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*THAT MA©AMN\fc01W*W'o1-» FM I „„
SU^ORTI^MCOUVERS WiD^»MT MUSIC CANITY
FOR OVElfW^IMfcS 1
MAY 2014 UPCOMING SHOWS t RiCtSSHA W
0 000000
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
NILE
Internal Majesty and Auroch
METAL ALLIANCE TOUR Behemoth, Goatwhore,
1349, Inquisition, Black Crown Initiate, Tyrants Blood
WACKEN METAL BATRE CANADA
VANCOUVER CLASH! SEMI FINALS
WARPAINT   'WRHhI
■ James Supercave
PAGANFEST AMERICA 2014       . 1
Korpiklaani, Turisas, Chthonic, Varg, Winterhymn
IINNIYAH & DRUMSPYDER «. featured
I dancers E-Chan & Mllla
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more:
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
K3
NcUTERHEAD Metal covers by members of 3
Inches of Blood, Anciients, Gross Misconduct & more j
THE HORDE AND THE HAREM, THE
RUFFLED FEATHERS si™ is at The com
SPOONS j
DTrevlonBand
FAILURE      ^^^^^^H
with Special Guests
BLACKPUSSV - ' ;■■ -Ml
Gypsyhawk, Black Wizard, La Chinga
SWEET ANOMALY The Tailor, Bombus,
Samantha Emanuel, Luciterra, Chris Murdoch
http://facebook.com/RickshawTheatre
©rickshawtheatre   iSj ©rickshawtheatre COA/r£A/7*S
19     WILD/KIND Historically, Craigslist is
mostly known as a place for people to post
ads about their old stained furniture, but the
website is also responsible for bringing wild/
kind together. In just over a year, the band
met through Craigslist, started playing music
together, and have already released their debut
EP, Mountains. Plus, theyVe actually been
enjoying themselves while doing itl
25     KISS PAINTING Part feminist band,
part No Wave throwback, Kiss Painting is a
local flavour like no other: a conglomeration
of the members' political beliefs and
anti-capitalist mantras, with strong ties to
Vancouver's Shout Back! Festival. Check out
the feature to learn more about their use of
narrative in music and why they're against
most no-minor venues.
51      FIST PULL O' SNACKS Discorder
shares some quality caffeine with Robyn
Jacob, the self-described avant songster
behind Fist Full o' Snacks, as she discusses
her songwriting techniques, how the recording
process varied between her first and second
full-length, and where that rad band name
came from.
55     HOMEGROWN LABELS:
ASL SINGLES CLUB
Where good singles come to mingle, the
Vancouver-based label has managed releases
from an impressive array of artiste, including
Prison Garde, Sleepyhead, Autem, and more.
Discorder chats with the three founders of ASL
about why they prefer quality over quantity
and if there's a particular genre the label
gravitates towards.
59     SKINNY KIDS Far from the skinny kids
you used to beat up and take lunch money
from, this three-piece from Vancouver have
quickly secured a place for themselves in the
already-robust grunge-rock music scene.
It's also been four months since Skinny Kids
placed second in CiTR's annual battle of the
bands—read on to find out what theyVe been
up to since and what's next on the horizon.
6    DISCORDER REVISITED:
WHAT THE STRANGLERS MEAN
TO ME(PARTfc
10  ON THE AIR:
THE SOULSHIP ENTERPRISE
16
31
34
HERE'S THE THING:
36
CALENDAR
THE WEDDING INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
41
REAL LIVE ACTION
IN GOOD HUMOUR:
45
UNDER REVIEW
ALICIA TOBIN
49
FILM STRIPPED:
ART PROJECT:
DOXA DOCUMENTARY
SYLVANA D'ANGELO
FILM FESTIVAL
66
PROGRAM GUIDE
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues can be
booked by calling (6Q4) 822-3017 ext. 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates available upon'request,
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please
contact: editor.dJscorder@citr.ca. To submit images,
contact: artdirector.discorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send In a cheque for $20 to #233-6138
SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1 with your address,
and we will mail each issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your business,
email distro.discorder@citr.ca We are always looking
for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered non-profit,
and accept donations so we can provide you with the
content you love. To donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
NOTICE Of DIGITIZATION Let it be known that CiTR is currently
working to digitize the entirety of Discordefs archives. Soon all
of the oast issues you know and love will be available for viewing
online. Thanks, computers! if you have any questions or concerns,
please contact Brenda at stationmanager@citr.ca
Writers: Evan Brow, Slavko
Bucifal, Robert Catherall,
Sean Cotterall, Selina
Crammond, Fraser Dobbs,
Joshua Gabert-Doyon, Max
Hill, Adam Johannesson,
Jonathan Kew, Erica
Leiren, James Olson, Keefer
Pelech, Shane Scott-Travis,
Elijah Teed, Sam Tudor,
Bob Woolsey, Chris Yee
Photographers &
Illustrators: Sylvan a
d'Angelo, Britta Bacchus,
Yuliya Badayeva, Alisha
Davidson, Alan Derksen,
Eduard Barcelon, John
C Barry, Pyra Draculea,
Jonathan Dy, Hanna Fazio,
Dave Jacklin, Dana Kearley,
Jimmy Liang, Steve Louie,
Rob Ondzik, Lauren Ray,
Alison Sadler, Nolan Sage,
Sam Tudor, Daniel Jamie
Williams, Jon Vincent
Cover: photo and pattern
by Nolan Sage, lettering by
Eduard Barcel6n
Editor-. Jacey Gibb
Ait Director: Jaz Halloran
Under Review Editor:
Robin Schroffel
Real Live Action Editor:
Steve Louie
Web Editor:
Marcin Lasinski
Ad Coordinator:
Ana Elena Garza
Copy Editors-. Robin
Schroffel, Steve Louie
Proofreader:
Marcin Lasinski
Calendar Listings:
Sarah Cordingley
Accounts Manager:
Corey Ratch
Official Tweeter:
Evan Brow
CiTR Station Manager:
Brenda Grunau
Publisher: Student Radio
Society of UBC
Student Liasons: Evan
Brow, Josefa Cameron
EDITORIAL CUTDFF: April 24 2014
©Discorder 2014 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. Ail rights reserved. Circulation 10,200. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (S04) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada. 1^    SUMMER
Lr       LOVIN'
1     HAD ME A
MUSIC FESTIVAL
illustration by Jimmy Liang
May is here and you know what that
means: it's open season for music
festivals.
I'm talking about more than just
the ones that rhyme with Morchella.
Brace yourselves, as we get ready for
favourites like Vancouver Noise Fest,
Sasquatch, Music Waste, Shake/ARAMA,
the Vancouver Folk Festival, Shout
Back! Festival, the revived Pemberton,
Pickathon, Squamish Valley Music
Festival, and more—and all in the span of
four months. My eardrums are ringing just
thinking about 'em.
Ill never forget the first time I enjoyed
the insanity of a music festival. It was the
summer of 2008 and I was fresh out of
high school, not even 18 years old. During
my senior year, I'd become acquainted with
Logan, a red-haired hippie in the making
who enjoyed smoking weed and avoiding
responsibility. We met in biology class and
over the coming months, we bonded over
things like the new Sam Roberts album
and how closely our teacher's expressions
resembled something a police sketch artist
would draw.
Who knows how we ended up going to
Pemberton together, but at some point the
decision was made. We stole a lawn gnome
from his neighbour's yard, packed my SUV
with what little camping supplies we had,
and headed for -the West Coast,
The weekend was an absolute
blur. We arrived in Pemberton ahead of
schedule and spent the night smoking
cigarettes and socializing with local teens,
an evening that could have been plucked
from the lyrics of a Joel Plaskett song.
They talked about parties where they set
old cars on fire and how the new Coca-
Cola machine outside of the convenience
store was a "big deal," a side effect of the
town attempting to modernize before the
crowds hit. Even then I could tell the small
community was unprepared for the festival
about to be dropped on them.
It won't sound impressive by today's
standards, but Pemberton marked the
moment my musical interests exploded. It
was the first time I'd ever heard Vampire
Weekend, relatively unknown at this point,
who played early in the day while a large
percentage of the festival was still asleep;
I witnessed the Flaming Lips battle the
Pink Robots and learned what true bliss
was via their circus-level performance; I
was up-close-and-personal for Tom Petty's
haze-induced set, where I couldn't tell if'
his smile was a permanent fixture or if he
was just really stoned. While I'd always
been a fan of music, something about
Pemberton lit a spark in me.
Though music obviously plays a
significant part, the real allure to festivals
is they're usually equal parts adventure
and disaster. At Pemberton, we lived
almost exclusively off of coldcuts that we
EDITOR'S NOT5 couldn't properly refrigerate and vodka
smuggled through water bottles; my
vehicle's brakes overheated while going
down a winding mountain and we almost
died; we made room in the backseat
to pick up a cute hitchhiker who later
admitted she was a drug trafficker. All of
these are great stories separately but are
even better when they're sewn together
with the thread of music festivals.
It was a turbulent beginning to my
romance with music festivals, but my
adoration has done nothing but grow
since. While people are saving for their
trips to Europe or funneling funds into
band equipment, I'm salivating over the
year's festivals and cartographing my next
great escape.
If you don't already have plans
to partake in at least one festival this
summer, you should probably reconsider.
Your body and bank account will loathe
you, but the memories and anecdotes will
be worth the sunburns.
So it goes,
Jacey Gibb
EDITOR'S NOTE WHIT THE
Sf h I16LERS a
Mi AH TO M|#p
by Erica Leiren
Our first date almost didn't happen.
Gord and I were in a band together, the
Debutantes, and when he asked me out
to the Stranglers gig at the Commodore,
I turned him down. But I immediately
had second thoughts and called him up
to see if he still had that extra ticket.
Luckily, he did.
"Actually, I'm on the guestlist. You
can be my plus one," Gord clarifies. "Will I
see you before then?"
"I can drop by tomorrow morning.
I need to get the lyrics for that new
song we're doing... is it YouVe Got My
Number?"
"No, that's the Undertones song.
The one you need to learn for next band
practice is *Fiction Romance' by the
Buzzcocks. What time do you want to
come by? fll have it ready for you."
"Is 7:30 a.m. okay?"
"Perfect. Just knock on my bedroom
window to wake me up."
•k  *  *
The next morning, Cindy and I are
enroute back to school for our ritual
second-breakfast of UBC cinnamon buns
when I suddenly remember my promise to
Gord.
"Cindy, I just remembered I need to go
by Gord's. He's going to give me the lyrics
for a new song we're trying out next band
practice."
"No problem-o. Let's go!"
Screeeeeeech! Cindy brakes hard,
gears down, and pulls hard on the wheel
to turn us around. She two-wheels the
Fiat into the left-hand lane of the overpass
towards Burnaby.
Arriving at Gord's house on
McPherson Avenue, we coast in quietly
and park on the street above the house.
(No need to wake the family.) Our mission:
to tap on Gord's bedroom window, wake
him up, and retrieve the lyrics. I tiptoe
ahead of Cindy along the cement walkway
to the backyard but as I approach, I see
something heart-stopping.
All of Gord's windows are decorated
with signs written in red marker on yellow
construction paper. They say:
"Erica, I heart you!"
"Gord hearts Erica"
"(Inside of a big heart): Erica & Gord
forever"
Wow. Double wow. The yard around
! me crystallizes bright green and glistening
like a Jeff Wall cibachrome. The scene
is captured forever in my mind like a
freeze-frame, humming and alive with the
pure light and energy of youth. True love
and nothing less.
I knock on the window to wake Gord
up. He's so cute in his ragged blue Terry
bathrobe with his hair standing straight
up. I can't remember anything specific
about the exchange, just that he passed
me the lyrics with a big sleepy smile and
I took them with an even bigger smile. f?|«&
"Fiction Romance"? No way, this is the real
thing.
Cindy and I roar off in the Fiat to
UBC, not caring whether or not we wake
DISCORDS* REVISITED u
o
3
Q
0)
up the whole neighbourhood; To me, it
doesn't matter. Gord and I are going to the
Stranglers.
k  k  k
Saturday finally arrives, the night
of the Stranglers concert. Inside the
Commodore, Gord won't hold my hand,
but instead grips me with his thumb and
forefmjger around my wrist, pulling me
gently through the crowd with him. It's
sweet how much he's trying to not be too
mushy too soon.
That first date at the Stranglers is
special. It's their Feline Tour and local
heroes Family Plot are opening. They
set the tone perfectly, a sinister, gothic
band with two basses; the four Addington
brothers sound like music taken from a
scary movie played backwards, while the
singer, Madeleine, prowls up front.
When the Stranglers come on stage,
they're dressed entirely in black leather.
The members take their places: Hugh
Cornwell, Jet Black, Jean-Jacques Burnel,
and Dave Greenfield. No smiles and
threatening, but in an exciting way. We're
all waiting for that voice, the beautiful,
low, insinuating, sexy growl that is
Cornwell's secret weapon.
The music kicks in hard on the very
first song, "Something Better Change."
An anthem for our age, and for every age
after: "Something's happening and it's
happening right now / Ain't got time to
waste / I said, something better change!"
The concert is unforgettable, but it's
over too soon. The gig ends in a'convulsive
explosion of bodies down the stairs and
out the double doors of the Commodore.
We emerge happy, blinking, and
exhilarated onto Granville Street and into
the warm spring Vancouver night.
But our story with the Stranglers
doesn't end there.
k  ie  k
A few years ago, Cornwell was touring
to support a new solo album, his first
time in Vancouver since the Stranglers
gig in '83. I'd guess that just about every
Stranglers fan in Vancouver went to the
Media Club that night. It was an intimate,
acoustic set, full of new material and the
Stranglers' hits—just Cornwell by himself
with a guitar and his wonderful voice.
He signed CDs after the show and I
decided to ask for a picture. Yes, there was
his intimidating reputation for sometimes
not being a gentleman, but I could tell
from the way he'd sung and played on
stage that night that he's one of the good
guys. As I stood beside him, just before the
camera clicked, I whispered into his ear
"Mr. Cornwell, I just wanted to
mention, my husband and I had our
first date at the Stranglers show at the
Commodore."
"My, what a lovely story." (Ooh, that
voice!)
"And we're still together. He's with me
here tonight."
And to think none of it would have
happened if not for our first date. I like to
think that Gord and I would have ended
up together even without the Stranglers,
but they were very much the catalyst. And
you can't argue with chemistry.
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t Photo: The Debutantes, 1983, photo by Dave Jacktin THE       I
SOULSHIP
ENTERPRISE
article and photos by Sam Tudor
"Whatever's funky, baby." This is how the captains themselves
describe The Soulship Enterprise, a weekly show at CiTR
specializing in everything from soul to R&B to, most apparently,
funk. At the controls are Robert Gorwa and Christopher Hunter,
both well-versed in all things groovy: Gorwa plays guitar for
local-funk group Jaguar and Hunter plays trumpet for the band
Night Shift. After procuring some prime sitting real estate in
UBC's students' union building, the boys of The Soulship Enterprise
and I discussed the finer things in life like Ray Charles B-Sides,
Pink Floyd, and Tupperware wine drinking, m
10
ON THE AIR How was the show started?
HUNTER: I think the New
Pornographers concert in grade 10
was the real start of our friendship.
GORWA: I remember that. We drank
wine out of Tupperware in the back
alley behind the Orpheum. We were
friends in high school, and we
talked about getting a radio show
at CiTR. I went to McGill last year,
but as soon as I transferred back here
we decided to go for it. We were doing it
jokingly to begin with. We didn't think that
they would let us on the air. When they
did, we realized how legitimate it was. We
learned about all the CRTC regulations
and rules, which was weird. Anyway, the
first couple of shows we^re pretty random,
but we started focussing on the groovy, jg
How do you decide what to play on the
show?
GORWA: Chris and I split it in half. It
creates an interesting vibe because the
shows get this weird duality. Maybe one
week 111 be going for a smoother soul
aesthetic, with some Charles Bradley,
Lee Fields, or maybe some Marvin Gaye.
But maybe that same week Chris will be
feeling something completely different, like
instrumental fusion funk or afro beat. So
our halves of the show can be completely
different. mm
HUNTER: We try to get stuff out there
that wouldn't usually get any radio airtime
or that we think doesn't get enough
attention.
What local artists do you play, and how
to you meet CiTR's CanCon and Femcon
requirements?
GORWA: There isn't too much funk in
Vancouver. There's Five Alarm Funk, and
we play their songs sometimes. Outside
of Vancouver, HEAVy is a band IVe really
been feeling lately. All their tunes are in
crazy meters, like 9/8, but it grooves really
hard. In terms of Femcon, there are a lot
of really brilliant female soul singers out
there. Lalah Hathaway, Erykah Badu, or
ON T-Ay£ AIR
11 Lauryn Hill are all great. We even play Joni
Mitchell. Sometimes for CanCon we have
to play some weird shit.
HUNTER: But it's still an interesting way
to discover new stuff. It does force you to
find new Canadian music.
You listen to a lot of technically skilled
musicians. What's the value of musical
technicality In genres like this?
HUNTER: I think technicality is
something that should be noticed, rather
than striven for.
GORWA: There are great bands that could
be way more technical. For example, in
a big band like Snarky Puppy^ there's
a lot going on. As we speak, they're
recording with a 72-piece orchestra in
the Netherlands. But even so, Michael
League (composer for Snarky Puppy) is
If you could only have one album, what
album would it be?
HUNTER: I'm gonna say Abbey Road. It's
a classic, and it's what I grew up on.
GORWA: You know those things that were
going around Facebook, the "pick your top
10 album" things? I had so much trouble
with those. I spent two hours trying to find
a balance between what I used to.listen
to and my favorite stuff now. This is like
that. I think it has to be Wish You Were
Here by Pink Floyd. I love Pink Floyd.
What are some benefits and drawbacks
of broadcasting from CiTR?
GORWA: It's so varied here; the station's
very nature promotes alternative
programming. It's great, but sometimes
it can seem extreme. In a sense, CiTR
isn't allowed to play any hits, which can
still not writing songs for the.sake of being
complicated. It breaks the mould but is
still accessible, which I think is key.
What's changing in funk and soul music
these days?
GORWA: Right now there is definitely a
funk revival movement. One of the big
labels doing that is Daptone Records,
with acts like Charles Bradley and Sharon
Jones & the Dap Kings. I mean, a lot of
that stuff sounds like it could have been
recorded in the '70s. So there are certain
kinds of old school revivalist bands
popping up.
be kind of limiting for us considering the
music we play. We can't play anything
that has ever charted. If we want to
play someone like Stevie Wonder or Ray
Charles, it has to be some B-side from an
obscure album because those guys were
huge back then. But that's the fun of it,
really. The show forces us to keep looking
for things. It's a musical exploration every
week. It's great, gf
i
To hear Gorwa and Hunter in action,
tune in to The Soulship Enterprise every
Saturday at 7:00 p.m. on CiTR 101.9 FM.
12
ON THE AIR o
ON THE AIR
13 2014UBC
it%9e
■    hnsts Jamie Hyneman
For special ettects^p^
^^'r&e and ^ a taste of the, u
as expected. Come
SPONSORED BY:
ODLUM BROWN
investing For Generations
Jamie Hyneman
and Adam Savage (AT THE COBALT)
THE DISCORDER AND THE
RICKSHAW PRESENT A CO-
HEADLINING BILL FEATURING
THE H0HDE
MP THE J
HJtEEM &
RUFFLED*
. FEATHERS
with a special dj set by HEAVY KEVY from
TOP LESS GAY LOVE TEKMO PARTY.
Georgia Straight and The Rickshaw present 1
• !•
with special guests
D TREVLON BUND
Tickets: Red Cat, Zulu, Highlife, Neptoon,
northerntickets.com and rickshawtheatre.com. |
Rectal W tickets avaUable at rickshawtheatre.com^
with guests
The Rickshaw presents
NICE     I
PETER
fOF EPIC HUP BUTTLES!
THE JACKPOT GOLDEN BOYS
hi, highlife, northerntickets.com
«r   Tickets avaiiaoie <-u- i<"^, *■""-< ™,»" " ' 0
m..■; »llAV,B« &rickshawtheatre.com |
ppg^^wp^jjjeBS
^G?oitaStr5ght and The Rickshaw present
]  '! I •' 11
MORPH Y -
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I
ort oi his      |
(OF BAUHAUS) In sui
upcontinff wwffl &««.***•
VIP Tickets include a limited edition l-shirt, c
signed poster, and an exclusive after show
reception with Peter Murphy.
Only 30 VIP tickets available.
Tickets: brownpapertickets.com, rickshawtheatre.com
■H
14 last lasting* I Hwalrfeksto^w \ m  /
V THE
WEDDING
INDUSTRIAL
COMPLEX
by Bob Woolsey
t illustration by Rob Ondzik
illustration by Daniel Jamie Williams
There's nothing more beautiful than
two people who are truly in love. It's a
wonderful thing, indeed worthy of great
celebration.
So then why am I dreading the
approaching wedding season?
IVe already been invited to five
weddings this summer, all of which are
located outside of Vancouver. Some of the
couples are friends, the others are family,
and while I love them all, I'm now forced
to pick and choose which ones mean the
most to me—or the more useful barometer,
which trips will be the most cost-effective.
Other factors contributing to my decision
process: gift expectations, surrounding
attractions near the wedding (can I spin
this into a proper holiday), and of course,
the bar situation. Open bar = 111 be there!
This cold approach to wedding
RSVPs isn't something I'm proud of and
it certainly wasn't the approach I started
out with. The beginning of my wedding
guest career was filled with hope and joy
towards both the couples and the events
.surrounding them. This jaded person
sitting at the keyboard now was forged
over years of wedding after wedding,
pointless gifts and forgotten dates, chicken
dances, and buffet lines. There are only so
many pieces of wedding cake you can eat
before the allure vanishes. These days it's
all about the cost/ benefit analysis.
You may believe in the sanctity of a
union between two loving people. You may
think love should be a pure thing and you
genuinely want to help your friends and
family celebrate that fact. ll$l
HERE'S THE THING
\7 We, as the guests, are not to blame for
this. We are but victims of the Wedding
Industrial Complex that's grown over
the past hundred years or so with an
exponential curve upwards in the level of
wedding craziness over the past 20 years.
WeVe got reality
shows and magazines
and televised stunt
weddings all with
the aim of glorifying
the moment above
and beyond the
lifetime partnership
it's supposed to
represent. As
the great love
doctor Dwight D.
Eisenhower once
said, "Only an alert
and knowledgeable
citizenry can
compel the proper
meshing of the
huge industrial and
romantic machinery
of nuptials with our
peaceful methods
and goals, so that
love and liberty may
prosper together." Or
something like that.
In an age where
our outward facing lives are curated and
edited with camera filters, hashtags, and
sideways smiley faces, it's no wonder
that wedding culture has spiralled out
of control. A wedding is like an insecure
teenager's Facebook wall: a carefully
This cold approach to
wedding RSVPs isn't
something I'm proud of
and it certainly wasn't the
approach I started out
with. The beginning of
my wedding guest career
was filled with hope and
joy towards both the
couples and the events
surrounding them. This
jaded person sitting at the
keyboard now was forged
over years of wedding
after wedding, pointless
gifts and forgotten dates,
chicken dances, and
buffet lines."
crafted narrative of what the couple's
relationship is expected to be and not
necessarily what it is. This life-sleight-
of-hand doesn't come cheap. I know that
weddings are expensive, but the money
paid out for things that we deem essential
to a proper wedding
is both frivolous and
ridiculous.
Here's the thing
about weddings: like
any right of passage
they serve a very
specific purpose for
the people going
through it. It's a
chance to get up
in front of whoever
you consider to be
your community and
profess your love
and partnership to
another person. It's
about welcoming
another person into
your identity. You go
from a single entity
to one half of a team.
None of those ideas
needs to have tens of
thousands of dollars
spent in order to
achieve it. When your
wedding becomes a financial strain, you're
doing it wrong. It's about you and the
people you love doing something that you
love. Me personally? I don't love chicken
dancing but if you do, then go
for it!
18
/V£/*£'S r.V£ THING  20
W/LD/KINO 1.
Like their name suggests, wild/kind
is neither totally crazy nor solely
sugar sweet; as guitarist Mark Payerl
says, "We're wedged perfectly in the
middle and slightly askew." Along
with frontman Johnny LaRusic, bassist
Lindsay Partin, and drummer Natalie
Glubb, the four members of wild/
kind seem happily nestled as the slash
between the two adjectives, as excited
to go and play a set at the Cobalt as
they are to just hang out and enjoy
being around one another.
&M&
"We actually call each other up
to hang out for no reason, not
to rehearse or anything. It's
unexpected, and a lot different
than some of the other music
projects IVe been a part of,"
Partin says, who some may
recognize from the Vancouver
dream-pop group Village. "A lot
of those times you might see
each other out, you might invite
each other to do certain things,
but most of the time you meet
just to write songs and play
a show. We legitimately love
hanging out with each other."
It's remarkable how close
the band is despite having only
been around since January
of last year. Sitting down with
wild/kind for the first time feels
like youVe somehow hustled
yourself into the most welcoming
family dinner of people youVe
never met.
The group's beginnings
are the result of LaRusic's
pseudo-New Year's resolution
to start writing more music and
start a new band. After contacting Partin,
whom he'd met at an audition for one of
her other groups, a fated Craigslist posting
put him in touch with Payerl and Glubb
shortly thereafter.
"Lindsey had given me all of the
horror stories of trying to find people for a
band, and all of the random creepy people
on Craigslist," LaRusic reminisces. "It
really wasn't dozens of people responding
to the ad, just a handful, and I really
lucked out that the people that responded
just happened to be the coolest."
That sense of camaraderie has
certainly been a crux of how wild/kind has
approached their music, with recordings
and releases feeling much more like the
hard work of a group of friends than the
tribulations of a group of no-nonsense
musicians. The group's debut EP,
Mountains, dropped in early April without
too much fanfare or online spamming—
something the band seems content with at
this point.
"It was kind of released fairly quietly,
but weVe had good reception from
that. We could probably do a better job
promoting us and the stuff that we do...
For as little promotion as weVe done, I
VVILD/KINO
21 think we've done pretty well," LaRusic
observes with similar concurrences from
the rest of the band.
Despite its sneaky release, Mountains
is a collection of songs not to be
overlooked. Harkening back to the Halifax
Pop Explosion of the *90s, wild/kind has
picked up a wealth of their indie-pop
sensibilities from groups like Sloan,
the Super Friendz, and Thrush Hermit.
Boisterous and bouncy, tracks such as
"Ready to Go" and "The Mountains of New
Brunswick" demand dancing and singing
along to, with rhythms
just jangly enough to
sound reminiscent of
Surfer Blood's Astro
Coast.
^[Almost] all the
songs on the EP right
now started as material
that Johnny wrote
by himself that have
been adapted for the
band," reveals Partin.
"I think that's one of
the reasons we're so
eager to record some
more stuff because we
have a lot more that
we've written as a band
together."
With any luck, wild/kind's future
recordings will be half as hectic and
effective as the process involved behind
Mountains. Payerl is quick to discuss the
situation behind the band's self-recorded
release.
"It was like a blitz, marathon,
up-until-four-in-the-morning session. It
was glorious. We all started talking and
everyone had a little bit of gear. I have
some microphones, I have an interface, IVe
got this, IVe got that," he remarks.
"A little bit of gear and very little
knowhow," continues Glubb. "It was
amazing we managed to be that productive
while still having that much fun.".
"It was like a blitz,
marathon, up-until-four-
in-the-morning session.
It was glorious. We
all started talking and
everyone had a little
bit of gear. I have some
microphones, I have an
interface, I've got this,
I've got that."
The entire guerrilla recording
experiment took place over the course
of one weekend at a friend's house in
Whistler, the band explains, with everyone
piled into a beat-up '86 Honda Odyssey
they rented from a rather disreputable man
named Mario.
"We just filled it full of gear and booze
and stuff, and all piled into it and it was
pretty fun, so I think we'd definitely do well
on the road," Payerl says with a grin.
"I definitely want to do some more
recording before summer's end," LaRusic
adds, "and if we do a
small tour, that would
be awesome."
While the future
may not be entirely
mapped out for wild/
kind at this point, the
band's eagerness to
continue and further
the project is palpable.
Talks with music
festivals are fledgling,
and a seven-inch of
"The Mountains of New
Brunswick" is also on
its way.
But for these
four musicians, more
important than any of
that is the notion that wild/kind continues
to be the collaboration of a^group of best
friends. As Payerl aptly puts it, "When we
started the project, Johnny specifically
said 'Guys, I don't want to make ourselves
crazy trying to push this. Let's make it fUn,
and try to write great music, and let it just
happen naturally,' and I think that tone
has been consistent throughout the time
weVe been a band and hopefully that's
what continues to drive us forward." ©
i
You'd be crazy to miss wild/kind's show
on May 2 at the Cobalt with Kill City
Kids and Gnomadics. Be there!
22
vviLD/KINO WILD/KIND Ill IIS! I
INT
FOR A MEASLY 15 BU
lor, free for station members)
Antisocial
Skateboard Shop
2337 Main St.
10% off
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1968 West 4th Ave
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and RM Williams
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101-111 Water Street
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2016 Commercial Dr.
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www.badbirdmedia.
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320 Cambie St.
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Band Merch Canada
www.bandmerch.ca
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Robson, Cherrybomb,
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3608 W 4th Ave.
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439 W Hastings St.
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3681 West 4th Ave.
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3934 Main St.
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4332 Main St.
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2418 Main St.
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2621 Alma St.
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43 W Hastings St.
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UBC Bookstore
6200 University Blvd.
f0% off clothing, gifts,
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Used House of
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118HanesAve, North
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a mmsiramm scores yid sweet deals
AT VANCOUVER'S F
MEST SMALL MERCHANTS AND
SUPPORTS CITR. SHOW IT WHEN YDDSIOP!
WWW.CITR.CA k KISS PAJNTJNG Enter the basement laboratory that Is
Kiss Painting. It's dingy and abrasive,
made up of images, stories, moods..
Everything is carefully placed, with dead
noise worked carefully between the
different components: build-up is key.
It's a Sunday night and the dimly
lit Astorino's has drawn a crowd for the
SafeAmp Zine Library launch party.
But the venue is still too big for its own
good, as half of Astorino's still feels
like a playground for ghosts. CA Chux,
guitarist for Kiss Painting, is in a dress
and yellow stockings, with bassist James
Baxter across from him and S. Hellina
drumming on the elevated stage, forming
a sort of triangle. The dynamic between
them is modest and controlled. Their
set, parsed with guitar plucking and
disorienting time signatures, is fittingly
creepy for the venue—eccentric jazz,
stripped down and skewed.
A few nights after the
show, I'm sitting with the band
at a bar on the Drive that
feels simultaneously slick and
sleazy. Tucked away in a corner booth, I
ask about "Tape/Bench Press," the closing
track on the band's demo which features
an extended, under-the-breath spoken
word section reminiscent of Slint. "One
thing IVe been interested in a lot lately
is working with narrative," says Chux,
who co-writes the lyrics with Hellina and
Baxter. "Often if I have a political message
of some sort, instead of having it come
across as really in-your-face, polemic,
didactic approach, to tell a story and paint
a picture of some interaction or some
person."
"I don't play music because I went to
music school. I can barely play drums,"'
Hellina explains, "I play music because I
think, philosophically, it's a really good
example of how things should operate."
She takes a bite of her veggie burger,
which has taken on a shadowy purple hue
from the bar's neon lights.
KISS PAINTING
27 The topic is a recurring one
throughout our interview. Music, both in
the way it's created and played, is about
striving for Utopias. "You go to some places
in Europe where there's squat culture and
you can build spaces of idealism that have
potential. Here, it's difficult to find that
kind of potential," says Chux, mulling it
over with intensity.
"One thing I've been interested
in a lot lately is working with
narrative. Often if I have a
political message of some sort,
instead of having it come across
as really in-your-face, polemic,
didactic approach, to tell a story
and paint a picture of some
interaction or some person."
"I'm tired of using the term realism
as something to describe people who are
conservative. It sort of disenfranchises
anyone who's not."
The band's sound fits within the   .
No Wave movement (genre? sound?
experiment?) which originated in New
York during the late '70s. The queen of
No Wave was Lydia Lunch, a crude and
confrontational songstress who gave one of
the more unpleasant Nardwuar interviews.
The movement is said to encompass
an influential array of musicians (Sonic
Youth and Swans often being thrown
under the No Wave blanket), and artists
whose work tended to reflect their
crumbling and crime-ridden city. "[It's]
more about ethic and expression of art.
You don't have to train to be a musician,
and you have more of a free realm to
express yourself," says Baxter.
Creating that "free realm" is
complicated though. Chux and Baxter
met Hellina through SafeAmp, and the
band has deep ties to the all-ages scene
in Vancouver. Kiss Painting doesn't flat
out dismiss the possibility of playing at
bars, although theyVe yet to do so. "I don't
necessarily believe a boycott politics is
going to make a difference," says Chux.
All-ages and underground venues
don't necessarily mean everything is fine
and dandy by default, as Hellina debunks:
"Even though a venue may not be legal,
they can still be operating under capitalist
principles and trying to push as many
bodies in as possible and trying to make
as much money as possible."
Hellina is an organizer at
Shout Back! Fest, a radically
anti-capitalist, anarcha-feminist
music festival and workshop
series. Both Chux and Baxter are
also volunteers for the festival and
while nothing's been confirmed
yet, the band hopes to play a
fundraiser leading up to the
festival.
"We identify collectively as a
feminist band... being a feminist
and identifying with feminism
is still, sadly, an odd thing in
society. That in itself could be deemed
experimental," says Hellina. I get the
impression she doesn't mean this as if
feminism is a "phase" for the band. Kiss
Painting—and perhaps the SafeAmp
community as a whole—is involved in
searching for new ways to talk about these
convictions.
"I think [feminism] is something I
just feel more than can articulate," says
Hellina. "I think that where we fall into
trouble is where we all start trying to get
righteous about what it is. I think that's
what I really like about music, it's about
communicating with feeling rather than
abrasive language."
The band experiments and pushes
boundaries in an effort to engage their
vision of Utopia. "It goes beyond what
we're trying to do as a band," Chux
explains. "It's part of the way we're living
and the way we're communicating with
each other and the outside world. Life is
experimental."
28
KISS PAINTING 1
■■■ STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF APRIL 2014
CITR 101.9 FM CHARTS
ARTIST
1 Role Mach*+
2 Cool*+
3 Spring**
4 Thee Ahs*+
ALBUM
Travels In The
Interior Districts
Paint
Celebrations
Corey's
Coathanger
5    Jody Glenham*+     Dreamer
6    Kandle*
Inflames
LABEL
Self-Released
Yellow Plum
Self-Released
Jigsaw
Self-Released
Dare To Care
7    Mode Moderne*+|f. Occult Delight Light Organ
8 Eden Fine Day* +     Things Get Better     Self-Released
n     .__.ini   , Burn Your Fire
9 Angel Olsen forNoWitness        Jagjaguwar
10   Blind Horses*+       Avail
11   MaCDeMarco*        Salad Days
12   Trust*
Joyland
Self-Released
Captured Tracks
Arts & Crafts
13   Dum Dum Girls .    Too True
Sub Pop
14 Craig Cardiff*       figBBj      Self"Released
15 Fearing & White*    jgj*£ LowdenProud
Warpaint
16 Warpaint
17 Black Lips
18 Speedy Ortiz Real Hair
Underneath
the Rainbow
Rough Trade
Vice
Carpark
19  The Haden Triplets   The Haden Triplets    Third Man
20 Village**
21 Livingston*
Old Man
22
Luedecke*
Village Kingfisher Bluez
Artificially intelligent     Labe, Fantastjc
True North
FolkSongs...
Never Sang
Before I Met You
,~   Thge Silver MtZion      Fuck Off Get Free VfePour,^_..
"   Memorial Orchestra*    Lighten Everything uonsteiiauon
u   Tigerwingx ,„ .
Barnaby Bennett*
25  St. Vincent
St. Vincent
Self-Released
Loma Vista
ARTIST
26 Tycho
27 Fresh Snow*
ALBUM
Awake
1
28 Lydia Loveless  "     Somewhere Else
29 ^y Malinowski &     M
The Deadcoast*        a™
You Show Me
Things
Stephen Malkmus    Wig Out at
30  Mien Forrister*+
31
and The Jicks Jagbags
32 The Ketamines*      11:11
33 The Pack A.D.*+      Do Not Engage
34   Monogrenade*
or   The Souljazz
Orchestra*
36 PyPy*
37 Failing*+
38 Fountain*
39 Bette Graham*+
40^'jSlates*
.,   prOphecy sun &
Emerge*+
42
Blackie And The
Rodeo Kings*
43   Solids*
..   Katie and
The Lichen*+
45 Cloud Nothings
46 Hunting*
47 TheJolts*+
48 PureX
The Hidden
49
50
Cameras*
The Nautical
Miles*+
Composite
Inner Fire
Pagan Day
The Apple in the
Pig's Mouth
Fountain
The Sensational
Bette Graham
Taiga
Spirit Dreams
South
Blame Confusion
Yours Truly
Here And
Nowhere Else
Hunting
LABEL
Ghostly
international
Reel Cod
Bloodshot.
Pirates Blend
Self-Released
Matador
Learning Tree
Nettwerk
Bonsotfnd
Strut
Slovenly
Self-Released
Self-Released
Self-Released
New Damage
Self-Released
File Under: Music
Dine Alone Music
Self-Released
Carpark
Nevado
Hammer Every Nail   Shake!
Angel
Age
Ode to Joy
Fat Possum
Evil Music
Self-Released
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked [+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find
them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordmgley. If you ask nicely she'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.eaishot-onlinfi.cnm.
30
CHARTS ALICIA TOBIN
"I like snacks. I like being in bed by
nine. I think it's nice to be nice. I'm
passionate about nature. I'm really
interested in where we are living in the
natural world right now. And I spend a
lot of time by myself."
When I ask Vancouver comedian
Alicia Tobin to describe herself, the
answer is short and direct; a grab-bag
of quirks and interests thrown together
like a Jackson Pollock piece. But when I
ask Tobin how she would describe herself
comedicaUy, I get an equally genuine
response.
"I'm interested in doing things that
make me laugh and don't hurt other
people," says Tobin. "I'm not really
interested in creating things that cause
more sadness or negativity. I like comedy
that's victimless. That's important to me."
ALICIA TOBIN
31 Tobin grew up in Rosemere, a suburb
of Montreal. She's loved comedy for as long
as she can remember, admiring The Kids
in the Hall, Saturday Night Live, and any
sitcom with Tim Conway. While she wasn't
the class clown type of kid, Tobin had an
affinity for getting people's attention.
"I remember feeling very shy as a
child, but my behaviour would indicate
otherwise," says Tobin. "If I was nervous
"This one guy drew his
girlfriend naked. And
unprompted, like it was
an unnecessary addition
to the show. And it was
an incredibly strange
picture. When I began to
understand the picture,
that he was really terrible
at drawing and she
was a muscular yoga
practitioner, I was like,
'Oh, okay.'"
or wanted attention, I would just fake tap
dance. I think I really wanted attention
and when I tried to get it, I would just fail.
I remember getting in trouble for fake tap
dancing too much. People wouldbe in
conversations and I would fake tap dance
and interrupt them."
Fortunately, this habit of attention-
seeking matured into Tobin regularly
performing stand-up around the city.
First grabbing the mic at Zesty's in 2004,
Tobin had a solid five minutes, one joke of
which was about the confusion of raccoon
blowjobs, a personal favourite of hers.
While she loved comedy, the experience
bf stand-up remained a little confusing to
Tobin. She never felt the same rush as the
other comics.
"I thought I was good at it, in that I
had something to work on. I was getting
something from it, but I wasn't sure what,
because I felt like
barfing most of the time.
The anxiety leading up
to a performance and
the crash afterwards
was really hard. There
were certain things
that I liked and certain
things that I didn't like
about performing."
It was in that comic
ambiguity, a time where
Tobin questioned the
value of stand-up in her
life, that she stumbled
onto her new passion.
In March of 2012, Tobin
came up with the idea of
Come Draw With Me, an
interactive, crowd-driven
comedy show where the
audience draws pictures
and Tobin dissects their
drawings in a loving, T§ff
comedic way.
. "I was going to a
show and I didn't really
have anything new
prepared," says Tobin. "I
was walking across the
Georgia Street Viaduct
and I came up with the
idea of Well, why don't
you get them to draw?'
And I love drawing...
and I felt it was something I wanted to do
more of and to learn how to draw better.
And that combination of ideas led to me
trying it one night and I was surprised by
how well it went. I was more surprised
than anybody. And I just kept doing it."
Tobin emphasizes that the vibe of the
show is so crucial to its success and that
the first few times she did it, she felt people
were scared that she would make fun of
them. By now, however, the support and
enthusiasm of its audience characterizes
the show. Whereas 15 people may have
drawn when the show started, now close
to 40 people do each time.. And with that
many drawings, there are bound to be
some "interesting" ones.
32
ALICIA TOB/N Tobin. on one of her favourite
Come Draw With Me drawings:
"The greatest is when someone really can't
draw. I had one person draw a bear but you
couldn't see that it was a bear. And then, after
the show, I found out that she had never seen
a bear before. She was from Honduras and
they don't have bears there. She was trying to
draw something scary and she thought, 'Oh,
bears are scary. I've heard about them. I've
never seen one before, but I think I could
draw one.' Like, it looked like spaghetti, like a
spaghetti monster. That was great. And then
she laughed so hard."
"There have been some weird ones,"
says Tobin. "This one guy drew his
girlfriend naked. And unprompted, like it
was an unnecessary addition to the show.
And it was an incredibly strange picture.
When I began to understand the picture,
that he was really terrible at drawing and
she was a muscular yoga practitioner,
I was like, 'Oh, okay.' But she was a
small-frame person and it's like 'Oh, that's
why she's only triangles.'"
With love and care, Tobin is bravely
tackling Vancouver with her delightful,
charming style of comedy. Focussing
on the (mostly poor) artistic abilities of
strangers, Tobin has found her niche and
is happy to stay in it. So whether you're
the second coming of Da Vinci or you
have trouble with the legs on stick figures,
Alicia Tobin welcomes you with open
arms, gf
i
Tobin performs Come Draw With Me
monthly at Hot Art Wet City, with the
next show on May 23. Tobin will also
be performing at "Kyle Bottom's Going
Away Show" at the Comedy Mix on
May 6.
ALICIA TOBIN
33 lli
■.;: "v .  >39t8388g£&
■
I    fm
>*:•
If
Sylvana d'Angelo
Satanic Panic
Dynamo Arts Association
May 9-23
Opening: May 9, 8-11pm
As part of an ongoing examination of her
surroundings, Sylvana's photography seeks
out new experiences and individuals in
search for something meaningful and then
exploits that moment through documentation
and presentation. Her work focusses on the
connections these moments have with the
subject, their surroundings and the unifying
effect of shared experiences.
SYLVANA D'ANGELO ii ^ M
T
w
TH
a
?fl
tf>
i
Misery Signals, Nihilate
@ Media Club
5
6
The Shrine, Bison, Three
Wolf Moon
@£lectric Owl
7           ^
8
The Tourist Company,
Dogwood and Dahlia
©Media Club
12
13
14
Gardens & Villa,
Pure Bathing Culture
@ Fortune
15
The Horde & the Harem,
The Ruffled Feathers
@ Rickshaw
19
Black Pussy, Gypsyhawk,
Black Wizard, La Chinga
@ Rickshaw
20
21
Next Music From Tokyo Vol. 6
@ Biltmore
■1
wt/Z£&
iii
26
27
28
^gl Cascadia, Lie, Gal Gracen,
Filthy Liars ©Rainbow
Connection
Neu Balance, Mesa Luna,
Noble Oak @ The Fox
Ladyhawk @ Biltmore
The Pains of Being Pure at
Heart, Fear of Men
@ Fortune
We are Scientists
@ Electric Owl
9
Broods @ Media Club
16
Tera Melos @ Media Club
Cloud Cult @ Venue
23
PinkMountaintops
@ The Fox
First Aid Kit, Willy Mason
©The Rio
30 fm
BESTiE, Sunshine, NEEDS,
Derrical
@ Fortune
Music Waste Warmup:
Soft Serve, Tender Hearts,
Get Over It, Shawn Mrazek,
and more @ The Astoria
Vancouver Noise Fest
,@ The Remington Gallery
.10
Acid Mothers Temple
@ Media Club
Derrival, Lovecoast,
This Mischief
@ Biltmore
17
Failure ©'Rickshaw
24
Banks @ Venue IB
Parquet Courts,
Naomi Punk @ Biltmore
31
M0
@ Fortune
Warpaint, James Supercave
@ Rickshaw
J3
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HUNTING / SHUYLER JANSEN / JOYCE ISLAND
APRIL 9   THE BILTMORE
I had high hopes for the album release
party at the Biltmore for recent Nevado
sigriees, Hunting, and did my best to keep
them that way as I descended from cold
air to the quiet tedium of an early-to-rise
group of Cowichan sweaters with local
songstress Lisa Joyce a.k.a. Joyce Island
taking the stage. She opened with "Mercy
on Me," but not before she had the chance
to explain, "This is a song about, um,
fucking your life up." Prefacing each of
the alt-country tunes with an unpoetic
tribute became ritualistic. Nods were given
to Rob Ford, Pussy Riot, the civil unrest
in Crimea, Rita MacNeil, and simply
"assholes" in general as she recited the
majority of last year's self-titled EP before
closing the set on an adapted cover of Hank
Williams' "Sundown and Sorrow" with the
hurried excitement only the onset of a tour
can incite.
An amiable small town atmosphere
sifted through the room as the unassuming
Albertan Shuyler Jansen stepped forward.
Charming prairie boy Canadiana was met
with an austere drum loop to create a
simple and personable affair—one where a
player like Jansen could be found amongst
the crowd after his set, sharing stories over
what was liable to become one too many.
Meanwhile the hazy refrain "Words have
lost their meaning," resonated through
"Totally Anonymous" before the songwriter
noted his fourth solo album was nearly
finished in-between sips of beer. Little more
was said between songs and he was in
no hurry to rush through his own brand
of unabashed electro-folk as he casually
played through "If it's Meant to be," taken
from his 2011 album Voice from the Lake
before announcing his friend Paul would
be joining him on stage. That friend
ft£4£ LIVE ACTION
41 being none other than Neko Case
collaborator and Hunting guitarist
Paul Rigby, whose guitar work on
"Brand New Wick" and "Don't see It
Changin'" provided Jansen's placid
introspection with big sky monoliths
fuzzy enough to impress any latent
shoegazer.
Following one last Jansen
original and a trip to the bar, the
room became awash with trucker
caps and denim jackets anxious to
hear the latest from newly formed
Vancouver indie-folk group Hunting.
With lyrics fit to traverse loneliness,
it was no wonder the Biltmore began
to feel more like a dusty Klondike saloon
than a place where shirtless bros gathered
every Saturday night to let the bass drop.
Nevertheless, the sea of denim began
to ebb as Bradley Ferguson and co. ran
through 45 minutes of hi-fi watery reverb
paired with Jesse Zubot's subtle violin and
the cute glockenspiel accompaniments of
Jessica Yliruusi. As the fuzzy folk group
churned through hits like "Everytime
I'm With You" and "Everything Will be
Okay," it was questionable whether the
crowd—who appeared more concerned
with themselves than those on stage, even
during the catchy forlorn single "Patti"—
had earned an encore.
Tired of being ignored, Ferguson
remarked, "Actually, fuck it," before
dashing away to make his exit. The
seemingly preoccupied crowd erupted with
disappointment before he got even two
steps away, so the frontman shrugged his
shoulders and closed out the night singing
"Goodbye." And even though Ferguson and
Rigby returned for an encore of "Lonely
Happy," I became preoccupied by a friend
who lamented, "I miss the atmosphere of
small town gigs."
"Why?" I responded.
"Because everyone's so nice."
"Yeah, but they're always
unremarkable. Everything's so, I don't $
know... "
"Vanilla?"
"Yes," I said, "Vanilla."
—Robert Catherall
STEPHEN MALKMUS & THE JICKS / SPEEDY ORTIZ
APRIL 10 • THE RICKSHAW THEATRE
There was no escaping the wistful,
rosewater-infused, dewy-eyed saturnalia
that a Stephen Malkmus 8b the Jicks
performance can sometimes squeeze
from their long-time fans. By no means
a nostalgia act, don't get me wrong, but
judging by the tattered vintage- shirts from
Malkmus' former band on display, a very
retro mist was tangible in the air.
To that end, Northampton,
Massachusetts four-piece Speedy
Ortiz ushered in the evening playing
'QOs-inspired indie rock a la Belly or
Veruca Salt—also a little Dinosaur
Jr. tossed in for added oomph—with
mandatory distortion and caterwauling
oceanic guitars. Gauging by the delirious
pogoing on the dance floor by the end
of their energetic set (as well as a well-
received cameo by the Jicks' Mike Clark
on cowbell), the revival movement still had
plenty of power to barrel along for some
time to come.
Reiterating Fred Armisen and Carrie
Brownstein's playful assertion that "The
dream of the ^Os are alive in Portland,"
the Oregonian entertainers everyone came
to see wasted no time taking the stage
and diving deep into a set that seemed
streamlined for dyed-in-the-wool devotees
of Malkmus.    Jp|l
While officially touring in support
42
/*£4£ LIVE ACTION 2.
<%'
of their sixth solid'Matador release,
the cheekily titled Wig Out at Jagbags,
Stephen Malkmus & the Jicks have now
released more material than Malkmus'
other band. (You know, the one from way
back that rhymes with payment). I'm
happy to report that Messrs. Malkmus and
co. were in fine form, luxuriating in their
deft technique, their ability to celebrate
their multifarious but always rocking
sound, and cotton to their fans too,
without exception.
A firm focus on Jagbags' finest
cuts with songs like "Surreal Teenagers"
and "Lariat" were tempered with tracks
like "Senator" and "Tigers" from 201 l's
beautiful Beck-produced LP Mirror Traffic,
and even long forgotten gems like
"Jenny and the Ess-Dog" from
Malkmus' self-titled 2001 debut
cropped up.
As Malkmus swaggered
around the stage, grinning
and tossing out the occasional
clamorous solo, it was impossible
not to notice his perpetually
ageless appearance. Has Malkmus
even aged a day since I first saw
him amble up on stage, leading his
sly lo-fi California combo Pavement
some 20 years ago, and still every
bit the indie rock saviour he
avowed to be? Hoodwinking aside,
truly, what Faustian pact did he
sign that not only made him rock 'n' roll's
Peter Pan, but saviour as well? Certainly
written in blood, this devil deed must
also include a clause allowing Malkmus
to enjoy a responsive career longevity
unheard of by most of his peers. Many
musicians would give their eye teeth for
the sweep he's taken, but seeing him pose
on stage, perspiring, clowning one minute,
shredding the next, it's hard not to cheer
him on and really mean it.
Bassist Joanna Bolme (formerly of the
great Elephant Six band, the Minders, for
all you trainspotters out there), a constant
in the Jicks line-up, deserves special
mention for her inventive rhythmic skills
in an excellent interpretation of Nilsson's
"Jump Into the Fire" that also showed
drummer Jake Morris to have some
indomitably deep pockets. Wow.
When Malkmus ripped into "Baby
C'mon" it was all but impossible not to
sing along and when "Stereo" crept in
there everyone in the Rickshaw Theatre
lost their shit. The line in that song
referencing Geddy Lee Segued perfectly
into a rousing rendition of Rush's "Fly by
Night," touching down amidst a covers-
saturated encore set Where I admit to
having a frenzied fanboy conniption. "Box
Elder" and Roxy Music's "Mother of Pearl"
sent us all on our way with full hearts and
express tenderness. What more can you
ask for on a night such as this?
—Shane Scott-Travis
GAL GRACEN / YOUNG BRAISED / WETFACE /
SPACE BROS
APRIL 11 • THEY LIVE VIDEO
When Space Bros, one of Tom Whalen's
numerous projects, took the stage at They
Live Video on April 11, no one seemed to
know what to make of it. Noise art or D J
set from hell? The room hummed with
distracted chatter, punctuated with hoots
of encouragement—whether sincere or
sarcastic, I couldn't tell.
But with a little encouragement from
Whalen, the crowd soon tuned in to the
bit-crushed minimal synth coming out
of the murk, getting down to lyrics about
losing control in Zero-G and cutting
/?f4( LIVE ACT/ON
43 loose with space brothers. But just as
the dance party was getting started,
the sound system started cutting out,
forcing Whalen to make some impromptu
cable adjustments. It was enough to get
him through the set, but the problems
re-emerged when Wetface, a.k.a. Slam
Dunk's Jordan Minkoff, took the stage
afterward.
Still, when the sound system did
work, the audience was treated to
Minkoff s ragged, exuberant vocals,
accompanied by keyboard and rhythm
machine chorus. Between the hand-
clapping and the sing-alongs, "Growing up
in NYC is as hard as can be!," it felt a little
like an Andrew W.K. gig.
But the next set, that of rapper
Young Braised, went smoothly, the
sound going with nary a hiccup. Decking
himself head-to-toe in North Face, Young
Braised free-associated about Slurpees,
admitted to being blazed his "whole life,"
and improvised lines about having to
change his Tumblr password because of
Heartbleed—all while serving up cuts off
his latest release, Japanese Tendencies.
The party atmosphere continued through
the night and right into Gal Gracen's set.
Gal Gracen's soundcheck segued
into the actual set, the bassist laying
down riffs to beats from a sampler. It's a
new direction for the band—once the solo
project of Role Mach's Patrick Geraghty—
formerly jangly and dreamy, now bassy
yet sprightly, at times reminiscent of New
Order.
The band covered material from Gal
Gracen's Blue Hearts in Exile, and signed
off with a lively instrumental version of
that album's fourth track, "Love Fantasy,
My Beautiful Girl." The audience couldn't
get enough of it, even as the night was
drawing to a close.
—Chris Yee
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44
ft£4Z. LIVE ACTION UNDER REVIEW
FILTHY LIARS
If All Else Fails (Cry and
Cry Again)
INDEPENDENT
Self-described on their
Bandcamp page as "two
fuck-up queer trans
boys," the Filthy Liars
have quickly morphed
their slow acoustic
sorrows into an emo,
punk-pop outfit equally as depressing, just
with bigger explosions. Due to their apparent lack of regard for age and wisdom,
the recently-formed threesome from parts
Halifax and parts Vancouver are a surprise
to be sure, demonstrating tight musical
choreography, all the while sounding like
they are headlining your local garage.
Aptly titled If All Else Fails (Cry and. Cry
Again), the prose, which
is generally harmonious
in delivery, is an honest
account of a personal
world of identity theft
and depression, and
though their angst is
often communicated
with pleasant decorum
(which is in contrast to
the manic guitars and
drums behind them),
on a few occasions they
inflict short but impressive amounts of abuse on their vocal
chords. Filthy Liars do not overstay their
welcome with any particular way of doing
things, and tracks like "Tunnels," which
starts innocently with three acoustic
strings played on two
separate guitars, still
end up sounding great
even in their simplicity.
Of course, exposing their
most inner thoughts
doesn't hurt their cause,
either: "I am afraid of
not actually being a
person." It's a sentiment
that captures the spirit
of their struggle; on the
one hand they're pissed
at the world and ready to take up arms,
and in other moments they are vulnerable, unsteady and unsure. The dialogue
throughout the record is delivered rather
maturely despite the frequent f-bombs and
inexperience in the range of their voices.
In the end, If All Else Fails is an
exercise in opposites with youth bursting
through the cracks and corners of a
soundscape that more
seasoned bands would
be happy to call their
own.
—Slavko Bucifal
LESSER PISSERS
Not Enough
NAPKIN/VANITY
RECORDS
Here we have a
posthumous release
from the short-lived and invariably
polarizing Lesser Pissers, who you either
love or hate—and for many, it's the
latter. Barely celebrating their one-year
anniversary, the Pissers called it quits in
UNOER REVIEW
45 true punk-rock style as lead singer Max
Zaitlin was booted off stage at Pat's Pub
during last year's Music Waste festival. I
mean, wouldn't you if your frontman was
out of his head and decided to recite Bible
verses in place of your band's lyrics?
Caustic, rude, and decidedly
unpredictable, this is a 15-minute
maelstrom of post-punk fury compiled
from some of Napkin's first recordings.
At a time before Crystal Dorval's White
Poppy project thrusted her into the North
American underground circuit, she was
recruited to play the drums on "Naughty
Philanthropist," "Watery Eyes," and "Bad
Momma," where the barely coherent
Zaitlin spews lines like "My mother was
a badass Nazi / My mother was a bad
girl" at you through muddied four-track
production. With gang vocals clipping well
into the red and spastic guitarwork that
has nothing but contempt for staying in
tune, the Pissers muster just enough self-
deprecating charm to hold their chaotic
mess together for seven short songs on Not
Enough Between a haphazard frontman
and the cock-rock noodling on tunes like
"Dale Lickman's Giant Salamander Mix" or
"Watery Eyes," the raw sound of a punk 45
circa 1981 makes this EP a crate-digger's
wet dream.
Sadly, there are no plans for the
web-only release to take physical form,
and while some of these cuts can be
downloaded, who knows how long they
will be available given the Pissers' volatile
relationship. Grab a listen while you can
at lesspiss.bandcamp.com
—Robert Catherall
SIGHTLINES/
CRYSTAL SWELLS
Split seven-inch
INDEPENDENT
I can think of no two
better bands to go in on
a split seven-inch than
pop-punk trio Sightlines
and Maple Ridge's
psych-rock outfit Crystal
Swells. The pairing have played more
than enough shows together to know their
respective sounds are complementary, and
at the end of the day, what's the point of
sitting on a couple of sub-three-minute
cutting-room tracks?
Side A of the peach-coloured (but
regrettably not peach-flavoured) vinyl
belongs to Sightlines and Eric Axen's
unique Jawbreaker-esque delivery. The
frontman doesn't lean on Kerouac quite as.
much as Blake Schwarzenbach, but the
emphasis on intelligent lyrics is definitely
present on opener "Foreknowledge."
Fun, scratchy guitar harmonics break
up the smart verses on song one, while
fuzz-soaked single-coils dominate the
one-minute "Commiseration." Sightlines
still exude the same summer charm that
dominated their last EP—it's not hard at
all to imagine soaking up these jams in
some ratty venue in the DTES while the
sun sets on a messy-hot August day.
The opening to side B, a cacophonic,
inebriated noise smash, plainly marks the
divide between Sightlines' straightforward
punk and Crystal Swells' chaotic and
dark psych tracks. Barely distinguishable
vocals sit well behind a reverb tank being
squarely beaten over the head with a
hacksaw, and rough, raw instrumentation
takes "Beach Bear" in a twisted, post-
hurricane vacation direction. Track two,
"The Bear Scare," almost sounds like it
was recorded in a bathroom stall—but
the over-compressed guitar effects are
most definitely intentional. It lends well to
Crystal Swells' off-kilter song structure,
and as the only instrumental track on
the record it stands
out for its gratuitous
under-production. It's
trash, but it's beautiful
and, most importantly, a
helluva lot of fun.
—Fraser Dobbs
46
UNOER REVIEW iBSft                                            L411il                          * •                                                                                    *                              4i0^
,.'§.-        SPELL    '
THEE AHS
2<TuH Moon Sessions
Corey's Coathangers
HARD AND HEAVY
JIGSAW
RECORDS
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Recorded, mixed, and
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third album draws
mastered under a series
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self-styled genre: black ~%M
debut release, the £ptly
bubblegum pop. Perhaps
titled Full Moon Sessions,
this connotes the
is an unapologetic col
codified juxtaposition
lection of fun, traditional
of heavy tones and
metal tracks. With
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light subject matter—or
little care for pretense or
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vice versa. But Thee
seriousness, this trio of
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Ahs possess a subtler,
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idiosyncratic dynamic.
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'80s stylings of such
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Songs shift between
song suite "Never
building tension and
Enough/ Sisters of the
blissful progressions of
Moon." Complete with soaring leads,
melody, both buoyed by bouncy dynamics.
pounding double-kick work, and Cam
It's a sound true to the complex emotions
Mesmer's wailing falsetto, the track does
Thee Ahs express: the play between
exactly what the lead song should do on a
free-spirited'melodic sweetness, troubling
metal album: grab the listener's attention
reticence, and sheer invective.
in the noisiest way possible. This track
Save one portion of harsh distortion
also doubles as a suitably amped-up
on the track "Love Sleep," Thee Ahs'
cover of Fleetwood Mac's smouldering,
,  dynamic exists in progressive movements
Stevie Nicks-penned "Sisters of the Moon,"
of melody and cheeky instrumental
morphing at the halfway point between
dynamics. Strong vocals figure into the
the two songs thanks to Graham "Gnarly"
forefront thanks to Sarah Lowenbot's
McGee's guitar work.
intonation and Davinah Shell's
Throughout Full Moon Sessions,
harmonization. While maintaining their
Spell treads some expected lyrical subject
soft tone, they absolutely nail a tight
matter. Black magic, supernatural evil,
rhythmic assonance with the instruments.
living hard, dying young, and above all the
Many of the album's highest moments
power of rock and roll are all thematically
are stolen by the duo, when the vocal
present and accounted for. If you can get
momentum supersedes the backing and
past some admittedly cheesy lines like
transforms, beautifully aloft amidst a
"Heavy metal thunder shakes my body
relative dearth of sound.
/ And white lightning strikes my soul,"
Equally strong is the instrumentation.
Spell's debut is definitely enjoyable. A
While the melodic guitar lines are pleasing,
working man's metal band, Spell has a
the key features of these strings are
special brand of black magic to share with
their dissonant sense of play. Stop-start
the devoted.
rhythm and counter-melodic chords take
—James Olson
up large portions of songs, or chop up in
UNOER REVIEW
47 the interstices. Mareesah Holmes' drums
rebut and build up in equal measure,
sometimes in tandem with the dissonant
chords, sometimes in focus with the vocal
movement towards crescendo. Altogether
the tone of the instruments possesses
an infectious bounce—the catalyst for •
innervation both within the listener and
the vocal movement.
This sense of play is evinced in the
album's immediately standout tracks.
Corey's Coathangers never settles down,
moving from tangent to tangent, ending
on a somber note but with a cheeky
three-second bounce-back and reprise.
"Does It Still Count" encompasses Thee
Ahs' foreboding tendencies, as well as their
lyrical penchant for zeroing in on affective
exclamations.
That this combination never feels
incongruous evinces the strength of
Shell's songwriting. Thanks to the
band's excellent chemistry, the complex
relationship between disparate emotions
is relayed by the dynamic music. The
emerging picture is quotidian yet
dreamlike, sharp yet soft, if only because
these things aren't mutually exclusive
within our experiences. Thee Ahs paint a
wonderful neighbourhood world, where
scraped knees flare out in a sharp contrast
of crimson.
—Jonathan Kew
WTCHDR
Triumph and Despair
INDEPENDENT
It's hard to fully
comprehend what you're
getting yourself into
when tuning into the new
WTCHDR album Triumph
and Despair. Emerging
out of the opening track
"The Pilgrimage," subtle
sounds of rattling bones
and dripping water
quickly give way to the
opening line "GET F*****,"
which punches its way
through the silence and accelerates slowly
but assertively straight into the heart of
the album.
WTCHDR is the lovechild of WRITE
OFF, Memorial, Night Terrors and Burning
Ghats, consisting of Chris Stiles (vocals),
Cam Strudwick (guitar), Andrew Temple
(drum's), and Kevin Grindor (guitar).
Triumph and Despair materialized over
the last two years; it was recorded in
September at Rain City Records and was
mastered by Brad Boatright at Audiosiege
in Portland, the man behind such
heavyweights as Sleep and All Pigs Must
Die, as well as Burning Ghats.
It's evident that there is an underlying
urge for rapid change of rhythm, beat and
genre as you are led through an inferno
of hefty musical structures appearing
as fast as they crumble, only to be held
up through a deafening breakdown that
abruptly ends to give way for a new set
of trashy grindcore ideas indulged in
powerviolence with a taste of straight-up
hardcore. On the third track "I Think I
Can," Andrew Drury from Baptists laid
down some much-welcomed guest vocals,
diversifying an already diverse record.
With most songs clocking in at around
one minute, except for "The Bonefinger," ,
"Like a Coward," and the ending track,
"Shatter Their Bones," it leaves little
breathing room for reflection yet contains
an abundance of diverse potential.
In all honesty, what you experience
within the first 40 seconds of the album
gives you a lot to think about. You realize
that there is a plethora of ideas that want
out and there is no doubt that this is the
place for the members to
feel truly unconstrained
and able to let loose.
WTCHDR, as a side
project, was meant for
this very thing, a place
for wild ideas and perfect
mosh soundtracks.
—Adam Johannesson
UNDER REVIEW 1
D0XA
OCUMENTARY
FILM FESTIVAL
by Selina Crammond   illustration by Alisha Davidson
W^m^^^^^^^^msmf^fm^Wm^m
There's nothing quite like a well-
crafted music documentary. It takes
a certain sensibility to marry the
two popular art forms and this year's
DOXA Documentary Film Festival
has a smorgasbord of music films to
feast your ears and eyes on! From
conventional rockumentaries to the
more peculiar art-house films, there's
something that'll arouse any music
aficionado.
[In full-disclosure, I sit on the
programming committee—meaning IVe
already seen every-freaking-film screening
at the festival—so I can say with full
confidence that the music documentaries
we're serving up this year are real good.]
Politics thriving through music is a
prevalent theme this year. In the wake
of music-as-marketing and apathetic
party anthems that continue permeate
the mainstream, these musical portraits
FILIV STRIPPED
49 Politics thriving through music is a
prevalent theme this year. In the wake of
music-as-marketing and apathetic party
anthems that continue permeate the
mainstream, these musical portraits are
refreshing, to say the least.
are refreshing, to say the least. Unlike
the standard rock *n' roll story that relies
on fame and tragedy, these docs explore
DIY ethos and communal convictions that
are the driving force behind the music
communities they showcase.
Pete Seeger: A Song and a Stone, the
first music doc of the festival, is made
entirely of archival footage from the 1960s,
when protest anthems dominated the
popular milieu. Come Worry With Us casts
an intimate look into the life of musicians,
lovers, and parents Efrim Menuck and
Jessica Moss of Thee Silver Mt. Zion as
they struggle to balance parenthood,
money, and ideals while on tour with
their young son. Revenge of the Mekons
provides behind-the-scenes encounters
with post-punk legends the Mekons, in all
of their anti^establishment glory. This Ain't
No Mouse Music provides a history lesson
in the "people's music" and "down-home"
jams from blues revival to Tejano; Cajun,
zydeco, bluegrass, and Appalachian
country. Death Metal Angola turns
attention to how a growing metal scene in
Angola is helping to heal a generation who
are still recovering from years of civil war.
Moving from narrative to the more
abstract, where musicians are the
composers instead of the subjects, the
following experimental docs demand
to be listened to as much as watched.
Bloody Beans, a wildly compulsive film.
about the Algerian War as told through a
gang of street-kids, is made all the more
phantasmagorical thanks to the score by
French electro-pop duo, Zombie Zombie.
Similarly, Montreal-based electronic
musician Tim Hecker provides the
soundtrack for Massacred for Gold that
creates a sensory experience, helping to
unearth a forgotten history of injustices
done onto the Chinese miners of Hells
Canyon. Using song as narration, collage-
animator Jodie Mack crafts a delightful
homage to her mom's failed rock poster
shop in Dusty Stacks of Mom. The result is
a bizarrely satisfying animated rock opera.
In Unplugged, an alluring Tarkovsky-esque
study, two strangers in Serbia play one
of the oldest (and most high-pitched)
instruments in the world, the leaf.
Preceding Unplugged, is a lively short
film starring a group of ragtag musicians
in Poland who orchestrate sounds using
found objects and children's toys.
Of course music is an integral element
of all film, but something oh-so magical
happens when the camera is turned
onto sound itself. The combination of
observation, performance and reflexivity
is what makes music documentaries
so special, for in these films, like music
itself, emotion is the driving force for
unpacking truth. They have an ability to
share personal perspective, while sorting
through perplexities without a reducing
one's experience to a single issue. Once
again, each of these films prove that
music—and music communities—are key
to understanding for the world around us.
That or maybe it's just as simple as a good
song makes for a good movie. $
i
To see any of these fantastic music
documentaries, make sure you attend
the DOXA Documentary Film Festival
between May 2-11. For more information
visit: www.doxafestival.ca
50
PILh* STRIPPED   "To climb the glass mountain, one first
requires a good reason."
—Donald Barthelme
I'm 10 minutes early for our interview,
but Robyn Jacob is already sitting in the
cafe, waiting for me. Her coffee cup is half
empty, and she's surrounded by piles of
sheet music and grocery bags. She bought
beets. "Bag full o' beets, fist full o' snacks,"
Jacob jokes. She's graceful and impeccably
dressed, and it's clear that she knows her
way around an interview;
As Fist Full o' Snacks, Jacob weaves
together off-kilter piano arrangements and
abstract lyrics that, according to her site,
promise to "tie your brain in knots while
untangling your hair." Released on April
4, Jacob's latest album, Climb the Glass
Mountain, is a doozy, full of breathtaking
vocal harmonies, skeletal piano riffs, and
loveably strange songs about birds, blood
forests, and paper people.
It's also a difficult album to describe,
or to fit neatly into a particular genre.
"Everyone always asks, What kind of
music do you play?' Usually I just say, 1
write songs.™
Like her music, Jacob's songwriting
style is more than a little unorthodox. "The
way I write, I mash things together," she
explains. "I very rarely write lyrics and
music at the same time. Ill have a poem
I wrote a while ago, and 111 have this new
riff that I'm stoked on, and 111 just mash
them together, and make it work," she
says. "I call it song-weaving, because I
think about it melodically. I always think
about tying things together, tying a knot
with all these elements."
The result is one of the most
fascinating and singular musical projects
to come out of Vancouver in recent
memory. On songs like "Dancing With a
Girl" and the titular "Glass Mountain,"
Jacob mixes her eccentric musical
style with a knack for impressionistic
storytelling, making for an engaging and
often moving listen. At any moment, each
song feels as though it's on the cusp of
coming undone—but that's just part of the
charm.
"I like to have a little bit of that
weirdness," she says. "It's my own
personal balance, and what I feel is a good
balance has really changed."
It sure has. Since her debut Of
Course the Journey, released two years
ago, Jacob has boosted her production
quality and incorporated new elements
mr FULL O' SNACKS
53 "I was out on Gambier [Island] one day, and I was just
eating snacks, and we were jamming with a bunch of
friends, and I was like, 'fist full of snacks!' For some
reason, it stuck... I don't know if I should change it or if I
should keep it, but I kind of like how it doesn't make any
sense with the music. It throws people off."
into her songwriting, like programmed
drum beats and swooning synths. Unlike
her previous, record, which was recorded
live in a single session, Climb the Glass
Mountain was recorded in studio with Jo
Hirabayashi, a fellow Vancouver musician
and the vocalist/guitarist for Spring.
"It was a totally different way of
recording," Jacob says. "You would lay
down a backing track, arid then you could
build on it, or take things away. It was so
much more sculptural."
She recalls the spontaneous recording
session behind "Paper Human," an album
standout, where she enlisted the help of
Kevin Romain, drummer for Spring and
bandmate of Hirabayashi. "We were like,
Hey Kevin, can you lay a drum track on
this song?' So he comes in, never heard
the song before, and we just play and. mm
record, and he improvises through it
twice," she says. "That's what's on the
album."
You can really hear the difference
Hirabayashi's production makes
throughout Climb the Glass Mountain's 10
tracks; each has its own unique tone and
sound, but all of them come back to that
central theme of sculpture, of charting
land. There's recurring imagery of castles,
mountains, rivers, and oceans throughout
the record. Maybe it's the influence of the
Vancouver landscape, and maybe it's just
a fascination with the natural world.
Either way, you can practically hear
the wind whistling in your ear when on
tracks like "Atlantic Rubbings," whose
refrain is about as coastal as it gets:
"Water links us / land divides us."
The record's title, Climb the Glass
Mountain—inspired by The Glass
Mountain, a haunting Donald Barthelme
short story based on a Polish fairy
tale—describes Jacob's journey from her
formative years in music school to the
present day, and the challenges that come
along with completely reimagining your
musical style.
"This album is so personal, in a weird
way," she says, "It's such a departure from
the last album. So, climbing the glass
mountain is, like, you have this thing
that you want, and you're gonna do it,
and it's gonna be really hard, but you're
gonna do it anyway." However, when I ask
if the album is autobiographical, Jacob
hesitates. "I'm not really trying to tell my
story. I wish I could tell stories about other
people better."
Of course, there's still one question
on all of our minds: what's the deal with
the name? Jacob laughs when I ask her.
*I was out on Gambier [Island] one day,
and I was just eating snacks, and we were
jamming with a bunch of friends, and IA
was like, fist full of snacks!' For some
reason, it stuck... I don't know if I should
change it or if I should keep it, but I kind .
of like how it doesn't make any sense with
the music. It throws people off."
Whether she's jamming out with
friends or weaving together melodies like
a harebrained seamstress, Robyn Jacob
is one of the most exciting new musical
talents this city has to offer—and she's
only getting started.
54
fist FULL O' SNACKS rnwiii,
taP CI t IB
by Sean Cotterall   photo by Sylvana d'Angelo
illustration by Eduard Barcelon (On previous page)
When I arrive at the Eastside headquarters of ASL Singles Club, an independent
record label based out of Vancouver,
each of the three founders are sitting in
the living room, glued to their laptops—
a scene that's more than appropriate,
considering ASL is operating at the
forefront of digital curation.
It's no secret that the music market
of 2014 is oversaturated: artists are
using social media to promote themselves
and music itself is more accessible than
ever. Much of my own life is spent on
the computer seeking this kind of aural
stimulation. Like a DJ or producer who
goes crate-digging at a local record store,
record labels play the crucial role of
combing through the masses of material,
selecting and organizing music into
user-friendly outlets. Arguably the biggest
obstacle for listeners nowadays isn't finding
the available music but sifting through
the loads of material and being able to
comprehend even a small portion of it.
That's where operations like ASL come in.
The label is headed by three
Vancouver-based artists: Patrick Holland
a.k.a. Project Pablo, a former science
student at UBC now studying music at
SFU; Markus Garcia, previously one -♦
56
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Canada half of the electronic duo LOL Boys, now
making music as Heartbeat(s); and Devon
White, a graphic designer responsible
for the visual component of the label,
including designs for clothing and
promotional material for shows.
The original motivation for creating
ASL Singles Club was to start a weekly
club night devoted to showcasing
infectious dance music. After tossing
around some names, the trio decided on
the name ASL for their potential weekly.
When the prospect of the weekly
night faded, ASL Singles Club became
something more: it became a vehicle for
the promotion and distribution of local
artists' material, as well as a clothing line.
But why those letters specifically?
Garcia explains: "We started out trying
to find a name for a club night and we
thought ASL would be a cool name. When
we started the label we added 'singles'
because 12-inch releases used to be called
singles and limited edition T-shirt runs are
single releases."
"What is the mission of ASL Singles
Club?"
"I think a lot of labels try to pump out
as much content as possible and some
releases get lost in it. We want to keep
things limited," says Holland. "We do small
releases and limited runs of clothing."
The goal is to keep things minimal. By
producing smaller batches of apparel and
vinyl, each release maintains a degree of
uniqueness and character.
With an upcoming release from
Montreal's Prison Garde, the label will be
releasing 100 copies of the EP on vinyl.
As many record labels are realizing, vinyl
is able to fulfill the listeners desire for
a physical copy of a release. There is a
degree of permanence with a vinyl record
that is lost with an MP3 release.
"It's cool to have a physical medium,"
explains Garcia. "Having a 12-inch record
that's hand-stamped with a sticker on
it makes the person feel like it's really
theirs."
As Holland explains, the release of
vinyl aids in the promotion as well: "Most
of our music is aimed at DJs. Our promo
list is how we get most of our listens rather
than relying on Soundcloud."
With an impressive list of releases
from the likes of Sleepyhead, Nick Wisdom,
Rook Milo, Autem, and the freshly released
Hopeless Romantic EP from Heartbeat(s),
ASL Singles Club is breaching the walls
of Vancouver nightlife and far beyond.
In a world where popularized electronic
music is being targeted at stadium crowds
with large synth lines and heavy bass,
it's refreshing to hear the minimalistic
nature of ASL's releases with a focus on
a particular vibe and a limited run of
material.
Instead of trying to strictly engage
in the competitive club scene, ASL has
hosted a number of afterhour shows
meant to fill the need for late-night
musical entertainment in a city that offers
few parties past 3 a.m.
At the centre of ASL Singles Club is
curation, the process of sifting through the
rubble to collect, organize, and showcase
forward-thinking and unique electronic
music. While best defined as a house
music label, Holland emphasizes that ASL
is open to any genre—the label is meant
to promote music that stands out to them
and offers something unique. "When we
first started, we talked about releasing
singer/songwriter material. We're definitely
not a genre-dependent label, but right now
we're focussed on dance music."
"I don't think there is any rhyme or
reason to how we're putting this stuff out,"
says Garcia, summing up the method of
ASL quite simply. "All three of us listen to
it, and there might be a particular style of
music we're feeling at the time, but good
music will find a way to influence you." gf
i
Make sure you're at the Fox Cabaret
on May 10 to catch some of the ASL-
related acts live, including Project Pablo,
Heartbeats), and more.
58
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|b   illustration by Alison s^ ^ ^^ ^ "A good time. Or just a feeling. Anything
to cheer somebody up or make them
feel better and take their mind off it."
That's Nick Creamore, drummer for
local rock-outfit Skinny Kids, describing
to me his reason behind making music.
We're joined by the band's other two
members, singer/guitarist Trevor Gray
and bassist Scott Pastolo, in Creamore's
Vancouver apartment, where the beer is
great and the company is even greater.
With a flair for lo-fi garage-surf
rock that easily hooks listeners, Skinny
Kids are the perfect soundtrack for
your pending summer escape—the kind
of music that was destined to vibrate
through the speakers of your old, beat-
down Mitsubishi Delica. With psychedelic
certainly, their music would be well-
received in basement parties and illegal
speakeasies alike.
"I grew up always listening to those
'60s Nuggets compilations," explains Gray.
"I think that's been a big influence on our
music." The nostalgia can easily be found
throughout Skinny Kids' song catalogue,
one that's rich with short,
dreamy gems that glow with
the warmth of old cinematic
capers.
The threerpiece
formed back in 2012
when co-workers Gray
and Creamore joked about
starting a band together
under the moniker Dads. The
name was taken, but the two
started jamming together
regardless. Shortly after,
Gray's long-time accomplice,
Pastolo, was also drafted
into the project. They threw
together a few songs and
almost immediately began
playing them live. "It was
after two or three months
and then we started playing
gigs. We just put out a couple
tracks and people started
asking us about shows," says
Creamore.
"I think Music Waste was
a big help for us," adds Gray.
"We didn't play much and
then we played Music Waste,
and then weVe just been
playing since."
In a sprawling local
music scene, Skinny Kids
have managed to fit in nicely,
sharing past bills with the
likes of the Ballantynes
and Dead Ghosts, among
others. In October, the band
also celebrated their debut
SKINNY KIOS      61 With a flair for lo-fi garage-surf rock that
easily hooks listeners, Skinny Kids are
the perfect soundtrack for your pending
summer escape—the kind of music that was
destined to vibrate through the speakers of
your old, beat-down Mitsubishi Delica.
release: a six-song, self-titled cassette.
With the same laid-back demeanour
as their live shows, the tape provides
a dream-like fix for fans between gigs.
Creamore describes the recordings as
"pretty bang-on" to what their live sets
actually sound like, so the shows and
releases share a similar vibe.
Within months of their first release,
Skinny Kids had returned to the studio,
eager to continue recording. The band
worked on four new tracks with the help of
producer Felix Fung at Little Red Sounds,
an experience Gray thought turned out
great: "We worked with Felix this time
around which was really cool. He had a
pretty good idea of what we were going
for. It was nice going into the studio and
having that already lined up. He pushed
us to try some different things."
"He's a producer who's got a lot of
ideas," adds Pastolo. "He's not shy to voice
them out, and I like that."
With clear schedules, the trio entered
the studio and cranked out four tracks in
two days. Fung's undivided attention and
guidance allowed the band to fully explore
the songs and experiment further with
their sound.
When the conversation steers towards
new material, the band members seem
content with the results: "It's not as clean
and poppy. It's a little more psych than
the last tape. It still has that same sound
as us, but it's more developed with a dirty
texture," says Creamore.
"I think it's more in tune with our
roots, with what we really like listening to,"
adds Gray. "It's a little more apacey*"
After the new songs are mastered,
Skinny Kids plan on releasing a seven-
inch (hopefully) around mid-summer.
In the meantime, the band is already
looking towards future projects: last
December, Skinny Kids placed second
in CiTR's annual battle of the bands,
Shindig, and were awarded studio time
as part of their prize—something they
already have plans for.
"I think we just have some songs that
we haven't recorded yet that we'd like
to get out there," says Gray. "We're just
gonna hammer out two songs and have a
chance to really try some new things—and
get a little bit weirder."
Creamore adds, "We're just gonna
work on it and see where it goes. Do a full-
length sooner or later. Who knows, maybe
those tracks can go onto that full-length?"
Skinny Kids have come a long way
in their short history, with no signs of
stopping. With a seven-inch on the way,
tentative festival plans—including an
encore appearance at Music Waste—and
an upcoming tour of several BC islands,
the summer's going to be a busy one. But
the band seems content with following the
flow, wherever said flow may take them.
As Creamore describes it, "There's no
pressure on the band. None of us feel, like,
we have any pressure on, we're just having
fun, playing a bunch and writing." B|
"When it stops being fun," quips
Pastolo, "then you know you're in trouble."
But with so much to look forward to,
trouble seems far from sight. ©
i
Catch Skinny Kids on May 15 as they
take over the Biltmore Cabaret with
Jay Arner.
62
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Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7-9am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-up/collage and
general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: @bepicrespan. Blog: bepicrespan.
blogspotea
vLnOolL/ML
Classical Chaos SUN 9-10am
From the Ancient World to the 21st century, join host Marguerite in exploring
and celebrating classical music from around the world.
Experiments In Happiness 4'33" 1/3 MON 6-7pm
This program showcases "new music"-contemporary classical and experimental music, especially highlighting Vancouver's local performers and
composers of new music, to uncover a new musical niche to the broader
public in a friendly and accessible manner. j|p§j|
TALK
Creators & Contributors
Alternating Wednesdays 11:30am-12pm
Democracy now
WED 1-2pm
The Sector FRI 8-9am
Website: http://sectorpodcast.wordpress.com. facebook.com/SectorPodcast.
twitter.com/SectorPodcast i
Alphabet Soup Alternating Wednesdays 11:30am-12pm
Alphabet Soup is a talk show which focuses on the writing of MFA Creative
Writing students at UBC. Topics include events happening in the program
and the Vancouver art scene while promoting the writers and the genre
which they are working in.
Synchronicity MON 12-1pm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations that help you remember why you're here:
to have fun I |^
News 101 FRI S-6pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and community newscast.
Every week, we take a look back at the week's local, national and international news, as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded TUE 8-10:30am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of
Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background on current issues
and great music.queerfmradio@gmail.com
Programming Training
TUE 3-3:30pm
Radio Free Thinker TUE 3:30-4:30pm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular extraordinary claims and subject them to critical analysis.
The City TUE 5-6pm
An alternative and critical look at our changing urban spaces.
New Website: www.thecityfm.org. New Twitter handle: @thecity_fm.
Terry Project Podcast Alternating Thursdays 1-2pm
There once was a project named Terry, That wanted to make people wary,
Of things going on In the world that are wrong without making it all seem
too scary.
All Ears WEB 6-6:30pm
All Ears is an advice radio program targetted to the UBC community. We try
to answer your questions and address topics sent via social media and over
the phone. Interviews and segments relating to campus life will be featured,
ail in our attempt to better our community and supply positive feedback.
Extraenvironmentalist WED 2-3pm
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth. Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sustainable economics and our
global ecological crisis.
Arts Report WED 5-6pm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film, theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and more) by host Maegan Thomas and
the Arts Reporters.
UBC Arts on Air B WED 6-6:30pm
(Alternating with Arts Extra!) On break from June-September 2013.
Sexy in Van City WED 10-11pm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in the realm of relationships and sexuality, sexyinvancity.com/category/sexy-in-vancity-radio.
End of the World News
THU 8-10am
Language to Language
Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness.
THU 2-3pm
REGGAE
The Rockers Show
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
SUN 12-3pm
ROOTS / FOLK / BLUES
Blood On The Saddle                       Alternating Sundays 3-5pm
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
Pacific Pickin' TUE 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and the lovely
Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
Folk Oasis WED 8-10pm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on our local
scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997. j
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com
CITR 101.9 FM I PROGRAM GUIDE
67 The Saturday Edge SAT 8am-12pm Shookshookta SUN 10am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin, and A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and per-
European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, sonal development.
Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@mac.com.    -	
   Radio Nezate SAT 7-8am
Code Blue SAT 3-5pm A mix show with music and discussion in Tigrinya the language of Eritrea.
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp honks, blues, and	
blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul. Asian Wave THU 4-5pm
Email: wcodeblue@buddy-system.org. Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the best music from the
 :—  Chinese language and Korean music industries, as well the latest news com-
SOUL / R&B ingfrom the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop scene. The
  latest hits from established artists, rookies only just debuted, independent
Soulship Enterprise SAT 7-8pm artists and classic songs from both industries, can all be heard on Asian
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and afrobeat Wave 101, as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned
tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as the world's foremost Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people	
named Robert Gorwa and/or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III. G4E Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
 ™ j 1  Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around the world, a
ELECTRO /  HIP  HOP thougtit and a dream ortwo. Reggae, House, Tecrirto, Ambient, Dance Hall,
 1—i 1— _____^.  Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise, Experimental, Eclectic.
Beaver Hour TUE llpm-midnight 	
  NashaVolna SAT 6-7pm
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9-10pm News, arts, entertainment and music forthe Russian community, local and
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to dubstep and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist for'Canadian college radio ■■	
show of the year 2012'Pioneer DJStylusAwards.Soundcloud.com/doe-ran African Rhyhms FRI 7:30-9pm
and search "Doe-Ran" on Facebook. Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
Crimes & Treasons TUE 9-11pm Rhythmsindia Alternating Sundays 8-9pm
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Featuring a wide range of music from India, including popular music from
Jules & DJ Relly Rels. Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca. the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and re-
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com. gional language numbers.
So Salacious MON 3-4pm
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local and Canadian Content—good and dirty
beats.
EXPERIMENTAL
More Than Human SUN 7-8pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past, present, and future
with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
Pop Drones
WED 10-11:30am
WORLD
Afrobeat Tuesday 10:30-11:30am
A show dedicated to expose UBC students and Vancouver to contemporary African
music. Hosted by Achieng Orlale.
La Fiesta Alternating Sundays 3-5pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your host Gspot DJ.
The Leo Ramirez Show MON 4-5pm
The best of mix of Latin American music. Email: Ie6ramirez@canada.com
Give Em The Boot TUE 2-3pm
Sample the various flavours of Italian music from north to south, traditional
to modern on this bilingual show. Folk, singer-songwriter, jazz and much
more. Un programma bilingue che esplora il mondo delta musica italiana.
Website: http://giveemtheboot.wordpress.com. facebook.com/givethebdot. -'
Mantra SAT 5-6pm
An eclectic mix of beats, layers and chants. Exploring the diversity of the
worlds sacred sounds—traditional, contemporary and futuristic. Email:
raghunatha.sda@gmail.com. Facebook: Mantra Radio.
DANCE / ELECTRONIC
The Copyright Experiment
THU 11pm-midnight
BPM Vibe FRI 10:30pm-midnight
Every week, tune in to BMP Vibe for the latest and hottest tracks from various genres and BMP. We also discuss various artists from the tracks we
play and bring up funny news-related topics. DJ Crave will be bringing you
genres from Hip Hop, Trip Hop, Trap, Dubstep, Drum & Bass, Glitch, House,
68
CITR 101.9 FM • PROGRAM GUIDE Electro, and Moombahton. Tune in for a good laugh, to learn new facts, and
to discover new tunes, mash-ups, bootlegs, and remixes.
Techno Progressive Alternating Sundays 8-9pm
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house and techno.
Trancendance SUN lOpm-midnight
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001. We favour Psytrance,
Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic
Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed. Current influences include Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace
Ventura, Save the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older influences include
Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax,
Platipus Records and Nukleuz. Email: djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
The Cat's Pajams FRI 10-11am
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and cool radio show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock, lofi and more from Vancouver
and beyond!
Chips 'n Dip Alternating Thursdays 1-2pm
Dip in every second Thursday afternoon with host Hanna Fazio forthe freshest local indie pop tracks and upcoming shows.
A Deeper Reverb SAT 8-9pm
Bringing you the chillout world of the heavy reverb genres; shoegaze, post
rock, dream pop, space rock, trip hop and everything in between, including
new tracks and old favorites. Online: facebook.com/adeeperreverb. Contact:
adeeperreverb@gmail.com.
LvLLu 1 I v
inside Out
TUE 8-9pm
■■■" Canada Post-Rock Alternating Wednesdays 6:30-8pm
Radio Zero FRI 2-3:30pm Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the west coast but it's
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams from New Wave to still committed to the best in post-rock, drone, ambient, experimental, noise
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever else. and basically anything your host Pbone can put the word "post" infront of.
Website: www.radiozero.com ••	
1M The Shakespeare Show WED 12-1pm
Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9-11pm ••••'  	
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-bit music/retro '80s, this Up on the Roof FRI 9-10am
is the show foryou! Website: synapticsandwich.net  ■■•'•     -	
  Breakfast With The Browns MON 8-11am
The Late Night Show FRI midnight-6am Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury blend of the fa-
  miliar and exotic in a Wend of aural delights.
ROCK / POP /  INDIE &ft: Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
Progression WED 3-4pm
Canadian progressive rock, including some of the Japanese and Russian
scene.
Chthonic Boom! Alternating Sundays 5-6pm
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the spectrum
(rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
Discorder Radio TUE 4-5pm
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear excerpts of
interviews, reviews and more!
Crescendo SUN B-7pm
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and building to the
INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE, Crescendo will take you on a mu-
       sical magic carpet ride that you couMn't imagine in your wildest dreams.
Tweets & Tunes WED 6:30-8am      Besides overselling his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds
We practice what we Tweet! Showcasing local indie music and bringing      throughout the hour and features both old classics, and all the greatest
bands, artists and fans together through social media. new tracks that the hipsters think they know about before anyone else does.
Website: tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:@tweetsandtunes.  :••	
Definition Soundwave v THB 1-2pm
Duncan's Donuts THU 12-1pm      The now of folk. The now of rock. The now of alternative. Join Evan as he ex-
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by      plores what's new, what's good, and what's so awesome it fights dragons
donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com. in its spare time. As always, Evan ends the show with a special Top 5 list
 -:       that's always fun and always entertaining.
Samsquantch's Hideaway        Alternating Wednesdays 6:30-8pm - '   	
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop. The Morning After Show TUE 11:30am-1pm
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com. The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday at 11:30a.m.
  Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The morning after what? The morn-
Parts Unknown MON 1-3pm ing after whatever you did last night. Eclectic show with live music, local
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow sandwich: soft and .talent and music you won't hear anywhere else,
sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and held close to a fire.
CITR 101.9 FM • PROGRAM GUIDE
69 tunes and explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
Stereoscopic Redoubt THU 7:30-9pm
Shine On MON MidnighMam
Hans Von Kloss'Misery Hour WED 11pm-1am Connecting music and artists through a different theme each week.
Pretty much the best thing on radio. 	
^ The Vampire's Ball WED 1-4am
Suburban Jungle WED 8-10am Industrial, electro, noise, experimental, and synth-based music.
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix thevampiresball@gmail.com thevampiresballoncitr.com.
of music, sound bites, information and inanity. Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.  '■	
 ; |  SKA
Student Special Hour WED 11:30am-1pm 	
Various members of the CiTR's student executive sit in and host this blend Ska-T's Scenic Drive $%M, MON 11am-12pm
of music and banter about campus and community news, arts, and pop cul-	
ture. Drop-ins welcome! CINEMATIC
Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6-7-.30pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and musicians
that take the route of positive action over apathy.
Peanut Butter'n'jams Alternating Thursdays 6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll hear
interviews and reviews on eats and tunes from your neighbourhood, and a
weekly pairing for your date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9-11pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and the weird, or
it could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Email: auraltentacles@hotmaii.com
Stereo Blues FRI 11am-12pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld sinks into blues, garage and rock n' roll
goodies!
It Ain't Easy Being Green FRI 12-1pm
CiTR has revived it's long-dormant beginner's show It Ain't Easy Being
Greenf With the support of experienced programmers, this show offers fully-
trained CiTR members, especially students, the opportunity to get their feet
wet on the air.
Nardwuar FRI 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment.
Doot doola doot doo.. .doot doo! Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
Randophonic SAT 11pm-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversai jukebox which has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even space-time relevance. But
ft does know good sounds from bad. Lately, the program has been focused
on Philip Random's All Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest
records you probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
Stranded FRI 6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds, past and present, from bis Australian homeland. And journey with him as he features fresh
Exploding Head Movies MON 7-9pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and
any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric pieces, cutting edge
new tracks and strange old goodies that could be used in a soundtrack to be.
JAZZ
The Jazz Show y«^i MON 9pm-midnight
Vancouver's longest running prime-time Jazz program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at 11 p.m. May 5: A large orchestral suite written by tenor
saxophonist Bob Beiden commemorating the memory of the infamous "Black
Dahlia" story. Stunning music! May 12: "Miles Davis at Fillmore East" June
19,1970. Newly re-issued and unedited: the full performance with Mites
Davis, Keith Jarrett, Chick Corea, Dave Holland, Jack DeJohnette, Steve
Grossman and Airto Moreira. A musical trip! May 19: Guitar great Grant
Green with McCoy Tyner and company. "Matador" May 26: Pianist/composer
Andrew Hill with a 9 piece group of Jazz stars playing innovative, edgy and
timeless music. "Passing Ships".
Little Bit of Soul     jj MON 5-Bpm
Little Bit of Soul plays, primarily, old recordings of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and motown.
LITERACY / LANGUAGE
Sne'waylh WED 4-Spm
In many Coast Salish dialects, "sne'waylh" is the word for teachings or laws.
The aboriginal language-learning program begins with the teachings of the
skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish language). Originally aired on Coop Radio
CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver, Tuesdays 1-2 p.m.
Simorgh THU 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the Persian
speaking communities and these interested in connecting to Persian oral
and written literature. Simorgh takes you through a journey of ecological
sustainability evolving within cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator
in the storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
Language to Language
Encouraging language flueney and cultural awareness.
THU 2-3pm
70
CITR 101.9 FM • PROGRAM GUIDE DRAMA / POETRY
Skald's Hall FRI 1-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story readings, poetry
recitals, and drama. Established and upcoming artists join host Brian
MacDonald. Interested in performing on air?
Contact us on Twitter: @Skalds_Hall.
SPORTS
Thunderbird Eye THU 3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus and
off with your host Wilson Wong.
PUNK
Rocket from Russia THU 10-11am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international and local
punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in brokenish English.
Hosted by Russian Tim. Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com. Email:
rocketfrom russiacitr@gmail.com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com-
RocketFromRussia. Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
Generation Annihilation SAT 12-1pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the non-commercial side
of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website: gen-
erationannihilation.com. Facebook: facebook.com/generationannihilation.
LOUD '<
Power Chord SAT 1-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Flex Your Head TUE 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands and guests from around the world.
GENERATIVE
The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2-6am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries.
CI JDCi^D ID EZ
jU Djv^IvI Dl
Discorder is Vancouver's longest-running
independent music magazine. Show your
support for Vancouver's independent music
community and the development of new
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Fill-out this form and mail-in cash or a
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CITR 101.9 FM • PROGRAM GUIDE
71 vinylrecords
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