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 FREE!
SEPTEWBER 2010 /-THAT WE LISTEN TO A SURPRISING AiOUNT OF RAP MAGAZINE FRO! CiTRiOU F!
// SUPPORTING VANCOUVER'S INDEPENDENT MUSIC COMMUNTY FOR OVER 25 YEARS
•I
^JI|§||
CMRTYZ 7 FOLK FEST /DiSCOMOER CEUBRlf K
BJTAiEIL/SHAMBHALA EDITOR
Jordie Yotv
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Reis
COPY EDITORS
Alison 'The Axe" Atkinson, Sarah
Berman, Steve Louie, Debby Reis,
Mine'Salkin
AD MANAGER
David Stansfield, Maegan Thomas
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Sarah Berman, Mine' Salkin
RLA EDITOR
Steve Louie
WEB EDITOR
Reilly Wood
INTERN
Susanne Dewein
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Susanne Dewein, Jordie You?
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
Corey Ratch
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn, Debby Reis
OFFICIAL TWEETERS
Debby Reis, Maegan Thomas
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society of 'UBC
COVER
CMRTYZ
EDITOR'S NOTE
Dear Discorder: IpR!^
It has come to our attention that school is starting again
soon. If you are starting school, then ifs quite possible that
you are new in town, in which case Discorder welcomes
you with an article designed to get you acclimatized to
your new locale. We spoke to some of our favourite people
in town and asked them what they would recommend
to people who are fresh off the proverbial boat. Even if
you've lived in Vancouver since you emerged from your
mother's womb, you might still learn of a place that you
hadn't thought of visiting before. I certainly hadn't been
aware that Mr. Lee's General Store & Haberdashery even
existed until Andy Dixon mentioned it for this article.
Check it out on page n.
If you didn't catch the Malahat Revue on their bike tour
it's still a very interesting story to read. You can find out
the details on page 22.
Everyone will probably be intrigued by the commentary
the patron saint of East Van, Steve McBean, has on his band
Black Mountain's third album Wilderness Heart.
And finally, those of you interested in the Vancouver
Folk Fest, whether critical or supportive, will find something to mull over in Alison Atkinson's commentary on
hCr most recent visit to the Festival on page 20.
There's a litde bit of change going on at the Discorder
offices right now and we'd like to bid a fond farewell to
David Stansfield, Mine' Salkin and our intern Susanne
Dewein who are all leaving town. They'll be missed but
we're looking forward to working with Maegan Thomas
and Sarah Berman who are taking on the positions of Ad
Manager and Under Review Editor, respectively.
I hope I see you all at the Victory Square Block Party; on
Sunday, September 5th to celebrate the last day of summer,
but if not, I wish you all the best in the fall.
Cheers,
Jordie Yow
CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!
DISCORDER.CA IS HOME TO LOADS OF CONTENT WE CANT FIT INTO THE PRINT ISSUE
OF THE MAGAZINE, LIKE EXTRA FEATURES, REAL LIVE ACTION AND UNDER REVIEW.
CHECK DISCORDER.CA REGULARLY FOR NEW ARTICLES, PHOTOS AND ALL
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SEPTEMBER
WRITERS
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rouf, Chris-a-riffic, Susanne Dewein, Bryce Dunn, Simon Foreman, Adam Mannegren, Olivia Meek, Kaitlin McNabb,
Mark PaulHus, Andrew Reeves, Mind Salkin, Sally White, Reilly Wood, Angela Yen, Jordie Yow
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Merida Anderson, Maya Beaudry, CMRTYZ, Melanie Coles, Gerald Deo, Cody Fennell, Rjobert Fourgere, Karlene
Harvey, Jonathan Taggart, Ryan Walter Wagner, Syd Woodward
PROOFREADERS
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2 TABLE OF CONTENTS // SEPTEMBER 2010 // DISCORDER.CA
StfAocTiAQtP,
m Q>Vj f-enn^lu
1>°»M        IT    Hi*A>N   STyLg
08/BLACK MOUNTAIN
Steve McBean from Black Mountain discusses his newest upcoming
%rw   album and what it was like to record this folk metal ("fetal") future
cleissic
11/DISCORDER CELEBRITIES'
GUIDE TO VANCOUVER
What do Cam Reed, Edo Van Breemen, Sincerely Hana, Dandi Wind,
Ryan Dyck and Andy Dixon all have in common? They all answered these
questions they let people (new and old) know of their favourite haunts.
20/FOLK FEST
Is Vancouver's hippie fest clinging to a conservative ethos in order to
preserve what it represents? And if it is, is that a problem?
22/THE MALAHAT REVUE
Take eight friends, give most of them bicycles and you've gotyourself
the Malahat Revue. You do if you're all talented musicians roving
across B.C. on a kick-ass music tour that is.
30 / DJ TAMEIL
Up-and-coming Baltimore DJ talks about growing up next to Redman
and getting his huuuuuugggggeeeee DJ crew started.
CO
06/RIFF RAFF
Big Dick / the Orpheans / Sex Church / the Split Up's
3 07/TEXTUALLYACTIVE
34/SHAMBHALA
How much bass do you need to rattle the bodies of 10,000 ravers?
Sarah Berman found us while researching this article on the Sham-
bala Music Fest.
46/SLED ISLAND
Check out some of the highlights of Calgary's most excellent
music festival.
The England's Dreaming Tapes: The Essential Companion to England's
Dreaming, The Seminal History qfPunk by Jon Savage
15/FILM STRIPPED
Ear Goggles
16/ART PROJECT
CMRTYZ
19/VENEWS
Little Mountain Gallery / Iron Road / The Fringe / Rossini's
24/CALENDAR
26/PROGRAM GUIDE
47 /CHARTS
CO 35/UNDERREVIEW
^g Arcade Fire / Chromeo / Health / Hot Panda / Jaill / JDH / Like a Martyr / Mind
Cinema / Pineapple / Purple Rhinestone Eagle / Rae Spoon / RatTail / SSRIs /
Stars / the Wheat Pool / Women
£ 41/REAL LIVE ACTION
Q^    Bear in Heaven / Casiokids / Girls Rock Camp Vancouver Showcase / Like
^ Animals Again / Joanna Newsom / Mezamazing / Mode Moderne / Quintron
%^^   & Miss Pussycat / Royal Canoe / the Wilderness of Manitoba October 19 - Piw lifetime
oiuim.lifctimecollcctiuc.com
wioiD.faccbooli.com/LifetimeCoHecti9l FILM FEBTIVAL
VISA   O ROGERS    IWi
Ride, Rise, Roar (USA, 87 min.)
David Hiilman Curtis' boundlessly energetic concert film captures David Byrne at his musical and theatrical peak during his crisply choreographed 2008 tour, while detailing the collaborative process that makes
the performances come alive. "Stop Making Sense is a tough act to
follow, but David Byrne gives his younger self a run for his money..."
—Hollywood Reporter <rider>
GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY     )l#C#r\)!ER
Rubber (France/USA, 82 min.)
Quentin Dupieux's film concerns
the adventures of an anthropomorphized rubber tire that
comes to murderous life in the
desert and, via telekinesis, begins
to exact bloody retribution on
humanity. One of the stranger
films to emerge from Cannes this
year... <rubbe>
Littlerock (USA, 84 min.)
When a pair of Japanese siblings
get stuck in the dead-end town of
Littlerock, California, their very
different experiences of "America" form the basis of director
Mike Cut's charming coming-
of-age drama. "A scruffy tale of
misfits, heartbreak and smalltown restlessness... gently funny
and sweetly melancholic..."—San
Francisco Film Festival      <LITTL>
Turn It loose (UK, 97 min.)
It's a b-boy battle royale in the
heated heart of Soweto, as 16 of
the world's most explosive dancers—all of them kids with touching stories from different parts of
the world—compete for the title
of world champion. With little
attention paid to the limits of the
human body, Alistair Siddons'
riotous documentary reinvents
physical possibility. <TURNI>
Strange Powers: Stephin
Merritt and The Magnetic
Fields (USA, 89 min.)
"The thing that makes you really want to watch a Magnetic
Fields documentary... is that the
genius behind Magnetic Fields,
Stephin Merritt, is so prickly... in
interviews that no journalist has
ever gotten an accurate picture
of him."—The Stranger. Until
now... Kerthy Fix, Gail O'Hara
direct. <stran>
// TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
THE ENGLAND'S DREAMING TAPES:
THE ESSENTIAL COMPANION TO ENGLAND'S
DREAMING, THE SEMINAL HISTORY OF PONK,
BY JON SAVAGE
(University of Minnesota Press, September 2010)
REVIEW BY MINI: SALKIN
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
utilJHiUNf* ******
Jon Savage's The England's Dreaming Tapes is the quintessential literary
companion for any punk devotee or music zealot prepared to venture
into the filth and fury of this genre's seminal history. The book contains hundreds of hours of interviews that Savage conducted while
researching his 1991 book, England's Dreaming Anarchy, Sex Pistols,
Punk Rode, and Beyond—which has been heralded worldwide as the
definitive history of the U.K. punk revolution.
This collection of manuscripts includes interviews with all four origlall
members of the Sex Pistols, Joe Strummer of the Clash, Captain Sensible of
the Damned, Adam Ant, Pete Shelley of the Buzzcocks and Siouxsie Sioux of
Siouxsie & the Banshees, to name a few.
In his introduction, Savage points out that the interviews were taped in
the late '80s, a time when punk was only a decade old, and so "untainted by
layers of myth and historiography." At times the manuscript really drives this
home, especially in his interview with Glen Matlock. The Sex Pistols' bassist
recalls first hearing the fast sound of the Ramones, but insists they never tried
to follow suit. "That was the difference between us and the other punk bands,"
he said. "'Anarchy' is strident, but because we weren't rushing through it, it gives it more power." Full of pithy, honest one-liners and moments of sober
sincerity, the book is riddled with personal confessions and reflections of a
time that was incendiary.
John Lydon, a.k.a. Johnny Rotten, was arguably the voice of his generation.
The thin, sinewy, yet strangely baby-faced lyricist and frontman of the Sex
Pistols publicly denounced authority, insulted the Queen and sang about cun-
nilingus to a young population bent on killing off the conservative sensibilities
strongholding modern society. As he grew increasingly controversial in his
old age, Rotten became something of a caricature of his former self, but in
this interview he's immortalized in the way we'd all like to remember him.
Savage notes in the interview's preface that it took nearly a year of negotiations with Rotten's agent before a meeting time was established. Sure to
find his interview subject stubborn and tight-lipped, Savage's cool, relatable
conversation style opened up even the most difficult and narcissistic of punk
characters. Borderline therapeutic in its delivery, Rotten admits the creative
difficulties he shared with Matlock. "He wanted that kind of innocence, and
I'm sorry, I was completely the other way," Rotten said. "I saw the Sex Pistols
as something completely guilt-ridden. You know, the kids want misery, they
want death. They want threatening noises, because that shakes you out of
your apathy."
The boys and girls of the punk generation have grown up; Savage's 750-
plus page book would fit nicely in their backpacks, purses or fancy attachees.
England's Dreaming Tapes is the kind of literary gift that truly reveals not only the
music that typified and fuelled a generation of rebels and social dissidents,
but also sheds light on the politics, fashion and counter-culture attitude of
this time in music history, fc
// RIFF RAFF
BY BRYCE DUNN
JENSEN
Holy hell, another summer been and gone and I feel like I didn't do
enough to enjoy it 'cause now we are heading for the inevitable
change to the colour grey and the rain. While most would agree
this is not welcome in our daily planning, one such group will
relish in the switch to soggier climates and they are Sex Church.
We have extolled the virtues of this combo before in this column
and will happily do so again based on two more prime examples of why it's
good to huddle in the basement and make a darn good racket to keep yourself
from going crazy knowing that we'll have a solid six months ahead of dismal
weather. Both "209" and "Paralyze" clock in over six minutes of noise-laden
drudgery, with riffs heavily on repeat, but with enough flourishes of melody
to keep things from going stale. Don't bother trying to decipher the lyrics,
unless you want to be depressed even further. Just enjoy it for what it's worth:
an audio capsule of anger management therapy wrapped in a paper sleeve.
Vancouver, this will cure what ails you.
For those still feeling down, you're in good company with a certain
troubadour-bout-town, D. B. Buxton. This captivating crooner and his backing band the Orpheans sing and play the blues like the legendary ghosts of
many who have come before them—with soul, conviction and balls. "Ellison's
Tomb" tears a page from the Howlin' Wolf songbook, both in Buxton's vocal
delivery and in composition, and "Keep It Slow" channels Steve Marriot's
raspy tenor quite nicely thank you very much. Lest you think this is simple
rehash though, D. B. Buxton has his own M.O. in giving people an education
in the music that makes him move and seeing the man live is a true treat, so
don't miss his next musical sermon. Meanwhile, best to pick up the Orpheans
debut single to tide you over.
Another debut comes to us from the Valley—not California mind you, but
the Fraser and keeping it real for the kids are the Split Up's [sic] with their
pogo-inducing prankster Nick Newtown (formerly of the New Town Animals)
at the helm. With a voice that lies between a helium-chugging Leonard of
the Dickies or Olga of the Toy Dolls, the Split Up's pack a punch with their
whip-smart guitar licks and churning rhythm section. "Action Man" and "No.
Future Calling" are the two faster numbers that bring to mind Rezillos' or the
aforementioned Dickies' playful punk vibes, while "Televisual" turns it down
just a hair with more of a Vibrators "Baby Baby"-style approach. Pretty solid
debut I have to say, and with a handful of shows under their studded belts
already, they are poised to take on all comers—you've been warned.
Finally, we are venturing all the way to the capital city of Ottawa for the
sounds of Big Dick, who unfortunately are not a Dickies cover band, but
a two-piece bass and drums maelstrom, who, according to their very nice
hand-written letter to me, state that they "sound like Jesus Lizard or maybe
No Means No." Well they lack the acerbic tones of Mr. Yow [ed. Not me! (Jordie)
He means David Yow.] and company and the quirkiness of the brothers Wright,
but they're on the right track. In fact, after listening to the three tracks on
their Jensen EP, "Bodies" could be a lost track from the Jesus Lizard circa the
Liar album, but I liken them more to the Edmonton two piece die Famines,
especially with "Aria," as the bottom end is really cranked but melodious and
straight ahead. If you need extra incentive to check this out, can I shamelessly
name drop the Million Dollar Marxists? A cool-as-hell band that features one
member of that group in this current outfit—now you know, son.
As always, thanks for reading!
Sex Church: Hozac Records www.hozacrecords.com
Orpheans: Neptoon Records www.neptoon.com
Split Up's: When's Lunch Records www.whenslunchrecords.com
Big Dick: www.myspace.com/bigdiiiick * STEVE MCBEAN ON BLACK MOUNTAIN'S RECIPE FOR
WILDERNESS HEART =£*
DISCORDER: WILDERNESS HEART COMES OUT ON SEPT. 14. WOULD YOU SAY IT'S YOUR
BEST WORK SO FAR?
Steve McBean: I don't know. It just fits into the whole thing. I like the first two
records too, butyeah, we're proud of this one. Itwas fun to make. It's different,
but it's what we're doing right now.
D: THE "OLD FANGS" VIDEO HAS A WICKED 70S-R0CK-0DYSSEY-R0AD-TRIPPY FEEL
TO IT. WAS THAT WHAT YOU HAD IN MIND WHEN YOU WROTE THE SONG?
SM: I don't know, we just had the riffs for a while and stuff. For the video we
were kind of going for the two-lane-black-top, "Lucifer Rising" vibe. It's kind
of a road song.
D: DO YOU CONSIDER IT A TEASER FOR WILDERNESS HEART IN TERMS OF SOUND?
SM: Yeah, this record's got probably our most extremes as far as our heaviest songs and then some of our folkiest stuff. It's kind of all over the place,
but it's a shorter record. You know, it doesn't have like a 19-minute epic
song on it.
D: I NOTICED THERE WAS A SHIFT IN SOUND FROM YOUR FIRST ALBUM TO YOUR '
SECOND. IN THE FUTURE SEEMS TO HAVE MORE CONTINUITY AND MORE COMPLETENESS
TO IT AND AMBER [WEBBERl'S VOICE IS MORE PROMINENT. ARE THERE SIMILAR SHIRS
OR EVOLUTIONS IN WILDERlSS HEART TO SPEAK OF?
SM: I don't know. The first record was just kind of like a happy accident. We
recorded in our practice space, at the Hive. I think it cost us like $1500 bucks
to make or whatever. We just rented a bunch of stuff. The second one was
done over a longer period of time, at the Hive as well. We got our friend John
Congleton to mix it. I think this one was different because it was the first time
we worked with people that actually took the official role of producer, which
is cool. It's just kind of that thing for the third record. I think for some reason
8 tftifd records are always like the dreaded record, it's like where do you go, what
*&6y6u <Jo?For this one, there was some interest from producers and we kind of
toyed w^Rhe idea and we generally came up with a list of older dead guys that
we wanted to work with and once we realized we couldn't do that we whittled
4h€ list down to either who was interested or who seemed cool or who was af-
* fbrdabl^We worked with Dave Sardy for one song on the second record. That
was ag^fptime, going to Sunset Sound to record. And then his name came up.
<? Tlteen we fust kind of stumbled across Randall Dunn from his work with Sunn
^D))), whc^I,really dig, Jeremy [Schmidt] really digs. Even though they're kind of
different styles, you know. Randall does everything from black metal to tripped- j
^o^tfbfitstuffor like Sun City Girls-type Butt Hole Surfers stuff. That was pretty
interesting to us. We had the opportunity to take a chance in that way, so we
figured Jp% give it a shot, see how it works. It was fun. It gave us more time to
concenfj|f|| on just playing as opposed to fucking around with sounds. The big
thing about recording is there's so much listening involved, you've got to listen
• back.'tp'kke a whole bunch of takes and argue that, you know, "Oh, this one's
^D©dnof .This one's good." But when you have someone that's in that role and
"i|^tt tr^tpt's a weight offyour shoulders.
fftWO WORKING WITH PRODUCERS INEVITABLY GIVE THE ALBUM MORE OF A POP SOUND
OR WOULD YOU DESCRIBE IT DIFFERENTLY THAN THAT? WILL IT APPEAL TO A WIDER
AUDIENCE?
>SM: Np/Idon't think it's that I think any of that came from the songs we had.
Generanyfney were shorter. The new record might be a bit more melodic vocally,
but that's also just probably us having been on tour forever, me and Amber singing
together every night and then building a bit more confidence in that way. Maybe it *
sounds funny, but there's less weed on these records. But [the producers] didn't
force where the band's going. They hopefully just help the band along in whatever
road you're taking. So they weren'tlike, you know, orderingup pop songs or "make
■ this shorter." That was where the band was af^yways.
D: CAN YOU GIVE A LITTLE NARRATIVE OF BLACK MOUNTAIN'S CREATIVE PROCESS; HOW A
SONG WILL EVOLVE FROM SAY THE FIRST LINE OR MELODY IN YOUR HEAD TO THE RECORDING PROCESS?
SM: Most of them still kind of started like, probably, folk songs, you know,
acoustic guitar and lyrics and melody and stuff. And then we just kind of jam on
them and sometimes they stick to that and sometimes they go to a completely
different space. It all depends, like for this we either had a bunch of riffs or a
bunch of songs and we just kind of went to our practice place and just jammed
them, played them over and over again, argued about them, figured out what
we liked and stuff. And I think once we felt we had the strongest 12 or whatever
it was, we sent those to the recording dudes and they gave us their opinions. It
was pretty similar to any of the other records. There was a bit of demo-ing or
whatever you want to call it, but mostly just jamming.
D: YOU TAGGED THE ALBUM YOUR MOST "FETAL" ... SORRY, MOST FOLK AND MOST METAL
ALBUM YET. YEAH, CALL IT "FETAL" I GUESS.
SM: (Laughs) Definitely our most "fetal."
D: HOW DID YOU FIND INTERLACING THOSE TWO GENRES, I MEAN IT'S SOMETHING
YOU'VE PLAYED WITH BEFORE, BUT WHY THE SUDDEN URGE TO GO MORE FOLK? WAS IT
JUST SORT OF LIKE YOU SAID, WHERE THE BAND WAS AT THIS POINT?
SM: Yeah, I think sometimes it just comes from the way you're writing. We had
some time off, so sometimes if someone's just writing the song in their room,
you're more laid back or whatever. The first bunch of songs we had were more
of the folk element and then at the last minute a whole bunch of the more riff
ones showed up and kind of just balanced it out.
D: I NOTICED YOU GUYS RECEIVED A LOT OF GREAT PRESS OVER THE YEARS FOR YOUR
ABILITY TO ELICIT THAT OLD SCHOOL KIND OF STONER ROCK SOUND, BUT THERE'S ALSO
A FEW CRITICS WHO SAY THAT LIMITS YOU. DO YOU HAVE ANY THOUGHTS OR COMMENTS
TOWARDS THAT?
continued on next page...
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Pips mm ...continued from previous page
SM: Well, it's like when we first came out, there was the obvious references.
And then, you know, you get lumped. I guess it's to do with rock journalism.
It's like, what three bands does it sound like? But we would get things like,
"Oh yeah, you guys are stoner rock. You sound like Kyuss," or whatever. But
none of us ever listened to Kyuss and stuff. It could be it's a similar thing for
them—I'm sure Kyuss listened to Black Flag as we did, or some of us did.
Whatever, if people want to put a label on it, that's fine. We're obviously more
into stoner rock than gangster rap. It's not a big worry. It's one of those things,
when you're in a band and some people get mad and are like, "Oh, what are
they doing? How can they do that?" It's like with any other band, whether you're
playing to two people or a thousand people, it's still just a band and it's for fun.
You're gonna do what you wanna do. If I'm placed with the choice of putting
onBlack Sabbath or Vampire Weekend, Vampire Weekend's like, never, gonna
win. It's just that thing of who we are as people and stuff. So if that's where we
fit and that's where people wanna put us, I don't really care.
D: THE ALBUM COVER IS PRETTY IMPRESSIVE. WHO CAME UP WITH THAT?
SM: Oh, that's Jeremy. Yeah, that's kind of his thing. He did the last record
cover for In The Future, and then he's done record covers for a lot of bands. He
did the new Trans Am record cover and Zombie. Yeah, he's a little graphic
artist. He loves design. He did a few covers and we definitely all thought that,
yes, that's the one, you know?
D: ARE YOU BASED IN LA. RIGHT NOW?
SM: Yeah, I just live on the beach down here. I wake up and eat Mexican food
and, you know, hang around. Wear flip-flops. It's nice down here. I mean I
like a lot of places in the world. For right now I don't have to be anywhere, so
m
I can be wherever I wanna be, which is a nice freedom.
D: WELL ENJOY IT, BECAUSE I SEE YOU'RE ABOUT TO GO ON A PRETTY MASSIVE TOUR THERE.
SM: Yeah, 'til December.
D: YOU LOOKING FORWARD TO THAT?
SM: I mean, it kind of makes you wanna throw up a little bit when you look at
the list of shows, but at the same time, it's like, if you're gonna get in the van
and all of a sudden start complaining, why are you doing it? For most people
that play music, that's kind of like the goal and the dream and stuff. We get to
go to a lot of places that I'd never get to go if it wasn't for the band. I had never
been to Europe before Black Mountain. It was one of those things, I never had
the money and it was like, "how the hell am I gonna get there?" We've been there
12 or 15 times now. So it's nice. And then you've got friends you get to see.
D: YOU'RE REALLY WELL RECEIVED IN THE U.K., I NOTICED.
SM: Yeah, the U.K.'s been kind to us. I like the U.K. It seems like one of the few
places left where the magazine is still holier than the blog—the music press,
you know, which is kind of cool. I assume they have blogs there, but it seems
like it's still in that kind of old school way. It's cool, because the generation
gap is maybe a lot wider too than most places in North America. So it's like
you can do an interview with some guy who's been doing it since the '70s. So
it's pretty fun to just rap with them about crazy old shows, Jesus & Mary Chain
riots or Crass or whatever, you know, all the stuff that they've seen. It's always
a good conversation.
D: THANKS, STEVE. BEST OF LUCK WITH WILDERNESS HEART!
SM: Thank you. j| 5!
THIS GUIDE IS ESPECIALL1WKN0T EXCLUSIVELY) INTENDED FOR THOSE OF
YOU WHO ARE NEW TO THElRF VANCOUVER AND WHO WANT TO DISCOVER
A VANCOUVER BEYOND GRILLE STREET AND LONELY PLANET. SOME OF
THE FINEST PEOPLE THIS CITY HAS TO OFFER WERE WILLING TO SHARE
THEIR FAVOURITE LOCATIONS. NOW IT'S UP TO YOU TO MAKE THE BEST OF IT!
WELCOME TO VANCOUVER AND ENJOY!
BY SUSANME DEWEIN
PHOTOS BY ROBERT FOUGERE / SUITCASE GALLERY RYAN
Andy Dixon is a Vancouver wunderkind, who not only produces his own music—
under a number of names, but he's most well known as Secret Mommy —he
runs Ache Records, works as a graphic designer and spins records as half of
the DJ duo Girl Fight!
RESTAURANT////////////
"Nuba [1206 Seymour /146 East 3rd / 207 West Hastings]. There are three of them
in Vancouver now. They serve Lebanese food (falafel, lentils, etc.) which,
granted, is not particularly hard to find in this city. What makes Nuba spectacular, though, is its quality. I literally have stopped eating other falafel since
tasting their Garden Falafel (which has a whack of avocado on it!). It must be
made of ground unicorn horn or something. They also have amazing decor
(specifically at the Main & 3rd location.)"
RECORD STORE/////////////
"Scratch Records [72 6 Richards]. Great selection. Greatprices. Cool staff. They've
been an asset to this city since as long as I can remember."
OTHER STORE//////////////////////
"Mr Lee's General Store & Haberdashery [109 East Broadway]. A handsome
little shop on Broadway by Main Street specializing in quality wares for men.
It's a classy joint that sells things like pipes, shaving cream, ties and hats. It's
got a throwback vibe without coming off as campy or costumey. A good place
to go to feel masculine."
VENUE///////////////////////
"The bulk of my favourite venues in this city are technically illegal and to
mention them in the press might be a heat score for them. But my favourite
legitimate venue is probably the Biltmore [2755 Prince Edward]. I guess that's a
bit of a go-to answer, and I wish I could suggest something a bit more creative,
but the fact is the Biltmore has a good dance floor, decent sound, a nice, small
stage and relatively decent drink prices."	
BAR/////////////////
"The Brickhouse [730 Main]. It's the perfect location for those nights where
you want to chat with friends without having to compete with an outrageous
music volume (oh no! I'm old!). Located right in historic Hogan's Alley as well.
Check out the sign above the entrance."
NOT TO BE MISSED /////////////////////
"WhyteclifFPark in West Vancouver is arguably my favourite place on Earth.
Rocky cliffs to climb and sit upon, the sea, fresh air, sunbathing seals, an island
you can only get to when the tide is low, I could go on and on."
Ryan Dyck runs Hockey Dad Records and is the lead singer of the local punk
band the B-Lines.
RESTAURANT////////////////
"I am a big fan of the Tomahawk BBQ [1550 Philip] in North Vancouver. It's
been there since the '20s and packed literally to the rafters with native trinkets
and crafts ranging from authentic to offensive. Ifs a charming old drive-in that
serves burgers named after famous chiefs like the 'Chief Skookum' that is topped
with bacon, cheese, an egg and a wiener cut in half. Definitely worth the bus
ride over the scenic Lions Gate Bridge. Plus it might be getting shut down in
the near future, so go before for this unique Vancouver landmark is gone!"
RECORD STORE///////////////
"Full disclosure, I work at Scratch Records [726 Richards], so it is my default
favorite. It was also the first good record store I ever went to back when I was
a mouth breathing suburban teen with a hunger for vinyl. When I'm not holding down the fort at Scratch, I often visit one of the other fine independent
record shops in Vancouver, such as Zulu [1972 West 4th], Dandelion [228 East
Broadway], Audiopile [2016 Commercial] and Red Cat [4332 Main] to find the
records that I need to stay alive."
OTHER STORE //////////
"Lucky's Comics [3972 Main] onMain Street is a great little gem. They carry lots
of d.i.y. comics and art zines that you could probably only find in Vancouver,
or stuff from other parts of the world that you could only find at Lucky's in
Vancouver. Plus they have a small gallery that showcases lots of Vancouver's
VENUE///////////////////////////
"Pretty much anywhere someone puts on a show is my favourite place. So many
times I've wandered down urine stained alleys straining my ears to hear music
seeping from an unmarked door where somebody is putting on some sort of
event. For many reasons, Vancouver is a hard city to run a legitimate venue in,
so lots of great shows are in unlikely and pretty sketchy places. Ifs pretty fun
though, it keeps things interesting."	
BAR/////////////
"If I'm going out to watch a hockey game with some friends, we'll usually hit up
the Legion on Main [2 65 5 Main] or Commercial [2205 Commercial]. The beer is
cheap, everybody there is into the game as well, and you can play pool or darts
during the intermission. They also make you take off your hat and sometimes
NOT TO BE MISSED //////////////
"Take a walk around the Downtown East Side. Ifs the most interesting historical, architectural, cultural and political area in Vancouver."
I <&m INCEREL,
 ■■---■
iMif^
Sincerely Hana is a local DJ and promoter who spins at Glory Days and Golden
Girls. She also does some beautiful photography that you can have a look at
on her website at www.sincerelyhana.com.
RESTAURANT/////////////
"Budgie's Burritos [44 Kin^sway]: vegetarian food that even non-vegetarians
love and they have the best tortilla soup ever!
Any izakaya ... I love them all! Gyoza King [1508 Robson], Guu ]?>s^ Thurlow /
1698 Robson / 888 Nelson / 375 Water], Kin^yo [871 Denman], Hapa Izakaya [1516
Yew j 1193 Hamilton /1479 Robson]."
RECORD STORE///////////
"The last couple years I've only bought records from merchandise tables at
shows. Ifs awesome because you can hear the album live first and so many
amazing bands come to Vancouver or are from Vancouver."
OTHER STORE////////////////////////
"One Of A Few [354 Water]: boutique clothing store in Gastown with a good
mix of local and international designers, most of it you can't get anywhere
else in the city. "
VENUE//////////////////
"The Biltmore Cabaret [2755 Prince Edward]: best place to see live shows because
you can always manage to get right up front (and crowd surf if necessary), the
stage isn't really high and far away so you can see everything and the bands
that play there usually end up playing at much larger venues the next time they
come to Vancouver, so catch them at a smaller venue while you can!"
BAR///////////////////////////////
"The Narrow Lounge [i8g8 Main]: there's nothing else like it in Vancouver
which makes it seem like you have teleported to another city or maybe just
back in time or something? The food is real good too...bonus! Oh and they have
a summertime tiki patio...double bonus!"
NOT TO BE MISSED ///////////////////
"Venture into nature! WhytecliffPark, Lynn Canyon and Third Beach are my
favourite spots to go to when I want to get 'out of the city' without actually leaving the city. And you should probably have a Japadog [530 Robson / Burrard
and Pender / Burrard and Smithe / Waterfront Station]."
Cameron Reed performs as a dubstep DJ under the name Babe Rainbow ,
with an EP out on Warp Records. He is also the public face of Music Waste,
Vancouver's annual independent music and arts festival.
RESTAURANT///////////
"From the day Budgie's Burritos [44 Kingsway] opened I've been filling my gullet
with retried beans and tofiirkey sausage and have never once looked back. You
can't argue with reasonably priced burritos the size of a newborn baby. Now
that they're licensed, I'll probably be spending much more time. Best place in
the city to hear Black Sabbath and eat Mexican food.
Sometimes I feel like every waking moment is just waiting until the next time I
can eat at Guu [838 Thurlow] again. Best izakaya in the city. Great drinks. Great
food. Awesome staff. Comfortable but fast-paced atmosphere. Perfect place
to eat for going out on a drunken night."	
RECORD STORE///////////////////////////
"Picking a favourite record store is like picking your favourite child, you do it
but you never tell anyone."
OTHER STORE///////////////////
"Solder & Sons [247 Main] is a cafe and bookstore. The proprietor, Rob, is always
great for a book recommendation, conversation or a cup of coffee. They carry a
bunch of zines and limited pressed vinyl from local artists and bands too!"
VENUE//////////////////////////////////////
"The Astoria [j6g East Hastings], I have had many venues over the years that
were more like club houses than they were bars. Currently, the Astoria is my
hangout. I like seeing shows here. Ifs comfortable."
BAR////////////////
"Six Acres [203 Carrall]. Lef s be honest, most of you guys reading this are
probably going to end up at the Cambie just like every other 19 to 21 year old
who's new to Vancouver. I did it when I moved here and it was awesome.
New friends, fights, hookups, yelling, foreigners, cheap bar food, headache-
inducing cheap draft. What more could you want? Well, as you get closer to 30
you can only really handle a few of those things on a work night (I usually pick
'yelling' and 'foreigners'). Six Acres is one of the few bars in Vancouver thafs
cool, reasonably priced and not full of idiots. With most bars in Vancouver you
can only pick one of those. They also have great food and one of the biggest
selections of beer in town. Check it out, but don't ruin this place for the us on
the wrong side of 25."
NOT TO BE MISSED////////////////
"Sex—my natural inclination is to talk about places where you should have sex,
but I don't think thafs what's expected of me. However, after careful thought,
my recommendations are all places you should also have sex. So do that.
I would suggest that newcomers soak in our natural beauty sooner than later.
Go check out all the beaches, do the Grouse Grind, or as I call it 'Taking the
Gondola'. Explore Queen Elizabeth Park and Stanley Park. Have sex in all of
these places.
Also, go check out some of our local sports teams. You don't even have to be
a fan to get lost in the excitement of a game."
l13 EDO VAN
BREEMEN
DANDI
WIND
Edo Van Breemen is the frontman for the Vancouver indie-jazz band Brasstronaut and co-runs the indie-label Unfamiliar Records.
RESTAURANT////////////////////////
"Sushi Yama [371 East Broadway]: why? Because ifs delicious, fresh, affordable,
and very close to Main and Broadway. The vegetarian udon soup and tempura
combo is absolutely the best value, healthy lunch in the city. The specialty
rolls are also amazing.
RECORD STORE////////////////////////////
"Red Cat [4332 Main]: why? Because they cater so well to the local music scene,
are genuine and nice people who care very much about their community. No
egos, just good suggestions and always a decent stock of new vinyl."	
Dandi Wind performs with her homonymous industrial dance band and as the
other half of electro-disco band Fan Death
RESTAURANT//////////////
"My fav restaurant is Nuba [1206 Seymour /146 East 3rd / 207 West Hastings],
delicious authentic Lebanese food with a slight Mexican twist.
OTHER STORE//////////////
" Salmagundi [321 West Cordova]: this is a little antique shop in Gastown perfect
for strange and fascinating mini gifts. ... Ifs the only place I spend money in
Vancouver besides the bar and the occasional Salvation Army or record store
purchase."
VENUE///////////////////////////////////////////
"The Orpheum [884 Granville]: why? Ifs one of the few places in Vancouver you
can pretend to not be in Vancouver when inside. Plus they do cheap last-minute
Vancouver Svmohonv Orchestra tickets on Saturday nitmts for students "
BAR///////////////
"Alibi Room [157 Alexander]... OK, so really these aren't party bars, but I love a
good pint of speciality beer. Alibi Room is conveniently located at the foot of
Main Street near Gastown and offers a great selection of micro brewery casks
and bottles. You can get a four-beer taster for $9 and the food is also good.
The Wolf & Hound [3617 West Broadway] has immense novelty value for me. Go
there on a Friday or Saturday night during the school year and watch a bunch
of wasted frat boys 'n' girls twirling around to the Irish dude doing just about
any acoustic guitar bar-worthy cover you can imagine. Ifs close to UBC and
seems to be one of the more authentic Irish pubs around. Ifs real, but in a
different kinda way."
NOT TO BE MISSED /////////////////////////
During the summer: go to Wreck Beach (www.wreckbeach.org) and swim
naked. Seriously. Get over yourself and do this. Say hello to Alonso Wang,
local musical celebrity."
RECORD STORE//////////////////////
"The coolest record shop in Vancouver is Zoo Zhop [223 Main]. You can find
limited edition records of exciting bands from around the world and also great
local music. They also sell vintage and local designer's clothing. And chocolate
bars, and dead-stock rock pins. When you're there ask David to show you his
original hand-printed Lucifer Rising poster!"
THER STORE///////////////////////
"Stinky Thrift Store [3 60 6 West Broadway] [ed. Actually, this is an SPCAThrift Store]
at Alma and Broadway is a cool place to check out. Go in on Monday or Tuesday
and say hi to "Charlie!" If you are new to the city ifs a great place to pick up
cheap furniture or household goods. Back in the day it really stunk in there
but they've cleaned it up and ifs not as bad anymore."
VENUE////////////
1 he best play to see live music, theatre and art shows is Little Mountain Gallery
[195 East 26th Ave]. Ifs a really special, intimate artists' run space with hardwood
floors, white gallery walls and a cute little stage. There's always something
exciting happening so check out the schedule at littlemountaingallery.com "
NOT TO BE MISSED////////////////
"The Rio Theatre [1660 East Broadway] on Broadway and Commerical screens
classic cult and horror films every Friday night at midnight! They have cheap
beer and cocktails deals too so you can drink while you watch." g|
14 I ART PROJECT i
1 CMRTYZ
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*>                                     CttfcTYZ.CDH
BASED IN SEATTLE, CMRTYZ IS MADE UP OF CMR, WHO'S PROUD OF NEVER HAVING
GONE TO ART SCHOOL AND DESIGNS POSTERS WHILE RIDING THE BUS, AND TYZ, THE
PR AND SALES GUY WHO IS ALSO IN THE BAND ZISKIS. TOGETHER, THEY HARKEN BACK
TO THE HEYDAY OF THE ZINE, USING PHOTOCOPIES, FELTS AND COLLAGE. THEIR LO-FI,
D.I.Y. AESTHETIC HAS FOUND A HOME ON ALBUM COVERS AND CONCERT POSTERS FOR
INDIAN WARS, JAY REATARD AND DEAD GHOSTS. THEY'VE ALSO VENTURED INTO FASHION,
CREATING SHREDDED T-SHIRTS AND TANK TOPS. THEIR T-SHIRT DESIGNS HAVE BEEN
FEATURED IN A LOOK BOOK BY THE AUSTRALIAN SHOE DESIGNERS, SENSO.
15 SM'S  y\tP£ST AHUHttlt
TRoH ART PROJECT//CMRTYZ exclaim.!
THIMKJ&MI THIS HOm-
FiJWNES
SEPTEMBER JO
KK#l\dliAW   1IICA 1 111:
DOORS 6PM - ALL AGES WELCOME
TICKETS ALSO AT TiCKETMASTER.CA CHARGE BY PHONE 604-280-4444,
ALLTICKETMASTER LOCATIONS, ZULU AND SCRAPE
FILMSTRIPPED //
EARGOGGLES
J|flBlW|l
% 9*-•■>'
wmBmBffMm
■111 «£'..
■■■■I
f you're feeling nostalgic for the Cobalt back when Wendythirteen ran the
bar, or you just like hardcore and punk, you should grab yourself a copy of
Ear Go&gles 5 featuring many performances from bands like B-Lines, Golers,
SNFU, the Famines, Propagandhi, Mattress and a music video that sounds
a lot like, but isn't Staind. Available at www.eargogglesdvd.com. ^
SUBSCRIBE TO
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DISCORDER MAGAZINE VENEWS // LITTLE
MOUNTAIN GALLERY
BY JORDIE YOW
ILLUSTRATION BY MERIDA ANDERSON
Little Mountain, the Mount Pleasant gallery and venue, drew the attention of Vancouver City Hall's bylaw inspectors after numerous
noise complaints were made about the venue. As a result, the venue
is currently holding a moratorium on live music performances.
"The cause for alarm was that there were a lot of similarities to
when The Butcher Shop was taken down," said Ehren Salazar, who
co-runs Little Mountain Gallery which operates in the same space
that the venue, The Butcher Shop, operated.
"I respect the art and I respect the music," said Jason, a resident on the
same block as Litde Mountain. "It's just too late and too loud."
Fritz, another neighbour on the same block said, "It's been a problem. I have
called the police," adding that "They are presenting themselves as a gallery,
but it is a party with up to ioo people.... They are not licensed." He also added
that he had been threatened by someone attending their shows.
In response to the criticisms Salazar, who co-runs Litde Mountain with
Nathan Drillot, said they never have events past i a.m. and those are infrequent
and only on weekends.
"The incident [where Fritz was threatened] wasn't with anyone affiliated
with us. It was someone from Car Free Days," he added. "I wish he [Fritz]
knew that. I don't even know who the guy was."
Other neighbours offer different opinions of the gallery.
"As a music venue it's great and as an art gallery it's great," said Spencer
Schoening, who has lived next to the space his whole life. "You've got to
expect a little bit of community living in one of the coolest neighbourhoods
[in Vancouver]."
By "community living" Schoening is referring to noise that spills into
the residential area from Main Street, something that Salazar feels that Litde
Mountain gets scapegoated for, as they are on the boundary between Main St.
and the residential area. "Sometimes we'll finish closing up after a show and
... Main St. will be bumping."
"Personally I have not had a problem with them," said Spencer's mother
Jody, who has lived on the block since 1986. "I like it a lot better than the smell
of lamb rotting in the garbage," referring to the butcher shop that occupied
the space before it became a gallery and venue (hence the original name, The
Butcher Shop).
After getting a number of noise complaints Salazar and his partner decided
to go to the city pre-emptively to deal with any problems with Little Mountain
being a venue before they got out of control.
The venue has to undergo inspection, but the city is waiving the usual inspection fee and withholding enforcement as long as Little Mountain continues to
cooperate with any upgrades needed to bring the building to code.
"[Little Mountain's] such a rare venue in Vancouver," said Diana Leung,
Vancouver City Hall's Cultural Liason. "It's a small venue that people can afford
... It's not a question that we want the space to stay open."
Leung is working to implement a series of sweeping changes to the bylaws
that look after venues in the city, however those changes are not expected to
begin being implemented until January of2011 at the earliest.
Litde Mountain is currendy holding a moratorium on music shows, but
continues to be used as a theatre space. The music shows that had been booked
prior to the moratorium have been moved across the street to the Ethiopian
restaurant Nyala.
If Little Mountain begins hosting music again Salazar said the music
would be "catered to the space—acoustic—I'm not into doing super crazy
noise shows."
Little Mountain has plans to apply for a cultural infrastructure grant, a
grant provided by the city to help cultural spaces do necessary upgrades to
meet bylaw requirements, which they hope will be enough to cover the costs
of any renovations needed on the space. (If you are interested in applying for
this grant, the deadline is mid-September so you'd better get cracking.)
A letter writing campaign in support of Litde Mountain was organized
by the Safe Amplification Site Society, which sent 200 letters to Heather
Deal, the city councillor from Vision Vancouver who works on most arts
and culture issues.
"We were really getting burnt out, but the people from SASS have been
really helpful rallying support," said Salazar.
The letters may have made an impression with city hall, but as Litde Mountain's neighbour Jody pointed out, most of the letters are probably not from
people who live near Little Mountain.
The fate of Little Mountain is still uncertain, but we will continue to keep
you up to date on the issue as things progress.
In other venews:
Dave Bowes from the Strathcona after-hours artist studio Iron Road announced the space would stop hosting events on Aug. 27 after it ran into some
problems with Vancouver City Hall despite the venue's best efforts to make
"extensive fire safety preparations and acquisition of liquor licenses." Diana
Leung at city hall did not have enough information on the situation to comment,
but as of press time the after parties for the Business and the Angry Samoans
have been cancelled and the space will not be holding future events.
The Vancouver Fringe Festival has organized a number of shows at Agro
Cafe' on Granville Island from Sept. 9 to 19, making for a temporary venue in the
city. There's a bunch of cool bands playing including Fine Mist, Wincermitts,
the Creaking Planks and Dbl Dragon. Check the calendar for a full listing on
their website under "Fringe Bar."
The Vancouver Courier recendy reported that long time Kitsilano jazz establishment Rossini's is shutting it's doors after 18 years of providing a place
for jazz aficionados to catch music in town, fc
19 H
THE NEVER CHANGING,
ALWAYS PERFECT FOLK EEST
BY ALISON ATKINSON
ILLUSTRATION BY KARLENE HARVEY
ffe £#
L_
bout ten feet to my left, beside the squatting pine, Kevin Smith
is hippie dancing. Well, not quite Kevin Smith, but a pudgy guy
with a bad goatee and a long ponytail down his back, dressed in
black cargo shorts, a yellow button down and a bolero hat: the
kind of guy who rents you videos or chartered your high school
D&D club. He's flailing his arms around and jumping side to
side as Alex Cuba and Calexico jam on the stage in front of us.
You know what kind of dancing I mean.
Welcome to the 33rd annual Vancouver Folk Music Festival, where it is
proven year in and year out that white people cannot dance.
The first Folk Fest I attended was in 2003. Like coundess other first-time
Folkies in their teens and early twenties, I lived in a big, run-down house in
Point Grey, where my friends and I dreaded each other's hair, hosted all-night
dance parties and wore skirts over our pants. We all saved up to buy weekend mQMAPHmjjMkOTHlNGiCHAmEi
iQjmj/^iRojiALmsLLMD the
STAYJN ffj£ SAME PLAGE, m
passes to the Festival. Michael Franti came into the audience and gave us hugs.
We only wore shoes when it was time to use the Porta Potty. We swam topless.
Ani DiFranco played, and after the lanterns led us out of the park, we stayed
out dancing at the beach-side drum circles for hours. It was perfect.
I went other summers, but eventually the music started to sound the same.
I left town and then came back, and festivals like Music Waste were where the
interesting work was happening, where the city was being re-calibrated. But
this year I went back.
The Festival itself was lovely. Every volunteer was smiling, whether he or
she was overseeing the bike lockup, pouring beer or making sure people put
their garbage in the right container. The whole park was thick with a loopy
feeling of contentment Within an hour of arriving on site I was carrying my
shoes around while I walked barefoot. Musical performances were consistendy
strong: on Friday the Avert Brothers had the crowd dancing to their appealing
bluegrass pop. They were followed by Calexico, whose generous, textured set
sounded over a setting sun and then over the hand-made lanterns that wended
their way through the park.
The main stage isn't used during the day, but the acres of park are full of
empty Festival homesteads, squares of blankets and tarps punctuated by beach
bags and coolers or men prone in the heat of day. The action is on the workshop
stages, where musicians were billed together in short programs. Canadian acts
Timber Timbre and the Deep Dark Woods were standouts.
This year the crowd consisted largely of young people who—like me in
university—want to be part of a bigger movement, as well as older people who
remember when they felt like they wanted to be part of something bigger.
I don't want be unrealistic about what went on in the heyday of folk music,
or idealize Baez and Dylan playing together at the March on Washington.
But the thing is, it's a collective ideal: folk music was music of the people
and for the people, and it was the most precise tool for changing minds by
changing hearts.
Folk music is the soundtrack to those bigger things, be they peace, be they
love, be they community. It has, for as long as it's been around, occupied a
space between activism and escapism. It is, by definition, the music of the
people. Along the way it's picked up a political charge: think the Civil Rights
movement, think protest music in the '60s, think Haight-Ashbury and San
Francisco free love. The music wasn't isolated to gated festivals.
Despite the kilometers of fencing around the Festival, the unmistakable
spirit of change, shared politics and community is still alive and well in 2010,
despite—or maybe because of—the comfort and easy privilege of us attendees.
But as the years passed in my life, I grew up to recognize that the Vancouver
Folk Music Festival was only one small part of a much larger puzzle. Change is
hard, because when it's real, it's the result of a great deal of time, compromise
and struggle. Maybe the Festival reminds us of what we're working for—or
maybe it's simply an escape.
And that it does well. The Folk Festival is a diverse, accessible and gated
oasis. Geographically, nothing changes year to year: everything from the coffee cart and the yam fry shack, to the weird hat table and the people doing Tai
Chi on the pathway stay in the same place. Each year the organizers book an
international roster of gifted and eclectic musicians—yet the music weaves into
the consistency of the feel. The sameness is part of the draw, of course—like
Christmas for suburban families, veteran folkies affectionately infuse their Folk
Festival pilgrimage with a great deal of tradition. People come every year and
they expect the same experience. It stays the same while you change.
As Saturday sunset crept on and Sarah Harmer started up on the main stage,
I remembered myself so many years ago, and thought about everything that has
changed since then. Her set was long and energetic and included older hits like
"Basement Apartment" and "Pendulums," and songs from her well-reviewed
new album, Oh Little Fire. Harmer is one of the most lovely and charismatic artists
in Canada, and despite the size of the crowd, her show felt intimate. Just like
when I was 20,1 was surrounded by my friends and everything felt right.
A bit later the lanterns came out and we got back on our bikes to head
home. I'm told that Sunday was lovely too. Then it ends. Then, the smiling
volunteers and the fence guys and the portable toilet guys and the stage guys,
who were probably not smiling, took it all down and away. Just like that, the
better world was gone. The students went back to their ramshackle Kitsilano
houses and the aged hippies went back to Kerrisdale or North Van. If you ask
them, they will tell you that the Folk Fest was wonderful, because it was. And
then life went on much as it always did. fe MALAHAT REVUE
BY SUSANNE DEWEIN
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN TAGGART (WWW.JONATHANTAGGART.COM)
1
^Malahat Revue is like one of those all-star superhero teams
■«■ that will get together and join forces only for very special
occasions. Comprised of Jeremy Fisher, Hannah Georgas,
Aidan Knight and all the members of Said the Whale, the
group united for their Bike-to-Work tour, which started in
early July on Salt Spring Island and led them through B.C. for
about ten days and 500 km—by bike. Their musical powers
combined, they played only the best of each other's songs. The
show at the Vancouver Folk Fest was the last concert of six,
and in between enjoying the sun and music, I got the chance to talk to Jeremy
Fisher and Said the Whale's singer and guitarist, Tyler Bancroft.
The whole project was Fisher's brainchild: he had already experienced touring by bicycle. In 2002 he cycled from Seattle to Halifax to promote his first
album. Fisher came up with the idea in January and initially wrote a proposal only
to Said the Whale and Hannah Georgas, who were excited and in immediately.
"I thought it was awesome," Bancroft said. "[Just like] a camping trip with
buddies and then playing shows." Knight was eventually invited by Bancroft,
who put out Knight's new album Versicolour on his own label, Adventure Boys
Club, in March. "I wanna be there!" was Knight's immediate reaction, he said
over the phone. And his addition to the group was an excellent idea, according
to Fisher: "It's been such a great group dynamic [...] after every show people
would say to me, 'I've never heard of Aidan before but I really liked his sense
of humour and the songs were amazing.'"
Rumour has it though that not everybody was as enthused when they first
heard of Fisher's plan and that people even got yelled at. Said the Whale's
bass player Peter Carruthers had never learned how to ride a bike, Bancroft
confessed, and was "dead set against it" But the upshot of his refusal was
that he would drive their tour van, which was needed for transporting heavier
instruments such as the drums.
To completely abandon any motorized vehicles didn't seem possible, but
Knight said he'd be open to using trailers next time in order to be even more
self-contained.
": '■;■■"* WmCTLYMffER THIS SHOW?
!1L h'SEM^'Bitit HUME,
Cycling for promotion is certainly a nice idea, but how about cycling in everyday life? According to Bancroft they all use their bikes regularly. Knight doesn't
have a driver's licence, so he rides his bike everywhere, "regardless," as does
Georgas (who said in a phone interview that she'd fallen victim to Vancouver
bike thieves for the third time now). And admittedly "it's a great way to drink
and drive," Bancroft says, but of course none of them ever did that.
For bigger projects like this, equipment is key. They not only bought new
bikes, but Bancroft for example got himself a pair of bike shorts and baby
powder, "to treat the junk well."
The group got sponsored by North Park Bicycles in Victoria and some of
the musicians are now planning on reselling their bikes. If you're interested in
official preowned Malahat Revue bicycles you should drop by North Park.
As a not so experienced bicycle rider one might wonder how it feels to play
a show after having cycled 55 kilometres with the sun beating down on you. "I
would call it easy. I think it's probably easier than having sat in a van for nine
hours which is what the scenario usually is," Bancroft said. "The difference
between being cooped up in a tour van and getting to ride your bike and you
feel like your blood's been pumping all day and you don't feel like you're just
a fat-ass, gaining weight all day, that was amazing."
"It's energizing," Fisher added. But "don't be afraid of SPF 50!" Knight
warned.
One of Bancroft's and Knight's big don'ts while cycling is listening to your
earbuds. This was not equally shared by everybody in the group and Bancroft
admitted that he was worrying for the others' lives every day. Fisher and Bancroft insisted on being confidential here and not telling who was "plugged in
the entire time" but were at least so kind as to disclose that "she" listened to
Peaches and that "Her name starts with H and ends with annah Georgas." In
a later phone interview Georgas explained somewhat bashfully that the music
just made her so much faster, which could be confirmed by Knight, who called
Georgas and Spencer Schoening of Said the Whale the "go-getters" of the tour,
their secret being a cocktail of Caribou, Midlake, Peaches and Local Natives.
There was no general consent on the best stop. According to Knight their
funnest concert was in Victoria, possibly because of the prank they played on
Georgas when all of a sudden the whole band played her song "The Deep End"
in reggae style. "They are funny," Georgas admitted, who ended up being a
target of the group's japes more than once. In Roberts Creek they unplugged
Georgas' amplifier, leaving her mute, and finished the song by blowing into
accurately filled water bottles. Bancroft was overwhelmed after every single
concert, thinking it to be the best of the tour. Looking at it this W^, dbekshj^M |
the Folk Fest inevitably must have been the highlight of their tour. After seeing |
them perform that evening I'd say this could definitely be true.. ^
All members of the project knew each other before throutgfe $a®s m$M (
another, and had even performed together. Said the Whale's rhj^m section IM? -
backed Georgas on her tour last fall, and Fisher had toured with her befym&k* *
well. Therefore practicing didn't take more than three or four days, J^her^^i
"The bulk of it was learning mine and Aidan's songs but that came together
pretty quickly." They learned two hours worth of music, yet Fisher feels they
missed out on many good songs, just because there is too much. "But I guess
that's a reason to do another tour."
When the interview was almost finished, I asked for their future plans.
Fisher is getting ready to bring out a new album in the fall and will do some
"conventional touring," as will Georgas this fall, while Said the Whale and Aidan
Knight participated in the Peak Performance Project at the end of August And
then Bancroft added, "Directly after this show? I'll ride my bike home."
23 I a u
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Si g I S      6 //CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
SUNDAY
MONDAY
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6am
7
11
1
1
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Blood On
The Saddle
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7
I
9
10
11
12am
1
%
3
4
5
CiTR Ghost Mix
Tana Radio (World)
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KolNodedi (World)
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Radio Freethinker
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CiTR Ghost Mix
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CiTR Listener Hour
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jeneration Annihilatioi
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6am
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Notes from the
Underground
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KSfflk Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
1
w
3
4
5
H
7
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11
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26 SUNDAY
The one and the only Mon-
Explore the avant-garde
extraordinaire Freddie Hub
WINGS
do Trasho with Maxwell
world of music with host
bard from his sophomore
(Talk) 3-3:30pm
TANA RADIO
Maxwell—don't miss it!
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
album, Goin' Up with Hank
Alternating Tuesdays
(World) g-ioam
From new electronic and
Mobley, McCoy Tyner and
TRANCENDANCE
experimental music to
Philly Joe Jones.
VPROFTALK
SHOOKSHOOKTA
(Dance) iopm-i2am
improvised jazz and new
(Talk) 3-3:30pm
(Talk) io-iiam
Join us in practicing the
classical! So weird it will
TUESDAY
Alternating Tuesdays
A program targeted to
ancient art of rising above
blow your mind!
Bringing UBC's professors
Ethiopian people that
common ideas as your host
PACIFIC PICKIN'
on air to talk about current/
encourages education and
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
NEWS 101
(Roots) 6-8am
past events at the local and
personal development.
latest trance cuts.
(Talk) 5-6pm
Bluegrass, old-time music,
international level. Aiming
trancendance@
Vancouver's only live,
and its derivatives with
to provide a space for fac
KOLNODEDI
hotmail.com.
volunteer-produced,
Arthur and the lovely
ulty and doctoral level stu
(World) nam-i2pm
student and community
Andrea Berman.
dents to engage in dialogue
Beautiful arresting beats
THROWDOWN FM
newscast. Every week, we
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
and share their current
and voices emanating from
(Dance / Electronic) 12-iam
take a look back at the
research, and to provide a
all continents, corners and
Hosts  Downtown  Stacee
week's local, national and
SOUNDS OF AFRICA
space for interdisciplinary
voids. Always rhythmic,
Brown and Jen Slator are proud
international news, as seen
(World) 8-9:30am
thinking. Interviews with
always captivating. Always
to announce that our playlist
from a fully independent
Showcasing music, current
professors from a variety of
crossing borders.
for each and every show will be
100 per cent Vancouver, B.C.
media perspective.
affairs & news from across
the African continent and
disciplines.
http://ubcproftalk.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
based underground music of
CAREER FAST TRACK
the diaspora, you will learn
wordpress.com
(Reggae) n-3pm
the sub-bass generation. This
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
all about beat and rhythm
proftalk@gmail.com
Reggae inna all styles and
means you'll never hear a track
Join host and author
and it will certainly kick-
fashions.
that's not from our west coast
province of B.C. We call our
Philippe Desrochers as
he teaches you how to
start your day.
RADIO FREETHINKER
(Talk)3:30-4:3opm
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
selves collectively: The Local
dramatically INCREASE
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
Promoting skepticism, criti
(Roots) 3-5pm
Union 604. ThrowdownFM@
your income doing work
(Rock) 9:30-n:30am
cal thinking and science, we
Alternating Sundays
gmail.com
you LOVE.
Open your ears and prepare
examine popular extraor
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
for a shock! A harmless
dinary claims and subject
boots country.
MONDAY
SORE THROATS, CLAPPING
HANDS
note may make you a fan!
Deadlier than the most
them to critical analysis.
The real world is a beautiful
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 6:30-7:3opm
dangerous criminals!
and fascinating place and
(Pop) 5-6pm
(Eclectic) 8-uam
Sore Throats, Clapping
borninsixtynine@
we want people to see it
Alternatina Sundays
Your favourite Brownsters,
Hands relies on simple
hotmail.com
through the lens of reality
British pop music from all
James and Peter, offer a
melodies and poignant lyri
as opposed to superstition.
decades. International pop
savoury blend of the famil
cism to drive our passions.
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Japanese, French, Swedish,
iar and exotic in a blend of
We embrace music that
(Eclectic) ii:3oam-ipm
IN THE CAGE WITH BARDS
British, US, etc.), '60s sound
aural delights.
takes little production and,
An eclectic mix of Canadian
(Talk) 4:30-5pm
tracks and lounge.
breakfastwiththebrowns@
for that reason, is extremely
indie with rock, experimen
Join Carlin Bardsley as he
hotmail.com
accessible to play, share,
tal, world, reggae, punk
welcomes the top names
SAINT TROPEZ
create and enjoy—music
and ska from Canada, Latin
in Canadian Mixed Martial
(Pop) 5-6pm
STRANDED
that can be produced with
America and Europe. The
Arts to put up their dukes
Alternatina Sundays
(Eclectic) nam-i2pm
little more than clapping
Morning After Show has lo
and discuss the fastest
Welcome to St. Tropez!
Join your host Matthew for
hands arid sore throats.
cal bands playing live on the
growing sport in the world.
Playing underrated music
a weekly mix of exciting
Morning After Sessions.
Recaps, interviews, tunes
from several decades!
sounds, past and present,
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
and more... it's the most
st. tropez101.9@gmail.com
from his Australian homeland. And journey with him
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
LAUGH TRACKS
(Talk)i-2pm
fun you can have without
being punched in the face!
QUEER FM
as he features fresh tunes
THE JAZZ SHOW
Laugh Tracks is a show about
(Talk) 6-8pm
and explores the alternative
(Jazz) 9pm-i2am
comedy. Kliph Nesteroff
CITR SPORTS SHOW
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
musical heritage of Canada.
Vancouver's longest
from the 'zine, Generation
(Talk) 5-6pm
bisexual and transexual com
running prime-time jazz
Exploitation, hosts.
munities of Vancouver. Lots
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
program. Hosted by Gavin
generationexploit@yahoo.
FLEX YOUR HEAD
of human interest features,
(Talk) 12-ipm
Walker. Features at npm.
com, musicalboot@
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
background on current
Hosted by David Barsamian.
Sept. 6: Although tomorrow
yahoo.ca
Punk rock and hardcore since
issues and great music.
is Sonny Rollins' birthday
1989. Bands and guests from
queerfmradio@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) i-3pm
we're celebrating it tonight
with his classic, Sonny Rol
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
(World) 2-3pm
around the world.
RHYTHMSINDIA
An indie pop show since
lins At The Villaae Vanguard
Sample the various
LIFE ON JUMPSTREET
(World) 8-9pm
1999, it's like a marshmal-
Sept. 13: Our bow to music
flavours of Italian folk
(Dance) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
low sandwich: soft and
education: A History of Jazz, ■
music from north to
Featuring a wide range of
sweet and best enjoyed
- narrated by the great alto
south, traditional to
CRIMES & TREASONS
music from India, including
when poked with a stick
saxophonist Julian "Can-
modern on this bilingual
(Hip-hop) 9-npm
popular music from the 1930s
and held close to a fire.
nonball" Adderley.
Italian/English show. Un
crimesandtreasons@
to the present; Ghazals and
Sept. 20: Continuing the
programma bilingue che
gmail.com
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
MANTIS CABINET
"back to school" mode:
esplora il mondo della
regional language numbers.
(Eclectic) 3"4pm
Maestro Leonard Bernstein's entertaining dis
musica etnica italiana.
CABARADIO
(Talk) upm-i2:3oam
MONDOTRASHO
THE RIB
sertation What Is Jazz?
For the world of Cabaret
(Eclectic) 9-iopm
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
Sept. 27: Trumpeter
Tune in for interviews,
27 skits, musical guests and
more. It's Radio with sass!
WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information and
inanity. Not to be missed!
dj@jackvelvet. net
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) io-ii:3oam
ANOIZE
(Noise) ii:3oam-ipm
An hour and a half of avant-
rock, noize, plunderphonic,
psychedelic and outsider
aspects of audio. An experience for those who want to
be educated and EARitated.
lukemeat@hotmaiI.com
THE GREEN MAJORITY
(Talk) i-zpm
Canada's only environmental news hour, syndicated by
CIUT 89.5 FM Toronto or
uMiu.greenmajority.ca.
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-spm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
REEL TO REAL
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
Movie reviews and
criticism.
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternatina Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a
focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail. com
SHAMELESS
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternatina Wednesdays
Dedicated to giving local
music acts a crack at some
airplay. When not playing
the PRshtick, you can hear
some faves you never knew
you liked.
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big emphasis on our local scene.
C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997.
fo!koasis@gmail .com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-iipm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvanclty.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) npm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET AND HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and hot
jazz from the 1920s, '30s
and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
duncansdonuts.
wordpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we interview a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:30pm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World) 3:30-5pm
French language and music.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
(Talk) 5-6pm
A national radio service and
part of an international network of information and action in support of indigenous
peoples' survival and dignity.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
Celebrating the message
behind the music: Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:3o-9pm
Experimental, radio-art,
sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended for
the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-upm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie
rock, hip-hop and reggae to
bring you up with the sun.
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) 9-ioam
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality, health
and feeling good. Tune in
and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun! This is not your average
spirituality show.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program.
djska_t@hotmail.com
CITR LISTENER HOUR
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Tune in each week as you,
the CiTR fan, gets to program an hour of adventure
for the whole world to hear!
For more info, contact
program coordinator Bryce
Dunn at citrprogramming@
club.ams.ubc.ca.
BARNBURNER
(Eclectic) i-2pm
The greasier side of rock
'n' roll, rhythm 'n' blues,
and country... Crack a beer,
order some BBQ, and get
your!
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:3opm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo!
nardwuar@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
HOT MESS
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
With banging beats of rock,
funk, electro and more
music from the beautiful DJ
Blonde Tron and entertaining banter from seasoned
hosts Jay and Eddy.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present and future
including jazz, soul, hip-
hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
Plus interviews with local
and international artists.
Truly international flavour.
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) io:3o-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampiresball.
blogspotxom.
thevampiresball@gmail.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.c0m
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk
and old-school hardcore
backed by band interviews,
guest speakers and social
commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by
Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy and Paul.
codeblue@
buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada.com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community, local and abroad,
nashavolna.ca
NOTES FROM THE
UNDERGROUND
(Electronic/Hip-hop/More)
7-9pm
Start your Saturday night
off right with our weekly
showcase of the local
underground DJ and
electronic music scene.
notesundergroundradio.
blogspot.com
notesundergroundradio@
gmail.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-npm
If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip-hop) npm-iam
Mr. Joi, being a cinemaphile
as well as a DJ, will surprise
you with the likes of:
French NewWave, Golden
Age, Noir, Action, Adventure, Comedy, Coming of
Age Drama, Epic/Myth,
Fantasy, Gangster, Horror,
Romantic Comedy, Science
Fiction, Social Drama,
Thriller, the Art Film, the
Black Comedy, the Musical
and the Porno.
28 //SLEEPLESS IN SALMO
SHAMBHALA MUSIC FESTIVAL DELIVERS 100,000 WATTS OF WOMP WOMP WOMP
BY SARAH BERMAN
PHOTO BY SYD WOODWARD
Contrary to what you may or may not have been told, Shambhala Music
Festival is not held in outer space. But considering its remoteness,
heart-stopping volume and 10,000 sparkle-encrusted attendees, it
may as well be.
It's a place where crystal healings and beatboxing tournaments happen in
confusingly close proximity; where entire rivers are inexplicably dyed fluorescent green; and where motorized couches pass as entirely reasonable means
of transport. Hosted on a 500-acre cattle ranch near Salmo, B.C.—about an
eight-hour drive from Vancouver—Shambhala is a dance party destination for
those craving spooky encounters of an electronic kind.
The first thing you would notice when arriving at Shambhala is the constant
drone of bass. At all hours of the night and in every corner of the forested
campgrounds you are followed by a dizzying wobble, a pulsating thump and
an occasional bout of spontaneous bleep-bloops.
That's because the festival's six stages are decked out with intimidatingly
massive sound systems, capable of spraying up to 130 decibels of amped-up
electro madness. (For the sake of comparison, that's a handful ofdB short of a
jet engine at close range). For better or for worse, this ensures nearly everybody
on the ranch continues dancing well past dawn.
Shambhala stacks are custom-designed by PK Sound, an Alberta company
that specializes in all things bassy. "We've always been into bass music," explained Jeremy Bridge, sound engineer at PK and director of The Village stage.
"Ever since the beginning, we've always wanted to build a sound system that
caters towards dubstep, glitch and the electronic scene in general."
Bridge himself is a DJ and producer, who performed at the festival under
the name Subvert. "It's something we've felt other stereo systems lack.... A
lot of the speaker companies out there were born in the days of rock and roll,
and so their designers catered to what they love," he said.
"We all come from the electronic music side of things. That's what we love,
that's what we design for," he added.
More than 200 bands and DJs camped out in the woods for a chance to be
heard on such coveted amplifiers, including Bassnectar,- NERO and up-and-
coming Brooklyn disco duo Holy Ghost!. In the past, the festival has also
hosted some prolific bass innovators, including New York's Drop the Lime,
and Skream from the UK.
At Shambhala the tunes are not just heard, but felt Sound waves reverberate
in your chest, making for a visceral, bodily experience. "That has to do with
the amount of low-frequency reinforcement we put in," Bridge said of the
adrenalin-rousing phenomenon. (Translation: they've got a shitload of sub-
woofers). The Village stage boasts 21 carefully-placed subs, a number Bridge
said is probably double that of a comparably sized rock venue.
Hence, when a Shambhala vet like Bassnectar gets behind the DJ booth and
begins weaving brain-fracturing beats on the fly, the result is a little bit insane.
"I had to give myself a time out after that set—I couldn't handle it anymore,"
Bridge recalled. "It was just so awesome—I had to."
Bassnectar's set, though undeniably epic in volume and energy, was not
without its complications. "There was a little mix-up, a few breakers blew, and
the sound was funny for two or three minutes," Bridge said. "It was a little bit
of a heart-racing momenL"
Now in its thirteenth year, Shambhala has established a core group of
Kootenay-area DJs, including Shasta, Excision, Lion-S and Adham Shaikh. These
guys have been around since the festival's beginnings, and can expertly adapt
to the whims of a crowd. At times it feels like the festival itself has spawned
its own bizarre brand of psychedelic forest DJs, best exemplified by Organic
Mechanic or JPOD (the beat chef).
Vancouver was well represented this year by Longwalkshortdock, Glitchy &
Scratchy, Love & Electrik, Five Alarm Funk and Sweatshop Union. All were met
with huge crowds of sweating, costumed dance-a-trons and left with new fans
and followers. (Apparently My!Gay!Husband! was there too, but he neglected
to show up for his 3 a.m. set), [ed. Tsk tsk.]
"The vibe just keeps getting better and better every year," Bridges said of
the sold-out 10,000-person crowd.
But because Shambhala is so far away from the West's major metropolises
(Calgary comes in closest at seven hours away) the festival remains a well-kept
party secret. "You have to really want to go—which sort of niters out the bad
eggs," he said. ^
29 BY BRAD WINTER
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
DJ TAME IL IS ONE OF THE MOST HIGHLY RESPECTED BALTIMORE CLUB PRODUCERS. A PROLIFIC PRODUCER AND
ACTIVE DJ, HE PERFORMS AT THE HOTTEST PARTIES IN THE USA AND EUROPE. DISCORDER WAS LUCKY ENOUGH TO CATCH
HIM THE FIRST TIME HE WAS IN CANADA. IN THIS IN-DEPTH INTERVIEW, HE TALKS ABOUT THE OVER 60 MEMBER BALTIMORE-BASED DJ CREW BRICK BANDITS STARTING UP, DUBSTEP, DJING WITH CASSETTE DECKS, WIKIPEDIA, AMATEUR DJS
FLOODING THE INTERNET AND BEING REDMAN'S NEIGHBOUR GROWING UP.
DISCORDER: SO I READ YOU WERE REDMAN'S NEIGHBOUR?
DJ Tameil: Yeah, we're sorta like cousins but not cousins, you know. It was
because we grew up together. His mother is like my grandmother's sister,
you know. Ifs just like a big family thing, even though we're not family. [He]
pretty much taught me how to DJ before time, you know I was about seven
years old, and it was the first time that I was ever actually on the stage in front
of a crowd, at my uncle's wedding, and I played EU's "Doin da Butt."... Once
I got the crowd response from that, it was just like, in my mind, "Wow! You
know I could actually be a DJ!"
D: YOU USED TO USE TAPES, YOU USED TO BREAK THE DOORS OFF CASSETTE PLAYERS
RIGHT?
T: Oh yes, I could tell you a long story about that. I actually have somebody
thafs outdone me, but yeah, I used to break the tape doors off the radios
and just slow the tapes down with my fingers so that I could get a good mix,
and I would record the mix with another radio... It was just so much, man!
I would end up with like three different radios just so I could get everything
right. One to cue the records up, one to play and one to record.... You gotta
do what you gotta do!
D: SO CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THE BRICK BANDITS CREW, WHAT THAT'S ALL ABOUT?
T: Oh the Brick Bandits crew was... OK I'll give you a little history on that Yeah,
you know, for a few years before that, you know, I used to be the known guy
around Jersey, you know, when it came to Chicago Juke music, I was the man
to go to, because you know, I used to get all the records before everyone else.
So they knew me to be the go-to guy and then I got introduced to some of the
guys from Baltimore that [were] producing, and at the time I was young, so
you know, they weren't really accepting me but I was buying all their records.
After a while they saw that I was really serious, and I was producing Baltimore-
style tracks and bringing it to them, and they'd listen to it and they'd be like
"OK, you definitely got a different style, you add a little bit more to it." They
gave me their blessings to bring it back to Jersey, and thafs when I created the
Jersey side of it, which I call Brick City Club music; but ifs still Baltimore Club
music, you know. Thafs where it came from. You know then after about a few
years, I would say around maybe 2002, and I met these guys Tim Dolla, Mike
V, Black Mike, and you know, it was a couple of guys in the crew but actually
what happened was I had the whole scene on lock and they knew that they had
to come through me to get known by everybody else. So actually what happened
was I had a vinyl that I pressed up myself, I had started my own label, Anthrax
Records. And to me, well, I listen to it to this day, and this probably happens
with everybody—I can't stand those recordsl I can't stand them. You know, I
listen to the way I produce now, and the way that I did then. My sound then was
so flat! But I guess they saw that side of it, and they decided to attack it.
D: THE BALTIMORE PEOPLE YOU MEAN?
T: No no no, the Brick Bandits! So they're also from Jersey. OK, so what happened was they decided to attack that, and I had a lot of CDs out at the time,
so they put out one CD, I guess it was like one or two guys that had stands
that I actually bought from them, so I just happened to be blasting my music
on my stand one day, and I heard a guy down the street, and all I heard was
"eeexcluusiiive!" That was the Brick Bandits drop at the time! So after I heard
that, I turned mine down, and I'm listening, and I heard one of my records
playing at first. And I was like "Oh cool!" you know, "Somebody else bought
my record!" So all of a sudden, you know, it was just like a record scratching
"rrrrrrip!" and then you heard some laughing and everything like that, so I
was like "Wait a minute!" I went and got the CD, I was listening to it myself,
so I called the number that was on the bottom of the CD. I was like, "What
the hell, that was supposed to be a diss towards my music?" And the guy on
the phone... deep voice, he's just like "Yeah! Yeah mothafucka yeah!" I'm like
"What the hell?" That was Mike V of course! [laughs] Mike V is like Debo! Mike
V actually reminds you of... you ever seen Everybody Hates Chris, the father on it?
The big guy! Thafs who he looks like, and we crack on him about that all the
30 time, but instead of us taking it to a level where, you know, it would get like
stupid and everything like that, because we had a lot of teenagers [as fans],
and we still do these days. We try to look like big brothers and sisters to them,
so you know, it would be stupid for us to go back and forth and create a scene
where they would think that ifs something more than it is, so we decided to
put all of that aside, and come together as a team, you know. And to this day
we just have a huge family. We don't even really call it a team or anything like
that anymore. We just call it a family, because thafs actually what it is, you
know, ifs a family.
D: SO YOU WERE ALREADY HIGHLY RESPECTED BECAUSE OF THE CHICAGO JUKE THING?
T: Yeah, it was that first, and then it went on to the Baltimore stuffbecause, you
know, I was producing that at the time, and I was the only guy doing it Yeah
I was the only guy doing the Baltimore sound, and that sound was growing at
the time in Jersey, you know, because they were buying the records from the
store down there, Music Liberated, which the guy Bernie, rest in peace, he died
in a car accident, but he had everything. He was the man to go to. Just like they
had Barnie's records in Chicago [which] was putting out all of the juke music.
He was the man for Baltimore Club because he was the man with the money
that was putting out all of the vinyls like every week. So yeah, everybody was
buying from this guy, and pretty much the scene was really growing in Jersey
at the time, and being that I was the guy that was producing that everybody
knew at the time—plus I had the Chicago side; it was just like, wow, I was just
the man not to be messing with, and they knew that. Thafs why they tried to
come at me so that I would actually say their names and blow them up, but it
went the opposite way. But we formed a family after that.
D: I ALSO PICKED SOMETHING UP, YOU'RE ABOUT TO WORK ON SOMETHING IN CHICAGO
CALLED "IT'S ABOUT TIME RECORDS?"
[Brad's note: the label is now officially called "Ghettophiles."]
T: Yeah, actually there's this guy in Chicago named Neema. He started this
new record label, which is... actually this is a good thing because now that I
met him, I ran into a lot of the cats from Chicago that I used to look up to,
and he introduced me to some of them. And ... afterwards, after I just did
this tour in Europe, and the United Kingdom, I was with these two guys from
Chicago named DJ Rashad and DJ Spinn, and actually we're about to work
on a joint venture that will cross the two, and this is gonna be big, man, ifs
gonna be big! [laughs]
D: SO WHAT NEW MUSIC STYLES ARE YOU FEELING NOW?
T: Oh, new music styles. They might not be so new, but they're new to me.
Ok, I would have to say electro for one... and dubstep! Dubstep has grown on
me in the past year and a half. Like, I love it! I can't stay away from it now, and
ifs funny because the area where I'm from, it used to be open, like when there
was just the huger DJs' names around, like there were ones before me, like
Cool Lou and a few others, but at the time you know... I think this happens
everywhere. I think it pretty much happens everywhere, where nowadays you
have DJs that just can't DJ at all. And everybody wants to be a DJ just because
they get their hands on a piece of equipment or a program and this and that,
and you know they really can't do anything! [laughs] But actually how that goes
is, my area is so stuck right now, to one or two styles of music. They don't
like to listen to anything outside of what they know, so when I'm riding down
my street they see my BMW coming down the street and I got a loud system.
I got a loud system in my BMW! [laughs] So I came back from Texas the year
before last playing dubstep, and I still do to this day, and people were lookin'
at me like, "What the hell is that? That sounds like transformer music!" I'm
like "Open your eyes. You don't know. You don't know about this stuff right
here, ifs huge." But I'm hooked on it now because I've seen great people play
it. Like I would say AC Slater. AC Slater's great! And I've seen DJ Craze play it
DJ Craze and DJ Klever, like, those were the most awesome sets to me. I think
that was what turned me on to it right there, you know, when I seen them play
it, and then afterwards I just started to look up more tracks and it was just
like, it just blew my mind, man! Jakes, I met Jakes. Jakes is one of the coolest
guys ever man! [laughs]
D: DO YOU HAVE ANY TIPS FOR ANYONE WHO WANTS TO GET INTO PRODUCING, ANY
TECHNICAL TIPS YOU CAN LET US IN ON?
T; For producing? I would just say about my brand of music, but I'm gonna
say for all brands of music right now, if you want to be involved in a certain
style of music, please study it before you try to do any tracks because... you
actually hurt the people that have been there before you. You know, you come
outand you thinkyou know whatyou're doing, and don't know anything about
the history, so now you come out with all of these wack tracks and everything
like that, and you're flooding the Internet, you're flooding everywhere with it
... I'm not really even going to diss a new producer like that, I'm just going to
say, just study before you get into it Thafs really all I have to say about that
you know, because ifs been a big change in music lately where there's just a
lot of people that see the popularity, they see that they can get popular from
it or make money from it, or get girls that like them just because they do it
and they don't know anything about the history at all. Like, I've heard a lot of
false stories and you know a lot of this floats around the Internet too! Like:
"Perculator came from Baltimore." No. Perculator came from Chicago! And you
know, ifs just a whole bunch of false information. I think that if people really
want to know the history of a music, they should go and study it Find out who
was there first Find out the real facts, the real truth from the people who were
there, the people who did it, instead of just finding a bunch of information
from places like Wikipedia... So yeah, definitely do a lot of studying before you
get into it. And if you get into it, make sure your heart is into it. You know, and
this is what you really want to do and, you know, cross-reference the two, man,
study... You know, my practice was every day, daily. I would recommend that
to everybody, too. You know, if thafs what you really want to do, then practice
it every day. I ate DJing, I slept DJing, I... everything, you know. DJing.
D: AND YOUR FAMILY TOO, RIGHT?
T: Yeah, all of my uncles were DJs, you know. I don't know why they gave up...
[laughs]. You know I held on to it even though they gave it up, I was just telling,
ifs funny I was just telling one of the old G producers that I look up to, from
Baltimore, Technics, I was just telling him the other day that when my uncle,
one of my main uncles that was DJing, he threw out all of his records, and put
'em on the side of the house. I maybe was around, I probably was seven or eight
years old at the time! But there was this one particular record, I knew the label
of it, I just knew what it looked like. And when I seen those records out on the
side of the house that day, it kinda hurt me that he stopped, but I was like, "I
gotta look for that record!" It was Vaughan Mason's Bounce Rock Skate Roll! I
took that record out of the trash and I held onto it... I hid it under the couch
... I just had to have it! You know, I mean... DJing just meant so much to me,
you know? I just wanted to be a DJ so bad, you know, so I went through life, I
remember all of the first records that I had of my own, that I used to play on
my Fisher-Price turntable. Redman's mother actually gave me a copy ofjames
Brown's Living in America... my mother bought me New Edition's Candy Girl. I
had Rebbie Jackson's Centipede. Man [laughs], I remember all of that stuff! And
ifs funny I can remember all of that stuff when I was so young, but you can ask
me about somebody I met last week and I'm like "who?" [laughs]  fc  TELUS STUDIO THEATRE AT THE CHAN CENTRE | UBC
Be a part of a live studio audience with these intimate Thursday evening recording
sessions for CBC Radio 2's Canada Live series.
featuring
THURSDAY SEP 23 7:00PM
Like a lazy summer's day, Victoria band Jon and Roy's
smooth brand of folk-reggae-rock is the perfect antidote
for our busy lives. With the release of their new album,
Homes, in April 2010 they finish off their tour of
Western Canada on the coast in their classic laid-back
style.
THURSDAY SEP 30 7:00PM
From the wiid boreal woodlands of the Canadian subarctic, Art Napoleon sings an original brand of bush
country blues combining the sounds of old hand-drums,
fiddles, guitars and harmonica with his unique brand
of storytelling. With special guest appearance by his
daughter, Niska.
ItMLETISALES fiCT 7
THURSDAY OCT 7 7:00PM
Growing up on an organic blueberry farm on
Vancouver Island, surrounded by Tibetan monks,
Hayley Sales has what you might call an eclectic
background. Her latest album, When the Bird Became
a Book reflects her fresh, folk-island style.
ALL AGES!      Student tickets only $10
Ticketmaster.ca | 604.280.3311 (service charges apply) or Chan Centre Ticket Office (in person only)
WWW.CHANCENTRE.COM
straight
CBC
radio^-
105.71
le chateau
Live Sessions Discorder ad.indd   1
8/24/2010 3:57:10 PM HEALTH
//UNDER
REVIEW
4*1
>^m
ARCADE FIRE
THE SUBURBS
(Mtrgt)   \
^^^o^^^^^^^^^te^^^^e
was released, the most groundbreaking work from the indie rock outfit
Arcade Fire. The album was completely electrifying—with haunt-
ingly beautiful riffs and the screams
of frontman Win Butler—Montreal
certainly made a name for itself on
the international scene.
Arcade Fire's third full-length The
Suburbs is extremely different compared to their past work, but is an
excellent new chapter for the group.
Based on childhood tales ofWin and
his brother William (who plays keys)
growing up in Houston, the songs on
the album sound much like a lovelorn
letter to naivety and suburban wonder,
with just the right amount of tentative
diffidence.
The title track opens up with a
piano-heavy riffsounding somewhat
inspired by Billy Joel, and sets the tone
for a mellowed, completely honeyed
Arcade Fire experience. With the exception of "Month of May," which
sounds like something Sonic Youth
could have written, the album strays
away from anything distorted or
sonically experimental. One standout
track, "Rococo," is probably the best
thing on the record. It'sgot crescendo
in all the right places, with Win delicately whispering the song's title in
a way that sends shivers right down
the spine. With words like "Let's go
downtown and talk to the modern
kids/ They will eat right out of your
hand/ Using great big words that they
don't understand," it's pretty easy to
conjure up this kind of imagery when
the lyrical component is so universally
understood.
For a group that seems like they're
carrying the weight of the world on
their shoulders, this album is seamless and lacks any kind of undeserved
pretension. With BBC critic rightfully describing The Suburbs as their
OK Computer, this is without a doubt
their masterpiece.
—Mine'Salkin
CHROMEO
BUSINESS CASUAL
(Last Gang)
The Montreal duo Chromeo has
released their third album, Business
Casual and it is just that: smooth and
laid back styles of some long gone
'80s aficionados (think Toto, or Christopher Cross) layered over the same
funky *8os beats that made them famous on albums like their 2007 work,
Fancy Footwork.
Business Casual starts with the ease
of a synthesizer's beat, hypnotic and
trance-like with lyrical sampling, but
quickly explodes into the catchy narratives and well placed percussion
and accents Chromeo is known for.
In true fashion, "HotMess," the opening track, samples heavy synthesizers,
slick keyboards and precisely timed
backbeats that sets up for the rest of
the album. The stand out hits "Night
by Night," a disco-tinged, relendess
song that will definitely keep dance
floors moving, and "Don't Turn the
Lights On," a slow-burner that's
cheeky chorus will be drunkenly
::DISC02l
shouted from many a dance circle,
promise to get heavy rotation on
any playlist. My favourite song was
definitely "When the Night Falls."
It features Solange Knowles accompanying Dave 1, and showcases her
powerful, soulful but controlled voice,
which manages to keep in tune with
Chromeo's tongue and cheek lyrical style, as well as musical sense
of humour. The song is fun and
playful and a far cry from the lowly
comparison of the David Guetta/
Kelly Rowland number.
The strides towards a more disco-
esque style coupled with cliched 8o's
pop music (Hall & Oates) balances
well for most of the album, especially
in "The Right Type," but it can tend
to drag. Although, what I love about
Chromeo is that they earnestly appreciate the musical era they grew up in
and continue to use those influences
while keeping a humourous tone
about themselves and their music.
Nothing is too serious to make fun
of and nothing is too silly to not take
seriously. And for that, this album will
be played at DJ booths everywhere.
—Kaitlin McNabb
HEALTH
01SC02
(Lavtpump United)
L.A. harbingers of soke HEALTH
decided to subject their 2009 release
Get Color to the same treatment as
their self-titled debut, distributing
the tracks amongst their favourite
electronic wizards to be remixed and
reinterpreted. DISCO2 completely
reinvents the already acclaimed Get
Color and opens it up to a wider, if
not completely different audience.
For good measure, HEALTH starts
the collection of remixes off with a
brand new single produced by Alan
Moulder (who is responsible for My
Bloody Valentine, NIN and Depeche
Mode to name a few). "USA Boys" is
a departure from the quartet's usual
noisy compositions. It is a surprisingly calm track with deep beats and
ambient vocals, setting the pace for
the remixes to follow. CFCF is first
up, taking "Before Tigers" and manipulating the three-and-a-half minutes of resonating noise into a gentle
five-minute melody. Javelin manages
to turn the erratic "In Heat" into a
funked-out dance track while the
trashy buzz and quick rolling beats
of "Nice Girls" are transformed into
a pleasant, mid tempo journey with
Litde Loud at the wheel. Most notable
(and full of super-hipster prestige) is
the rematch between HEALTH and
Crystal Castles. This time, HEALTH
throws "Eat Flesh "'into the ring and
Crystal Castles chews up the chaotic
whirlwind of minimalist noise, spitting out an electronic tsunami born of
the same spirit. All in all, 11 tracks are
cleverly re-imagined, ultimately offering an interesting and more widely
accessible perspective on HEALTH'S
original conceptions.
—MarkPaulHus
HOTPAHDA
WHYAMIOEAB?
{Miffi$
|i^^;|^ptle, Edmonton's Hot
Panda is very much alive. The quartet's
sophomore release finds the quartet
in the vital and creative throws of their
youth. Their distinctive core sound allows them to experiment and explore
34 musically without losing their sense
of themselves as a band. The songs
on Why Am I Dead? are diverse and
dynamic without being inaccessible as
an album. There is the art rock intro
"Membership Fees" for the VU set
and the oddly aggressive, humorous
and very catchy hip hop rant "Fuck
Shit Up/ Hell Hey Hex" for those that
like to drive with the windows down.
The country duet "Shoot the Horse"
is a sweet piece of Canadiana with
Leonard Cohen-esque male vocals
contrasted by a beautiful female voice
and capped off with a guitar solo that
pays tribute to Neil Young. Mixed in
with all that are a few more commonplace, melodic indie rock tracks like
"Start Making Sense" that will have
everyone singing along with Chris
Connelly's simple yet shrewd lyrics.
Why am I Dead? proves to be an ironic
title for such a vibrant, lighthearted
and intelligent album from a band
who obviously has a blast making
music.
—MarkPauIHus
^AILL
THAT'S HOW WE BURN
*$ub Pop)
-Cwat&e spellers and Milwaukee four-
piece Jaill sound like the type ofband
that "practices" rather than "jams."
Every song on their big label debut
That's How We Bum fits into a cohesive
garage-pop aesthetic; the riffs are watertight, the drum licks indestructible.
Never mind improvising—everything
from lead singer Vincent Kircher's
conversational melodies to the subdued hints ofWisconsin twang—feel
polished and calculated.
When executed properly, this strategy knocks it out of the park. Like
the sweet bubblegum pop riffage on
"Everybody's Hip" (which could have
easily been written by a member of
Vancouver's own indie rock royalty).
Hooks are clean and distilled to their
most energizing essence. The track
stands out as the sunniest effort on
an album that seems to intentionally
evoke images of empty saloons and
overcast beaches.
However, such a methodological
approach to Midwestern alt-rock is at
times deflated. Like that uneasy feeling
caused by a stark turn in the weather,
many songs leave you wishing the lyrics were actually saying something,
or that there were at least a few solid
weeks left in the summer. In fact,
That's Hou; We Burn is sort of a sonic
manifestation of the end of summer
blues, rife with inoffensive jangling
and semi-boring guitar solos.
—Sarah Berman
IDH
ARMS LEGS FEET
(Beatismw$0
Mixed at &ue#a Vista Au^J§l4g^
ley, B.C., an unlikely locale to spawn
such a promising work of indie-tron-
ica, JDH's debut album is downright
excellent. With his delicate voice and
superb computer-music skills, this
album should be categorized in the
same vein as heavies the Postal Service, Frou Frou and Vampire Weekend. Taking four years to record, Arms
legs Feet is a paragon of technical execution, meticulous editing and soulful lyricism.
While the album is a collage of
covers ranging from Sufjan Stevens
to Fugazi, it's not a creative cop out
in the least, "Quiet Noise," a stripped-
down, almostvintage-sounding track,
is hypnotic, and chronicles the musician's plight since he started the project. During the time it took to make
Arms Le^s Feet, JDH survived cancer,
had a baby and broke both wrists after
Arms Leas Feet, JDH survived cancer, had
a baby and broke both wrists after a
12-foot fall. With the soft crooning and
slightly honeyed tragedy in his voice,
"Quiet Noise" is a perfect summation
of this artist's life events.
JDH doesn't work in a vacuum either. The tragic passing of drummer Devon Clifford of You Say Party! inspired
him to release "Wake/Sleep Prince," a
single released under Branches, one of
his many side projects.    s
This review would be remiss not to
mention that JDH—which stands for
Jonny Dylan Hughes—is a pretty badass
name sure to garner more attention for
his innovative and brass approach to
electronic pop music.
—Mine'Salkin
LIKEAMARTO
AS LONG AS YOU D0N7 BET CAUGHT
(Fantasy Ranch)
like AMarty* doesn't mess around too
much with fancy bells and whistles or
mega production tricks in order to
produce good music. A true adage
to the term "less is more" LAM are
straight up rock and they don't make
any apologies for it. You either love
them or you don't and chances are,
whatever your take, the band will keep
on doing what they do exactly how
they want to do it.
As long As You Don't Get Caught is
LAM's second full-length and is a
stronger and more assured reality
than their first album, The North. The
band is solid and they don't fake any
punches or butter you up with sweet
tales of girly drinks and pink sugar
cupcake icing. The opening title track
showcases the band hard tapping into
their inner AC/DC while holding onto
their own. Then along comes "Calloused Hand By Calloused Hand" to
toughen things up a little more. Of
course, like any good formulaic rock
record there are bluesy riffs, drunken
piss taking and even the odd "power
ballad."
Singer/guitarist Jeremy Ailing-
ham's loose and dirty bad-child guitar and leathery voice play centre to a
tight as hell band that creates good
gritty music for the rocker in us all
and as far as shameless rock records
go, As long As You Don't Get Caught is
good as gold.
—Nathaniel Bryce
MIND CINEMA
(Independent) ;
Any ami,£f| activities that require
alertness orattentiveness should be
avoided while listening to the debut
release from Mind Cinema as their
pedigree of upbeat ambient shoegaze
will undoubtedly encourage the mind
to slip in and out of consciousness-
no stimulants needed. Sun Beat features layered meandering guitars,
mesmerizing beats and soft, dreamy
vocals all sounding like they were
recorded in a huge echoing palace.
"Monkeys" welcomes the listener
with a country twang and harmonized vocals which get sampled over
each other to produce the ambient
wanderings of the track. "Lovesick
High" seamlessly continues the vibe
with toasty synths that are careful
to avoid sounding cheap or cheesy.
Their single, "Solar Rays," is an epic
of strings, synths, melt-in-your-ear
vocals and a motif that comes as close
to a chorus as you will get on the album. "The Downsides of Freedom''
contains uncharacteristic aggressive
vocal bellows midway through the
track that sound a tad out of place,
but the spacey delayed guitars are a
good consolation. The album finishes
with "Rec 22," an indie pop song at
its foundation fed through a thousand
delay and reverb machines creating a
warm and soft finale to the eight-song
EP. Based out ofVancouver and Mexico, Mind Cinema has created a debut
with many memorable moments that
will echo into your subconsciousness,
and though you may not be humming
any of the tunes in the shower, you will
appreciate the masterfully blended
soundscapes and hypnotizing beats.
The EPis available for a free download
from their website, www.themind-
cinema.com.
—Slavko Bucifal
PINEV$U
ftNEAPfll
(Independent
The listener will know exactly what to
expcctrroni Pineapple s debut release
just by looking at the artwork. The
album cover depicts four indie-nerds
and a roaring grizzly bear superimposed against a glowing intergalactic
night sky (an obvious choice of graphics for a band named after a popular
tropical fruit). Featuring songs with
titles like "Snoodle" and "Wahow,"
the mishmash of quirky indie-pop
contained on the album proves to be
just as odd as the cover art.
The project is the brainchild of
Cameron Dilworth, formerly of Niens
Circa, who brought together some
of his friends from Prairie Cat, SSRIs and the Joint Chiefs (along with
the recording talents of Caleb Stull
of Parlor Steps) to help contain and
3S ■I
jM
translate some of the songs that have
been bouncing around his head. The
resulting eleven tracks center around
Dilworth's strange, whimsical lyrics
and his unique Fred Penner meets
Lou Reed vocals. For the most part,
the poppy tunes are catchy and fun.
They are lighthearted and endearingly
childish both lyrically and in instrumentation. This, however, proves to
be a blessing and a curse, as some
songs are clever and well delivered
while others end up sounding just
plain silly and interrupt the flow of an
otherwise good album. On a whole
though, it is nice to hear some music
by talented musicians who don't take
things too seriously!
—Mark PaulHus
HI8PIE RHINESTONE EAGLE
THE GREAT RETURN
(Stank House Records)
Her Majesty the Purple Rhinestone
Catenas retarnecf with the?ffi|
full-length LP that will blow your
unassuming mind out of the fiery
waters from which it resides. Amass
with trance-inducing riffs and lyrics
of witchcraft and sorcery, The Great
Return will carry any earth dweller to
another cavern of being.
Purple Rhinestone Eagle is a three-
piece based out of Portland, Oregon.
The band consists of Andrea Genevieve (guitar, vocals), Morgan Ray
Dennis (bass, backup vocals) and
Ashley Spungin (drums, backup vocals). The three ladies work together
to create magic reminiscent of heavy
and fiizzed-out '70s rock 'n' roll,
namely, Black Sabbath.
Not only are all nine songs on The
Great Return perfectly executed, but
they are perfectly written. Some bands
seem to know the secret of song writing, and PRE is not exempt. Their live
shows are full of energy and no one
watching can help but let the sounds
wash over them as they fade into
oblivion. The album hardly differs.
I suggest you conjure up this LP as
soon as humanly possible. With one
dose, you will be hooked.
—Sarah Charrouf
RAESPOON
LOVE IS A HUNTER
(Saved &u Radio)   .
Metaphorical monsters In your closet,
transgendered culture and the desire
for love on many levels are themes that
permeate Rae Spoon's love is a Hunter, which was released mid-August.
While there are indie pop gems like
"We Can't Be Lovers with These Guns
on Each Other," which will have you
singing and dancing in the wee hours,
the album's foundation continues Rae
Spoon's tradition of honest and reflective music, love is a Hunter furthers this
country musician's experimentation
into electro dance music by blending
beats and pops of synth sounds with
beautiful folk tunes. The album moves
from "danceables" such as "You Can
Dance" and "Danger Danger Danger"
(described in the press release as a
"glitter-splashed queer anthem") to
stripped-down country folk songs.
In the lead track, "Death by Electro," Spoon is armed with an acoustic
guitar, a flute sound and his delicate
yet powerful voice. He poignantly describes the appeal of late nights at the
discotheque with a tune worthy of folk
stages everywhere. It is a fitting start
to the album and a reminder of the
roots of his music. "Lighthouse" will
speak to frustrated lovers everywhere
with lyrics like: "Do me a favour/and
I can stay out of your way." The idea
of love being unwanted but inevitable
presents an interesting perspective in
the title track of the album, and it is
a further example of the depth and
quality of Spoon's writing.
Loue is a Hunter is a complete record
that flourishes when listened to in
its entirety, yet has stand out tracks
primed for a mixtape. The lyrics are
dark and celebrate the fragility, triumph and diversity of culture and
life. Spoon's voice is magical and
complements the electro blips and
beeps with acoustic and indie pop
sounds. Overall, this a meaningful
and endearing record following the
success of his previous Polaris Prize
nomination.
—Slauko Bucifal
RATTAIL
GEORGE MOUHSEYEP
(Unjarailiar Records)
Jasmyn Burke's vocals are probably
^T^m^mmmg part of Toronto
three-piece RatTaiPs George Mounsey
EP, which is solidly produced for being, according to their MySpace, "recorded by the band in there [sic] basement ." The album is part of a series
of 300-copy limited edition 7" EPs by
Unfamiliar Records, which includes
releases by Vancouver's prodigious
offspring, Makeout Videotape and
Brasstronaut.
Formed just last year, RatTail—or
whoever is behind their marketing
strategy—appears to have a good
grasp of how to make a band appealing and accessible. The clear vinyl
print gives them cred with the audio-
philes, while the half-dozen weirdly
stimulating d.i.y. videos online add
a multidimensional depth to their
cultural presence. Searching "Rat-
Tail - Gasmask" on YouTube will get
you a video (created by RatTail drummer Jesse Frank Matthews) of one of
the band's songs set to a hilarious
psychedelic re-edit of a VHS workout
video. They also have a blog (http://
rattailmusic.blogspot.com/) with unabashed photos of the band playing
to handfuls of people at churches and
underground venues across Canada.
"Green Guitar," the second track
on the EP, demonstrates the variance
36
in Burke's vocals, from a sensual Cat
Power-esque purr to an unforgiving
plaintive-yet-badass caterwaul. On the
B-side, "Poncho" begins with a indie-
disco feel and closes with a pounding,
epic stoner rock buildup, channeling
old school Black Sabbath or Dead
Meadow. In contrast, "Secret Song" is
a shoegazer lullaby, with Burke crooning mournfully, urgently, again and
again so you will never forget: "This is
our secret from me to you;" the drums
all soothing, capering toms like two
adjacent heartbeats, accompanied by
spacey ambient effects that tickle your
pineal gland.
Ifyou have a phonograph, owning
one of the three hundred copies of
this 7"—which includes a six-song
digital download - might make you
a quantifiably cooler person.
—Andrew Reeves
SSRIS -
EFFEMINATE GODZILLA-SIZED WIND-
CHIMES
(Independent)
SSRIs has undergone a transforms- ri
tion since their runner-up status at
Shindig 2007. The death of their
drummer, Tommy Milburn (whom
the album is dedicated to) forced a
reconstruction project for Joseph
Hirabayashi and crew. The band has
added a few new faces and a more
complex refinement of unpolished
bedlam, which conjures up the theory
of chaos, and order from disorder. File
Effeminate Godzilla-Sized Windchimes under art-punk, synth-punk, jazz-punk,
death-punk and psychedelic avant-
garde musings. At first, the record
feels random and chaotic, but with
listening demonstrates compositional
brilliance and lyrical depth.
Upon successive spins, the songs
seamlessly blend into each other to
the point where listening to a track
out of sequence feels awkward. Every
note, whether in tune or chaotically out of control, seems placed purposefully and skilfully.
There is no room for ballads or
any kind of formulaic pop. Perhaps,
for only brief moments, the furious
rhythms of Tony Dallas, and abusive
guitar/synth tracks give way to a softer
side of the band. There are no catchy
pop riffs or choruses (the band boasts
of being chorus free since 2006 on
their MySpace page). Instead, you will
find intricately arranged, complex
patterns that produce a restless yet
completely satisfying record.
The songs dabble in perfection so
much so that after successive listens,
it is difficult to imagine any of the
tracks performed differently. Play it
loud, be prepared to get charged up,
and place it in your 'favourites of 2010'
playlist.
—Slavko Bucifal
STARS
THE FIVE GHOSTS
(Vagrant/Soft Revolution Records)
Prepare to fall in love upon listening
^to^'Star^T^^^ft^r^^CT^TO^S.
If you enjoy the music this band has
produced in the past nine or so years,
then there is a good chance this album
will stir up a lot of things in your body.
It's okay, let it happen. Awakenings
and shakings of the soul never felt so
good. Just as a great classic movie is a
force unto itself, Stars are simply that.
They make string-heavy music about
death and the haunted, love, and the
un-loved. They spin dour dramatic
dance pop odes to heartbreak and getting revenge-drunk on brandy. They
sing beautiful songs to the ghosts that
haunt us when we sleep, make love,
hate, crumble, pray and fade away.
These are personal tales laid bare and
spun into a kind of maudlin tragic
comedy set to music under the strong
guise of death and what comes next.
The dreamy and sweeping "Dead
Hearts" begins the journey as vocalists Amy Millan and Torquil Campbell
converse on ghosts of children once
known and how dead hearts are everywhere. Strings and pretty sounds
fill everything with light, offering a
perfect opening to a nearly perfect
album by a band that is just so good
at what they do, transforming mope
into hope and twisting heartache into
resolve through masterfully weaved •
sound alchemy. The Five Ghosts is a
winner down the middle, and though
dramatic and maybe even a bit sad,
these songs about despair end up feeling light and moving as the heaviest of
feelings are translated through honeyed tales spun so eloquently.
—Nathaniel Bryce
TIME WHEAT POOL
BEHIND THE STARS
(Shameless Records)
Edmonton's the Wheat Pool are
^^cWtown^^u^l^^^^e^^^OTi
a 'fan friendly' offering in the form
of a five-song EP entitled Behind The
Stars, featuring a couple of unreleased
tracks as well as two versions of Neil
Young's "Helpless" and an alternate
take on a song from last years full-
length CD, Hauntario. The unreleased
songs, "Woman" and "Edith Cavell"
are quite nice, showcasing the band's
delicate alt-country romantic trappings at their best, and "Evangeline"
is a pretty, stripped
down alternative to
the meatier version
found on Hauntario.
The two versions of
"Helpless" apparently a favorite at live
gigs, are faithful and
respectful takes on the
original. The Wheat
Pool's soft-focused
Canadian sound is
appealing and easy to
digest and they really
do know how to write
a good song. Offering a little back to the
fans for mere pennies
shows that they care
about who is listening
and what they'd like to
hear, a sure sign that
this band is far from
self-serving. If you're
already a fan of what
this band does then
log onto their website and download
this digital only re
lease, because this is all for you. But if
you're looking for a more stylish and
substantial introduction to the band,
track down some of their earlier, more
palatable output and work your way up
from there.
—Nathaniel Bryce
WOMEN
mm straw
(HemishEge)
Calgary*s own Women have returned
with their second album, Public Strain.
Juxtaposition is one word that comes to
mind when describing Women's style.
Their sound piles a layer of atmosphere
upon a layer of chaos that leaves a very
eclectic album, but ultimately a conducive one.
The opening track, "Can't you see"
has Arcade Fire overtures, the squeaky,
grinding guitars and violin backing up
distorted, Brian Wilson-like, vocals.
With atmospheric, dense sounds, it
belongs on a film score.
The instrumental tracks are superior
to the vocal tracks but only by an inch.
They seem to take you away to another
desolate, ghost like space. In some
ways Women are reminiscent of Glasgow's Mogwai. It is that same sound
that can be so deceptively simple but
still completely overwhelming.
With a great melody and an easy
beat, "Eyesore" is one of the best
tracks on the album. "Bell" is another
piece that would be best served in a
David Lynch film. Beautiful but just
a little creepy.
Definitely an album to be played
in the wee hours of the morning. But
be careful kids, this one gets real dark
on you.
—{Catherine Boothroyd
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LIKE ANIMALS AGAIN / APOLLO GHOSTS / LANGUAGE-ARTS / GUT
FEEUNa
June ^.fwmky Winkerbeans
Funky Winkerbeans jbosted Like Animation's debut album release party
and though the doOrswere at 8 p.m., of4|fcrse the show didn't start until n
^PHPfifter a long sound check, the first band,;€lut Feeling delivered a set of
generic punk songs, consisting of the usual three power chords, harsh vocals
and eye-rolling comments such as, "Fuck Gordon Campbell." They seemed
stoked to be a part of Like Animals Again's album release party, and were
generous enough to give out bath bombs, but it's not a good sign when instead
of watching the band, you find yourself more amused by the guy skanking in
the front row.
Luckily the next band, Language-Arts, had a refreshingly unique sound.
Lead singer/guitarist Kristen Cudmore's distinctive staccato, pixie-like voice
created an interesting contrast to the smooth loungey keyboards and upright
bass. At times, Cudmore sounded like she was dropping rhymes or scatting.
Her voice acted as a metronome as it sounded so precise and sharp, much
like her impressive classical guitar skills. Before the breakdown in the song
"Benson," Cudmore sang, "It's better e-lectronic," making me realize that her
vocals even possess an electro/robotic flare.
Apollo Ghosts, who were recendy long listed for the Polaris Music Prize
couldn't have been more fun and entertaining. Whenever singer/guitarist
Adrian Teacher played one of those catchy little riffs, like from "Coka-Cola
Admen," he would stare down the audience and have this ridiculous grin on
his face. I especially loved the moments when drummer, Amanda Panda (what
a great stage name), belted her explosive back up vocals during the callbacks
in "Charms of Cars" or "Land of the Morning Calm." Though their songs are
about two minutes long to begin with, the trio ripped through them at a comically fast rate. Ending with a punked out cover of the Monks track, "Boys Are
Boys and Girls Are Choice," Apollo Ghosts pleased the Funky Winkerbeans
crowd but left everyone craving more after a mere 20 minute set.
Like Animals Again took the stage donning zombie, Viking and skeleton
outfits. There was something very carnivalesque about their act and it was more
%    _\*\&~~"    """          -■■Minimi——1 f~. It^^r--^s«
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40 than just the Halloween costumes. On the band's MySpace they are described
as a blend of baroque and rock; however, all I could think of whenever that
synth kicked in were circus clowns or those creepy electric light parades. The
song named, fittingly enough, "Like Animals Again," is a stand out track where
the band's vocal harmonizing proved to be their strong point. But overall, my
mind was focused on the previous, short but sweet set by Apollo Ghosts and
wondering where their next show is going to be.
—Angela Yen     „___
MEZAMAZING / BEN ROGERS / HYAENAS DJS / DOUBLE DOUX
June 27/Wise Hall
I like this venue, the Wise Hall. I think it is important to have all-ages shows
so that everyone can go! And this venue has a bar too, so it all works out The
Wise Hall is kind of like a big, wise hall. It's someplace you would go to for a
Scouts or Guides meeting. It has big, clean washrooms (I'd hang out in there
for sure), and a few tables and chairs for your relaxing and mingling pleasure.
There is a big stage which has a "performance" vibe to it, which seemed appropriate for these bands. Hardwood floors make a great dance-floor, which
was necessary for the dancing and jumping that happened.
Double Doux was the first band that played, which consisted of some
high-energy drumming, sweet squealing and riffing saxophone. Sometimes I
forget about saxophone, but there is something to be said about using breath
power to play a musical instrument. Some non-major scales were definitely
riffed on here. Saxophone-drum jams were exacdy what I wanted to listen to/
that Sunday night.
Ben Rogers and band took the stage up next. More frequendy than not, I -
look around atshows and I'm like... "Dayyumm everyone looks so GooOOd."!*
This was a good looking ensemble, including a feathered head piece mask and
a poncho. There was a wonderful violinista wearing some great white pants
and a shirt with all these jewels. I was pretty distracted during this spectacle,
mostly thinking how I wish I had a poncho. I took notice to the worn out
acoustic guitars, wholesome strumming and a whole lot of foot stomping and
hand clapping which was fun. It would have been appropriate if a big fire pit
was in the middle of the crowd and Ben Rogers was dancing around with his
headpiece on and everyone was clapping and swinging.
Hyaenas (members of Basketball), from what I gathered, were DJing in
between bands with some groovy Middle Eastern-esque music. Not sure
though, I went outside.
Finally, we have Mezamazing. This is the kind of music I would want to wake
up to in the morning, or secredy listen to on the bus, or just move around to!
The band had a couple of acoustic guitars (which don't seem to be exceedingly
important), aflute, a saxophone (yess!!), a trombone, an accordion, some babes
singing and playing percussion, a drum and a cymbal unit More great singing
and jumping ensued. This is a fun gypsy-esque jam band where everyone was
dancing around and having a great time. Definitely a live band. I thought it was
funny when I was in the backroom and saw the set-list which just read:
"Circus"
"Fuck Germany"
Germany beat England in a controversial match that day.
—Olivia Meek
MODEMODERNE
July 10 / The Biltmore Cabaret
Vancouver's own Mode Moderne is one of those bands that have clearnptisi$il
|fl|$rl^N0U0LY HKttHft
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JESSHILL
BODHI JONES
VINCE VACCARO
ACRES OF LIONS
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UP MARIA
~419iNtfD HOME.
BENfltSPON
ADALINE
THURSDAY OCTOBER 7TH
GREG SCZEBEL
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41 influences and are able to meld them all together with such ease. After seeing die
band open for the Raveonettes back in November, I couldn't wait to catch them
live again. Glory Days at the Biltmore featured the goth/New Wave group and
it's confirmed, they really are the love child of the Smiths and Joy Division.
Instantly, the thumping bass had the crowd bopping their heads and lead
singer, Philip Intile, pulled you in with his powerful haunting voice. Intile's
vocals are often compared to Ian Curtis and on songs such as "Disco Ruff,"
the comparison is obvious. However, when the band slowed it down with the
alluring track "Rattle," the vocals possessed a warmer and almost romantic
quality, proving that Intile is doing much more than simply imitating.
Guitarist Felix Fung was intriguing with his skills on the nine-string Vox
Teardrop, something you don't see every day and Intile, who was constantly
closing his eyes and doing the occasional delicate hand gesture, seemed like
he was offin another world. You feel like you're invading his personal space,
watching him pour out his deepest emotions into the microphone.
One of Mode Moderne's newest tracks, "Undiscovered Country,'' (it's
Donkey Kong meets the Cure, can't get much better than that) was noticeably
absent from the set It's a shame because it's the type of song that would have
gotten the entire place up and dancing. They closed with a respectable cover
of Echo and the Bunnymen's "A Promise," which fit so well into their set that
they could have passed it off as one of their own. At the final chorus, Intile's
vocals reached an ultimate crescendo and it was as if every single person in the
building was being enveloped by a hypnotic wave of '80s nostalgia.
■ •^Amdai Yen ;;  ■':ri:.vm„,r,n.;i[.i......;if;..[...;.rri ..:,n[[1:..:„„
QUMTRON * MISS PUSSYCAT / THEE MANIPULATORS / CHANNELS 3X4
Jidg 12 / The Biltmore Cabem
I ham two points to make about this wonderful show. First, I hesitated seeing
the magnificiant organ-driven soul duo from Louisiana because my last time
f- vltewfag^tneir graMspetri^eln'A4srlA,Tltwa^ possibly the greatest show I
had ever seen. It was at SXSW five years ago, it was packed and I had no idea
what to expect This time out, they played on a Monday to, at most, 75 people.
But, those were 75 hardcore Quintron fans. And those two folks from New
Orleans are pros. The set started with a blood-splattered and psychedelic puppet show by the lovely Miss Pussycat The story was about pizza and cops and
beheadings and we all loved it Then Quintron came on, revved up his Drum
Buddy, turned on the lights to his keyboard-driven '57 Chevy, took off his shirt
halfway through and destroyed. Truly. Everyone screamed "I AM A BAD ASS!"
to their great tune "Swamp Buggy Badass." They played "Love Is Like a Blob"
to perfection. And the crowd were being wonderful spazzes. So good.
My second point. For the longest time, I have been watching more and
more local bands of late. I love watching my talented friends play, and it's a
little cheaper. But there is something to be said for a touring band that's got
their shit down. You've got to be so good for even 75 people to come see you
on a Monday night in Vancouver. Quintron & Miss Pussycat were still loose,
but so engaging and charismatic, even after performing a handful of "meaningful" shows at the Sled Island festival. Hopefully they can come to town on
a weekend next time?
—Chris-a-rifjtc t*;£K »■
ROYAL CANOE/FOREST CITY LOVERS/YONCALIA DRAIN
July 13 /The Media Club
I'm assummgYoncaha Drain opened me show, because they were on the bill—
though the female vocalist kept referring to them as "the opening band," so
maybe ifs a working title.
Either way, the two-piece, featuring Lyn Heinemann (vocals/guitar) and
Gregg Steffensen (drums) fit in perfectly in the low-light, velvet-red room.
Heinemann's lovely, sandy voice was the highlight of their set
Next up was Forest City Lovers, a band composed partially of members
from my hometown of Guelph, Ontario. Kat Burns, Mika Posen (also of Kite
Hill), Kyle Donnelly (also of the D'Urbervilles) and Christian Ingelevics were
joined by new member Claire Whitehead (of the multimedia Guelph-based
project Polydactyl Hearts) on the cross-country tour that they're documenting for Exclaim! Magazine. Their set was varied and melodic, mixing songs
from their recent release Carriage ("If I Were A Tree," "Constellation") with
older fare I was nostalgic for, like "Country Road." Burns is one of my favourite contemporary Canadian songwriters, thanks in part to her knack for
well-crafted lyrics that are intimate and tender without dipping toes into any
earnest Canadian lakes.
Just when I thought the Lovers had sung me the perfect lullaby, Royal Canoe (Matt Peters, Joey Penner, Bucky Driedger, Matt Schellenberg, Jeff Bruce)
hit the stage. Oh my holy synthesizers, coupled with falsettos reminiscent of
Beck from his Midnight Vultures days -1 was awake immediately. And really,
really drawn in to their dancy, hopping songs. To be perfectly honest, I don't
know exactly what's going on with the message of the song "Me Loving Your
Money"—it's tongue-in-cheek, right? The five bouncy, bandana-wearing
Royal Canoeists are tongue-in-cheek, right? I think so. Let's just say they are
and keep dancing, yeah?
—Andrea Bennett
THE WILDERNESS OF MANITOBA /THE MOUNTAINS & THE TREES
Julu 2 2 / Litik Mountain Gallery
Housed in the small, charmingly rustic Little Mountain Gallery, the comfort
and smoothness of folk could be heard. The crowd lingered and chatted or
strolled past Inspired Mam St drawings, slowly converging in front of a small
stage lined with a painted landscape backdrop, scattered instruments and an
assortment of folding chairs assembled in front This was a venue to highlight
singular acoustic bliss and enveloping melodic resonance.
The Mountains & the Trees, a solo unit hailing from the Eastern coast—
Newfoundland to be exact—took the stage with a relaxed and inviting presence. Charmed by his accent and anecdotal banter, I enjoyed listening to his
plucky but smooth guitar riffs, along with his banjo work, as he strived at an
uplifting melancholic feel. However, the lyrics though earnest, gave the songs
a bland tilt and I found my attention wandering. He quickly brought me back
with "More More More," which interjected a new sound and churning pace,
making it clear why it was the single off his new album.
The Wilderness of Manitoba jumped on staged right after, sparing the moments taken to light incense and arrange the singing bowls. Opening with an
impressive three-part harmony, complimented by lush cellos and guitars, the
band quickly drew the crowd to a stunned hush. Sacrificing large drum sounds
for minor intricately placed percussion and a constant switching between cello
and banjo, acoustic and electric, they cultivated music that was reminiscent
of back porch cottage country, but one haunted by the ghosts of folklore. The
atmosphere contributed to the combined feeling that this band was good,
but I wonder if their music could be translated to other venues. It seemed
their boisterous sound was well displayed through a single microphone, but
can it deliver on a bigger stage? I will be at Little Mountain Gallery again, and
I might watch these bands again, but I don't think I will venture to a larger
venue to see them.
—Kaitlin McNabb
BIARIIiHEAVIII/WHISISm/MWHIIStMHIAYS
jfu!$ 24/Hie Biltmore
As die hordes flocked to the city's bays and beaches for die evening's fireworks,
42 a few others ambled over to Prince Edward St to be greeted by the winsome
sounds of Edmonton's Whitsundays wafting through the Biltmore's wide-open
doors. A five-piece, they played light indie rock complete with summery, sweet
harmonies to a sparse audience of early birds. Their latest full-length, Saul,
explores styles from weirdo-psych to earnest folk, but the performances
homogeneous and ponderous, save for a theremin-fiielled blowout finale.
Twin Sister, by contrast, found themselves playing to a dense crowd near
the stage. They were basically Chairlift with extra guitars and a shot of caffeine,
with everything in place to conjure up a dreamy retro sound: demure female
vocals, jangly guitars and Cure-ish keyboards. It was entrancing and exciting
by turns, a nice complement to the setting sun outside and the cooling breeze
from the still-open front doors.
Finally, as the outdoors were shrouded in dusk, the stage inside became
bathed in red light and the three moustachioed gendemen of Bear in Heaven took
their places. Wolf howls and hoots from the crowd were constant throughout
the evening, prompting singer Jon Philpotand bassist Adam Wills to do some
howling of their own. Amid the fun and games, the band hit all the high notes
from new album Beast Forth Rest Mouth, as Philpot's face strained to convey the
flooding emotion of "Ultimate Satisfaction" or execute the mournful wails of
"Beast in Peace." "Wholehearted Mess" created an undulating dance party,
and both "Lovesick Teenagers" and its reprise, "Casual Goodbye," were just
what everyone desired: a release of the uncertainties of youth in perfect three-
minute pop songs.
Closing out with a distorted cover of Lindstr0m & Christabelle, the head-
liners made fireworks in their own way, ones fashioned from echoing synths
and rolling drums, and ones that came without the risk of a police beatdown
at English Bay.
—Simon Foreman
JOANNA NEWSOM / ROBIN PECKNOli :* -
August 5 / The Vogut Theatre
Standing ovations usually don't mean much at the shows that Discorder covers. -First, most of the venues don't have seating, and second, most crowds
are usually polite enough to offer some restrained clapping. This show was
different—when harpist/pianist Joanna Newsom's set ended on Thursday, the
crowd erupted from their seats and the applause was deafening.
Robin Pecknold, best known as the lead singer for the Seattle harmonic
folk band Fleet Foxes, opened the show with a solo set showcasing a lot of
new material. It was clear that he's a talented guy, but also somewhat limited.
Imagine a Fleet Foxes album without the gorgeous vocal harmonies, and you
should have a good understanding of his newer work.
After performing "81" solo, Newsom was joined by a five-piece band that
contained, at various times, violins, trumpet, banjo, guitar, drums and tam-
bura. Her recent triple album Have One On Me claimed about two-thirds of her
90-minute set, and to say the least, it was fantastic live. The album contains
huge variety, and it showed—Newsom switched seamlessly between shorter,
more conventionally structured songs like '"81," upbeat piano-heavy romps
like "Good Intentions Paving Company," and long, meandering harp-abased
numbers like "Have One On Me" and "Baby Birch."
Even more fun, though, was hearing older numbers rearranged for the five-
piece band. "Monkey & Bear" was played slightly faster than usual, lending a
sense of urgency to the whimsical ten-minute fable. "Peach, Plum, Pgar^wVfe
accompanied by an tambura, violin, and trumpet, then given a cap^vatihgex-
tended instrumental outro. Newsom has grown immensely since those songs
were first recorded, and it showed. After the main set and the encore of "Baby
Birch," every audience member was on their feet begging for more.
—ReilhjV^^' .-i^va*
GIRLS ROCK CAMP VANCOUVER SHOWCASE
August 7 f The Rio Theatre f $$&»$■'
Girls Rock Camp is the ultimate volunteer-run project Six women spend the
year organizing a week long camp for girls ages eight to 18 to learn how to
play an instrument and write a song; giving them a chance to form a band and
perform on a real stage, all while instilling the necessary ideology that women
are equal, women are awesome and they can do anything they settheif mt&ils
to. It may sound obvious—of course women are important and capable—but
the reality remains that society, especially pop culture and mainstream media,
treat women as objects, anomalies, and auxiliary citizens. What Girls Rock
Camp seems to aspire to do is not only instill a healthy dose of feminism in
these young girls, but also try to create an area, nay, a culture, where there is a
female presence. These young girls get to flourish in an environment of strong
female leaders and encouraging male allies while developing new skills and a
burgeoning self confidence that will be hard to rattle.
The Rio is a theatre like any other; a touch darker, a touch danker, butsimilar
nonetheless. On this night, the night of the Girls Rock Camp Showcase,5&Was
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1 Sszssslg: transformed into a venue filled with support, community, excitement and of
course, the satanic forces that are rock 'n' roll.
The screen was filled with pictures of the days that passed; photos of each
band, the scream circles and music practice. The speakers blared the songs of
last year's bands, letting everyone know what we were in store for.
Isatatthe back for maximum rock potential. These girls, these rockers, delivered
with every fibre of rock being those rock goddesses laid down upon them.
With songs titled "Devil's Wand" and "Bite Me,'" I was absolutely blown
away at these girls' prowess for lyrical attitude, sense for catchy beats and really,
just their insane ability to play their instruments and play those instruments
hard. I think the only way to describe it is: badass. They dabbled in distortion
pedals, I heard double-kicks from the drum kits and mini death growls through
the microphones. I was impressed by their ability to dive into whatever genre
they chose, heavy metal, classic rock, pop rock, and commit and write and
perform a song that expressed everything they believed about themselves and
their music. Whether it was about Dracula sipping blood from a cup of gold
or the anger that can seethe from divorce, the songs were proud statements of
a week's worth of hard work. I had the pleasure of seeing these girls perform
again at Under the Volcano, and that will definitely not be the last time I see
them. Next year I will be excitedly await a crop of new girls, as well as some
old favourites take the stage and blow me away. Shout outs to A.K.A. Girls,
Devil's Wand, Shock White Vampire, Bipolar Bear, LemonNation, Kerplunk,
and Seasonspeechl You girls rock my world.
—Kaitlin McNabb
CASIOKIDS / LI6HT POLLUTION / EINAR STOKKA
August 21 / The Media Club
I'm not sure what I expected the crowd at a Euro electro-pop show to look like,
^^n^^l^^^rat I saw at the Media Club on3aturday night Opener Einar
Stokka, a college friend of the Casiokids and self described "melancholic act,"
played his mellow acoustic rock with notable stage presence, despite the crowd
of roughly 25 people tightly hugging the walls of the club. He seemed to think
he was still in the U.S., but was forgiven for that slip after offering his CDs for
free at the merch table. Up next was Chicago-based band Light Pollution who
did their best to get the crowd up on their feet and "fill the void" with their
scratchy, bouncy pop-rock, managing to get one solo male jumping around
front and centre to the song "Good Feelings."
For an early show with an 11:00 p.m. curfew, I was surprised when the
main act was still setting up at 9:45 p.m., but when the Casiokids finally took
the stage just after 10:00 p.m., the crowd was on their feet without hesitation.
Opening with "Grant Lys I Alle Ledd," which loosely translating to "Green
Light At All Levels," the band started an instantaneous dance party. The fact
that they sing almost exclusively in Norwegian has no Searing at all on the level
of entertainment. This was total infectious fun. How often do you understand
the words to half the bands out there anyway? When not singing in their native
tongue, it's often just solid instrumental, well developed melodies that bring
in everything from the slide flute to a perfectly utilized cowbell. The members
tend to cluster towards each other on stage amongst the analog keyboard and
drum kit, creating a five-man sound think-tank.
Dedicating "Verdens storste land" ("The World's Biggest Country") to
Canada, lead singer Ketil Kinden Endresen played to the crowd with his fantastic
falsetto and expressive, motivational speaker-esque movements. Ending the
show with the oft-remixed, and my personwval favourite, "Fot I Hose," the
band was joined by a giant monkey man who bounced around with a pineapple
shaker. The show was short but sweet, ending promptly at 11:00 p.m. with no
encore, leaving a sweaty happy crowd wanting more.
—Sally White
IsADNoued
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OCTOBER 1st AT THE RICKSHAW THEATRE1
254 EAST HACTNeSj*
THEDREADNOUGHTS.COH-ST0MPREC0RDS.COM
45 Ik*
^ SLED ISLAND
BY JORDIE YOW
PHOTOS BY RYAN WALTER WAGNER
IRAKIS # ARRATA OPERA CENTRE
Braids could not have picked a better
venue to perform in; Arrata has beautiful acoustics and plenty of space to
move around and see the four-piece
play. The band was the highlight of the
first night with their songs filled with
slow builds of organic sounds like
their voices and percussion, mixed
with the alien sounds of processed
music. Their music had a full shoe-
gazey feel to it that powerfully washed
over the whole audience, while simultaneously seeming vulnerable and
emotionally charged. If you get the
chance to see this band, do it, they
were wonderful.
FUtpBUP© OLYMPIC PLAZA
t$pewgE4&e& $*ePo!ark Prize winning hardcore group, but I must say
they were one of the best spectacles in
existence. In addition to playing a tight
set of some of the best hardcore in the
world, this band has Pink Eyes as a lead
singer, who is a sight to behold. He's fat
and willing to take off his clothes. He
got things started by taking offhis shirt
and joining the crowd for a gigantic
group hug, which was one of the most
heartwarming and positive things that
I've ever encountered at a punk rock
show. He would spend about half the
set screaming his lyrics from the audience and while down there would pour
two Dr. Peppers on himself, spit some
more Dr. Pepper on our photographer
Steve Louie (he seemed ok with it),
pinch cheeks, blow bellies and gradually strip down to nothing. He was like
a fat court jester regaling everyone with
funny stories between songs and acting
generally ridiculous.
WOODHANDS@DICKEN'S
Dan Werb (vox/keytar/keyboards) and
Paul Banwatt (drums/rapping) took
to the stage of Dicken's and proved
why this dance band is primarily a
live band. Despite having solid recordings, their live sets are not done
justice on record. The* band seems
to consistendy find new ways to improve upon their songs on the road.
They primarily played their more
practiced live material off of Heart
Attack, but dipped into some newer
songs as Werb moaned, grunted and
"uh-huhed" in between lines. Werb
plays up a ridiculous figure, bordering into chachi territory, but the band
brings a lot of party and the audience
SSRIS® TUBBY IP
The post-thrash/hard^&st^gt*
core quartet brought a lot of noise
to Calgary's amazing little hot dog
restaurant. They played a hard fast
set that was loud enough that it made
me wish I had some earplugs to put
in (I'm told they have to play loud or
else their drummer, Tony Dallas, will
just overwhelm their sound). The brief
bursts of melody in their songs were
followed up by thrashy freak outs and
the band seemed to be enjoying themselves a lot as they waved their bangs
around. Too bad this was their only set
at the Festival, but they're launching
a tour soon, so most of Canada will
get a chance to see them.
For more reviews and a photos from Calgary's Sled Island Festival, checkout www.
discorder. ca and search "Sled Island."   ^
AG //CiTR 101.9 FM CHARTS
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF JUNE
#
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
#
ARTIST
ALBUM
^JLAIEL^
1
Sex Church*
6 Songs By
Sex Church
Convulsive
26
Stars*
The Five Ghosts
Soft Revolution
2
Wawes
King of the Beach
Fat Possum
27
Tokyo Police Club*
Champ
Dine Alone
3
Various
R&B Hipshakers Vol. l:
Teach Me To Monkey
Vampi Soul
28
Alejandro
Escovedo
Street Songs of love
Fantasy
4
Daniel Johnston
The Story
of an Artist
Munster
29
Friendly Rich & die
Lollipop People*
The Sacred Prune
of Remembrance
Hazelwood
5
Nu Sensae*
TV, Death
& the Demi
Nominal
30
Various
Offthe Hip
2010 Sampler
Off The Hip
6
White Lung*
Ifs the Evil
Deranged
31
On/Fennesz
Something... Form and
Something That Does Not
Type
7
The Orpheans*
Turn Out the
Lights EP
Neptoon
32
Shane Turner
Overdrive*
sft
Independent
8
The Boyfriends*
Lead & Follow
Independent
33
Various
Next Stop ... Sounds
from the Townships
Strut
9
Fine Mist*
Public Domain
Independent
34
M.I.A.
//\iO
Interscope
10
The
Mohawk Lodge*
Crimes
White Whale
35
Jaill
Thafs How We Burn
Sub Pop
11
The Nymphets*
Slow Song 7"
Independent
36
Laurie Anderson
Homeland
Nonesuch
12
The Arcade Fire*
The Suburbs
Merge
37
Joey Only
Outlaw Band*
Transgression Trail
High Art for
the Low Down
13
The Pack A.D.*
We Kill Computers
Mint
38
Jason Zumpano*
Room & Mansion
Independent
14
Jane Vain & the Dark
Matter*
Give Us
Your Hands
Rectangle
39
Aidan Baker*
Liminoid/Lifefbrms
Alien8
15
Battle Snakes*
On Fire '99
Transistor 66
40
Electroluminescent*
Oban
Chat Blanc
16
Best Coast
Crazy For You
Mexican Summer
41
Spastic Panthers /
The Throwaways*
Split 7"
Handsome Dan
17
WolfParade*
Expo 85
Sub Pop
42
Magic Kids
Memphis
True Panther
18
The Shilohs*
sit
Independent
43
D.O.A.*
Talk-Action=0
Sudden Death
19
Tender Trap
Dansette Dansette
Slumberland
44
TySegall
Melted
Goner
20
Modern
Superstitions*
All the Things
We've Been Told
Last Gang
45
Sex Church*
209/Paralyze
Hozac.
21
Faux Amis*
|
Independent
46
The Weird Weeds
Help Me
Name Melody
Autobus
22
Trentem0lIer
Into the Great Wide
Yonder
In My Room
47
The Varsity
Weirdos
Can't Go Home
It's Alive
23
PeteSeeger
Tomorrow's   Children
Appleseed
48
Of Montreal
"Coquet
Coquette'[Single]
Polyvinyl
24
The Alps
Le Voyage
Type
49
Shad
TSOL
Black Box
25
Ariel Pink's
Haunted Graffiti
Before Today
4AD
50
Gitar
Stuffed
Seeland
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian. Most of these excellent albums
can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. His name is
Luke Meat If you ask nicely he'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.com.
47 -Hre  fH-rf--S-rrhTyn-|
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7I» B»l CD /LP        Af.U
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KZC6VD3
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Hrtf

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