac Brock
(Modest Mouse), Ray Cammaert's
melodies come off as raw and
emotionally driven. Further,
Cammaert's voice and piano
contrast well with his methodical
guitaring and accordion harmony
reinforcement, provided by Jared
Ozuk. Maps Of The Night Sky are
something that should grace the
stages of The Red Room/Drink,
and The Brickyard, as opposed
to those larger and more bustling
locations of Richard's, or The
Commodore, and yet I can see
their crowd being equally as
moved as the audience was at
The Faint's most recent Vancouver
show (though in a mellower, more
emotional way). The Twilighters
EP, while not something I could
see perfecting my indie kid strut
to, is made for long bus rides, rainy
afternoons, for dark nights staring
at your bedroom ceiling.
Mare-in
Roses are Red
Conversations
(Trustkill)
Roses are Red seems like one of
the more melodical acts on the
Trustkill label, which is a definite
positive for someone so unsure
of how deep into this hardcore
pool she should dip her little
toe. More punk than the rest of
Trustkill's releases, Roses are Red
are a band I can easily equate
with folks like AH, Yellowcard and
Funeral for a Friend: melodic and
harmonious vocals are applied to
energetic and drum/powerchord-
driven instrumentais. Vocals
and instrumentais aside, their
Alexisonfire-like lyrical stylings,
both in content and delivery, left
me pleasantly surprised rather
than disappointed to be listening
to "just another punky hardcore
act." My only hesitation in my
praise of this album would be
that these guys may be having
their own set of" 13 Conversations
about One Thing" and may need
to look to subjects other than
"love and all its many forms" for
their lyrical inspiration. To call them
emocore -seems so degrading
(we all know my feelings on emo's
bad rap these days), yet they
seem to fit well into that category.
I'm not afraid to admit, however,
that sometimes. Just sometimes,
someone needs more than just
a good cry. A good scream can
help tool
Mare-in
Yohimbe Brothers
The Tao of Yo -
(Thirsty Ear)
Let's pretend that the Yohimbe
Brothers are making music in a
cultural vacuum where no one
remembers Vernon Reid's work
with Living Color and the world
has yet to discover Dj Logic, who
has appeared on albums all over
the musical map (includingworks
by DJ Spooky, Vitamin C, and
the terribly Phish-esque String
Cheese Incident). All formal
aspects of the songwriting are
solid and in the execution Reid's
guitar work is consistently tight
while Logic maintains interesting,
if not innovative, work on the
turntables. But does this make it
worth listening to? With or without
context, half the tracks on this
album are just plain good, with
the duo throwing the weight
of their abilities into some finely
crafted instrumental work. "Shape
4" and "Shape 1" present a blend
of tap dancing and impromptu
steel string that might feel more
comfortable on a compilation
disc with Jack Rose and Steffan
Basho than it does matched up
with classically-themed rap music
and occasional metal riffage.
"Overcoming," on the other hand,
blends steel string arpeggios,
muddy beats, skronking electric
guitar masturbation and some
old-fashioned turntablist quirks
without sounding the least bit trite.
As for the. acoustic/hip-hop fusion
of "30 Spokes" and the sample-
philic outro track, "Perfect Traveler
(Tourist Europe)," even they furnish
enough interest and instrumental
dialogue to be considered
something far beyond simple filler.
Yet the album's girth rests equally
on vocal tracks, particularly blends
of heavy rock guitar and politically
charged rap; thus we return to
the album's real context. When
I say that the Yohimbe Brothers
blend heavy metal guitar and
wild beats beneath aggressive
rhyme schemes, don't think of
Old Dominion or D§lek, instead
recognize the fact that these
are musicians more accustomed
to attending the Grammies than
being picked apart by Pitchfork
Media. Still, if this is where
'mainstream' is headed then the
distinction is soon to be obsolete.
BenR.
James Yorkston and The
Athletes
Just Beyond the River
(Domino)
James Yorkston and the Athletes
■iMYflwm
ZIB USHER51 KmTnww, v«rmraq| BE
fiiESWERS REST HUE HP RV HBR
HEBE - HIIEE i/BJ luiBnUE
Su^an&smi pilssei DrmES «75
LU SIB BDB1E-FIEE Pm-DEIT HS
fiBff lUK'HEBM DJE'CHHF DHHK5
HBSTED ST DJ JfflW EHDEM
WaannauBFun'turns Ms «blt *
FSESEBTEB £f RflKMC T*1I IO fiUKS
DEEP flSBSE FBI SBEL'STELLi SPEDlt
Pm'T MBS THESE FEE. ElfESTS
TH - 5TJEE FUSTS f BBMFK5, EH - gflf
-m an - sweets i mmm f
TJttIlMfflJSTS,ISn-JjllUE(5EirTLE),
259 - ans Bum a ieleise putt,
_m - snr wun un
DMPLETE 5CHED8LEI lOT'TrnWlBTCEfrEi
BFS USEtEiTKSHJEEE
BKUETEniMmTlElJuffimrTB^t
is a Scottish band, backed by a
label with an impressive line up.
If that doesn't 'inspire confidence,
Just Beyond the River is also
produced by Kieran Hebden
(AKA Four Tet) and preceeded by
the acclaimed debut. Moving Up
Country. However, Just Beyond
the River doesn't reach beyond
okay: Yorkston's soft folky vocals
and instrumentation are peaceful
and pleasant but really offer no
substance or progression. Each
milky song begins to blend into
one another as time passes,
and simple strummings become
banal and stale. Yorkston's brand
of musings lack, the colourful
viewpoint found in the work of
label mate Bonnie Prince Billy,
or M Ward. I'm a big fan of folk,
but the greatness of the genre is
found in the innovation that keeps
it vital; an innovation that this
album sadly lacks.
Ebony Hel of Radio Shows!
A CiTR Program Guide
usmjf¥AmwU?&OR
SUNDAY
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC
9:00AM-12:00PM
All of time is measured by its art. This show presents the j
most recent new music from around the world. Ears
open.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12:00PM-3:00PM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE alt.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
AFROBEAT
3:00PM-5:00PM
In two hours, I take the listener for a spin—musically—
around the world; my passion is African music and j
music from ihe Diaspora.
Afrobeat is where you can catch up on the latest in j
the "World Music" scene and reminisce on the classic j
coflections. Don't miss it.
<uget_afrobeat@yahoo.com>
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING alt.
5:00PM-6:00PM
British pop music from all decades.
SAINT TROPEZ alt.
5:00PM-6:00PM
International pop (Japanese, French, Swedish, British, I
US, etc.), 60s soundtracks and lounge. Book your jet set
holiday now!
QUEER FM
6:00PM-8:00PM
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transsexual
communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest |
features, background on current issues, and great j
music.
RHYTHMSINDIA
8:00PM-10:00PM
Rhythmslndia features a wide range of music from India,
including popular music from Indian movies from the 1
1930s to the present, classical music, semi-classical
music such as Ghazals and Bhajans, and also Qa wwalis, j
pop, and regional language numbers.
TRANCENDANCE
10:00PM-12:00AM
Join us in practicing the ancient art of rising above
common thought and idearas your host DJ Smiley j
Mike lays down the latest trance cuts to propel us into 1
the domain of the mystic-at.
<trancendance@hotmail.com>
ELECTRONIC SPECTRUM
12:00AM-3:00AM
FILL-IN
3:00PM-6:00AM
MONDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM-8:00AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8:00AM-11:00AM
Your favourite brown-sters, James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the famifar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights!
LIONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS...
11:00AM- 12:00PM
ALT. RADIO
12tf0PM-1;00PM
Hosted by David B.
PARTS UNKNOWN
1:O0PM-3:0OPM
Underground pop for the minuses with the occasional
interview with your host, Chris.
SANDBOX THEATRE
3:00PM-4:00PM
A show of radio drama orchestrated and hosted by
UBC students, featuring independent works from
local, nationat, and International theatre groups. We
DBCORDER - February 2005
welcome your involvement.
<sandboxtheafre@hotmail.com>
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS
4:00PM-5:00PM
A chance for new CiTR DJs to flex their musical muscle.
Surprises galore.
THEFUPSIDE
5:00PM-6:00PM
Join me - Dallas Brodie - for stimulating talk radio
about local, national and international issues. '
SON OF NfTE DREEMS eft.
4:Q0PM-7:30PM
SOLARIZATION alt.
6:00PM-6:30PM
MY ASS alt.
_:30PM-7:30PM
Phelps, Albini, 'n' me.
Wt^tUXRADIQ
7:30PM-9:00PM
Listen to Selecta Krystabelle for your reggae education.
THE &ja SHOW
9:OOPM-12:0OAM
Vancouver's longest running prime-time jazz program.
Hosted by the ever-suave, Gofife Walker. Features at
11:00, as listed
Feb. 7: Modem jazz Pioneer Bud Powell on piano with
Oscar Pettiford on bass and Kenny Clarke on drums.
"The Three Bosses" who play their set and then become the rhythm section for "the father of the tenor
saxophone," Coleman Hawkins. Recorded at the
Essen jazz festival in 1960. Nothing less than great!
Feb. 14: As this was pre-empted on January 17 by a
special on CiTR, tonight's the night for the famous
Benny Goodman Carnegie Halt concert of 1938.
B.G's trio, quartet, and big band and much more in
a concert that changed jazz forever. This special feature will begin at 10:00pm.
Feb. 21: One of the most important present day bands.
Pianist supreme, Keith Jarrett with bassis Gary Peacock
and the always creative Jack DeJohnette on drums
in thei' latest recording called "The out-of-towners".
No More Need be said about this great trio.
Feb, 28: Legendary guitarist Wes Montgomery ("The
*|||6s$$b"} recorded in concert in parts with his working
group. At this time wes was making more commercial
recordings but in person was still playing Ixird-drivtng,
swinging, real jazz Ike tonight's concert.
VENGEANCE IS MINE
12:O0AM-3:O0AM
AS the best the world of punk rock has to offer, in the wee
hours of the mom. Hosted by Trevor.
PSYCHEDELIC AIRWAVES
3:00AM-6:30AM
DJ Christopher Schmidt also hosts Orgartx at Club 23 (23
West Cordova) every Friday.
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6:30AM-8:00AM
Bluegrass, old-time music and its derivatives with Arthur
and "The Lovely Andrea" Berman.
HIGHBRED VOICES alt.
8:00AM-9:30AM
SWEETN'HOT
8:00AM-9:30AM
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
9:30AM-11:30AM
Open your ears and prepare for a shock! A harmless
note may make you a fan! Hear the menacing scourge
that is Rock and Roll! Deadlier than the most dangerous
criminal!
<bominsrxtynirie@hotmcfl.com>
LIVE HERE, WORK EVERYWHERE, alt.
11:30AM-12:00PM
CJLY - Kootenay Co-op Radio profiles 30 creative
enterprises   in   Nelson   with   markets   and   clients
worldwide.
MORNING AFTER SHOW alt.
11:30AM-12:30PM
REEL TO REAL alt.
12:30PM-1:00PM
Movie reviews and criticism.
ENGAGING THE WORD alt.
1:00PM-2:00PM
Canadian   authors,   fiction   writers   and   noveKists
interviewed by James O'Heam.
BEATUP RONIN
12:00PM-2:00PM
Where dead samurai can program music.
CIRCUIT TRACING
2:00PM-3:30PM
EN AVANT LA MUSIQUE alt.
3:30PM-4:30PM
«En Avant la musique!» se concentre sur le metissage
des genres musicaux au sein d'une francophonie
ouverte a tous les courants. This program focuses
on cross-cultural music and its influence on mostly
Francophone musicians.
TANSI KIYAW alt.
3:30PM-4:30PM
Tansi kiyaw? Is Michif-Cree (one of the Metis languages)
for "Hello, How are you?" and is a monthly Indigenous
music and spoken word show. Hosted b June Scudeler
(for those who know me from other shows-Tm Metis!),
the show will feature music and spoken word as well
as events and news from Indian country and special
guests. Contact me at jlscudel@ucakjary.ca with news,
■ even listings and ideas. Megwetchl
FILL-IN
4:30PM-5:00PM
WENER'S BARBEQUE
5:00PM-6:00PM
Join the sports dept. for Iheir coverage of the T-Birds.
FLEXYOURHEAD
6:00PM-8:00PM
Up the punx, down the emo! Keepin' it real since 1989,
yo. ttecyourhead.vancouverhardcore.com
SALARIO MINIMO
8:00PM- 10:00PM
THE LOVE DEN alt.
10:00PM- 12:00AM
<loveden@hotmaiI.com>
ESCAPISM alt.
10:00PM-12.00AM
es»cap»fsm n: escape from ihe reality or routine of fife by
absorbing the mind in entertainment or fantasy.
Host: DJ Satyricon.
<DJSatyricon@hotmail.com>
AURAL TENTACLES
12:00AM-6:00AM
It could be punk, ethno, global, trance, spoken word,
rock, the unusual and the weird, or it could be
something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
W E D N E SO A Y
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 7:00AM
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
7:00AM-9:00AM
CITR NEWS AND ARTS
9:00AM-10:00AM
EXQUISITE CORPSE
10:00AM-11:30AM
Experimental, radio-art, sound collage, filed recordings,
etc. Recommended for the insane.
ANOIZE
11:30AM-1:00PM
Luke Meat Wtates and educates through musical
deconstructtoh. Recommended for the strong.
THE SHAKE alt.
1:00PM-2:00PM
FOR THE RECORD alt.
1;00PM-2:0QPM
DEMOCRACY NOW
2:OOPM-3:O0PM
Independent news hosted by award-winning journalists
Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez.
MOTORDADDYatt.
3:O0PM-5:O0PM
Cyde-riffic rawk and rolll
RUMBLETONE RADIO alt.
3:OuPM-5:O0PM
M§^W^2ze<^-<M^ garage mayhem!
NECESSARY VOICES
5:0OPM-6:30PM
Socio-politicat, environmental activist news and spoken
word with some music, too. www.necessaryvoices.org
<necessaryvoices@telusjiet>
AND SOMETIMES WHY alt,
6:30PM-8:OOPM
(Rrst Wednesday of every month.)
BLUE MONDAY alt.
6:3OPM-8:O0PM
Vancouver's      only      industrial-electronic-retro-goth
program. Music to schtomp to, hosted by Coreen.
PRIMAL
8.-O0PM-9:O0PMalt.
A sex positive fortnightly news magazine, hosted by
Maura Ingraham. www.primalradio.net
JUICEBOX
8:00PM-9fl0PMalt.
Developing your relational and individual sexual health,
expressing diversity, celebrating queemess and encouraging pleasure at all stages. Sexuaity educators
Julia and ASx wil quench your search for responsible,
progressive sexuaWy over your life span!
www4uiceb0xradfo.com
FOLK OASIS
9:00PM-11:00PM
Roots music for folkies and non-folkies... bluegrass, shger-
songwriters, worldbeat, aft country, and more. Not a
mirage!
<f0lkoasis@canada.com>
HANS KLOSS'MISERY HOUR
11:00PM-2:00AM
This is pretty mxt^te best thing on radio,
FIRST FLOOR SOUND SYSTEM
2:00AM-6:00AM
THURSDAY
FILL - IN
6:00AM-8:00AM
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
6:00AM-10:00AM
PLANET LOVETRON
10:00AM-11:30AM
Music inspired by Chocolate Thunder, Robert Robot
drops electro  past and  present,  hip  hop and
intergalactic funkmanship. <rbotlove@yahoo.com>
FIRED UP
11:30AM-12:00PM
Ever told yourself "I can't even boil water, let alone
cook a chicken or stir-fry vegetables!" Let Chef Marat
show you the way to create easy meals prepared in
the comfort of your own kitchen/bechelor pad or
car. OK, maybe not the car. Wouldn't want to spill
anything an the upholstery.
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES
12:00PM-1:00PM
WE ALL FALL DOWN
1:00PM-2:00PM
Punk rock, indie pop, and whatever else I deem
worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd.
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW
2:00PM-3:00PM
Comix comix comix. Oh yeah, and some music with
RHYMES AND REASONS
3:00PM-5:00PM
DJ Knowone slaves over hot-multi-track to bring a
fresh continuous mix of fresh every week. Made
from scratch, samples and just a few drops of
fame. Our tables also have plethora of guest DJs,
performers, interviews, giveaways. Strong Bad and
the occasional public service announcements.
<eno_wonk@yahoo.ca>
LOCAL KIDS MAKE GOOD
5:00PM-6:00PM art.
Local Dave brings you local music of all sorts. The
program most likely to play your band!
PEDAL REVOLUTIONARY att.
5:00PM-6:00PM Viva la Velorutionl DJ Helmet Hair and Chainbreaker
Jane  give  you  all  the  bike  news  and  views
you need and even cruise around while doing itl
www.bikesexual.org
NUTHOUSE RADIO THEATRE
6:00PM-7:30PM
All-original Canadian radio drama and performance
art written and performed live-to-air by our very
own team of playwrights and voice-actors. We also
welcome you to get involved, whether you are a
professional or inexperienced...
ON AIR WITH GREASED HAIR
7:30PM-9:00PM
The best in roots, rock 'n' roll and rhythm and blues
from 1942-1962 with your snappily-attired host, Gary
Olsen.
<ripitup55@telus.net>
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
9:00PM-11:00PM
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell showcases local talent... LIVEI Honestly, don't even ask about the technical side of this. This month will probably be the best
month ever.
WORLD HEAT
11:00PM-1:00AM
An old punk rock heart considers the oneness of all
things and presents music of worlds near and far.
Your host, the great Daryl-ani, seeks reassurance via
<woridheat@hotmail.com>.
LAUGH TRACKS
1:00AM-2:00AM
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
2:00AM-6:00AM
FRIDAY
FflLl-tN
6:00AM- 7:00AM
PLEASE ROCK THE DOOR
7:00AM- 8:00AM
CAUGHT IN THE RED
8:00AM-10:00AM
Trawling the trash heap of over SP^F^rs' worth of real
rock *n' roll dl||ti£^
SKA-T'S SCENE-IK DRIVE!
10tfOAM-12:00f»M
Email requests fa: <djska_t@hatmail.com>
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
12:00PM-2:00PM
lr^^fir®> crate digger DJ Avt Shack mixes the
underground hip hop, ok) school classics and
i c^iiat breaks.
RADIO Jt»0fc|sp£
2:00PM-3:30PM
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS...
3-3XSttk-SiS^^0i
CITR NEWS, SPORTS AND ARTS
5:00PM-6:00PM
A volunteer-produced,  studenf.'^^d  community
newscast featuring news, sports and arts. Reports by
people tike you. "Become the Media."
THE NORTHERN WISH
6:00PM-7:30PM
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-9:Q0PM
David "Love" Jones brings you the best new and old
jazz, soul, Latin, samba, bossa and African music
from around the world.
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
HOMEBASS
9:O0PM-12:00AM
Hosted by DJ Noah: techno but also some trance,
acid, tribal, etc. Guest DJs, interviews, retrospectives,
giveaways, and more.
I LIKE THE SCRIBBLES alt.
12:00AM-2:00AM
THE ANTIDOTE alt.
12:00AM-2:00AM
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
2:00AM-6:00AM
Dark, sinister music to soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Hasted by Drake.
<fhevampiresbaH®yahoo.ca>
SATURDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM-8:00PM
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8:00AM-12:00PM
Studio guests, new releases, British comedy sketches,
folk music calendar and ticket giveaways.
8AM-9AM: African/World roots. 9AM-12PM: Celtic
music and performances.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12:00PM-1:00PM
A fine mix of streetpunk and old school hardcore
backed by band interviews, guest speakers, and
social commentary, www.streetpunkradio.com
<crashnbumradio@yahoo.ca>
POWERCHORD
1:O0PM-3:0OPM
Vancouver's only true metal show; local demo tapes,
imports,  and  other rarities.  Gerald   Rattlehead,
Dwain, and Metal Ron do the damage.
CODE BLUE
3:00PM-5:00PM
From backwoods delta low-down slide, to urban harp
honks, blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5:00PM-6:00PM
The best mix of music, news, sports and commentary
from  around  the  local  and  international  Latin
American communities.
BATTLE ZONE
6:00PM-7:00PM
Each show will make you feel as though you're
listening  in  on  conversations  between  political
insiders. As well, this guest and caller-driven programs
its guest from opposite ends of the corridor of public
argument against one another in ho-holds barred
debate that takes you behind today's headlines.
SHADOW JUGGLERS
7:00PM-9:00PM
An exciting chow of Drum n' Bass with Dj's MP & Bias
on the ones and twos, plus gusts. Listen for givawas
everyweek. Keep feelin da beatz.
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9:00PM-1 1:00PM
PLUTONIAN NIGHTS
11:00PM-1:00AM
Cutting-edge, progressive organ music with resident
Haitchc and various guest performers/DJs. Bye-bye
civilisation, keep smiling blue, where's me bloody
anesthetic then? http://plutonia.org
EARWAX
1:00AM-4:30AM
"noiz terror mindfuck hardcore like punk/beatz drop
dem headz rock inna junglist mashup/distort da
source full force with needlz on wax/my chaos runs
rampant when I free da jazz..." Out.
REGGAE LINKUP
4:30AM-9:00AM
Hardcore dancehall reggae. Hosted by Sister B.
CITR BROADCASTS AT 640 WATTS
24 HOURS A DAY. TUNE US IN
AT 101.9FM, CABLE 101.9FM OR
LISTEN TO US ONLINE AT WWW.
CITR.CA
6*m
7
8
9
10
11
12p«
1
2
3
4
5
. 6
7
8
9
10
11
12*m
1
2
3
4
5
6
SUIfiDAY
MONiDAY
TUESiDAY       WEDNESDAY      THURSiDAY
FRiDAY
SATURiDAY
REGGAE LINKUP
(RG)
ARE YOU SERIOUS?
MUSIC (EC)
ROCKERS
SHOW(RG)
BLOOD
OH THE
SADDLE (RT)
AFROBEAT
(WO)
QUEER FM
(TK)
RHYTHMSINDIA
(WO)
TRANCENDANCE
(DC)
ELECTRONIC
SPECTRUM
(DC)
FILL-IN
FILL-IN
BREAKFAST WITH
THE BROWNS
(EC)
UONS AKD TIGERS AND BEARS
ALT. RADIO (PO)
PARTS
UNKNOWN (PO)
SANDBOX THEATRE (TK)
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS (EC)
THE f UPSIDE (TK)
WIGFLUX RADIO (RG)
THE JAZZ
SHOW
(JZ)
VENGEANCE
IS MINE!
PSYCHEDELIC
AIRWAVES
(DC/EC)
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(RT)
HIGHBRED        FILL-IN
VOICES (WO)
THIRD TIMES
THE CHARM (RR)
BEATUP
RONIN
«
CIRCUIT TRACING
(DC/EC)
EN AVANT
UMUSHMJE (Ht)
WENER'S BBQ (SP)
FLEX YOUR
HEAD(HC)
SALARIO MINIMO
(WO)
THE LOVE
DEN
m
ESCAPISM
(EC)
AURAL
TENTACLES
(EC)
FILL-IN
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(EC)
CITR NEWS* ARTS (TK)
EXQUISITE CORPSE (EX)
ANOIZE (NO)
Msiuifiitt)—]  mm
DEMOCRACY NOW (TK)
RUMBLETONE
RADIO
(RR)
MOTORDADDY
(RR)
NECESSARY VOICES (TK)
AND SOMETIMES
WHY(P0/EC)
PRIMAL (TK)
BLUE MONDAY
JUICEBOX (TK)
FOLK OASIS (RT)
HANS KLOSS'
MISERY HOUR
(HK)
FIRST FLOOR
SOUND SYSTEM
(EC)
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(EC)
SWEET'N'HOT (EC)
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES (PO/EC)
WE ALL FALL DOWH (EC)
THE OHOMATOPOEIA SHOW (TK)
RHYMES &
REASONS (HH)
LOCALHOS
MAKE GOOD (EC)
NUTHOUSE
RADIO THEATRE
ON AIR WITH
GREASED HAIR (RR)
LIVE FROM...
THUNDERBIRD HELL (LM)
WORLD HEAT
(WO)
LAUGH TRACKS (TK)
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
FILL-IN
PLEASE ROCK THE DOOR (EC)
CAUGHT IN
THE RED (RR)
SKAT'S
SCENIC DRIVE (SK)
THESE ARE THE
BREAKS (HH)
RADIO ZERO (EC)
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS (NW)
CiTR NEWS AND ARTS (TK)
THE NORTHERN WISH
(EC)
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(WO)
HOMEBASS
(DC)
I UKE THE
SCRIBBLES (EC)
THE ANTIDOTE
w
TNE VAMPIRE'S
BALL (GI/MT)
FILL-IN
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE(RT)
GENERATION ANNIHILATION (PU)
POWERCHORD
(MT)
CODE BLUE
(RT)
LEO RAMIREZ SHOW (WO)
BATTLE ZONE (TK)
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(DC)
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(DC/EC)
PLUTONIAN
NIGHTS (DC)
EARWAX
(HH/DC)
REGGAE UNKUP(RG)
DOdance/electronic • EOeclectic • EX=experimenral • FR=French language • Gl-goth/industrial • HOhardcore • HH=hiphop • HK-Hans Kloss • JZ=jazz
LMHive music • LO-lounge • MT-metal • NO-noise • NW=Nardwuar • PO-pop • PU=punk • RG-reggae • RR-rock • RT-roots • SK=ska • SP=sports • TK=talk • WO-world
6a«
7
8
9
10
n
12pm
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12-
1
2
3
4
5
6
page 23 ZULU'S IVRIS1CF0RUM Listen, ttscuss, and C^ebrate the New Music
BHGHTEIB
irasaft
ioenms- isall: gmswti ui? antS
tefetfeditit> unleash not ons but
twws fenwdl raw raeorcfe, musto to>
tttedelight of his eseivgr-Gwing; mrj.
fraadftniitg, iNMBfl Steeped Me:
iftdi ofidfeamaiand: emotion, present
i«sMI
tttt»t«»0'l)«l»-|19C8Hte.ShWIBS»
tawaaaMi&inwBsawsQnpritir^
SOTtpelllnf stt»rtss,in'hislpss, PatWM>5wa*« is thek&l^roots-
aJtami at tt»pif and1 feature swestspotEh by Smmjiwabwis and
tim liiamu ot iHy JWanaig jactot, ainidst'HlasliwIle tinged: produe-
SannamliplwiQt gfip8d8|ist8el'an*mandDllii. RMMtlMMl
Men. 'gSsriftfluertcadicouBin, Ogita* Aefts is; a? playful(album 8f>
sisettoHW' swm <w whii*' 8*»* B]MB MmsaJfi ft* spase- tetrss
sonw new things musically am* mates us all'wondeii if latselrmaJBs.
B»&fc*rtav.sb88nshowlng.©M»aftJng,'ortwo; Releasing!two
stylistically diffefentalbums atttie'Same time-isirodouteta^boia-
rnoae; but you liave to giwe BHaJH Eyas credit for tatongfechanGes:
ani always- pushingi the-, envelopes
OlfiJB    tFlfcSfeaeM
OH the-yeans w« haw noiisiarily pulsed
Die-work- ot Thrill Jockey/s Arefcat
Gliicaga Irsungarfarf popster? Tne Goctatts
as wall!as- eveifejffijjflpaate wla jsasfroefe
outfit; Ste a^&fc^.ftwwIBiaawteJiiiF-'',
allBa#walli isp:sp-?!-tedii'.yoL-i' rrcurd'Ecite'-.tioii. |
fasouiitrlisyeaKl Sfeted;
will i llnlini Iptltiiii'iiflJf'il I'iIniiiI' im ill Mililliiil j mull j iimrti'i'nTilfla Willi
coast sofft-poj>«|}Bstiaftbii,.ft«Mrtrts intospectiye sonic wsicrri is irtfcised;
witJjittngesaf^iaa^SigialW^sftiand abafoijueunite that ertotttessiy
balances- l-Gi:e v.'itir JesuauJow wih lost and. the- ephemaaf l;eai:w of a s-n-
ple mBicrjv be^»i%te;#te^t& the work, of fellow dai* terseftwfli -
fto saute Qlljls&|rtlSs#fKlaiteetedgeries that disSaet us taw 8» personal:
anaisnirrtuaii fej^Wiferaafcrigliwe;
DESTROYS!
Lightning and
OOerWnfcsCD
Infill
aisp
lou barlow
EMQttCD
I' 9»terita» is-bestknown as:te founder
am* ttius a printsrarw.iirSielM bedroom racordi n gsbaom of; fte aarfy '90s.
Earning- compaBSSBSSgrt the famous
nature boys-(WMtoJaiiJBtBBMBBL &
aipSpsnee Bariaws delicate- songwriting.
visionun only !» descr.bed as a direct andhonest ma7iifesta*»afthe
heart. Recallingitf^^ptfdowBfBll* glory-of his Brand taw Uwa<id
recordings on -iHW return, to Ws "back to bases*
songwriting approach; These am tracks feature quiet acoustic guitars, alternatively tuned ultuiete anAextremeJsf lush vocals. The results are a warm and
phosis of nomenclature- as- a.
means todiversify hiedissography (whilfrsnatting. new. sonfe
directions, collaborations, etc), SwigsiUhia^ central figure Jason
Mnrhii has evolved- his oeuvre-now recording under the enigmatic.
s was indeed- ft* title of his last art*
3 INhwusesits-rich folk,tones
a springboard for this ft* next
fttataadiBtawis a live recording;
s if MaUaa wished his dark honest
best reconjlngs, and fittingly
and-deeply personal writing-a
phase-in his esteemed career,
purposely |
Bo>layte
> before the lis
sr thus re
aling its enthralling
OT 16.98
CASS
McCMB
CO/IP
Touted as one of America's
finest independent singer-songwriters, it would appear that
Baltimore native Cass McCsmas stands at the precipice of mass
appreciation and greater reward. His sublime first release Jt has
just received distribution throughout Europe on the taste making
4AO label, and as he readies this sophomore effort tor North
American ears, his honest plaintive melancholic soft-pop aesthetic
is now being compared to greats such as Jonathan Hebrew Im
■mland Mwrimwy. Prafectww builds upon the promise of these
initial fulsome recordings, allowing KfcCowa* and his verdant
band room to explore the delicacy of the more restrained end of
the outsider folk parameters. This album is soothing, catchy without rendering itself childish or th* product of fetishized whimsy,
and ultimately an important recording forwarding todaySs insurgent bard supreme fascination.
CD 16.98     IPm»
UDf  I
Superwolf €BIP
Superwotf is a collaborative effort by an
ex-Zmatex-CBwa* dude and HHt
OAata, plus a few-odd' players to fill the
thing up. Old BHI supplies the words, as is, we think, his vary best calling,
while Sweeney does the tune-agei. or so we've read (is this even true?5-Ha
matter whatthedivJsiwofFafeOHr, rtawsver.ftethmffisgoodmusie—and
we canall agree th$gee*HW8i£«s8aoL Itsgot more of a dirty bluesy
¥h» UrtBhasfeei than the emptier Waee stuff but w»tr a FrtJe more
savvy in the studio, lite that store-imagining of the Palaea catalogue
played via rich NasHvMWyJe, buteffflte less so, if you foftoar. Here s what
to expect imagistic lyrics with possible deep meaning and the occasional
weil-placed crudity ptesweet fret wsr* and other instrumentation. T3w»k
a vague sense that maybe we ve heard this before from the bearded one yet
its so finely done that such-ccitf^wte*Berely cursory train-spotting.
Besides, why knock a good thing, which is, we again all recognte, good.   - .
CD 16.98     IP16.98
AMON TOBIN
Chaos Theory CQ/LP
Gamers and non-gamers alike should perk
up with the news that Ninja Tune mainstay Aman Tobm has agreed to create some
new spools beats to set fte stealth mood for
the release of the latestSjIWBrCeBgame.
TaWngrhis commissionerf *in»game* samples
and beats and reworking: them into a sfek
soundttaek sure to get yatr nerves tingttig. If you've ewer played I
GMI; you'll know there's no telling justwhat waits around fte next comer.
Smilarty, with ToWns rich sonic outings, he always keeps one guessing and
constantly tackles a new mfesrarrof adventure.
CD 16.98     IF19.98
SAIE PRICES W EFFECT LMTH. FEBRUARY 28,2005
awBs fpkaavMfiht; w just eenader Gatan's hedonistic satsbac-
eai 8M»a**Ufc»»» Bacfc and- rali iss m5f*«^isarney «*
deep-seededi psyeWtegroai' sigrtficarree- that requiiiesi^ heroes ■ 3..«, j
tlie lorisl-/ roefean; .--jiiet! ;■:■. oc a -:^ri;;:n l«:v?i. bevsa-ter. about
esplyrfng} ;lwpra.:!iv» possibWes of ftis tefijf icx-iy pirwd-cut BusJe
!orr.r.r?ta-ivoly SK;yi.:g, '.vliile also-speMsngintaispersonaf and
TMlJUpiHiiiilli i riii 111 I'm    nuf TTiiniiiffilfliiiii Him IHW ' ■
ra^l^ Dravsled; is as suck Certain periis- saurt ffiiSwctetecEamf,
wfsmiftat footing. Thisk iwjss grosK on fte Brags m& ufifeshionabto
^teftiKtaider cetenwniesfediscardBdialongfte-paft—warnings k
(ronst fte sra^ myftiafeaEai; beast catted Twius&y;"'ate has claws
-exrandii-g dsep irto *e saftiuai: caazsn. Slaving ttsstsiBoes creaftw
is impossibie. not that Pnnwl tojar entertains fie iBBght. Ratw, tefr
ingiWifcitfeaTOugrr. And. so, he falsify invites his pals F»tE|as
ifife im arena to colfoboratB on- ftis intense raworkag.rf his astonish-
ing torn ttamt material Wgh. Season- is h seastasL-S'
GD12L9B
LOW
Des&oyer CQ/LP
Please be advised that eternal and
forevermore Zulu beloveds Law
have changed1 record labels. Thus,
When you break the siirirw-wnp of
tfeaewesB^sact dte you will not be
breathing; fe the kidje air of Chicago's hip Kranky records, but rather the:
purifierf ulfe coot exygan of none other than that sfStt^^Popf Tate a
deepteafer^ftieRds, letthegfory ftH your lungs and warm your beat-
in® heart, eBerglSngissefy blood celft sirtting right iaisi joar marrow. )■
Um are. going ftraagh many changes and as with most maturate*
there are hourtffoi benefits quickly apparent Far their latest opus, lte
wr challenge their own signature spacey-broodlng'
i magnificent toy of noise resembteg Soot Hmm,
ttsur own telecaster blazing pal JaaiR,L IMpn
Incted,. standout traete: like the cacophonous "Monkey^ arid freneficaily
melodious "Silver Rider" showcase las adventures info new sonic territories and. m- true revelatory fashion, humanity's reat urge: the will to
evolve.
C016.98   LP14.98
THE LOCAL REPORT:
PfmMB FATHERS <# CD
TlSstwg is so OMnteftatve were beginrHV to wonder and,
feanfc^, wany. Bat as be <M adage ones, good Amps as worth
| »eiwflLAcfctie?Yes.fetstt»roB?Yfes,Ber^fcMi iiniettupritfit
I and vet: end, sranasftt jaz^p Kftutnanialns^ietttateiifaBrantl
iMnYiPJlmiiHiyJi uii^iiiy»tWtp[B
CD12J8
BUCK
sfttSB
HoJMpfat Iftis deteit rnaster-
totfcfeBtftgse beastW pso-
plehassomtiehsdirneFnusfcifii:
Satiltaite. KM I pramfee-;
we' re going; to piay fe shffi aat of
f1       «*"'     tE^M
ANTONY AND
TNEJQHSm
lAmABirdNow
CD
Once tea while,, statist comes
along who is able to create mus
so bold and powerful that people are
forced to sit up and take notice. Astray along with his talented band
He Jraasms, is no doubt such an artist Most often accompanied by
somber piano arrangements, a choir of backing vocalists, and dramatis
stringed instrumentation, Asteaes unmistakably intense androgynous
voice is comparable to other unique vocalists such asUna Smtne,
ttmrnTmit, Haas Masa. and ftrfus Wranmakt (who makes a cameo
appearance on "What Can I Do?*). Aatanr s ability to deliver his melancholic songs wift such unflinching displays of passion and fervour is
so rare that he has been known to leave those audiences lucky enough
to witness one of his rare live appearances speechless and weeping
tears of joy in their seats. His second full length I Am a Bird lew features an impressive cast of musicians including guest spots by longtime Antray supporter Lea deed, out-folk visionary Baveadra Banhart,
JaBa Yawaa, and Bee 6eerfe. For the very first time, Antony ami tha
Johnsons are set to play live in Vancouver March 6th at fte Media
Club, which is sure to be an intimate and memorable evening not to be
I feasant ei
seBftself,w*asasGO
I martial*ontofc
set iousljf ex
known-crew ot ragged warriors and scenefrtaters. This fe definite^
garigtotecwmasteverytiad^'stoppieksristofZIMB—and its
what, February? Eft^it on and; far fcekwigi w&
GD12J8
CiVMBDHAMM
Erotic Thritte"
m
Now you too-can star in m&rte
Thritar of your own dreams?
Indeed everyone%feveMi*dparnk I
duo return with a hikww ne
release designed to get your ass
shaking and baking with LO VB fatal between the lines, or past read
the lines of their poetry. Big Haaaa and IB Hasan know a thing or
two about passion desire and fte carnal pleasures? Hey—stop by
Zulu Feb- 15ft at 6PM and they willbe-here to sing to you? CABBED
HAMM instate FBI 15ft 6PBL     OUT FEBRUWfY MIM
CD16J6
OTWRSnJFVt«m«SHAK»C
A STICK AT:
■Hi FWHFttL-fcfcBBte Prison CD Her
amazing collaborations with PJ HARVEY and NICK
CAVE?
mONW&fFNmnWMfrStimi>**1m_
HMOrO
atOCflaflY- l^pCDEPAsigi of grralnessto
come!
TK FRAMES- Bun tie Maps CD More from our
beloved root rockers.
SAGE FRAHOS- All i iftf IHIbiiI TWP Inventive
post-hip-hop beats.
POUY UP- s/t CDEP Montreal^ finest new rack act
— look out Brooklyn.
STEREO TOT^AL-To TteBambi CD New Disco is tfe
New Punk
CD 16.98
MT. EERIE AKA PHIL ELVERUM
STOPS BY ZULU FOR AN INTIMATE
PERFORMANCE, FRIDAY FEBRUARY 11™ @ 6PM
gliS       CANNED HAMM PERFORMS SONGS FROM
CD O    EROnCTHRILLER, TUESDAY FEBRUARY 15™ @ 6PM
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed 10:30-7:00
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00
Sat 9:30-6:30
Sun 12:00-6:00

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0049972/manifest

Comment

Related Items