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 o
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SSjsEwSte
~5_____3l     GUIDE INSIDE!    Ip^*^*
DISCORDER
THAT MAGAZINE FROM CITR 101.9 FM
SUPPORTING VANCOUVER'S INDEPENDENT MUSIC COMMUNITY
FOR OVER 30 YEARS
*    JUNE 2014     ♦ |NOTICE OF INTENT TO DIGITIZE|
IBACK ISSUES OF DISCORDER  MAGAZINE!
We are so excited that Digital Initiatives
is going to help us release every issue of
Discorder online!
CiTR IS pl<
Discorder  Magazine and make them available
online. CiTR has never had formal copyright
agreements with its contributors, and all
content has been produced by volunteers and
disseminated for free to eager audiences.
Likewise, CiTR does not have express
permission from Discorder  contributors to
take
it available to eager readers online. When
Discorder  began, the founders had no idea
we'd be published on the Internet—sorry Mike
and Jennifer—and it would be impossible for
CiTR to identify all of the contributors
and obtain permission to republish their
work electronically. Who knows where all you
creative people are and what cool things you
Therefore, CiTR is shouting out to our
alumni and asking any authors, illustrators,
and designers who object to let us know
as soon as possible. Please contact me at
stationmanager@citr.ca if you have any
questions or concerns, or don't want your
contribution published online. If we do
not receive objections, we will assume that
permission has been granted. If objections
are made, we will omit these issues from the
archive. However, we hope you see the value
in releasing this content to the public.
Please share this notice with your peers
and fellow alumni! We will begin scanning
shortly and need to spread the news far
and wide.
Discorder  provides an incredible history
of Vancouver's local music scene, and we're
very excited to share
Sincerely,
Brenda Grunau
s with ouj
CiTR Station Manager and Publisher of
Discorder  Magazine
UPCIMING SHIWS
RICK
OO0
SHAW
#11011
254 Cast Hastings Street
604.681.8915
NICE PETER OF EPIC RAP BATTLES OF ■
HISTORY The Jackpot Golden Boys
FIRST BLOOD: OMEGA CROM ommsignt,
Crucifliction, Elysium Echoes, Baryon, and more
DESTR0YER(S0_0SEO ■ml
Blackout Beach
HAVOK Wretched, Nylithia, Skull Vultures, Neck
Of The Woods
PEUCAN   '3^11^3
Tombs, Red Vienna
ABORIGINAL DAY COMEDY EXTRAVAGANZA
Wayne Alexis, Chuck Cease, DJ Roy, and more
J|ddifidT>al show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more:
tWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
YAHRWAIII
Bellydance Showcase
AGES AND AGES ""
with Guests
l-TCR MURPHY(0F BAUHAIIS)   "*"""
Ringo Deathstarr
BMRINGTON LEVY & DETOUR POSSE
DJScovie
SEPUCFLESH FLESHGOD APOCALYPSE,
Hour of Penance, Necronomicon
MD NOTHINGS AND METZ    •-
TheWytches
■Li http://facebook.com/RickshawTheatre
[7j ©rickshawtheatre fiSij ©rickshawtheatre CONTENTS -
21      THE TOURIST COMPANY
Slow and steady didn't win this Space Race,
as the Tourist Company's EP ebbs and flows
effortlessly between folk rock stompers and
blissful harmonies. After being crowned
Regional Champions in the CBC Music
Searchlight competition, they're destined for
a success that we can't help but describe as
being out of this world.
27     SPENCER DAVIS
Sure, a Vancouver musician playing in
multiple bands isn't exactly unheard of, but
it's nevertheless still impressive., If you're
familiar with Cowards, Tycho Brahe, S.P.
Davis, Nervous Operator, or the dearly
departed Glass Armonica, then you're
familiar with the multi-talented Spencer
Davis. Discorder catches up with the man
of many musical monikers to talk about
projects past and his thoughts on the "No
Fun City" label.
49     THE FLINTETTES
Alternatively this feature could have been
called "The Flintettes, or how they learned
to stop worrying and love pop music." With
June already here, the demand is high for
catchy, upbeat tunes to keep your good times
going—and the Flintette's debut release, Open
Your Byes, is just what the summer ordered.
57     MUSIC WASTE 2014
It's hard to describe to non-Vancouverites
just how special Music Waste is. It's like the
Christmas of local music, except it lasts for
four days and there's a lot more beer involved.
The festival turns 20 this year and weVe got
a special peek behind the curtains at how
things have grown over the years and how local
culture is still at the heart of it all.
62     ACE MARTENS
Silence may be golden but Silent Days is even
better. Ace Martens' debut EP—which enjoyed
its physical release as a cassette last month—
is a five-track gem chockablock with hazy
guitaring and foot-tapping hooks. Get to know
more about Martens, as well as his release, in
this breezy feature.
#& 'iJprfVHMtWt STlVftlOUl!
13   flLl* STRIPPED:
*|pil ENIGMAS MVE IN CONCERT
16    HERB'S THE THING: D.|*WHY?
Jft-f CHARTS -M
31    MUSIC WASTE GUIDE
36^€AIMMK;
42   llAlJlVE ACTION
46   liNOERiEVIBW
66   PROGRAM GUIDE
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues can be
booked by calling (604) 822-3017 ext. 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please
contact: editor.discorder@citr.ca. To submit images,
contact: artdirector.discorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to #233-6138
SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1 with your address,
and we will mail each issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your business,
email distro.discorder@citr.ca We are always looking
for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered non-profit,
and accept donations so we can provide you with the
content you love. To donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
WT«t« mmuim Let t oe known that CiTR <s currently
working to digitize the entirety of Oiseenhfs archives. Soon ell
ot the past issues you Imm and love will be available for viewing
online. Ttianks, computers! If you have any questions or concerns,
please Contact Brenda at stationmanager@citr.ca
Wrtters:WillaBao,Alex
de Boer, Robert Catherall,
Julie Colero, Fraser Dobbs,
Max Hill, Natalie Hoy, Erica
Leiren, Daniel Una, Shane
Scott-Travis, Angela Yen,
Bob Woolsey
Photographers &
Illustrators: Sylvana
d'Angelo, Yuliya Badayeva,
Eduard Barceldn, John C
Barry, Sarah Cordingley,
Alisha Davidson, Alan
Derksen, Dana Kearley,
Steve Louie, Justin Longoz,
Tylor Macmillan, Rob
Ondzik, Alison Sadler,
Nolan Sage, Andrew Volk
Cover: photo by Nolan
Sage, illustrations by Tylor
Macmillan, design by Jaz
Halloran
Editor: Jacey Gibb
Art Director: Jaz Halloran
Under Review Editor:
TBD
Real Live Action Editor:
Steve Louie
Web Editor:
Marcin Lasinski
Ad Coordinator:
Ana Elena Garza
Copy Editors: Steve Louie
Proofreaders:
Natalie Hoy, Penelope Pots
Calendar Listings.
Sarah Cordingley
Accounts Manager:
Corey Ratch
Official Tweeter:
Evan Brow
CiTR Station Manager:
Brenda Grunau
Publisher: Student Radio
Society of UBC   '
Student Liasons: Evan
Brow, Josefa Cameron
EDITORIAL CUTOFF: May 18,2014
©Discorder 2014 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 10,200. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ tine at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office et (604) 822-3017, emeil CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Cenada. I remember it clearly. Discorder's art
director, Jaz Halloran, and I were sitting
across from each other, partaking in a
few beverages post-office hours at the
Gallery. It had been one of those days \
where you didn't get as much done as you
wanted to but you had a beer in your hand
and the company was good so none of it
really mattered. Halloran was going on
about the special effects in the new Star
Trek movie—actually kind of old by this
poin^Jbut new to him—and how visually
satisfying it was to watch. &fe
"People get paid to make that kind of
stuff! That's their job, making these big
blockbuster movies." I agreed with his
musing and casually sipped my drink,
when it suddenly dawned on me where
A lot can happen in just 12 months' time
and the same applies to the next 12, which
means this merry band of merries is going
to be a whole lot of fun to work with.
the conversation was going: Halloran
was about to tell me he was leaving the
magazine.
His departure was by no means
sudden. That conversation of ours took
place about seven months ago and I'm
only now getting the chance to write about
it. Numerous people have asked me why
Halloran is leaving, just as we've found a
groove with the new format, and it's been
immensely satisfying telling people the
truth: that there's no behind-the-scenes
controversy and no one's being fired
or forced to resign. It hardly even feels
like Halloran is quitting, but rather just
moving on from the position. In his own
words, Halloran told me he wants to leave
the magazine while he still likes the job
he's doing and I can respect that. It's been
an incredibly organic progression and as
much as 111 miss sharing weekly office
hours together, I'm excited to see what he
does next.
On the topic of new beginnings,
Halloran's departure has another •
significance for Discorder. over the past
year, nearly every major position within
the magazine will
have traded hands
with someone
new. Well be
welcoming our
2014/15 student
liaison, frequent
contributor Joshua Gabert-Doyon, after
the summer's end; our new web editor,
Marcin Lasinski, has been rocking and
redefining Discordefs presence on the web
and beyond; starting in June, well have
a new editor taking over your much-
beloved Under Review section; and even
I myself didn't take over as EIC until last
September. A lot can happen in just 12
EDITOR'S NOTE I
T illustration by Yuliya Badayeva
months' time and the same applies to the
next 12, which means this merry band of
merries is going to be a whole lot of fun to
work with.
IVe spent the last nine months of my
life brainstorming, collaborating, arguing,
and creating with Halloran and 111 miss it
dearly going forward. Since he announced
hi& resignation, our running joke has
been it's because he's too old and we're
having Halloran "put out to pasture* with
the other 30 year olds. Kind of a dark gag
when I write about it, but I know Halloran
will appreciate it and so 111 end on that
note. Enjoy the pasture, Halloran. Hope
it's as green as they say it is on the other
side and thanks for all your years of
Discorder-ly conduct.
So it goes,
Jacey Gibb
EDITOR'S NOTE Well, this is it—my last issue at the
helm as art director of Discorder. IVe put
,in a lot of blood, sweat, and tears over the
past few years. Those are the three main
things that go into making every issue
of Discorder. Or perhaps less blood and
more all-nighters, in my experience. Lots
of couch-sleeping in the cozy-ish, messy
office at the, CiTR station. And coffee and
hummus! I'm pretty sure hummus has
been at more of our proofing parties than
I have.
I'd like to say thank you to Gregory
Adams and Lindsey Hampton—whose
shoes I had the honour of filling—my two
makers, who gave me the opportunity to
take the wheel of all things visual. Thanks
also to Brenda Grunau and Jacey Gibb
for entrusting me with the challenge of
designing a new format and for their
help in making it happen. And thanks to
previous editor Laurel Borrowman, who
was very fun to "make a magazine" with
and was instrumental (that music pun's
for you, Borrowman) in helping the new
format take shape in the beginning.
One of my intentions in the art
direction and design of the new format
and the past several issues has been to
encourage Discorder to shift and change
each issue, so that each month could be
different, unique, and as a result, feel less
disposable and more precious. To give
the editor, art director, and contributors
an opportunity to make Discorder their
own, and express this collective voice as
loudly, prominently, and with as much
experimentation as possible.
I'd like to sign off with a quote from
Jennifer Fahrni, one of the co-founding
editors of Discorder, on how she felt when
leaving the magazine in 1983: "Every
editor comes in and makes it their own.
And that's what makes it last. You can't
have something the same, it's got to keep
changing."
Best,
Jaz Halloran
o
I
6
ART DIRECTOR'S GOODBYE NOTE Steve Louie is a live music photographer based in Vancouver, BC. He's attended
over 1,500 shows in the past seven years and continues to document the Vancouver
music scene. An exhibition of his photography opens at the Remington Gallery and
Studio (108 E Hastings St) on Friday June 7, at 7p.m., and runs until June 21. 8
$r£V£ LOUIE   STEVE LOUIE Gang Violence at Hone^ijLpunge,
Music Waste 2009,
«   ■*
WEVE LOUIE i*$
m
'■*0«
'•**>:
m
!_*<
«._
IS
£.*£? LIVE IN CONCERT
by Erica Leiren
illustration by Eduard Barcelon (on page 13)
In an alternate reality, the Enigmas'
"Flying Dutchman" is the theme song for
the Pirates of the Caribbean movies parts
one thru infinity and the boys have cashed
out early to live in personal castles and
drive their hovercraft down to the local'
pub whenever they feel like it. Luckily for
us, that hasn't happened yet.
In 2010 the Enigmas reunited for
the first time in 17 years—a raucous gig
that was immortalized on film and is now
available on DVD. The occasion was for a
friend of the band's birthday and thanks
to him and his film team, we now have the
chance to experience an Enigmas concert,
where the pent-up energy of band and
audience make for a heady draught from
the psychedelic stream.
If you didn't see them in their
mid-'80s heyday, now's your chance to
learn how to do the Windshield Wiper
(a Vancouverite-original dance craze)
and sing along to "Teenage Barnacle,"
the Enigmas' pun-tastic ode to beach
life and our beloved Girl-in-a-wetsuit
at Stanley Park. The Enigmas' clever
originals and well-curated selection of
songs from an earlier era connect the
This exciting concert film captures the gifts
of four musicians so spectacularly endowed
with talent, they make the rest of us feel
both humble and thankful.
dots at an '80s midpoint that forms the
straight line for Vancouver's West Coast
garage sound—from the Collector's
"Lydia Purple" through to Abbotsford's
BMX (a.k.a. Kick in the Eye) and their
brilliant 1995 album Starliner right on
up to today's Skinny Kids.
The freshly released Enigmas
Live in Concert DVD is now available
in videoactive splendour at your local
independent record stores. Included are
some of their very best songs: wonderful
originals like "A Bit too Far," "Strangely
Wild," and "Roll With the Punches," as
well as ripped covers of the Count Five's
• "Psychotic Reaction," the Sonics' "Boss
Hoss," MC5's "Kick Out the Jams," 13th
Floor Elevator's "You're Gonna Miss Me,"
and the Balloon Farm's "A Question of
Temperature."
This exciting concert film captures the
gifts of four musicians so spectacularly
endowed with talent, they make the rest of
us feel both humble and thankful. Nailing
down the beat with supreme confidence
is the hardest hitting rhythm section
West of the Mississippi: Randy Bowman
on drums and Stephen Hamm on bass.
(Slow's epic player
here standing in for
original Enigma's
bassist Brian
Olinek.) Guitarist
Mike Davies is a
magnificent player
14
FILkf STRIPPED who bestrides the stage colossus-like,
launching flamethrower riffs into the
audience, apparently effortlessly, and
sounding like three guitar players, not
one. Everyone in the band can do backups, which makes for fantastic harmonies.
This is one musical team that has totally
gelled in every way.
As for lead singer/ saxophonist Paul
McKenzie, he is one vivacious bon vivant,
a fun-loving raconteur, and natural
entertainer. His wonderful voice is like
good scotch: smooth, deep, powerful, with
an overtone of smoke. He's an original,
but if you must make comparisons, Paul
McKenzie is Vancouver's own answer to
Iggy Pop, plus whip
smart and with a witty,
subversive sense of
humour.
The Enigmas
reigned as Vancouver's
prime movers of
party action on the
alternative/ university/
club scene through
the mid '80s via their
explosive live shows
and two vinyl releases,
both produced by the
Scissors Bill Barker:
1983'sEiVZGA_ASon
their own Mystery
Records label, and
1985's Strangely Wild:^
on the Zulu Records
Label. These 12' 45
RPM EPs are hard
to find now, but very
worthwhile if you
can get yourself a
copy, as they contain
excellent songs not
on the set list of the
filmed concert: "Pancho
Villa," "Roll with the
Punches," "Daymare,"
"Greenstreet,"
"Monsters in the
Basement," and "Rush
Hour in Russia." Of
special note is the
Strangely Wild EP's incredible Dali-esque
cover artwork by photographer Dave
Jacklinj who chronicled several bands
during this era and famously fronted the
Spasms, a Cramps cover-band.
In the Enigmas, West Coast
dreaminess merges with the harder
influences of the Stooges and MC5 to
produce a unique and powerful sound.
As a band, the Enigmas are like one
of their own favourite motorcycles or a* J
beautifully tuned muscle car: revved up,
pumping 450 HP, firing on all cylinders,
and raring to go. Hop on and take a ride
you won't regret.
FILIVf STRIPPED
15 •
■__ataaa«Mi-"-i
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by Bob Woolsey
illustration by Rob Ondzik
At a recent party I found myself
regaling a group with my premiere foray
into making fresh cheese at home. I'd
gotten the kit from a farmer's market .
and I was quite proud of my delicious,
cheesy results. Someone was quick to
point out that she feels like a chump
whenever she has to do something for
herself that's already available in its
finished form. In her eyes, the whole DIY
thing is a ridiculous proposal.
Lately, IVe gained a lot of joy
out of making things at home that I
used to exclusively buy: beer, bread,
the aforementioned cheese. Although
my results aren't always as good as
the store-bought stuff, there's a deep
satisfaction that comes with making things
myself. Granted, it's time-consuming
and if a batch doesn't turn out it can
be an expensive waste, but there's just
something about doing it yourself that's so
alluring to me. I'd never even considered
The huge downside to having everything
done for you—especially when it comes
to food—is that you lose track of what's
going on behind the scenes. Even if you
never intend to make DIY your permanent
lifestyle, shouldn't you at least have a
passing knowledge of how all the stuff
around you is made?
that my efforts could make me a chump in
any way, shape, or form. Had I been the
victim of clever marketing or a cultural fad
this whole time?
I grew up in a household where
my mum cooked—a lot. Going out for
dinner or ordering in was a rare and
special occasion. From a very early age I
remember being included in the baking
and learning the basics of food. My dad is
a tradesman and my brother and I were
always watching over his shoulder as he
would work on the family car, build us a
fort behind the house, or fix the plumbing.
While IVe not pursued any of these
skills seriously, this upbringing instilled
a certain amount of normalcy in doing
something for myself.
When I moved to Vancouver and met
people born and raised in larger centres,
my habit of cooking most of meals at home
and being able to change the oil on a car
all by myself seemed strange to them. In
my hometown, I'm not
considered a handyman
at all. Here in Vancouver,
I'm nearly an expert in
home repair. It stands to
reason that if you grow up
in a rural area, you'll pick
up more DIY skills than if
you grow up in a bustling
metropolis. City living
doesn't provide the same
access to the space you
need to work on a car. In
Ay£ft£'$ 7"A/£ THING
17 rural areas you don't have a convenience
store two steps away from your house so
making your own food is somewhat more
necessary.
The huge downside to having
everything done for you—especially when
it comes to food—is that you lose track of
what's going on behind the scenes. What
are you really putting into your body
when you eat that restaurant-prepared
dish? How do you know if your mechanic
is ripping you off when you have no idea
what a carburetor is? Even if you never
intend to make DIY your permanent
lifestyle, shouldn't you at least have a
passing knowledge of how all the stuff
around you is made?
Here's the thing about this whole DIY
movement: it's not about the end result.
If you happen to end up with a delicious
ball of fresh mozzarella when you're done,
that's awesome but it's not necessarily
the point. At the core of the entire idea of
doing something yourself is also where
the art resides. When a person makes
something, no matter how technical that
task may be, they put their own personal
stamp on the process. It's uniquely yours.
Chefs refer to this as the love that's put
into the food. Doing it yourself transforms
even the most routine things in life
creative endeavors. If enjoying that makes
me a chump, then so be it.
18
Af£/*£'S THE THING Its slimmer festival season! Check out
citr.ca and facebook.com/citt101.9 for
updates on our live broadcasts from
local music festivals. ;J^ Warpaint
8    Spring*+
^|§ lll'6IIS%t
10   TheeAhs**
,.   Dixie's Death
n  frn^."
12  Bend Sinister*
..   Fist Full o'
^\ Snicks**
14  Jay Arner*+
|f^Wakefl»f^
16 TheBinz*+
17 Panther God
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OP MAY 2014
CITR 101.9 FM CHARTS
ARTIST ALBUM
I    Cool*+ Paint
m
2 Mu*+
3 Connecticut**
4 Role Mach*+
fHpbc DeMarco*       Salad Days
Small Town
By The Sea
Holy Shades
of Night
6    Chad VanGaalen*    Shrink Dust
Warpaint
Celebrations
Mi'ens
Corey's
Coathanger
Twin Galaxies
Animals
Climb the
Glass Mountain
LABEL
Yellow Plum i
Self-Released
Aagoo
Self-Released
Captured Tracks
Flemish Eye
Rough Trade
Self-Released
Sell-Released
Jigsaw
Self-Released
FU:M
Self-Released
T.S.A.T.S. (RSO Flexi)      Mint
Vagrant
The Private World
of Paradise*
How to Freak out
Responsibly,..
Golden Changes
18  iody Glenham*+     Dreamer
19- JPIasfc Palace*+      Ceiling i
20
Liars
Mess
21
^Man
Uiedecke*
1 Never San
imetYbu
22
Village**
Village
n
Tycno
Awake
24
Handle*
In Flames
m
"rtiSouIja^1''
Orchestra*
InnerFire
Not Yer Buddy
Outside Music f
Self-Released
Self-Released
Mute
True Noitti r
Kingfisher Bluez
Ghostly
International
Dare To Care
Strut
m
27
ARTIST
Woolworm**/
GrownUps*
Dorval &
Devereaux*+
28 Phono D'Enfant*
29 Cloud Nothings
30 Tinariwen
31 Blind Horses**
Pink
32
33
Mountaintpps*
Brian Eno & Karl
ALBUM
71 Split
Dorval &
Devereaux
The Wild Rose
That Is
Here And
Nowhere Else
•nmaar
Avail
Get Back
LABEL
Debt Offensive
Moon Glyph
Self-Released
Carpark
Ant> .
Self-Released
Outside Music
Hyde
34 Eccodek*
35 Failing**
36 Allen Forrister**
„   Katie and The
Lichen**
38  Hunting**
Someday World       Warp
Singing in Tongues   Self-Released
Self-Released
The Apple in the
Pig's Mouth
You Show
Me Things
Yours Truly
Hunting
Self-Released
Greenbelt
Collective
Nevada
39 Coast Redwood*     Spirit
40 Angel Olsen
41 Fenster
Radiclaw
Jagjaguwar
ThePink Caves        Morr Music
Burn Your Fire
for No Witness
. 0  Royal Foundry,
u The*
43  She's*
..   Sarah Jane
Scwiten*
45   The Bamboos
Where We Go
She's-
TheCape
Self-Released
Self-Released
Self-Released
Fever In The Road     Nettwerk
46  The Belle Brigade    Just Because
mm
47   West My Friend*     When The Ink Dries   Self-Released
Hard Boiled
48 Odonis Odonis*
49 Amen Dunes
50 Carta Bozulich
Soft Boiled
Love
Boy
Buzz
Sacred Bones
Constellation
CiTR's charts reflect whats been played on the air by CiTR's lovely OJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine Independent music stores across Vancouver, if you can't find
them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. II you ask nicely she'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.eHrahot-online.com.
20
CHARTS  THE
TOURIST
COMPANY
by Natalie Hoy
photos by Yuliya Badayeva
illustration by John C Barry (on page 21)
"We wanted something to do with
travelling or a feeling of transience, not
having a permanent home. How would
you describe it, Taylor?" Jillian Levey,
who provides backing vocals, keys, and
percussion in the Tourist Company, is
describing the origins of their name. She
motions to bandmate Taylor Swindells,
taking a sip of her chai tea latte in the
process.
It's a rainy Sunday afternoon and
I'm sitting inside a crowded Starbucks
with three of the progressive folk band's
members: Levey, Swindells (vocals/guitar),
and drummer Brenon Parry—only missing
bassist Josue Quezada. Surprisingly, none
of the band members are originally from
Vancouver. "Jillian was born in South
Africa, Brenon is from Arizona, and I'm
from out East," Swindells explains, while
remaining member Quezada is from
Guatemala. "We're kind of transient, so
we wanted [the name] to be as well." Even
so, their latest release, Space Race, seems
to have found them a home within the
Vancouver music scene—and the hearts of
its loyal supporters.
The original trio of Swindells, Levey,
22
7*A/£ TOURIST COMPANY Inspiration for the album's theme—
the race to the moon during the Cold War
and the optimism that surrounded it—
originally stemmed from Swindell's life-long
fascination with space.
and Parry started playing music together
in 2010 after meeting at a camp ministry
and released their debut album, Brother,
Wake Up, in May of 2013. Following the
addition of Quezada last fall, the band
decided to take a more lengthy approach
with the Space Race EP—released on May
6. "A lot more time and attention went
into how we got the sounds for each song,"
says Parry. Levey nods in agreement,
adding that there are "a lot of layers to
[the album]—a lot of intricacies."
The band attributes their dynamic
sound to working with fellow musicians
Jordan Klassen and Dan Klenner, who
produced and engineered Space Race,
respectively. Both are mutual friends
through the band's manager, Alex
Wyder: "We asked Jordan [to produce
the album] because we like his artsy
mind," says Parry. "He's just this really
creative person." As luck would have
it, Klenner had recently, opened a studio
space—coincidentally named The Space
Studios—in East Vancouver around the
time they were looking to record. "Jordan
and Dan went above and beyond trying
to make each song have its own unique
r.*y£ TOURIST COMPANY
23 sound. Songs that are high energy reflect
that in the sounds we got out of each
instrument; [same with] the smaller, more
delicate ones."
Inspiration for the album's theme—
the race to the moon during the Cold
War and the optimism that surrounded
it—originally stemmed from Swindell's
life-long fascination with space. "Taylor
likes to write with a story in mind,"
explains Levey, adding that their releases .
are formed around concepts pitched by
Swindells. "Science at the time was so
optimistic about their idea of what the
world would be [like] 50 years from now,"
Swindells says of his interest in the era.
"When I pitched it to these guys, they were
like, '... Sure."* He lets out a small chuckle.
"I'm too much of a nerd for my own good, I
guess." mM
Interestingly enough, the band had
already written a full-length album before
the conception of Space Race even came
into play. However, they decided to put
the project on hold, opting instead to do
"something that [they] could afford to do
earlier." The decision seems to have paid
off, with the group crafting a short, yet
astonishing journey through time and
space. Opener "Irrepressible Future" is an
upbeat, folk-rock number, accented with
sweeping vocals and xylophone magic. The
looming desire for innovation during the
era can be described perfectly by closing
lines, "I don't wanna die until you know
who IVe been." "They've Got Us on Our
Heels" is another standout, and provides
contrast with "Irrepressible Future" by
drawing inspiration from the darker,
despair-filled atmosphere of the Cold War.
The vocal dynamics between Swindells
and Levey are heartbreakingly haunting,
yet there is something sweetly poetic about
their lyrics: "We woke up today / Our
futures planned / Walking side by side /
So unaware that they were planning our
demise."
Releasing Space Race is not the
band's only recent accomplishment.
Earlier this year they entered the CBC
Music Searchlight competition on a
whim—and ended up being crowned
the Regional Champions. The band was
blown away by the support they received
from family, friends, and even fellow
competitors. "The other artists were so
supportive and positive," says Levey. "It
was such a great surprise, actually. I
didn't expect that."
Swindells is quick to agree: "I think
it's unique to Vancouver. The community
of musicians are really supportive of each
other—it's not like you're all competition."
Without any major touring plans in
the foreseeable future, the band has a
few local shows already on the horizon.
"Hopefully this fall well be going out and
touring the EP," Parry says.
And how about that full-length
album? "We're working on it already,"
shares Swindells. "I don't stop writing
'cause I'm just obsessive like that."
That being said, the band plans to
take their newfound knowledge into the
current writing process, noting that a
lot of their previously written material
probably won't survive. "Our sound
changed a lot with recording the EP,"
Swindells explains. "It shaped a lot of the
way we do things, so the older songs just
didn't feel like they followed suit with the
[direction we were] headed." One detail
they have settled on is the theme: a World
War II love story.
With the Tourist Company's innate
ability to weave stories into wondrous
soundscapes, it is most definitely another
adventure you won't want to miss. @
i
Don't forget to check out the Tourist
Company at either of their next shows:
June 7 at the Fox Cabaret with Colour
the Wild and June 28 at the Narrows
Pub, where they'll be sharing the bill
with Rococode. -JSm
24
7*Ay£ TOUR/ST COMPANY 	
'• ■   ■ I
I
illustration by Alison Sadler '.4f  (#; s*.w C* f
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t-    «        !    f    1     & ■III
I _,        5  *   I  | |   g..       *• * SPENCER DAVIS
by Robert Catherall   photos by Sylvana d'Angelo
illustration by Dana Kearley (on page 27)
"When I asked my dad if I could get a
guitar, he wasn't into it. He said it was a
phase and thought I should get a parrot
because it would last me longer," a man
pensively recalls from behind wire-framed
glasses. "They live for 40 or 50 years," he
adds, cracking a smile. This is just the
first of many light-hearted anecdotes
Spencer Davis shares with me as we sit
down to discuss his many projects, music
as a dialogue, and how to have a good
time in "No Fun City."
Best known for his role as unaffected
bass player in local aggro-rock outfit
Cowards, whose early recordings found
a home on Majorly Records last month
under the title World Leaders in Male
Chastity, the tireless musician maintains
a lighter, yet determined air behind the
antagonism of his Albini-esque stage
presence.
"I started out playing with Sydney
[Koke] from the Courtneys. It was this
noisy, messy kind of thing, but we had
a lot of fun," says Davis, recounting the
details of his first jam sessions in his
hometown of Calgary. Then, as with most
high school bands, graduation happened,
reality sunk in, and the players went their
separate ways.
For Davis, the natural progression
was to escape the endless prairie winters,
and so he made inroads from Calgary to
Vancouver eight years ago, where he did
guitar and vocals for local noise-rockers
Fortress. Since then, Davis has been
involved with a variety of projects, such
as the short-lived and challenging work
of Glass Armonica, whose self-titled
EP, which can still be found online, is a
worthwhile journey into cross-cultural
experimentation. Meanwhile, Davis' most
28
SP£7VC£$ DAVIS 1                        1                      • 1      '                1
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recent undertaking finds him at the
opposite end of the spectrum, playing
spastic garage psych alongside veteran
rockers Jeremy van Wyck (Shearing
Pinx, Aerosol Constellations) and David
Rogers (Basketball, Aquanaut) under
the Tycho Brahe moniker. Somewhere
between these commitments the dynamic
multi-instrumentalist always finds time to
return to his solo projects: S.P. Davis and
Nervous Operator.
"IVe been working on the S.P. Davis
stuff for around 10 years now," he says,
describing the patient, progressive twang
reminiscent of early John Fahey.
Although his songs have been written
slowly over the past decade, they are
never agonized over and develop through
an organic process that has taken on its
own electro-ambient alter-ego: Nervous
Operator.
"It's fun because I can be booked
at a noise show and show up with my
acoustic guitar," Davis notes, explaining
the interchangeability of the two monikers.
"For me, [sangwriting] needs to be like a
ballast with two opposite ends. Ill work on
one project to the point where I'm sick of
it and then be able to work on something
completely different."
SP£/VC£ft DAVIS
29 "It was this
noisy, messy
kind of thing,
but we had
a lot of fun,"
says Davis,
recounting
the details of
his first jam
sessions in
his hometown
of Calgary.
Then, as with
most high
school bands,
graduation
happened,
reality sunk in,
and the players
went their
separate ways.
Shuffling between acoustic and
electronic means his solo live shows
(whether as S.P. Davis or Nervous
Operator) takes sidestepping an
audience's expectations further thari
just extending a solo or taking cues from
a genre. Challenging the tradition of
catering to audience expectations is not
a new concept in music, especially in live
performances, where bands in both jazz
and noise circles continually change their
sound or collaborate with others to skirt
expectations. This, Davis insists, is part
of a larger dialogue about challenging
perpetuity and stasis: "I don't do a lot of
improvisation at shows, but I definitely
love the organic songwriting process."
Nevertheless, the Calgary native's
inquisitive nature spurred him to keep
that dialogue open. The medium of music
has given _him an outlet for ongoing .
conversation that transcends not only
listeners' expectations, but borders and
cultures as well. Viewing music as a
component of this larger dialogue, he sees
it as a balance between bringing together
communities and nurturing individual
catharsis.
With this in mind, Davis giyes no
credence to the "No Fun City" subtitle
when considering Vancouver's music
scene. "It's always been a struggle but it's
all about yourself: if you're a fun person,
you're going to have a fun time wherever
you go. If you're expecting the city to give
you a good time, then youll be upset. If
you go out to make a good time, then
you'll have a good time."
Whether curating shows at the Red
Gate Art Society or performing in one
of a handful of local bands, the tireless
Vancouver mainstay shows no signs
of stopping, "My dad is actually very
supportive now. He says I should apply to
4AD. That's his favourite label." $f
i
Spencer Davis will perform back-to-back
daytime sets with both Tycho Brahe and
as Nervous Operator at Red Cat Records
on June 7 as part of this year's Music
Waste Festival.
30
SPENCER DAVIS GALLERY        KINGSGATE
GACHET MALL
SMILIN'
BUDDHA
COBALT
88 E Cordova St
370 [Broadway
1     WASTE ..■:
1     111
1 ■'■ M    '
■   KINGSGATE    1
WASTE:     I
OPEN      ■
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SNACKBAR    GALLERY       MALL PI
Ii
1131 Howe St     433 Dunlevy Ave   110 E Hastings St    370 E Broadway    403 E Hastings
(enter thru alley).
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is I       REMINGTON    SMILIN' n
GATE       GALLERY      BUDDHA      ASTORIA
CABARET
COBALT
855 E Hastings St   108 E Hastings St   109 E Hastings St   769 E Hastings St     917 Main St
TYLDR
Art
STEVE LOUIE
Aft
III
JtMI
LIE
VINCENT PARKE
VILLA6E
CDQL AVENUE      DYNAMO       GUYS      KINGSGATE    LUCKY'S
GALLERY & DOLLS        MALL        COMICS
163 E Hastings St     30 E 6th Ave       2434 Main St     370 E Broadway     3972 Main St
SHERRY
'; gfypur own
waste
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goyotir.osvs
waste NEPTOON     PAT'S      RED CAT     SIMPLY        THE      THEY LIVE    TOAST
RECORDS       PUB       RECORDS   DELICIOUS   ASTORIA     VIDEO    COLLECTIVE
3561 Main St   403 E Hastings St   4332 Main St     4316 Main St   769 E Hastings St   4340 Main St    648 Kingsway
sis
EATING
LINE
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PRIEST
OVERCOATS
_*> w
TH
>^W^
Eagulls, Twin Peaks
©Media Club
Jonathan Richman
@ The Biltmore Cabaret
MUSIC WASTE
Sunny Pompeii
@ Fox Cabaret
The Jezabels, Gold & Youth
@ The Imperial
Tomorrow's Tulips,
The Prettys,
Scotty P & The Virgins
@ Electric Owl
10
Metronomy, Cloud Control
@ Fortune Sound Club
11
Hannah Epperson,
Rococode, JP Maurice
@ Fortune Sound Club
12
Old Man Markley,
Fire This Time,
Jesse Lebourdais
@ Biltmore Cabaret
Destroyer (solo set),
Blackout Beach
@ Rickshaw Theatre
16
Hillfolk, Hunter's Night,
Ross Nuttall
@ Electric Owl
17
y^wyxif
18
Pelican, Tombs
@ Rickshaw Theatre
Mystic Braves,
Tropical Popsicle,
The Electric Magpie
@ Electric Owl
19
Public Animal,
Slow Learners,
The Rock Band Called Time
@ Biltmore Cabaret
The Flavr Blue
@ Venue
23
The Backhomes, Betrayers,
The Lad Mags, Scars & Scarves
@ Electric Owl
Fitz & the Tantrums
@ Commodore Ballroom
30
Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds
@ The Orpheum
S. Carey
@ Biltmore Cabaret
24
Veruca Salt
@ Biltmore Cabaret
King Khan & the Shrines
@ Fortune Sound Club
25
Ages and Ages
@ Rickshaw Theatre
Run River North
@ Media Club
26
Devo
@ The Commodore Ballroom illustrations by Tylor Macmillan
MUSIC WASTE
The Archers,
Ruffled Feathers,
Luca Fogale
© Electric Owl
Nice Peter,
The Jackpot Golden Boys
@ Rickshaw Theatre
13
The Zolas, James Younger,
Damn Fools
©The Imperial
20
Yamantaka//Sonic Titan,
Sun Killer
© Fortune Sound Club
Top Less Gay Love
Tekno Party
©The Imperial
27
Sheer Agony, Lab Coast,
Jay Arner, Watermelon
© The Astoria
DeanWareham,
Jody Glenham
© Biltmore Cabaret
7
Sled Island Music Waste
Showcase ft.
Crystal Swells,
Supermoon, Woolworm
© The Toast Collective
14
We Hunt Buffalo,
Shooting Guns
©Media Club
The Dudes
©The Imperial
21
Chelsea Wolfe
© Electric Owl
Royal Canoe, Copilots
© Fortune Sound Club
Lily & Madeleine
© Media Club
28
The Knocks, ASTR
© Media Club
Spanish Gold
© Biltmore Cabaret
Wu-Tang Clan
© The Orpheum
1
Gordon Ashworth,
The Rita/Molena,
Rusalka, Worker,
Mass Marriage
© Rainbow Connection
8
MUSIC WASTE
(see guide in this issue,
pages 31-40)
22 AVENUE      DYNAMO       GUYS      KINGSGATE    LUCKY'S
GALLERY & DOLLS        MALL        COMICS
163 E Hastings St     30 E 6th Ave       2434 Main St     370 E Broadway     3972 Main St
8:15
8:30
8:45
9:00
9:15
9:30
9:45
10:00
10:15
10:30
10:45
11:00
11:15
11:30
11:45
12:00
12:15
12:30
12:45
1:00
1:15
1:30
1:45
2:00
2:15
2:30
2:45
3:00 NEPTOON     PAT'S      RED CAT     SIMPLY        THE       SUNSET      TOAST
RECORDS       PUB       RECORDS   DELICIOUS   ASTORIA    TERRACE COLLECTIVE
3561 Main St   403 E Hastings St   4332 Main St     4316 Main St   769 E Hastings St   2028 Clark Dr    648 Kingsway
THE
JAMIE
KB
i BUD
IH1
FAITH HAXWttl
pnson
lien
III
11NILI
iumes
CULT BABIES
Mill
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THE NOBODIES
<aq Your Own Wastt
6r>Y<3urOwr^Vmta
iYSTAL SWELLS
SIM w Hi
r      ANZA
ff     CLUB
frS
3 W 8th Ave
r                     3:45
i	
4:00
■■■■mmmm^mm	
4:15
liiniil
4:30
....^____™«___r.	
4:45
i
sow
PHANTOMS AGAIN
OEFEKTDflS THE BEST 0
IN Til!
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(or, free for station members]
Antisocial
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101-111 Water Street
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AT VANCOUVER'S F
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WWW.CITR.CA Evan Dando & Sarah Johnston    photo by Alan Derksen
42
$£4(. LIVE ACT/ON PROJECT PABLO + NEU BALANCE +
MESA LUNA + NOBLE OAK
May 2 at the Fox Cabaret
Few venues in Vancouver can boast a
history as dubiously intriguing as the newly
opened Fox Cabaret. Up until last year, the
Fox was known as North America's last
35mm porn theatre, improbably located in
the heart of Mount Pleasant. After several
months of planning, renovations, and
undoubtedly a lot of scrubbing, it officially
reopened its doors in March of 2014.
Under the new management of the
Arrival Agency, (previously known
as Waldorf Productions), the Fox
has been hosting an increasing
variety of shows and regular events,
including the legendary Ice Cream
Social. It has also stepped up to
fill a void left by the now-defunct
Waldorf Hotel, particularly as a
much-needed nexus for Vancouver's
% electronic dance music scene
alongside prominent local artists,
both seasoned and relatively fresh.
The night kicked off with Noble .
Oak, who has frequently been in
the spotlight over the past few years
with a collection of EPs, singles,
and remixes. Combining reverb-
drenched falsettos with house and
DnB inspired beats, he warmed up
a slowly filling dancefloor, at one
point impressively recovering after
a few seconds of silence caused by
what looked like a snagged audio
cable. sgifej
Making my way back in after a
mid-act smoke, I was treated to the
sounds of newcomers Alex Cooper
and Justice McLellan, a.k.a. Mesa
Luna. They grooved on guitar and
MIDI-controllers, channeling folk
and lo-fi dreampop into brooding,
yet entirely danceable music. Their
new single "Shutting Down" closed
the set, a head-nodding tune about
existential anxiety featuring a killer
synth solo.
Next up was laptop-wielding duo
Neu Balance, filling the Fox's cathedral-
esque, high-ceilinged space with their
cerebral concoctions. A familiar name to
, anyone following Vancouver's output of
electronic music, they've coupled sporadic
web releases with consistently good live
performances, including a set at last year's
New Forms Festival. Friday night was no
exception, although the intricate drum
patterns and warm, sampled textures were,
inexplicably, not quite enough to ignite a
somewhat lethargic crowd.
Following Neu Balance's set, the
night was taken over in earnest by Project
Pablo, a new house-directed moniker of
the DJ and producer formerly known
as 8prn, Patrick Holland. He had been
inconspicuously spinning tunes between
acts at the side of the stage, maintaining
a grooving atmosphere with tasty 4/4
tracks that included some of his own
material, in anticipation of a forthcoming
EP on Hybridity. A personal highlight of
the subdued final set was Joy Orbison's   ,
superbly soulful house edit, "Donell."
Around 1:30 a.m. the house lights went up
and we all headed out, reminding us of our
populated surroundings, far removed from
the warehouses where Vancouver's dance
music has been thriving lately.
—Daniel Lins
THE PAINS OF BEING PURE AT HEART +
FEAR OF MEN + ABLEBOBY
May 2 at Fortune Sound Club
One of my favourite things about Fortune
Sound Club are those initial steps up the
stairs, where you can hear the echoes of
the on-stage band spilling down into the
lobby. Climbing the steps by two, I eagerly
wanted to see the band that was luring me
in with their bright haphazard melodies
and garagey guitars. Playing to a decent
crowd for 8 p.m., trio Ablebody got the
night started with a fuzzed out, noise-pop
set. The band had a chill, unkempt sound
that had bite but remained catchy. Lead
singer and guitarist Christoph Hochheim
projected the standard reverbed blitheful
vocals but also hit a surprisingly nice,
$£4£ LIVE ACTION
43 floaty falsetto. Reminding me of a young
Bobby Gillespie—okay, maybe just in terms
of hair—Hochheim hooked the crowd with
his sporadic guitar solos that were short
and oh-so-sweet. Sure, Ablebody has a
sound weVe heard many times before
(though their records tell a different story,
which are more dreamy and new-wave in
comparison) the band delivered a no fuss,
down-to-earth set that any crowd can't
resist just vibing and bouncing along to.
Like Ablebody, second openers Fear
of Men proved that the band on record
doesn't necessarily give you an idea of
what they 11 sound like live. Hailing from
Brighton, the four-piece band has the
recipe to be the ideal loveable twee-pop
group: soft vocals, forlorn and ho-hum
lyrics, bright sunny guitars... they're
British. But rather than succumbing to
the sickeningly sweet genre that's already
overly associated with any band that has
female members sporting bangs, Fear of
Men weren't delicate, whimsical or twee
to any extent. They were bold and gloomy
and won over the crowd wholeheartedly.
With a girthy bass and pounding drums,
the opening song brought everything down
to a low and moody register. Contrasted
by lead guitarist, Daniel Falvey's tinging,
crisp notes, the band immediately set up
an interesting dynamic for lead singer and
rhythm guitarist, Jessica Weiss' pristine
vocals and vigorous strumming to shine.
It was their closing number, "Inside,"
that took an already impressive set to a
memorable finish. With its impeccable
build up, Fear of Men's shoegaze freak-out
was by far the highlight of the night.
Promoting their upcoming studio
album, Days of Abandon, the Pains of
Being Pure at Heart (let's go with Pains for
short) gave the audience a preview of some
new/ never -released material. Stepping
away from their signature blitzed out, noisy
tracks, Days of Abandon dares to be tender,
poppier, and more sentimental which was
perfectly demonstrated by the first song of
the set, "Art Smock." It was just frontman,
Kip Berman on stage with his electric
guitar, singing about nostalgic memories
and bittersweet loves. His bandmates,
plus Weiss (on synth and backup vocals)
discreetly joined Berman on stage. The
essentially, three bands in one line-up,
jumped seamlessly into "Just Like Heaven."
Following with a couple older tracks, the
next new one was, "Kelly," featuring Weiss
on lead vocals and a very Smithsy's a la
"This Charming Man" beat. Catchy as hell,
the song put an extra pep in everyone's
step as the crowd got their dance on. After
playing smother upbeat track, "Simple and
Sure," from the new record, the band went
back to some oldies but goodies from their
self-titled debut including the always crowd
pleasing, "Young Adult Friction." When
the band goes into the final verse, reciting,
"Don't check me out," it just never gets old
on how addicting that outro is.
Offering a nice variety, the first encore
song, "Coral and Gold" stood out with its
misty and serene arrangement that calmed
everyone like soothing ocean waves before
being blasted again with closer, "Everything
With You." I went in thinking I was in for
just another show of the usual despondent
shoegazing, dream-pop acts. But how
sweet it is to witness bands that defy your
expectations and give you an energetic slap
in the face for being so pessimistic.
—Angela Yen
EVAN DANDO + SARA JOHNSTON
May 9 at the Biltmore Cabaret
The ^Os nostalgia train chugs ever
forward, building with it some sprightly
momentum that's easier to see than those
Magic Eye illusion thingies ever were,
and more digestible than those Pizza
Lunchables ever were, too. Sure, the
decade was synonymous with grunge and
gangsta rap but it also brought alternative
music into the vernacular and, for better
or worse, the mainstream. Some of the
power pop heavyweights of that era fared
better than others—there's a shit ton of
poseurs who just aped Eddie Vedder, most
of them named Scott (Weiland, Stapp,' I'm
looking at you!)—and of those who made ft
clear, the Lemonheads have a modest but
utterly laudable legacy. Their frontman,
44
r?Mt LIVE ACTION Evan Dando, remains relevant via sporadic
but delightful releases and he tours his
oeuvre tirelessly. Dando's current solo
Canadian tour with Sara Johnston (of
Montreal famed *90s-era electronica act
Bran Van 3000) opening, touched down .
at the Biltmore Cabaret for an early show
promising and delivering wistful and
rollicking pop in profusion.
The crowd was sparse but building
when Johnston took the stage, and
while she was cheerful and feelgood, her
songs were a little dull and unadorned in
that exhaustively exuberant kinda way.
I feel bad admitting it but I found her
too complaisant and folksy in a Sarah
McLaughlin vanilla kinda way. Fine and
inoffensive, just not my cuppa tea.
Johnston closed her set with a cover of
Billy Idol's "Eyes Without a Face" for some
reason, reminding me that I dislike the
original version a fair bit and found hers
somehow even more rasping and shrill,.
Maybe needlessly singing a few verses in
francais is what did it, or perhaps that
Johnston's plumbing of the Me Decade
went back a little too far for what I was
after. Regardless of this lapse nothing could
impede the elation of knowing that Dando
was up next as the now buzzing throng
edged up to the stage in eager anticipation
of our favourite long-haired poster boy of
all things alterna-awesome.
Dando didn't disappoint, opening with
"Tenderfoot," a fan favourite originally
performed by Aussie slackers Smudge
back in *94. Later in his set Dando would
do another Smudge cover, "Divan" which
was divine. Both those Smudge ditties
were penned by Tom Morgan, one of the
Lemonheads during their heyday, who also
contributed hugely to It's a Shame About
Ray, their chef d'oeuvre.
After a couple songs, Dando, who
wasn't fully engaging the crowd but still
playing his heart out, left the stage in
search of a capo. With the stage empty
I had a brief panic attack. When he was
in and out of rehab in the mid-^Os and
every now and then since, his stage shows
can get a little whack. Ill never forget the
disaster that befell Richard's on Richards
in 2001 when a very intoxicated Dando
leapt off the stage, fists flying. That set
was interrupted frequently by antagonistic
fans and Dando's engaging with them.
This reached a debauched crescendo
when a drop-down drunk Courtney Love
(accompanied by a painfully embarrassed
Charlize Theron) joined him on stage,
demanding he replay half his set (which
he did) before flashing her boobs and her
bird to the stunned audience, and later
commandeering his guitar for a set of songs
nobody wanted to hear.
Thankfully Dando was back on stage
in no time, capo in hand, and he dove
back into a set peppered with some of
his greatest hits. "The Outdoor Type,"
"Confetti," Being Around," and "My Drug
Buddy" had everyone dizzy with delight.
Playing requests like "The Great Big No,"
"Ride With Me," and "Skull" more than
made up for the fact that his banter was
non-existent. He ploughed through an
enshrined tally of tunes, his voice intact
and sunshiny as ever. He could have
played all night long and the crowd wished
he had. But, since Dando seemed to be
enjoying himself on stage and rumours of
another Lemonheads LP keep breezing by
(though the lack of any new songs played
didn't suggest such), hopefully hell be back
before us again posthaste.
—Shane Scott-Travis
r?W( LIVE ACT/ON
45 BESTIE
No Bad Days
Independent
With all the gorgeous
weather hitting Vancouver
recently, there really is
no better time to listen to
BESTiE's new album,
No Bad Days. A lush, surf-
and-sand feel oozes from every chord while
the popy riffs and nasally vocal phrases
urge you to bust out your coconut bra and
pair it with a pina colada.
It's amazing how BESTiE were able
to produce such .a summery album,
considering they likely wrote and recorded
it during the fall/winter months. Songs
are rich in lyrics that pine for various
girls, using some interesting edible
analogies along the way, including opener
"Pineapple." At the album's forefront, the
track starts with jungle animal noises
before proceeding into a sunny, energetic
beat complete with lip trills to give it that
extra luau vibe. The staccato sung verses
add to the catchy percussive rhythm.
As isomeone whose mouth becomes
ablaze at the mildest of
salsas, it's quite surprising
that my favourite tune on
the album is "Sriracha."
It begins with the sound
of waves, establishing a
beach setting. Cool, twangy
riffs follow, alongside lyrics
depicting a romantic, dare-
I-say-spicy encounter with
a girl; breathy "sriracha"s
punctuate between verses,
making it seem as if they
just had some. It ends with
a great last line that ties
the whole schtick together:
"She burned my lips."
Contrary to their
album's title, BESTiE
does have its bad days, as
demonstrated by exemplary
"Foolish Hearts." The deep
bass, unrelenting string of notes, and
ooo's set the heavy-hearted tropical-surf
tone. You can hear the yearning in singer
Tristan Orchard's voice, lamenting about
past love and using drawn out vocals to
create an expansive-feel. A stormy day at
English Bay with the palm trees swaying
in the wind is the best image to summarize
the track.
Overall, No Bad Days is a fun album
for a fun summer. It'd be nice if Orchard's
vocals were a bit more distinguishable,
but then again, that might take away from
the island vibe. Regardless this album fill
will undoubtedly be a cornerstone of my
summer playlist.
—Willa Bao
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GNOMADICS
Try It Again
Independent
There's something that
screams mild disorder in
the artists merging rock,
psychedelic, and power pop
in the modern music scene j
but something very right   •
46
UNDER REVlEvV about the trance-like state
listeners are put in whilst
on the musical journey.
And it appears Vancouver
rockers Gnomadics know
this all too well, and have
helmed—and executed—
their latest release
accordingly. •
Opener "Purple
Flowers" begins almost
childlike, complete with whimsical guitar
riffs and nonsensical lyrics. Yet there's
appeal in the clever instrumentation and
raw vocals, drawing listeners in to each
rhythmic strum and drum beat. The pace
quickens with "Lend Me Your Bones," an
oddly cheery tune for one whose lyrics I
expected the worse from. It's thoughtful,
almost playful, but still dons a groovy rock
'n' roll vibe. "Autobiography I" is clouded
with nostalgic feelings on both sides of the
spectrum. "Oh memories / At every corner
/ Oh misery / Never more than I need,"
outpours the lead vocalist, sombre and
accepting.
"Draws Surreal" has a depressing
ambient, showcasing wounds and hurt.
Powerful guitar solos and angst-ridden
vocals are the strengths of the song,
which help to draw out the vulnerable and
wistful tones: "And I don't want to care to
see that light again / Cause I don't want to
fix my sight on this fight again." Clocking
in at just under 3 minutes, closing track
"Try It Again" impresses with its blend
of roots-oriented sound, and could have
easily been plucked from a *90s flick. ■
For a toe-tapping listen, Try It Again
is the catch of the day. Although the songs
lack cohesion with each other, each is
well-crafted and unique to the ear. The
shift in tempo and rough-edged rhythms
are refreshing, and the passion for rock
'n' roll is undoubtedly present in the
forefront of the melodic tunes. Far from
solid direction, the wandering souls of the
Gnomadics are carving their own approach
to original music, and are surely making
memorable waves in the process.
—Chloe Hoy
NO SINNER
Boo Hoo Hoo
Provogue Records
"You know I love the
smell of whiskey /And
I hate the taste of gin /
But I always feel at home
in a place that's soaked
_fc ILfc, -...3    in sin."
Powerful lyrics for an album's second
stanza, but No Sinner's latest offering,
titled Boo Hoo Hoo, is about as subtle as a
cinderblock to the jaw. It's not an album
about self-pity or whining, but rather
about self-reclaiming and acceptance.
No Sinner knows where they've been and
knows what they've done, but it's time
to look towards what's next—endless
optimism, but with an edge to it.
Boo Hoo Hoo starts off appropriately
with a thunderous opener, the album's
title track. The initial 10 seconds of
lone percussion dares anyone to not be
immediately hooked, while the rest of "Boo
Hoo Hoo" follows a steady pace. Though an
amazing first song won't make or break an
album, it certainly doesn't hurt either.
Following up a knock-out with
another knock-out, Boo Hoo Hoo's second
track, "Love is a Madness" is as silky as
the rock _i' soul numbers come, knowing
exactly when to keep things low-key
and when to crank them up. There's a
certain air of intimacy to the song, no
doubt largely credited to singer Colleen
Rennison's signature voice and impressive
vocal range |       iNfcf||
Unfortunately, after the album's'
first two tracks, Boo Hoo Hoo seems to
stumble in following up with anything
that seems completely fresh—and that's
not necessarily a bad thing. In the year -
2014, it seems like a significant chunk
of music could be classified as a retread,
but that doesn't make the retreads
any less enjoyable. There's something
simultaneously throwback but modern
about No Sinner's overall sound, yo-yoing
between early classic rock and fresh
upbeat tracks more common in today's
UNDER RE VIE Vv
47 music. If you needed another act to draw
comparisons to, Alabama Shakes would
be a good one—though Rennison's vocals
definitely have a more refined touch to
them than Shakes' Brittany Howard could
ever reach.
At eight songs, Boo Hoo Hoo seems to
end just as it's getting started, but better
to leave 'em wanting more than wear out
a welcome. With a couple of shining gems
and a few other decent songs, Boo Hoo
Hoo will make for easy listening but won't
necessarily go down in the record books.
—Brody Steeves
MI'ENS
experimentalsparklenoisepop
Independent
It can't be stated thoroughly enough just how
much Mi'ens benefit from
a studio-booth finishing
session. Kim Glennie and
Evan Johan, the sonic
titans behind the math-rock project, seem
to have been plagued in live performances
by mismatched sound .systems, and
Glennie's brand of looped guitar noise can
overpower and muddle even the mightiest.
of amplifiers.
All of these troubles make it
a rewarding experience to hear .
experimentalsparklenoisepop, the duo's
first LP, and to hear Mi'ens as the band
members have always intended. Each
song starts with a basic guitar loop
before expanding on itself with multiple
overlays, tempo changes, and flourishes;
the band aren't exactly rewriting the
world of math music, but it's refreshing
to hear each glitchy electrical riff in the
clarity it deserves.
Standout tracks here are the ones
that break from the mould Glennie
relies on in a live setting. "Sparklecore"
manages to sound even fuller than the
tracks preceding it without the benefit
of a looped guitar track, and instead
hammers home with beautiful, tremolo-
rich arpeggio chords and even the
muted whisperings of Glennie herself,
gracefully presented just below the mix
of the quiet instrumentation.
Elsewhere, the rabid "Pointillist
Pilot" plays like a forgotten Fugazi song
minus Ian MacKaye's indignation. The
instrumental refrains are to the point
and carry some of the most interesting
guitar-work on the record. As the fastest
song of the eight, it stops well short
of wearing out its welcome which, at
times, can be the main fault with Mi'ens'
debut offering. While closer "Terrorist
Attraction" is the most diverse—and
best-r-track of the bunch, it highlights
that the duo don't need
loopers to create intricate
and fantastically full-
sounding noisescapes.
Another instrument
might go a long way in
continuing the excellence
that Mi'ens have gotten on
tape in the studio, but for
now it's enough to sit back
and wonder at the amount
of crazy sounds two people can put out
at once.
—Fraser Dobbs
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48
UNDER REVIEW  THE
FLINTETTES
by Max Hill   photos by Nolan Sage
illustration by Alisha Davidson (on page 49)
"We were all friends from playing in
other bands." Mike Flintoff, thin, sanguine,
and bespectacled, sits at a 90 degree angle
from me in the noisy Mount Pleasant bar
where I'm interviewing the Flintettes, one
of Vancouver's newest and most promising
pop groups. It's trivia night, so we're all
shouting over the din of a multiple choice
quiz; every 10 seconds, a new song blasts
through the speakers, and barflies shout
out guesses for the name and artist.
Flintoff and his bandmates—bassist
Marissa Johnson and drummer CC
Rose—seem unfazed. They're used to a
little bit of noise.
They're telling me the story of the first
show they played together—10 years ago,
when all three were in different bands. "I
was playing with the Parallels, Marissa
was playing with the Weathered Pines', and
CC was with Vancougar," Mike remembers.
The three debate over whether the show, a
triple bill at The Marine Club, was in 2004
or 2005 (it was actually 2006); either way,
it's clear the trio's history goes far beyond
the Flintettes. All three are long-term,
members of Vancouver's tight-knit
community of musicians, and sitting with
them as they share a pitcher of beer and
trade barbs and in-jokes, it's clear that
they go way back.
As the Flintettes, the three are a force
to be reckoned with—a concentrated dose
of sun-soaked power pop with a strong
'60s influence and enough high octane
hooks to make the Beatles blush. "File
under pop" is how they describe their own
sound, and they leave it at that. Their
new EP, Open Your Eyes, is a rollercoaster
debut from a group who knows exactly
what they want to say—and they say it
pretty fucking well.
"I'm not afraid to embrace pop,"
Flintoff, the band's principal songwriter,
admits. "It used to be kind of a bad word
for me, and I think it got to a point, in this
band, where I thought, You know what,
fuck it! I love pop music, let's just write
pop songs."*
All three bandmates share a love
for pop music, along with an affinity for
cheap beer and the Kinks. It's easy to play
-spot-the-influence with the new record—
Mike's vocals have definite shades of early
50
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as more serious projects, so
it was like, 'Let's just have this
side project that's really fun.' But
it's ended up being the most
productive band of all my projects."
Elvis Costello, and Johnson and Rose's
chemistry as a rhythm section would feel
right at home within the grimy walls of a
late 70s CBGB's. "This band, I think, is
the culmination of all of our influences,"
Johnson says. One of the biggest strength
of Open Your Eyes, then, is its ability to
mix its influences into something warm
and familiar, but completely new in its
own right.
For the Flintettes, there's a simple
secret to their success: having fun. "It's
definitely not our first times around the
block writing music or playing in bands,"
Flintoff notes.
"We kind of wanted a band that was
just fun," Johnson adds. "Our other bands
were perceived as more serious projects,
so it was like, 'Let's just have this side
project that's really fun.' But it's ended up
being the most productive band of all. my
projects."
"It's a combination of the music being
fun to play and catchy, and also that we
all get along really well and have a great
time hanging out together as friends/
RoSe adds. "I think, inevitably, that ends
up coming through somehow." It's easy
to hear on the record, too. The .chemistry
the three share inside our cramped booth
in The Five Point is the same chemistry
you hear on tracks like "What Was One,"
whose call-and-response vocals add
a playful, spontaneous quality to the
standard pop rock formula.
"I'm just as excited about a weekly
practice night as I am about going to
a show. As long as the three of us are
together, and we're getting to have fun
playing our songs.'LFlintoff says. After
years of playing music in Vancouver and
elsewhere, the Flintettes are all about
having a good time, and ignoring the
drama. The main focus is to have fun
and to enjoy playing music, and not get
too riled up about turnouts and venues
and money and band politics and stupid
bullshit not worth getting riled up about,"
Rose says. "Having played with bands in
this town for almost 20 years, I just wont
take any shit. I dont care about any of
that, I just want to play music."
As I'm sitting with them, the three
are recovering from a weekend of shows
52
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ii in Victoria—they can hardly contain their ,
excitement about playing for an island
audience. "As a drummer, I just really
like playing catchy songs with a good beat
that people want to dance to," says Rose.
"That's been a goal my whole life, to play in
a band that plays songs that people want
to dance to. So even if it's only like 15 or
20 people, and they're all dancing, I'm very
satisfied." '^jM
So, what's next for the Flintettes?
They seem hesitant to plan too far in
advance. There's a new single coming out
soon, they say, with a darker feel than
Open Your Eyes' shimmery pop—and they
make sure to thank their label, La-Ti-Da
Records, which Flintoff describes as "a
real ma and pa shop." About the closest I
can get out of them in the way of a future
plan is an idea for the photo shoot: a dip
in Flintoff s claw-foot tub, filled to the
brim with poutine, another of the band's
shared loves. "You have to eat your way
out," Rose jokes.
If there's one thing we can say for    rll
sure, it's that the Flintettes have no plans
of slowing down, and they intend on
keeping their focus on casual fun totally
intact. "When it becomes work, it's not fun
anymore," Rose muses. With these three,
it's hard to imagine anything seeming like
work, gf
I
If you're in the mood for some non-stop
pop, look no further than Open Your Eyes,
available as a limited-edition seven-inch
through La-Ti-Da Records or as a digital
download on the Flintettes' Bandcamp.
56
7*A/£ £U/v7-£7*7"£$  VANCOUVER'S
WASTE-MAKERS
by Julie Colero   photos by Sarah Cordingley
illustration by Justin Longoz (on page 57)
On a sunny Sunday afternoon in
mid-April, I arrived at the Strathcona
store-front apartment of Mark Richardson,
one of the main Music Waste festival
organizers; with two flats of tall cans and
an extra-large bottle of vodka in the back
seat of my car. I was a little late, and there
was already a living room full of alcohol-
starved judges and tastemakers, all ready
to crack the first beer of the day and settle
into the arduous task of listening to 247
Music Waste hopefuls.
''So... are there any bands that I
shouldn't make fun of?" I ask, somewhat
nervously. Many of the Music Waste
organizers are musicians themselves, and,
knowing Ryan Dyck to be the frontman
of Vancouver punksters B-Lines, I had a
feeling there might be a few others with
vested interests in the bands we were
about to pass judgement on. As it turned
out, all bands are fair game to ridicule.
"We're curmudgeons who truly love
local music," says Dustin Bromley, one
of the organizers. "Our dedication to this
festival comes from our sheer appreciation
for musicians and artists who are pushing
boundaries or branching out and trying
something new. We want to provide a
stage and an audience for those acts, as
we feel they deserve to be heard.
"That said, we don't think we're
changing the world, and it's important to
have a good sense of humour, especially
in a city which at times seems to hate all
culture-creators. Music Waste has this
sense of humour ingrained deep in our
core, and it helps to keep a positive head
about things."
That collective sense of humour
helped the group make it through almost
10 hours of submissions, and the resolve
to give each and every band its fair chance
to make a favourable impression, well,
made an impression on me.
Music Waste has been running off
and on for 20 years now, and the current
organizers are using this year to celebrate
the festival's successes. Its origins lie in
a mid-'90s "fuck you" to Music West, a
o
01
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58
i^usic waste 2014 Mish Way (White Lung),
Bradley McKinnon (Bakelite, Bison), and
Cameron Reed (Babe Rainbow) at the
Emergency Room, Music Waste afterparty, 2011
—.
Nam Shub, 2010
corporate rock festival where
bands paid to apply, and the
venues were often filled with more
networkers (and Nettwerkers,
ha ha) than music patrons. Music West is
no more, but Music Waste lives on, largely
due to the commitment of its organizers
and volunteers, and a local music
community happy to have its own low-key
festival where the focus \s on having a
good time.
"I feel that Music Waste is that
once-a-year jumbling of bands and scenes
that is needed to keep things from getting
stagnant," says Richardson, about why
the festival soldiers on. "A lot of bands
tend to fall into scenes that revolve around
a handful of bands and few outsiders are
let in. When 75 bands are playing the fest,
they're undoubtedly going to be playing
alongside bands theyVe probably never
played with—at least that's the way I
aimed the schedule and have in the past."
"There's always room for evolution,"
he continues. "Art Waste, Comedy Waste,
merchandise, and Go Your Own Waste
were additions over the last 6 years or so.
The torch will continue to get passed down
to hungry young volunteers, as it has in
years past, and hopefully theyll add more
to the fest as it goes into the future."
As the listening party continued,
bands met with lukewarm responses,
and there was a very grey "maybe"
scale, including pluses, minuses, and
even a few plus plusses. Many bands
came with back stories along the
lines of "This girl is awesome. She
disappeared for a while to have a baby,
but now she's back and her band is
rad." Some bands came completely
out of left field, and those were the
ones who sparked the most exciting
responses; we Googled bands; we
creeped on their Myspace (still a thing!)
and Facebook profiles.
lyus/c waste 2014
59 'So... are there any bands that I
shouldn't make fun of?" I ask, somewhat nervously. Many of the Music
Waste organizers are musicians themselves, and... I had a feeling there
might be a few others with vested
interests in the bands we were about
to pass judgement on. As it turned out,
all bands are fair game to ridicule.
One unknown band that got the
group salivating was the Poles. Their
first song was strong enough to land
them in the "yes" column, but then
Bromley clicked- on the video link. What
followed was, in my estimation, the sort
of magic that keeps these guys coming
back year after year: the Poles had made
a music video on a beach with their
lead singer, slightly balding and heavily
paunched, wearing a mermaid costume
and writhing about. The listening party
crowd ATE IT UP.
According to Richardson, "It can
be tough slogging through hundreds
of submissions, so when something
genuinely interesting/innovative pops
up it really makes up for the bands that
I'm not particularly keen on, to put it
very politely. Yes, every year has its own
Poles. 2013 had Young Braised, Garbage
Mountain (their first and only show?),
and the Napkins Records bands, and
years past I was blown away by bands
like Freak Heat Waves, Bertha Cool, and
more, many of which were brief flits upon
the Vancouver music scene." Some of this
year's flits may also include bands like
Black Magique and the Nobodies. A band's
bio, and the two tracks they submit, only
tell the group so much. The proof will be
in the performance.
But Music Waste is not solely about
performances, or even music for that
matter. The organizers have expanded
the festival to include Comedy Waste, Art
Waste, and bands who are not accepted
are actively encouraged to plan "Go Your
Own Waste" shows during the festival
period. One example of a GYOW event
is taking place at Kingsgate Mall, where
Western Front artist in residence Casey
Wei has booked bands and events
throughout the month of June. Her band
showcases include Late Spring and Cut
Losses on Friday, June 5 and Kele-Kenji,
Only Wolf, and Strawberry in an afternoon
show on Saturday, June 6. Comedy Waste
will feature shows at China Cloud, the
Havana Theatre, and Little Mountain
Gallery throughout the weekend.
Most bands, when turned away from
the festival, take the GYOW idea and run
with it. Others are not as receptive to
rejection. Robert Catherall, the festival's
beer and venue expert, ran into members
of a band whose entry had been rejected
by the festival, outside 33 Acres one
evening in early May. "They had sent
Music Waste some digital correspondence,
either Facebook or email, I'm not sure,
lamenting the fact that they had been
rejected from the festival. Someone
responded that they should host their own
GYOW and call it *Fuck Music Waste.' I
told them that would be great and really in
the spirit of Music Waste."
Cut to three weeks after the listening
party. Katayoon Yousefbigloo, one of
the two women heading up the Art
Waste component of the festival, is busy
running around the Red Gate Art Society,
balancing the urge to tidy up the venue
space with the need to prep the front
room for band photos. It has become a
tradition to invite all the bands to come by
0»
o
o
:_
z
60
busic Waste 2014 for promo shots based loosely around the
year's theme. We set up a living room style
interior, festooning the room with balloons
and streamers to celebrate the festival's
20th birthday.
Over the course of the next seven
hours, bands come and go, preen and
pose, and contribute their own props to •
the scene—candles, champagne, birthday
cake, a pinata, and even dogs. As the day
wears pn, people stop leaving. There is a
genuine sense of community in the room
and everyone seems eager to add more
empties to the pile from the night before.
Yousefbigloo's photography will be
featured in one of the Art Waste shows,
"The Taste for Eternity at Bargain Prices,"
which features female artists working
in assorted mediums. Fellow Art Waste
organizer Sarah Wylie will also be showing
her photography.
"Art Waste is in its second year in its
expanded format featuring Vancouver
artists in galleries across the city,"
explains Wylie. "The theme of June 5's
submission group show will be 'public/
private.' We want to address this
dichotomy in artistic practice and in the
greater context of the collapsing divide
between these two realms in
modern society. The theme
served as a catalyst for artists
to share their private world
with the public world." Other
shows Wylie is excited to
support include illustrator and
designer Tylor Macmillan's
show at Red Gate. She is also
quick to point out that there
is a great deal of crossover
between musicians and artists:
"The group show features
musicians too, like Craig
Pettman from Indian Wars,
Kyle from TimeCopz/Buds,
Aaron Read, Tom Whalen,
and more."
A highlight for Discorder
fans—and anyone who goes to
shows in this city, really, since
we all know the guy—is the
Steve Louie Retrospective at
the Remington Gallery on June 6. Louie
has been taking his signature swirlie shots
and capturing the highs of the Vancouver
music scene for several years and this will
be his first solo gallery show. Wm
As for the grand finale, this year's
closing show will be hosted by the Anza
Club, where you can see eight huhgover
bands—including Weird Candle, Summer
Babes, Love Cuts„ Wetface, Sontag,
Phantoms Again, and Skinny Kids—play
to an equally hungover crowd. Oh yeah,
and Defektors. But this is definitely their
last year playing Music Waste. Probably.
From the 10-hour listening parties
held months ahead of time to the
rambunctious festivities themselves, it's
easy to see why Music Waste has been
such a mainstay in the Vancouver art
scene. Whether this is your fifth year as
part of the festival's lineup or you choose
to Go Your Own Waste, there's something
in it for everyone. $f
i
What are you waiting for? Get your
Music Waste weekend pass for a mere
$15, available at Red Cat, Neptoon
Records, Audiopile, and Zulu.
lyusic waste 2014
61 Besides breakups and new romance, Silent Days'
most poignant explorations are of daydreams
and feelings of discontent in day-to-day life.
Put simply, the trope in.Silent Days is "everything's
great, but you're still not happy with it."
4C£ SMARTENS by Alex de Boer   photos by Andrew Volk
The cover of Vancouverite Ace Martens'
recent cassette release Silent Days is a
photo of a man standing on the deck of a
cruise ship. He's a small detail, in a full-
frame pattern of identical rooms. Holding
a margarita and wearing a smile, he is
content. Alone and unobserved, but for
the far off photographer, his contentment
seems unwarranted. Without obvious
attachment to any person or thing, the
photo suggests his happiness is actualized
and internal.
Yet most people don't find this
picturesque inner satisfaction. Most
people are left a little bit disenchanted by
life, even if they are lucky enough to meet
their own expectations. Lyrically, Silent
Days explores the idea that dissatisfaction
can't be entirely planned against.
And yet, Silent Days is the product
of heavy planning and diligent artistic
authority. All the music on the EP was
performed—or looped—by Martens.
His role as a solo artist set inevitable
limitations on Silent Days, to which he
had to adapt. After doing so, he then
imposed further limitations, including
the use of an aged drum machine and
his decision to release the Silent Days
on cassette tape. In a way, Martens uses
deliberate measures of creative control to
confront his own themes of life's drifting
discontent.
Chatting over two dollar beers at
the Backstage Lounge, I learn that Ace
Martens is relatively new to Vancouver's
music scene, but well-acquainted with
the music making process. Toying with
various music projects since high school,
Martens has played in bands both in
Montreal and Vancouver. Wanting to move
away from a group dynamic, Martens
chose to make his most recent EP an
entirely solo effort. He explains, "I've
been getting kind of tired of playing with
people who don't share the same taste as
4C£ GARTENS
63 me. This last tape is all stuff that I can
play by myself. All the songs are based on
loops." He even constructed his own guitar
with two bass strings to avoid switching
instruments during live shows.
In addition to being independently
composed and performed, Martens set
other boundaries on Silent Days. He
purchased a 505 Drum Machine off
Craigslist, instead of reaching to the
Internet for unending drum samples.|
"It only has 12 options for sound," he
explains. Enjoying the limitation, Martens
reflects that his process was "a little more
fun working with the tangible box."
As for his final product, Martens
chose to release Silent Days on cassette for
its "keepsakey" connotations. Martens also
sees this plastic medium as a reflection
of his hard work. "It's hopefully a show of
the effort I put into it. If I put it on a CD, I
don't think it would seem as interesting."
The sound on Silent Days bears
evidence of Martens' influences. "I was
listening to a lot of shoegaze and a lot of
Bryan Ferry," he reflects. And in proper
shoegaze fashion, the five tunes on Silent
Days tend to neglect leading melodies.
Martens sites favourably, "you can't really .
hum a Ride Song."
Silent Days does however host
pOppier overtones and some melody
hooks. Nodding to local influences, the
most recent Gal Gracen tape is singled
out in particular. Referring to Patrick
Geraghty's jangle-hued, Blue Hearts
in Exile, Martens explains: "I was very
conscious of really liking it and not
wanting to rip him off at the same time."
The result is Silent Days; an album
ornately influenced by shoegaze and
jangle-pop, while still distinctly its own.
The EP's unique sound is a blending
of tropical beats and shearing distortion.
By culminating light and dark sounds,
Martens has created five stylistically
contemplative tunes. The album's lyrics
are equally as introspective. Martens
discloses, "For me, it's kind of where I am
in my life and that was sort of like a theme
when I was writing this music."
Besides breakups and new romance,
Silent Days' most poignant explorations
are of daydreams and feelings of
discontent in day-to-day life. Put simply,
the trope in Silent Days is "everything's
great, but you're still not happy with it."
Seemingly the inverse of the cover
photo, which depicts happiness without
obvious cause, Silent Days explores
unprovoked discontent. The song "Waiting"
is about the finite nature of goals and the
familiar feeling of "waiting for something
to happen and now that it's happened
it's not appealing anymore." The title
track "Silent Days" expresses a longing to
be somewhere other than where you are.
The idea that life often falls short of our
expectations is the album's thematic focus.
Martens' songs are honest and critical,
without offering simplified resolutions.
Heavily introspective, Martens
feels confident he chose music as his
mode of creative expression. With all the
emotion and none of the egotism of a
diary, Martens reasons that songs, "don't
sound so self-important." Somehow
earnest sentiment seems less hyperbolic,
"because you can hide things in a song."
In true Robert Smith style, Silent Days
dresses disenchantment in rhythm and
beat, proving that raw emotion is less
devastating if you can hum along to it.
Away in Europe for part of the
summer, Martens' goal is to start
performing in July. He's looking to match
his music to the right Vancouver venue
and to collaborate on live sets with other
similar-minded musicians. Martens
will likely be an appealing candidate to
work with. His ability to remedy themes
of powerlessness with assertive creative
control displays how insight can be
successfully woven into art. Silent Days
is a dreamy album that is simultaneously
a realization and a reaction to the inner
contentment life often lacks, gf
I
You can check out Ace Martens' Silent
Days release for yourself on Martens'
Bandcamp page, where it's also available
for purchase.
64
4C£ GARTENS m
j mm	 DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CITR ONLINE AT CITR.CA EVERY DAY
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BREAKFAST WITH I    V«U„VCE„R:
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CLASSICAL CHAOS
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STUFF
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GIVE EM THE BOOT   extraenvironmentalist |    L tANGUAG_°
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_______3___i__5_£__i Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background on current issues
DIFFICULT andgreatmusic.queerfmradio@gmail.com
Bepi Crespan Presents...                                       SUN 7-9am Radio Free Thinker                                              TUE 3-4pm
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack size for- Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular ex-
mat! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-up/collage and traordinary claims and subject them to critical analysis.
general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: ©bepicrespan. Blog: bepicrespan.      ■■ v-	
blogspot.ca                    $0JMi The City         ||||                                           TUE 5-6pm
 \  An alternative and critical look at our changing urban spaces.
CLASSICAL New Website: www.thecityfm.org. New Twitter handle: @thecity_fm.
Classical Chaos SUN 9-10am      Terry Project Podcast Alternating Thursdays 1-2pm
From the Ancient World to the 21st centuryjoin host Marguerite in exploring There once was a project named Terry, That wanted to make people wary,
and celebrating classical music from around the world. Of things going on In the world that are wrong without making it all seem
       too scary. Wktj,
4*33" 1/3 MON 6-7pm      |||| MM	
This program showcases "new music"- contemporary classical and exper-      All Ears Alternating Wednesdays 6-6:30pm
imental music, especially highlighting Vancouver's local performers and (Alternating with UBC Arts On Air.) All Ears is an advice radio program tar-
composers of new music, to Uncover a new musical niche to the broader getted to the UBC community. We try to answer your questions and address
public in a friendly and accessible manner. topics sent via social media and over the phone. Interviews and segments
relating to campus life will be featured, all in our attempt to better our community and supply positive feedback.
Extraenvironmentalist WED 2-3pm
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth. Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sustainable economics and our
global ecological crisis.
TALK
Alphabet Soup Alternating Wednesdays 11:30am-12pm
A talk show focussed on the writing of MFA Creative Writing students at
UBC. Topics include events happening in the program and the Vancouver art
scene while promoting the writers and the genre which they are working in.
AstroTalk                                                      THU 3-3:30pm Arts Report                                                       WED 5-6pm
Space is an interesting place, Marco slices up the night sky with a new topic Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film, theatre, dance, vi-.
every week. Death Stars, Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red Giants, the Milky Way, sual and performance art, comedy, and more) by host Maegan Thomas and
G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars... the Arts Reporters.
The Sector                                                |||    FRI 8-9am UBC Arts On Air                                              WED 6-6:30pm
A showcase about different non profits and the work they do, with in-depth (Alternating with All Ears.) on break from June-September 2014.
interviews with non-profit representatives about social justice, charities        '-'My-	
and causes. Website: http://sectorpodcast.wordpress.com. Facebook.com/ Sexy In Van City                                               WED 10-11pm
SectorPodcast. Twitter.com/SectorPodcast Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in the realm of relation-
  shipsandsexuality.sexyinvancity.com/category/sexy-in-vancity-radio.
Alphabet Soup Alternating Wednesdays 11:30am-12nm         	
Alphabet Soup is a talk show which focuses on the writing of MFA Creative End of the World News                                       THU 8-1 Oam
Writing students at UBC Topics include events happening in the program End of the World News is grooves and news from around the world, mashed
and the Vancouver art scene while promoting the writers and the genre and crashed against the wall. Lauren, Adam and Graeme talk trash about
which they are working in. international events with caffeinated cartoon voices from the world press
  and the dark net. The Big World Love Vibe: Roots & Beats, Funk & Soul,
Synchronicity                                                   MON 12-1pm Dubbed Vibes & Dyslexic Drum & Bass. The antidote to The Corporation.
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling good. Tune    ■ Call in and we will put you on.
in and tap into good vibrations that help you remember why you're here:      	
to have fun I
News 101 FRI 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and community newscast.
Every week, we take a look back at the week's local, national and international news, as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded- TUE 8-10:30am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of
Language to Language
Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness.
rv nvava/nc.
The Rockers Show
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
THU 2-3pm
%m 12-3pm
CITR 101.9 Eh* PROGRAM GUIDE
67 So Salacious MON 3-4pm
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local and Canadian Content—good and dirty
beats.
EXPERIMENTAL
More Than Human ":f v£| SUN 7-8pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past, present, and future
with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
Pop Drones WED 10-11:30am
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl underground.
Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage rock all the way to harsh noise
and, of course, drone.
WORLD
ROOTS / FOLK / BLUES
Blood On The Saddle Alternating Sundays 3-5pm
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
Pacific Pickin' TUE 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and the lovely
Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
Folk Oasis WED 8-1 Opm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on our local
scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997.
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com
The Saturday Edge SAT 8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin, and
European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters,
Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@mac.com.
Afrobeat Tuesday 10:30-11:30am
Code Blue SAT 3-5pm A show dedicated to expose UBC students and Vancouver to contemporary African
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp honks, blues, and music. Hosted by Achieng Orlale.
blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul. -•••• 	
Email: wcodeblue@buddy-system.org. La Fiesta Alternating Sundays 3-5pm
  Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your host Gspot DJ.
SOUL/R&B 	
  Shookshookta SUN 10am-12pm
Soulship Enterprise SAT 7-8pm A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and per-
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and afrobeat •    sonal development.
tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as the world's foremost  p '	
funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people Radio Nezate SAT 7-8am
named Robert Gorwa and/or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III. A mix show with music and discussion in Tigrinya the language of Eritrea.
ELECTRO / HIP  HOP AsianWave THU 4-5pm
 \  Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the best music from the
Vibes and Stuff WED 1-2pm Chinese language and Korean music industries, as well the latest news corn-
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered bringing you some of the ing from the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop scene. The
best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all in one segment. All the way from latest hits from established artists, rookies only just debuted, independent
New Jersey and New York City, DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing the artists and classic songs from both industries, can all be heard on Asian
east coast to the west coast throughout the show. We will have you remi- Wave 101, as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned
niscing about the good ol' times with Vibes and Stuff every Wednesday af- Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
ternoonfrom l:00pm-2:00pm PST. E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com 	
  G4E Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
Beaver Hour TUE llpm-midnight Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around the world, a
Dance music from local scenes, particularly underground music by African thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House, Techno, Ambient, Dance Hall,
Americans, with a strong focus on music from ghettos. Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise, Experimental, Eclectic.
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9-10pm NashaVolna SAT 6-7pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to dubstep and News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community, local and
ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist for 'Canadian college radio abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
show of the year 2012' Pioneer DJStylusAwards.Soundcloud.com/doe-ran   	
and search "Doe-Ran" on Facebook. African Rhyhms FRI 7:30-9pm
 ••••-'••• Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
Crimes & Treasons TUE 9-11pm 	
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Rhythmsindia Alternating Sundays 8-9pm
Jules & DJ Relly Rels. Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca. Featuring a wide range of music from India, including popular music from
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
68
CITR 101.9 Pkf PROGRAM GUIDE the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and re- •'•	
gional language numbers. Tweets & Tunes WED 6:30-8am
    We practice what we Tweet! Showcasing local indie music and bringing
The Leo Ramirez Show MON 4-5pm bands, artists and fans together through social media.
The best of mix of Latin American music. Email: leoramirez@canada.com Website: tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:@tweetsandtunes.
Give Em The Boot TUE 2-3pm Duncan's Donuts THU 12-1pm
Sample the various flavours of Italian music from north to south, traditional Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by
to modern on this bilingual show. Folk, singer-songwriter, jazz and much donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.    <K
more. Un prog«amma bilingue cheesplora il mondo delta musica italiana. ■ ••	
Website: http://giveemtheboot.wordpress.com.facebook.com/givetheboot. Samsquantch's Hideaway Alternating Wednesdays 6:30-8pm
  All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Mantra SAT 5-6pm Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers, chants and med- -	
icine song. Exploring the diversity of the worlds sacred sounds - traditional, Parts Unknown MON 1-3pm
contemporary and futuristic. Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmaliow sandwich: soft and
 '■  sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and held close to a fire.
DANCE / ELECTRONIC il
 __ __ The Cat's Pajams FRI 10-11am
The Copyright Experiment THU llpm-midnight The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone superawe-
    . some or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and cool radio show tejf"
Moon Grok FRI 10:30pm-midnight turing the latest and greatest indie pop, rock, lofi and more from Vancouver
■■•■'  and beyond!
Techno Progressivo Alternating Sundays 8-9pm  	
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house and techno. Chips 'n Dip Alternating Thursdays 1-2pm
  Dip in every second Thursday afternoon with host Hanna Fazio forthe fresh-
Trancendance SUN lOpm-midnight est local indie pop tracks and upcoming shows.
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance has been   ■<■■■$._	
broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001. We favour Psytrance, A Deeper Reverb SAT 8-9pm
Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance, Bringing you the chillout world of the heavy reverb genres: shoegaze, post
Hard Dance and even some Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic rock, dream pop, space rock, trip hop and everything in between, including
Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed. Current influences in- new tracks and old favorites. Online: facebook.com/adeeperreverb. Contact:
elude Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace adeeperreverb@gmail.com.
Ventura, Save the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older influences include —	
Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, EC L ECTIC
Platipus Records and Nukleuz. Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net.  ;	
Website: www.trancendance.net. Soul Sandwich MON 5-6pm
  A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into one show. From Hip
Inside Out TUE 8-9pm Hop to Indie rock to African jams, Ola will play through a whirlwind of drf-
 -  ferent genres, each sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of
yummy goodness will blow your mind. AND, it beats subway.
Radio Zero FRI 2-3:30pm
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams from New Wave to
, foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever else.
Website: www.radiozero.com
Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9-11pm
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-bit music/retro '80s, this
is the show for you! Website: synapticsandwich.net
The Late Night Show
FRI midnight-6am
ROCK/ POP/ INDIE
Discorder Radio TUE 4-5pm
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear excerpts of
interviews, reviews and more!
Canada Post-Rock Alternating Wednesdays 6:30-8pm
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the west coast but it's
still committed to the best in post-rock, drone, ambient, experimental, noise
and basically anything your host Pbone can put the word "post" infront of.
The Shakespeare Show WED 12-1pm
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear. Kick back with gems of
the previous years.
Up on the Roof FRI 9-10am
Friday Mornings got you down? Climb Up On the Roof and wake up with
Robin and Jake! Weekly segments include improvised crime-noir radio dramas, trivia contents, on-air calls to Jake's older brother and MORE! We'll be
spinning old classics, new favourites, and lots of ultra-fresh local bands!
C77"* 101.9 Phj PROGRAM GUIDE
69 Breakfast With The Browns                                 MON 8-11am Stereo Blues                                               FRI 11am-12pm
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury blend of the fa- Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld sinks into blues, garage and rock n' roll
miliar and exotic in a blend of aural delights. goodies!
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.	
It Ain't Easy Being Green FRI 12-1pm
Chthonic Boom!                            Alternating Sundays 5-6pm CiTR has revived it's long-dormant beginner's show It Ain't Easy Being
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the spectrum Green! With the support of experienced programmers, this show offers fully-
(rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock. trained CiTR members, especially students, the opportunity to get their feet
 ; -  wet on the air
MoonGrok SUN 6-7pm       :-:r-	
   Nardwuar                                                    FRI 3:30-5pm
MoonGrok WM                                            MON 11am-12pm Join Nardwuarthe Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment.
  Doot doola doot doo... doot doo! Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
MoonGrok MON Midnight-lam
  Randophonic                                               SAT 11pm-2am
The Morning After Show                               TUE 11:30am-1pm Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversal jukebox which has no con-
The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday at 11:30a.m. cept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even space-time relevance. But
Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The morning after what? The morn- it does know good sounds from bad. Lately, the program has been focused
ing after whatever you did last night. Eclectic show with live music, local on Philip Random's All Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest
talent and music you won't hear anywhere else. records you probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
Stereoscopic Redoubt                                     THU 7:30-9pm Stranded                                                     FRI 6-7:30pm
Experimental, radio-art, sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds, past and pres-
for the insane. ent, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he features fresh
  tunes and explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
Hans Von Kloss' Misery Hour WED llpm-lam
Pretty much the best thing on radio. The Vampire's Ball                                             WED 1-4am
    Industrial, electro, noise, experimental, and synth-based music.
Suburban Jungle                                             WED 8-10am thevamplresball@gmail.comtbeyampiresballoncitr.com.
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix 1	
of music, sound bites, information and inanity. Email: dj@jackvelvet.net. CIN E M AT IC
Student Special Hour                                          TUE 1-2pm Exploding Head Movies                                       MON 7-9pm
Various members of the CiTR's student executive sit in and host this blend Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and
of music and banter about campus and community news, arts, and pop cut- any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric pieces, cutting edge
ture. Drop-ins welcome! new tracks and strange old goodies that could be used in a soundtrack to be.
Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and musicians
that take the route of positive action over apathy.
 i	
Peanut Butter Y jams Alternating Thursdays 6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll hear
interviews and reviews on eats and tunes from your neighbourhood, and a
weekly pairing for your date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9-11pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and the weird, or
it could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com   -JiM
jazz
The Jazz Show MON 9pm-midnight
Vancouver's longest running prime-time Jazz program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at 11 p.m. June 2: The Jazz Show's annual Jazz Festival
Special. Gavin takes a back seat and invites Jazz Festival Media Director,
the ebullient John Orysik to pick the music and discuss the 2014 Jazz Fest
lineup. A show not to be missed! June 9: One of the foremost exponents of
the tenor saxophone....Illinois Jacquet. Monsieur Jacquet with an all-star
cast including Roy Eldridge (trumpet) and Papa Jo Jones (drums) and others. "Swing's The Thing!" June 16: Multi-instrumentalist (clarinet and tenor
and bari saxophone) and composer Jimmy Giuffre and his Trio with guitarist
Jim Hall. Gentle folk-tinged Jazz by a master. 'The Jimmy Giuffre 3." June
23: One of the founding fathers of Modem Jazz Dexter Gordon. The giant
tenor saxophonist burns up Denmark with pianist Kenny Drew and others
recorded live. "Take The 'A' Train." June 30: One of the most original composer/pianists. The often underrated Elmo Hope and what many consider
his masterpiece. 'The Elmo Hope Trio."
70
CITR 101.9 Mf PROGRAM GUIDE LITERACY / LANGUAGE
PUNK
Sne'waylh WED 4-5pm
In many Coast Salish dialects, "sne'waylh" is the word for teachings or laws.
The aboriginal language-learning program begins with the teachings of the
skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish language). Originally aired on Coop Radio
CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver, Tuesdays 1-2 p.m.
Simorgh THU 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the Persian
speaking communities and those interested in connecting to Persian oral
and written literature. Simorgh takes you through a journey of ecological
sustainability evolving within cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator
in the storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
Language to Language THU 2-3pm
Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness.
DRAMA / POETRY
Skald's Hall FRI 1-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established and upcoming artists join host
Brian MacDonald. Interested in performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
©Skalds Hall.
SPORTS
Thunderbird Eye THU 3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus and
off with your host Wilson Wong.
Rocket from Russia THU 10-11am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international and local
punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in brokenish English.
Hosted by Russian Tim. Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com. Email:
rocketfrom russiacitr@gmail.com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com-
RocketFromRussia. Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
Generation Annihilation SAT 12-1pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the non-commercial side
of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website: gen-
erationannihilation.com. Facebook: facebopk.com/generationannihilation.
LOUD
Power Chord SAT 1-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Flex Your Head TUE 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands and guests from around the world.
GENERATIVE
The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2-6am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries.
ident music magazine. Show your
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CITR 101.9 £A/f PROGRAM GUIDE
71 AtrfaoMUH,
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©VICTORY SQUARE
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