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  upcoming mm   RiQCSUAW
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
I
1
IKE LOVERS CABARET Jj
Lovers of Marley: Night 1
D.DA 'Welcome To Chinatown' Live Album Release
The Ford Pier Vengeance Trio, Jenny, & more
Lovers of Marley: Night 2
hobBell^^™™*"""""" """'""""a
11 Leaves Eyes, Atrocity, Celestial Ruin
;I60V1NDA rr"" " f" 1
Scarlet Lux, Lady Ra, Nils
J JOEY TOUCH 'Night Life' Album Release Party
Dylan Ross, Live Meat, Chingers, John Doe
AdditionafcsJiow listings, ticket sale info, videos and more:
VWWJttKSHAWTHEATRElOM
SAD MAG x RAIN CITY CHRONICLES
PRESENT: L0V1 HANGOVER pjj;
THE PACK A?p^^^^
The Courineys and Dead Soft
RBW m 1! - | • IS
Grass City and Sumner Brothers
thecave*Smis      ?'T!"""
with Guests
REALESTATE •^7" """"' .""
The Shilohs
CELTICFEST PRESENTS: THE IRISH EDGE
Hermitage Green, Vagabonds
http://faeebook.com/RickshawTheatre
[j/J ©rickshawtheatre [tSJJ ©rickshawtheatre
FEB 27-MARCH CQNTENTS
.      KUBLA KHAN §, 19 ll
Despite an early elimination In last year's CiTR Shindig, Kubla Khan are moving full-speed ahead
with their album Pincushion Man ready for release. If you're wondering where the name came from (or
what the band's worst show ever was), read on to find out. By Avash Islam
VAGUE 13
Founded in 2013, Vague is the brainchild of three local, experimental musicians interested in
creating and preserving physical forms of music. We sit down with two-thirds of the founding fathers of
Vague to learn more about the emerging Vancouver record label. By Alex de Boer
THE WRITTEN YEARS
21
An event six years in the making, last month's release of the Written Years' self-titled debut
marked the start of a new chapter for the local trio. Read on to find out all about the album's recording
and how the members' different musical backgrounds had an Influence. By Natalie Hoy
REDRICK SULTAN
25
On the front line of the Vancouver space folk scene, Redrick Sultan may not be a household name
(yet). But with a massive tour planned for February, a promotional EP to go with It, and a refurbished
band lineup, the Sultans are ready for royalty. By Elijah Teed
CONNECT ICUT
29
Pronounced "connect-ick-cut," Samuel Macklln aJca. Connectjcut is a wizard of layered, ambient
electronic music. His sixth album, Crows <fi Kittlwakes Wheel 6 Come Again, only debuted in December and
he's already looking towards lucky number seven. By Joshua Gabert-Doyon
HALLOW MOON
55
Discorder catches up with this month's cover band, Hallow Moon, on what they've been up to
since last year's debut release, as well as their musical influences, recording styles, and sugar vices.
By Josefa. & Paulette Cameron
7    Charts 44
} # Fundrive 2014 46
35   Art Project: %ine-A-Palooza SO
'% .Calendar 60
'-§£' Discorder Staff Sound-off
Venewss SBC Restaurant
Under Revie#. '
Real Live JtegtiiMt.-
Here's the Thing:
lllf Friends & Parents
«2   On the AIR
%   Exploding Head Movies
66   Program Guide
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-3017
ext. 3 or emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder,
please contact: editor.discorder@citr.ca. To
submit images, contact: artdirector.discorder®
citr-ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to
#233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1
with your address, and we will mail each issue
of Discorder right to your doorstep for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
business, email distro.discorder@citr.ca We are
always looking for new friends.      ->if!
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you love. To donate
visit www.citr.ca/donate.
ftfffmwoiemzATiov
let tt be knows that CiT4^|arreatly walking to digitize the
eii&raty ot Otsmriefs archives. Soon all of the past issues you
know and love will he availa&te tor viewing online. Thanks,
computers! If yes Save any Questions or concerns, please contact
Brenda at stationmanager®eitr.ca
PH0T06RAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS: Britta Bacchus, John C Barry, Sitji Chou, Tyler Crich (cover lettering), Jensen Gifford, Elyse Gerstenecker, Dana Kearley,
Justin Longoz, Steve Louie, Gina MacKay, Moses Magee, Bas Mantel, Kelsey McGowan, Tierney Milne, Rob Qndzik, Alison Sadler, Jon Vincent, Priscilla Yu
PROOFREADERS: Natalie Hoy, Mike Lakusiak, Steve Louie WRITERS: Mariko Adams, Willa Bao, Alex de Boer, Josefa Cameron, Paulette Cameron, Robert
Catherall, Natalie Dee, Fraser Dobbs, Pyra Draculea, Joshua Gabert-Doyon, Brenda Grunau, Chloe Hoy, Natalie Hoy, Avash Islam, Ibrahim Itarri, Jonathan Kew,
Mike Lakusiak, Erica Leiren, James Olson, Mark PaulHus, Keefer Pelech, Omar Prazhari, Shane Scott-Travis, Lindsay Stewart, Elijah Teed, Sam Tudor, Max
Wainwright, Bob Woolsey, Justin White EDITOR: Jacey Gibb ART DIRECTOR: Jaz Halloran COPY EDITORS: Robin Schroffel, Steve Louie A0 COORDINATOR:
Ana Elena Garza UNDER REVIEW EDITOR: Robin Schroffel RLA EDITOR: Steve Louie WEB EDITOR: Behrouz Salehipour WEB DEVELOPER: Jenny Lian
CALENDAR LISTINGS: Sarah Cordingley ACCOUNTS MANAGER: Corey Ratch OFFICIAL TWEETER: Evan Brow CITR STATION MANAGER: Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER: Student Radio Society of UBC STUDENT LIASONS: Evan Brow, Josefa Cameron EDITORIAL CUTOFF: January 22,2014
©Discorder 2014 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 10,200. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR,
which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604)
822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada. EDITOR'S NOTE
HONEY, WE SHRUNK
THE DISCORDER!
It was a Tuesday evening last September when I first
heard Jaz Halloran's pitch for a Discorder redesign.
I'd just survived my first pitch meeting as incoming
Editor-in-chief and there the four of us were: the
outgoing EIC, me, the advertising coordinator at the
time, and art director Halloran himself. I remember
being more than slightly aghast when he started a
semi-formal presentation on where he wanted to.
visually take the magazine. Discordefs always been
a homebase for the alternative and experimental;;i^^
we can take creative risks that larger publications
can't, and Halloran knew it. That's why he wanted to
shrink the current format of the magazine and turn
Discorder into a zine.
Halloran's vision terrified me. My name
wasn't even on the masthead yet and here was a
proposal that would quite literally change the face of
the magazine like never before. Who was I to green
light such an important decision? I guess the correct
answer is I was the new Editor-in-chief. We talked for
over half an hour, debating and drinking beer from
cups that looked like those popcorn bags you'd get
at the movie theatre. I remember leaving that night
feeling nauseous with anticipation; the redesign
wasn't a done deal, but the general consensus was a
thumbs up. Despite the agreeable groupthink, I still
wasn't 100 per cent convinced.
It wasn't that I was totally against the shift.
Discordefs a place of innovation and you can't have
innovation without change. The nagging hesitation
at the back of my shaggy head was the thought of
wrecking something I loved. Discordefs been around
for over 30 years—though my involvement has been
restricted to the previous three—and even the inkling
of failure made my already tense shqulders tighten
up further. What if the whole world universally
rejected the new concept and I somehow became the
last EIC of Discorder?
After all that fear and doubt, what finally
convinced me to go along with the redesign? One
of the major selling points came during Halloran's
initial presentation. He had collected a miniature
library of newspapers, magazines, and zines to use as
examples of what other publications were doing and
where he wanted to take Discorder. The star example
he used to show what size and page count he wanted
was a gorgeous zine with James Franco on the cover,
his eyes fixed in a permanent smoulder. That was the
first step in securing my approval.
But let me tell you about the exact moment
I came to support the redesign: I was sitting in
the perpetually messy Discorder office, my eyes
meandering at the wall's decorations. For those of
you who've never taken a peek behind the creative
curtains, the office is a hodgepodge of relics, junk,
past issues, music memorabilia, and more junk. The
walls are decked with posters for old CiTR sponsored
concerts, several calendar pullouts from years long
gone, and Discorder covers dating back to 2008. Six
years doesn't sound like an incredible timeline (and
it doesn't look like much when you have them lined
up all together) but something amazing happened as
my wandering eyes traveled upwards to the covers
of Discorders past. At some point between June and
October 2009 (an unusual jump but we're apparently
missing a few issues from the timeline) the magazine;:.,
shrunk in size. Discorder circa 2009 and before was
about the same size as the Georgia Straight, closer to
that of daily newspapers and that genre.
When I noticed the otherwise minute gap, my
mind immediately jumped back five years to what the
then-EIC must have been thinking during the time of
change. Was their art director the catalyst behind the
redesign? Had it been a group project? Regardless of
whose idea it was, I was sure of one thing: they were
probably as nervous as I was. And yet the Discorder
staff of 2009 pulled through and put together a
format that lasted for four strong years.
- Later that week I sent an email to Halloran
and told him he had my full support for the redesign.
, While some things change (like our formatting), others stay the same. February plays host to
CiTR's annual Fundrive, a nine-day-lOng fundraising
marathon in support of community radio and
everything it stands for. We have a lot planned for
this year, so keep those eyes and ears open for details
over the coming month. If you're a supporter of CiTR,
Discorder, local music, or you're just looking for
somewhere to unload that $5,000 burning a hole in
your wallet, I encourage you to donate to the cause
and help keep the community going.
That about does it for me. Halloran has a
few words to say and then well let you get on with
the rest of the issue. Great reads about Kubla Khan,
Hajlow Moon-, Redrick Sultan, connect_icut, and
more await you inside. I hope you like the new look of
the magazine and I hope you like the words we filled
it with.
So it goes,
Jacey Gibb
4 ART DIRECTOR'S NOTE
THE LO-FI, DIY, DIGITAL SCREEN
NEWSPRINT MAGAZINE
Hello! My name's Jaz Halloran and I'm the Art
Director of Discorder. Usually you wouldn't be
hearing from me at all. Normally you'd just be taking
in the layouts I've designed and the artwork I've
commissioned from our many amazing contributors.
Although it's unusual for an art director
to have a voice beyond that of shaping the visual ,
content of a magazine, it isn't new. In 1967, a book
was published called The Medium Is the Massage
(yes—Massage), a so-called "electric information age"
book that was part of a subculture-oriented genre
of publishing popular from 1967-75. The book was
"authored" by Marshall McLuhan and Quentin Fiore,
who was a graphic designer. It wasn't "written" by
both McLuhan and Fiore, but it was definitely shaped
and made visual by Fiore, an "author" of the book's
visual content (a.k.a. the design itself).
and reads it by opting for a lo-fi, DIY aesthetic over
that of trade magazines.
You may notice a few key changes. Discorder
is now eight pages shy of having twice as many pages
as it used to and its dimensions are also quite a bit
smaller (now 6" x 9", before 8" x 10.5"). This new size
aligns itself with the most democratic and accessible
means within the realm of publishing (particularly
zine making): an 8.5" x 11" sheet, folded in half. It
also gives us the flexibility to feature photography
and illustrations at larger scales and more often.
The new format stands in opposition to the
"disposable" nature of print—p'articularly that which
is distributed for free—by offering more substantiality
(more pages and visual content), portability, and
characteristics that make it an object worth keeping.
These qualities also make it distinct among other
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In 1967—and still today—it was an odd move
to feature the graphic designer's name on the cover of
a book as a co-originatpr of the content. But such a
credit would seem to be "necessary and appropriate,
because what follows on the pages within is more a .
series'of photomontages and collages than the dutiful
typeset lines found in a traditional paperback book"
(Andrew Blauvelt, As If—Design and Its Producers).
This redesign, is inspired in large part by
the design of these "electric information age" books
(notably, The Electric Information Age Book by Jeffrey
Schnapp and Adam Michaels, Ways of Seeing by
John Berger, and the aforementioned The Medium
is the Massage); the Canadian cultural magazines
Bad Day, Poetry Is Dead, and Pyramid Power; and
the local newsprint publication Dunk. It is also a
response to zine making and screen-based media,
and seeks to represent the community who makes
local, free newsprint magazines, particularly the
promotional magazines that have the same dimensions as the previous format.
Having the privilege of being a part of
Discorder for it's 30th anniversary issue (February
2013) gave me a unique understanding of its history—especially of its design, whieh has taken many
different forms over the years. The most important
shift in this new iteration of Discorder is that it
retains and strengthens the magazine's freedom and
presence as a platform for experimentation—not
only in its design, but also in the work of the
emerging artists, writers and musicians who are
featured within.
All the best,
Jaz Halloran ™B
IN TOW
5BU
Antisocial
Skateboard Shop
2337 Main St.
10% off
Australian Boot Co
1968 West 4th Ave
$30 off Blundstones
andRM Williams*
Audiopile
2016 Commercial Dr.
10% offLPs/CDs
BadBird Media
www.badbirdmedia.
com
10% off
The Baker & The
Chef Sandwich Cafe
320 Cambie St.
10% off
Band Merch Canada
www.bandmerch.ca
20% off
Bang-On T-Shirts
Robson, Cherrybomb,
Metrotown locations
10% off
Banyen Books and
Sound
3608 W 4th Ave.
10% off
Beatstreet Records
439 W Hastings St.
70% off used vinyl
The Bike Kitchen
6138 SUB Blvd.
10% off new parts and
accessories
Bonerattle Music
2012 Commercial Dr.
10% off
(or free for staflon members]
The Cove
3681 West 4th Ave.
10% off food
Dentry's Pub
4450 West 10th Ave.
$6.99 wings, $11.99
pitchers
Devil May Wear
3957 Main St.
10% off
Displace Hashery
' 3293 West 4th Ave.
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Dunlevy Snack Bar
433 Dunlevy Ave
10% off
The Eatery
3431 W Broadway
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The Fall Tattooing
644. Seymour St.
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Fortune Sound Club
147 East Pender St.
No cover Saturdays
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Fresh is Best Salsa
2972 W Broadway
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Gargoyles Tap+Grill
3357 W Broadway
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Highlife Records
1317 Commrecial Dr.
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Hitz Boutique
316 W Cordova St.
15% off regular priced
clothing and shoes
Limelight Video
2505 Alma St.
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3278 W Broadway
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Lucky's Comics
3972 Main St.
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Neptoon Records
3561 Main Street
10% off used, $1 off
new
Nuba Kitsilano
3116 W Broadway
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Pacific
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1131 Howe St.
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People's Co-op
Bookstore
1391 Commercial Dr.
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Perch
337 East Hastings
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The Portside Pub
7 Alexander St.
10% off
Prussin Music
3607 W Broadway
10% off
The Regional
Assembly of Text
3934 Main St.
1 free make-your-own
button with purchases
over $5
Red Cat Records
4332 Main St.
10% off
R/X Comics
2418 Main St.
12% off
Rufus' Guitar Shop
2621 Alma St.
10% off everything but
instruments and amps
The Rumpus Room
2698 Main St.
10-20% off
Save On Meats
43 W Hastings St.
10% off food
UBC Bookstore
6200 University Blvd.
10% off clothing, gifts,
stationery
Used House of
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Granville, Robson St.
locations
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Gallery
118HanesAve, North
Van
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Vinyl Records
319 W Hastings St.
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The Wallflower
Modern Diner
2420 Main St.
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\BWMMKtm SCORES YOU
SWEET DEALS AT VANCOUVER'S FINEST
SMALL MERCHANTS AND SUPPORTSlCITI.
SHOW IT WHEN YIU SHBP!
WWW.CITR.CA STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF JANUARY 2014
CITR 101.9 FM CHARTS
ARTIST
LABEL
ALBUM
LABEL
ARTIST
ALBUM
1
>1£
Dog Day*             1
:ade Out
Fundog
26
BlackieAndThe
Rodeo Kings*
South *
File Under: Music
2
Tough Age*+         Tough Age
Mint
27
Phantoms Again*
Half Dog
Self-Released
*|
CFCF*                  1
)utside
Paper Bag
;'-#•
Greg Rekus*
Punkoustic
Self-Released
4
The Pack A.D.*+     !
Some Sssongs
Nettwerk
29
The Gories
The Shaw Tapes: Live
in Detroit 5/27/88
Third Man
'5|
The Arcade Fire* -<
ilieter
Merge
30
The Cyrillic
Typewriter**
Custodian
Jaz
6
Tim Hecker*          \
/irgins
B8W|t South b/w.
)own with You
Mutant
31iss Clah/ ;
Paper Bag
Deranged
Urbnet
Self-Released
31
Frog Eyes *+
Carey's Cold
Spring
Self-Released
Sakamano
Flemish Eye
ill
Whitening*
MokaOnly*
Bliss Club*+       jj
^M
Dylan Rysstad*
Harbours. •*.
Flourish//Perish
8
33
34
Braids*
9
Egyptrixx*
A/B Til Infinity
Last Gang
10
The
Ballantynes*+
Cheap Time        |j
Hallow Moon*+
First Base*
Nervous Talk*+
\3pmy KiJli*#-'A;^
Zacht Automaat*
Three Wolf        1%
Mooa*+
Lindsay May*
.iquor Store Gun Store
'awn Shop Church
LaTiDa
35
Little Wild*+
Victories
Neptoon
Self-Released
Other People
Self-Released
11
•xitSm^f"
In The Red
36
37
38
39
40
The Silver
Skeleton Band*
Darkside
We Were Lovers*
Snake Highs     ;
Psychic
We Were Lovers
12
Hallow Moon
Neptoon
ij
"irst Base
ntroductions
HoZac
Mammoth Cave
14
Shearwater
Fellow Travellers
Sub Pop
15
Stirmytiids
Zacht Automaat
local Art Collective
Calico Corp
U.S. Girls*
Free Advice
Column
Bad Actors
16
41
42
43
The Albertans*+
Dangerous
Anything
Ernest Jenning
Recording Co.
Nevada
17-
'hree Wolf Moon
jirl with Grit
Neptoon
Self-Released
Jordan Klassen*+
Wooden
Horseman*+
Repentance
18
Wooden Horseman
Self-Released
19
Yamantaka //
Sidfe Titan*
Connect_icut*+
Jzu
tows & Kittiwakes
Wheel & Come Again
Paper Bag -
Aagoo
44
45
46
Fred Eaglesmith*
Tambourine
Self-Released
20
Diana*
Perpetual
Surrender
Paper Bag
ConstellatielK-
Fixture
|e» Mystery
Fogg* s|-/|.
Hag Face*
Neil Young*
Sharon Jones And
The Dap-Kings
White Poppy*+
Racoon ^4;
Kingfisher Biuez
Esmerine*
Dalmark
22
Hag Face
Live At The Cellar
)oor
3ive the People
What They Want
Self-Released
Reprise
Daptone
47
Freelove Fenner*
DoNot-AffectA
Breezy Manner
23
48
Trentemoller
Lost
in My Room
Columbia
24
49
The Civil Wars
Bare Bones
25
rVfito Poppy
Not Not Fun
ds with asterisks I*) an Canadian and those
r name is Sarah Cordingley. if you ask nicely s
50
Cult Babies**
Cult Babies
ndent music
Harts at www.
Self-Released
tores across Vancouver. If you can't find
iarshrjt-oniine.com.
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely D Is last month. Recor
them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. He
narked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine indep
ie' ll tell you how to find them Check out other great campus/community radio c
i 7 iNF0ATMRGC0Nam.COM    TKmSATWHTHmMTICKm.COM
Ctouxtd&
CITR   MtXtMSR
Shearwater Dave House! Solids Nick
w/ Jesca Hoop
•Friday, February 14
The Media Club
Doors of 8pm
& Northcote
PUP
Waterhouse
The Electric Owl
19*   Doors at 8pm
Monday, March 3
The Media Club
Doors af 8pm
I IS
Yellow Ostrich
Weekend
Kim Churchill
iia Club
i       March 26 - Doors 8pm |    April )6 - Doors 8
19+ The Media Club 19* The Bilfrwore
fmtfffs O&faef
JJJ facebook.com/mrgconcerts
jjj @mrgconcertswe$t
I §mrgconcerts
TICKETSatN0RWERNTICKEIS.COM
~~ tfhe>
^* eruiM   ii rtiiinrii  cietnwii
H  fi .A STOWS
JV£ MUSIC l"t
TU      l A        :       kJ If f CM Ji
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on iav
EVERY FRIDAY AND
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8  written by Avash Islam
illustration & lettering by Gina Mackay
photo above by Kelsey McGowan
"It was at this house party," Tom Messent, singer
and guitarist for local grunge-mod rockers Kubla
Khan tells me about the worst show the band ever
played. wl was really drunk... on substances."
"Yeah, I think I ate too many mushrooms,"
continues bassist Reise Rooney. "My mom and little
brother were in the audience, so I was freaking out...
I'd say that was my worst show; that was one of my
worst days ever."
Also joining us is Danika Speight, Kubla
Khan's keyboardist. The only band member missing
is drummer Adrian Long, who's down and out with
the flu. Messent has arranged for us to meet at the
Marulilu Cafe, a cozy shop just off of Broadway and
Cambie that provides a warm, welcome respite from
the rain outside. A yueqin arrangement of Chopin's
"Raindrop" prelude No. 15 plays in the background;
the effect is as odd, yet strangely familiar as the
music Kubla Khan plays.
"Like a cream pie," opines Speight on what the
band's music would be if it was a food. "A chocolate
cream pie. 'Cause we definitely have a dark flavour,
but then we have the nice organ, the velvety sound
which is very creamy, and that's like the sweet parts."
Rooney and Messent stare at each other and
shrug, before laughing. "Yep, sounds good to me."
In non-gastronomic terms, Kubla Khan's
music is a dreamy blend of '60s psychedelic-pop
and grunge, the heavy drums and bass coupled with
a soft organ lay out the foundation for Messent's
catchy chord progressions and melodic, whimsically
sing-song lyrics.
Substances reoccur throughout the conversation, unsurprisingly, even when I ask about the
name, which comes from the opium dream inspired
poem by the famous Romantic poet Samuel Taylor
Coleridge.
"I found out about the emperor later on," grins
Messent, "but I've always liked the Romantics and
their idea of fighting against industrialization."
The band's music also hearkens back to the
kind of rebellious, anti-establishment acid-fueled
pop that was popular in the '60s. "White Rabbit" by
Jefferson Airplane comes to mind, as well as Magical
Mystery Tour era Beatles.
"My parents listened to Buddy Holly and the
Beatles. Music from the '60s and '70s," Messent
recounts. "Then there was this period where popular
music on the radio like Eminem and Backstreet Boys
were really big and I kind of got out of music.
But I thought, There's got to be good music out there
somewhere.' When I was 131 listened to Nirvana and
instantly liked it. I listened to a lot of grunge growing
up and that's how I really got into music. I remember
one night when I was 13, my friends and I just
stayed up all night listening to Nevermind. We were
10 KUBLA KHAN
"My parents Listened to Buddy Holly and the
Beatles. Music from the '60s and 70s," Messent
recounts. "Then there was this period where
popular music on the radio like Eminem and
Backstreet Boys were really big and I kind of got
out of music. But f thought, There's got to be
good music out there somewhere/
m
photo above ft on page-9
by Jon Vincent
II KUBLA KHAN
listening to 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' or "Drain You,'
and there was this bass guitar in the room. I was just
air jamming on it, pretending to play the song, and I
thought: It'd be cool to actually learn this song,' and
eventually I just decided to buy a guitar."
Speight explains her decision to join the band
as fulfilling a lifelong dream: "I knew I always wanted
to be in a band. I grew up on rock tn' roll, and they
always seemed so cool. It's still cool!"
Messent and Rooney share her enthusiasm,
especially when talking about recording the new
album.
"Being in the studio was like a dream come
true," Messent explains with a childlike wonder.
"They had all these awesome instruments to play, and
. these cool amplifiers: vintage shit from the '60s."
"It was very different from [our] demos," adds
Speight. "It was professional. We went to Mushroom
Studios, which was a pretty well-known studio in
Vancouver."
Kubla Khan were one of the last bands to
record at the historic Mushroom Studios, whose
former clients include Diana Ross & the Supremes
and Led Zeppelin, among others.
"We were super lucky," says Messent. "Qur
sound engineer was awesome. He made it so easy for
us setting everything up, made us ,feel at home... We
pretty much made the whole album with him."
As we discuss the origins of song names from
the album (including misheard song lyrics, a girl
Messent met in Okanagan, and daffodils, to name a
few), Speight shows me a-physical copy of the album,
pointing to the cover.
"It's this '30s cartoon," she says.
Messent continues, "It's not very long, like
5 minutes. It's called The Pincushion Man and [the
album cover-is] a scene from it. He*s basically this
sadistic psycho who goes around killing balloon
people, popping them, and the main characters are
these two little balloon kids who have to stop him."
"That's where the name Pincushion Man comes
from," Speight adds.
As the interview winds down, we talk about
what's next in store for Kubla Khan after Pincushion
Man's release—including the two recorded songs that
didn't make it onto the album.
"They fit in style but they didn't fit on the
vinyl," says Messent. "We're going to put them on an
EP or something. And once our album comes out,
we're going to branch out and start playing in other
cities in BC. We played in Victoria, once."
"That was great," Rooney chimes in, "we can
always do that again, for sure."
Messent chuckles, "Next time we do it though,
we're just going to bus out there," everyone nods at .
this, "You have to pay so much on the ferry."
With the release of their debut album
imminent, additional songs already recorded, and a
province-wide tour in the works, Kubla Khan seem
poised to live up to their conqueror name—just don't
expect them to charge into town on a ferry.
Come rock out with Kubla Khan at the Railway
Club on April 4 for the album release party of
Pincushion Man.
12 • •   •••
• *   •*•
«m  mmm  «»a»#  • •*■*  »/   •*•• • **•**•  mummm »«■>•   •»
• ••^  •
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 1 VAGUE
written by Alex de Boer
border & lettering by Alison Sadler
illustration by Rob Ondzik
In the absence of performance, recorded music
takes on an air of effortlessness. Yet no sound is
Independent of a source. In reality, the way we
receive captured music is always through forms of
media, or mediums. Though it may seem inconsequential which form this media takes, that is
not necessarily the case. Canadian philosopher
Marshall McLuhan, author of the celebrated phrase,
"the medium is the message," might contend that
forms of media are not often enough considered
In today's music saturated society. In McLuhan's
1964 text, "Understanding Media: The Extensions
of Man," he writes, "the 'content' of any medium is
always another medium,'' meaning that a cassette
or record used to hear music is, in Itself apiece
of content.
Vancouver's new experimental music label,
Vague, is acutely aware of this relationship between
technology and substance. In fact label founders and
local experimental musicians Fraser Dobbs (Drogue),
Caton Diab (C.Diab), and Ian William Craig, not only
know "the medium is the message," they embrace its
possibility.
Vague was prompted this past summer by
Craig. He called up fellow musicians Diab and Dobbs
suggesting they, quite plainly, start a music label.
Being regularly billed together at local shows, the
three friends found their artistic interests and values
were already well-aligned. As a result, there was no
debate when determining that Vague's specialization would be in releasing music on physical
formats. i$fj$t
Sitting in Commercial's 6th Avenue Royal
Canadian Legion with Diab and Dobbs, the pub
harbors an indistinct dimness, perfectly suited for ,
the start of discussion. According to Diab, the title of
their label was born of vagaries. Quite literally, Diab
explains how the three friends "kept coming back to
the word vague." A both ubiquitous and memorable
word, it was only after some thought that its obvious
appropriateness also struck. Dobbs explains that the
group always wanted to focus on physical mediums
and one of the charms of these mediums is that
they change over time. At the whim of a needle or
warped Walkman, music may degrade, "So even if
you record something super specific, and that totally
encapsulates everything you Ye doing at that point
in your life as a musician, it's still going to change
and be less specific than it was when you recorded
it, if you release it as a physical thing." He goes on,
"I really like the idea that stuff we record isn't going
to be the same in 50, 100 years. I really like the idea
that it could be vague."
Aptly branded, Vague's passion for analogue
music has been compiled on "normal-bias 6-minute,
'smoky' c-zeros." This means, the cassettes they put
out ascribe to a certain visual and audio professionalism, seldom seen in Vancouver's DIY tape scene. With
cassettes as canvas, Diab boasts, "you can wOrk with
more than just the music." Their current three tape
releases—Long Metrics (Drogue), Interludes (C. Diab),
and Theia & The Archive (Ian William Craig)—can
attest. Each image adorned by one of the founders
(corresponding to their own music project), Vague
wholly embraces physical mediums by extending the
music experience beyond sound.
And lying just beyond sound and sight is
Vancouver's experimental music community. A
group, Dobbs admits, who often conforms to the
idea of the "nervous artist." He elaborates, ^You don't
get a lot of bedroom rock bands, but you see a ton
of people who have been playing guitar with a loop
pedal in delay for a year." This, less glamorous music
genre, produces a mass of amazingly unfiltered
audio. After getting fed up with "seeing people under
represent themselves as experimental musicians,"
Dobbs found strengthened cause to support and
showcase such artists.
"Putting on shows is definitely a priority," he
states. And only a short time after Vague's inception,
the label began participating in the local experimental
music community. The launch of their,first three
cassettes took place this December at Big Joy
Festival. Helping to promote the festival gave the guys
at Vague not only a sense of solidarity with the event
organizers (Shaunn Watt and JP Doucet) but also a
first-hand account of another way Vague can breathe
life into Vancouver's experimental music,scene.
Whether attending or organizing, Dobbs says, "I think
you'll automatically help a community by showing
your support for it." Vague aims to do both and more.
Organizing, promoting, and releasing music are all
welcome territory according to Dobbs. As the label's
title blurrily asserts, "Vague can be a lot of things."
Facing the encroaching future, the guys
at Vague carefully, selectively, encourage a music
experience that is at once sonically evolving, visually
enticing, and physically engaging. At Vague, "The
medium is the message" is more than a philosophy;
it's an opportunity. ''$%%
14 VAGUE
Illustration by Dana Kearley
15 IUARY7
SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 9
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12
Yurie's Bon Voyage
Amenda Rude, Killing Time
Tuesday, February
THURSDAY, MARCH 6
'eater Be;
Rico Uno, Genie
lance, Jolin Ras, Tiger
GEAZY
eoewEFftEsi
THESE TWliiaKMAP/EN
:FQRTUN£lts&S*fD  CLUB '.'•
SATURDAY, MARCH 8
jf^4^l\#iTiIwIiISF
PHANTOMS
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24
'hantoms
w/ guests
, w m 	
fllS
THURSDAY, MARCH 20
Rufus
// gue?
MORE INFO + TICKETS  + SEE FLYERS + GUEST LIST AT
147 E.PENDER ST. CHINATOWN VANCOUVER WrtA^
^g^-fc/ / MWf      ''>'*ttGn$gatfSGaG%sxa&A
lettering & illustrations by Priscilla Yu
photos by Steve Louie
Fundrive 2013 Finale
CiTR and Discorder are actually a two-headed
beast, splashing and spraying you with local musk,
culture, and Journalism in radio and print. The
monster types away on the computer with talons
or claws, making sure you have all print and radio
content online. This is also the time of year when
the monster asks for your support, collecting donations to support the infrastructure needs of volunteers that create the content that you love.
This year's Fundrive runs from February 27
to March 7, and we're asking our friends, family,
listeners, and readers to support the work we do and
make a donation. During Fundrive, programmers
extort listeners to pledge while volunteers wait poised
at the phones. On March 7, our Fundrive Finale
will celebrate the end of the drive with a party at
the Biltniore Cabaret featuring the talent of local
musicians. We're hoping you'll consider supporting
our quality, alternative programming, and the costs
of moving into our new home in the new Student
Union Building. Visitwww.mynewsub.com to see the
building plans! pfe
Since we're asking you for your support,
here's a mini history of CiTR and Discorder, your
double-headed, locally focused, independent
media outlet. We're always changing and growing,
figuring out better ways to serve our audience and
volunteers and the local music community, pushing
to experiment, stretch minds and avoid the boring
and predictable at all costs. Here are some highlights,
initiatives and wins of the past three years:
Wmmn 2010
♦> CiTR's News 101 wins a Community Radio Award
for alternative coverage of the Olympic Games.
♦, CiTR teams up with Mint Records to release the
CiTR Pop Alliance Compilation Volume lion vinyl.
♦ CiTR raises funds to build a digital library, and
begins the neverending task of converting its
massive library to digital.
2011
CiTR receives a grant to conduct 19 live on-
location broadcasts at the 2011 North American
Outgames.
CiTR hires a Volunteer Coordinator to improve the
lives of CiTR volunteers and volunteer numbers
skyrocket! Mkjk   ,
CiTR launches DJing 101.9, teaching over 130
young DJs how to.mix and beatmatch,
Adam Janusz, host of The Arts Report, wins a
Community Radio-Award for supporting local
artists and musicians.
18 FUNDRIVE
19 FUNDRIVE
2012
♦ CiTR builds a new log sheet that connects with
our digital library, new broadcast software, and
website.
♦ CiTR receives another grant to produce videos of
local musicians and host in-studio performances^
♦ The Extraenvironmentalist, produced by Justin
Ritchie and Seth Moser Katz, wins a Community
Radio Award for Syndicated Show or Podcast.
2013
CiTR receives another grant to offer spoken word
training!
CiTR teams up with Music Waste to organize
Victory Square Block Party, adding another
signature event to our roster!
CiTR releases another Pop Alliance Comp with
Mint Records. $%&&
CiTR raises funds to purchase new broadcast
boards for all three studios!
CJSF and CiTR win a Community Radio Award
for a multi-location live broadcast on Record
Store Day. P|||
CiTR prepares to digitize our back catalogue of
Discorders, and make them available to the public
online. Imagine having access to this record of
Vancouver's local music scene!
CITR'S MISSION IS TO:
♦ Create alternative and locally based programming
♦ Provide community access to media and space for
under-represented voices
♦ Empower UBC students and community members
through training and participation in broadcasting,
print, and other media forms
CALL IN TO DONATE, AND RECEIVE THE
FOLLOWING CITR SWAG:
$30 Friends of CiTR Card, offering discounts to
local businesses
$60 + Get Moving Mug
$101.9 +. RadSoc Radsocks
$175 + CiTR Hoodie .
$250 +CiTR Tee
$500 2 Friends Cards, 2 Moving Monsters Mugs, 2
Radsocks, Hoodie + Tee
$1,000 double everything + recognition ott CiTR's
donor wall in the new SUB
If you are interested in supporting your campus
and community radio station and magazine,
visit citr.ca/donate or call UBC-UNIT
(604-822-8648) between February 27 and March 7.
2014
Discorder launches a new format, with 72
pages (almost double) and an art mag/zine
feel, to improve layout, better showcase art and
photography, and experimentation with pantone
colours. The smaller mags will fit in your purse
(or, manpurse) and stack nicely on countertops
in bars, brunch spots, and coffee shops. You're
reading it right now!
CiTR anticipates moving into the new SUB, with
200 extra square feet, spacious studios and
offices, and a folding wall that will open into the
main concourse to create a natural performance
space with track lighting.. Fundrive 2014 will raise
money for costs associated with the move, including engineering costs to rewire all three studios,
design costs, and new equipment.
20 m
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lettering & illustration by Justin Longoz
photos by Steven Toews
There isn't a lot of information online about the
Written Years. They have a Twitter account and a
Facebook page, like most musicians well-versed in
the power of online presence in today's generation. Their website is minimalist; a short description of their sound, and the opportunity to stream
and purchase their self-titled debut album—which
was released on January 28, by the way. When I
meet the band on a bustling Saturday afternoon
inside Metrotown, I am armed with relatively
generic questions regarding the making of the
album as a result. That being said, I leave more
than satisfied with their thoughtful responses—
and a story about an all-out war pitting Batman
versus Superman (in action figure form, that is).
Childhood memories aside, this trio has a pretty
good idea of what they're doing in the music
industry—and it seems to be working out Just fine.
Comprised of Wade Ouellet (vocals/guitar),
Kodie Krogh (guitar), and Kane Enders (drums!;'life
the Written Years is a musical endeavour that took
shape a few years ago—though originally under
a different name and slightly different lineup.
"Wade and I started playing music around the
same time when we were 15," Enders shares. "This
most, recent project birthed once the two of us hit
Vancouver (all three members, in fact, originate
from Kelowna)—and had been playing and writing
together for a while. When we invited Kodie into the   ,
mix, it became what it is today."
Self-described as Winter rock, Ouellet
explains that the season encompasses many of the
feelings associated with their music. "Some of the
ambience; a bit of the moodiness," he says with
a chuckle. "It really just sounds like the Lower
Mainland to me," remarks Krogh. The ocean, the
coast—rBC, really!"
A project six years in the making, the band
finally released their debut album last month. "We
just couldn't get our shit together," jokes Enders
about the convoluted process. They laugh, with
primary lyricist Ouellet explaining, "I just take a long
22 THE WRITTEN YEARS
"I remember being a kid sitting in my room,
NHplayln£ with' a Batman and a Superman," M
Krogh continues. Ml would put Clumsy on, and have
those two guys fight these epic battles.
And then I'd have 'Superman's Dead' playing In the
background... it was cooLB
23 THE WRITTEN YEARS
time to write songs—until the point that I'm happy
with them.. Then it takes a long,time-to arrange
them. We went through a lot of different lineups... a
lot of different renditions." The first five years of the
process consisted mainly of demoing, and the album
was recorded at Echoplant Studios in Coquitlam
over 2013. Still not fully content with the songs, the
band continued to refine the lyrics, guitar lines, arid
melodies—rewriting right up until they recorded
the album. "It seemed like a pipe dream for a while,
because so many things were changing," Enders
admits. "It was hard to lock down. But that process
was good too, because we got to write and rewrite the
songs, getting them to where they are today."
After listening to the alburn a few times
myself, it's safe to say the trio should be pleased with
the finished product. Openers "It's Not Your Fault"
and "I Would Miss My Home If I Knew Where It Was"
are nostalgic, folk rock-inspired tracks, accented with
sweeping instrumental and Ouellet's acid-tinged
vocals. The melancholic "You're Too Kind" boasts
infectious guitar lines and gang vocals that pack a
punch at just the right time. Lyrically, the themes
of affection, belonging, loss and nostalgia reappear
through the album—subject matter inspired by
experiences surrounding Ouellet. and the people
around him. "When I write, I don't really think
about how other people^ [will] receive it; that comes
later, in a sense," he notes. "I just write with what is
happening around myself, and people I know. Those
four themes kept coming up, and the alburn became
a concept album around those ideas."
Though challenging to pinpoint what acts
they compare themselves to, all three members
of the Written Years agree that the National, the
Weakerthans, and Arcade Fire are large influences in
their sound. "We all have our own background musically, but we also share influences and everything
melds in its own organic way," explains Enders.
ww&i. "Kane came from a jazz background, so he
incorporates some of that drum style," Ouellet adds
of their complex sound. "Kodie came from a metal
background, and a singer-songwriter background as
well. I've always been a singer-songwriter," he says,
citing Steve Earle and Bruce Springsteen as personal
inspirations. Proving that their group creativity stems
from its member's individual interests in multiple
avenues of music, Ouellet also scores movies (as i^^
a duo with fellow musician, Michael Gumblidge).
Search "WO/MC Desolate" on YouTube for a stunning example of their work.
"Personally, I've always identified with the
lyrics," says Krogh. "The first album I ever owned was
Clumsy by Our Lady Peace." This statement sparks
interest with Enders and Ouellet, who both admit
that they recently rediscovered the Canadian rockers.
"I remember being a kid sitting in my room, playing
with a Batman and a Superman," Krogh continues. "I
would put Clumsy on, and have those two guys fight
these epic battles. And then I'd have "Superman's
Dead" playing in the background... it was cool." He
reiterates that "it's always been about the lyrics"—
now over the muffled laughs of his bandmates.
At the time of this interview the band does
not have the details of their album release show
confirmed—only mentioning that it will take place
late February. Following the show, they plan to start
playing concerts across British Columbia.
When asked what they hope listeners will
take away from their debut release, the band remain
cleverly elusive. "It comes from its own place," Ouellet
shares with a smile. "I think it will speak for itself,"
concludes Enders. "We wrote music that we wanted
to write, and we're all really proud of it.".
24 mj*
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written by Elijah Teed
lettering & illustration by Rob Ohdzik
photos by Jon Vincent
If you aren't up on the "space folk" music scene,
the name Redrick Sultan likely won't sound familiar. A shame, considering the amount of passion
guitarist Spencer Hargreaves and bassist Noah
Jordan are able to exude in less than an hour's
conversation. Redrick Sultan is an ensemble that
deserves every piece of recognition it has, and
all the recognition it should be getting. Amidst a
smorgasbord of bacon, eggs, coffee, and thick chocolate milkshakes, Jordan and Hargreaves explain
the changes Redrick has undergone since their last
album two years ago—and what the future holds
for one of Vancouver's most unique local acts.
At the top of the heap, the paramount shift
Redrick Sultan has undergone is a substantial
change in their lineup. Moving away from what was
oftentimes a quintet, the loss of several members and
introduction of a new drummer, Sean Mitchell, has
solidified the group as a full-time trio. "It almost took
a while before we realized how much of a different
thing it was. It started making less and less sense
to be playing [our old songs], and we were realizing
more that we were actually starting a new project,"
Jordan remarks. "[The band] has stabilized with the
three of us; we're all on the same page and we work
really well together."
Aside from the physical transformation,
Redrick Sultan has also experienced a change
from their previous sense of musical wackiness. As
Hargreaves notes, "We. were a. lot goofier and sillier
before, and not to say [we aren't] still that way in
some regards, but by our own growth and by just
hanging out with [Sean], the band has changed a lot."
That isn't to say that fans of the band's
earlier work should resign to thinking the group will
no longer be making eccentric music—Jordan is
quick to note that the new material still possesses
much of the same sense of fun from the previous
albums, while at the same time being more focused
on making great music and less on their former
buffoonery. "There's still lots of jokes. It's not necessarily the same kind of joke as "Dinosaurs' or like
26 REDRICK SULTAN
"There's still lots of jokes. It's not necessarily
the same kind of joke as 'Dinosaurs' or like
some of the songs on the first album when we were
super ridiculous, but there's still a definite
sense of playfulness."
27 REDRICK SULTAN
some of the songs on the first album when we were
super ridiculous, but there's still a definite sense of
playfulness."
However, Redrick Sultan is far from being
done with experimentation. On the subject of "equal
temperaments* (a different way to approach the
structure of an octave) and how they're using them
in their music, Hargreaves and Jordan speak with
resounding passion; you half expect them to have
baby photos of their guitars on hand just in case
of discussions like this. "It has to do with mass
production. Before pianos and guitars became
mass-produced, the study of tuning was a very real
thing," says Jordan, and Hargreaves is quick to
add his own insight on the subject. "The point of
being in tune, right now, in today's music culture,
is ignorant of what actually is in tune... Being in
tune is not a standard," he declares. "Growing
up... I've encountered people [who think] there's a
certain protocol to the way you live your life, or that
you have to do 'a' and *b' in a certain way. But with
music ,being a primary interest of mine, and as sort
-of a metaphor for life in general; [equal temperaments] are a kind of proof that there's not a certain
way you have to do things, or that maybe we're
looking at life the wrong way."
While Jordan and Hargreaves acknowledge
that their original plan was to plunge headfirst into
the studio at the start of this year, they realized that
the group, in its new format, needed more time to
settle into itself before they feit ready to produce
sdmething full-length. "The first album [Redrick
Sultan], we'd have skeletons of songs that we'd just
jam around on. With the second album [Trolling for
Answers] we wanted [to write songs], but we hadn't
really written songs before, and every song was
kind of an undeveloped idea. On this project, it was
taking that further, and incorporating the different
guitar tunings, so now the songs are much more
developed." With that in mind, it seems that their
upcoming tour through the United States is a great
alternative. Traversing first down the West Coast
and then up through the Midwest, Redrick Sultan
begins their voyage on February 7, punctuated with
the release of a hew promotional EP on February 4 to
help kick things off. However, those eager to get their
hands on a physical copy of the five-track release will
only have the opportunity to do so while the band is
on the road. The self-titled EP is currently slated to
be a tour exclusive, but can also be purchased online
as a digital download from Redrick's website.
With such easy introspection, and a clear
sense of what the trio hopes to accomplish, it's
evident that the gentlemen behind Redrick Sultan
have evolved along with their work. By the time
their new album drops next fall, here's hoping that
evolution will continue to lead Redrick Sultan on
their quest of experimenting with the ever-changing
face of music. §*#§ llff$
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28  CONNECTICUT
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Something cuts through the near-complete static
of Connectjcut's (alias Samuel Macklin's) sound.
The music is lined with something, often a recurring
set of glitchy noise, which pulls you away from total
immersion. It keeps the listener spinning away at
the Rubik's Cube of Connectjcut's music. "I start
off with this seething mass of noise, which is going
to, at some point, almost cohere into something
resembling a song," says Macklln.
The lining can come in the form of a certain
uncomfortableness, but Macklin, born in the west
of England but now based in Vancouver, notes that
there's always "a solid point of reference" in his
music. The computer jamming twirl that sounds
like a 1950s vision of the future, can be that point
of reference. Or it can come as a more disturbing
quality, as if the sound were haunted. Although the
music can be challenging, unconventional, and even
sometimes abrasive,, it also contains a pop sensibility.
It's in this tension between the abstract and $
the accessible where Macklin finds interest in science
fiction work. "I think the thing I like about science
fiction is that it's a pulp form," says the earnest and
curly haired Macklin. "It's a pop form; it's kind of *
trashy. It's considered less that way, but when most
of the classic science fiction was written it was not a
respectable form—it was pop trash."
Macklin funnels abstract concepts through
a simple ("like the Buzzcocks, just three chords"),
but twisted, pop formr*I don't see it coming from an
avant-garde perspective. I see it as just, trying to do
something really new and radical in the context of
pop music."
Macklin's latest album, Crows & Kittiwakes
Wheel <% Come Again, was released in December.
The album, produced completely on a computer,
has an organic quality too, pulled from Macklin's
experience in the backcountry of BC and Wales. "It's
inspired by being in the middle of nowhere and just
looking around and being like This is beautiful' but
it's also kind of scary," says Macklin. As a sort of
meditation on the sublime, the album is an account
of the natural world in digital form; layers of sound
bouncing off each other, with crackling textures and
aerial hums. 9»
The murkiness of ambient music plays a
big part in Macklin's conception of producing. The
ability of electronic music to communicate "personal
intensity" without forcing interpretation upon the
listener, is invaluable to him. It's a blur, rather than
a ray of light. At the same time, he's aware of the
fact that most audiences are generally unresponsive
to "laptop music" and that creating music digitally
comes with prejudices.
Macklin crafts his music with the "graphical
programming" of Max/MSP, a software which allows
for code to be written using a visual interface. "It's a
really ethereal thing in that its all done behind the
computer and its not physical," Macklin explains
intently, "but the way you can manipulate sounds
30 CONNECT ICUT
r
y
illustration by Dana Keaiiey
31 CONNECT ICUT
album artwork by Bas Mantel
with a computer the way you can play with sounds,
its very tactile... I can literally have all these sounds
moving around in this really chaotic way and I can
grab them out of space and click them into place so
they fall into line."
"There's this idea of what making music with
a computer is like, which doesn't jive with my idea of
actually doing it and I'd love to interrogate these limitations we put on with digital audio," says Macklin, »
who discusses music with a real honesty. "One of the
thing that's important to me is looking to polarities
in music, like for me, its my bloody valentine. It's like
an ongoing, deep obsession with them. It's noise and
dissonance at just like this incredible volume but
very immersive and beautiful and melodic as well."
Fourier's Algorithm, Connectjcut's sixth
album, is dedicated to French thinkers Joseph
and Charles Fourier. The work of mathematician
Joseph Fourier is central to Macklin's music in
that all digital audio-and MP3 format goes through
a Fourier transform, developed using Joseph's
theories. Charles Fourier, who lived at roughly the
same time as Joseph, was a philosopher and political
thinker. Macklin starts to talk about Charles' ideas
on Utopian socialism, but is reluctant. He insists
he's not an intellectual: "I cant have any certainty
about any conclusions I have about that. This kind
of abstract, diffused music, it's the only way I can
explore those things."
Connectjcut's music occupies a weird space,
but occupies that space in a really sincere manner.
It's space-age sound working through a lens of the
uncanny. Not quite pop, and not quite organic either,
there's a definite indistinctiveness to the music. "I'm
not going for an insular, head trip. It's more a desire
to make you more aware of or sensitized of your
surroundings"
32 ♦ Connecticut opened for Oneohtrix Point
Never (OPN) in April at the W2 Media Cafe
in Vancouver. Oneohtrix's album Replica,
sampled extensively from old television commercials. "It wasn't just dealing with straight
nostalgia or straight irony. He was kind of
interrogating those things," Macklin says
about the album. "Doing stuff with trash
material or material that's considered trash
and doing it with intellectual pretensions.
It's something that's appealing to me. Partly
because a lot of people are going to look at
you and say You're a pretentious idiot, this
is just trash.' It's almost worth doing that
just because it requires that leap of faith."
♦ Macklin's new album, tentatively named
Small Town by^theSea, is still in production.
The album features field recordings, as well
as some percussion and vocal work. The
record ends "with little waves recorded oh
the Shore of Jericho beach," Macklin admits
gleefully. It's new terrain, however, and he
expresses some uncertainty over the way
that field recordings can be too obvious, and
too descriptive. "Even though [sampling field
recordings] are still very abstract, it feels like
I'm giving a lot away" The album is set to be
released by Aagoo on April 15.
♦ Developing the instrumentation to make
his sound digitally is part of the quickly
vanishing "paradigm of personal computing".
His music works on "a generative element...
an algorithmic element."
CANADA'S LARGEST INTERNATIONAL
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33  ART PROJECT -jg^
ZINE-A-PALOOZA
t 4 Photos (pages 35, 38 & 40) from the Print Ready: Zine-A-Palooza
exhibition curated by MichaelLachman and Nathan Jones at
Dynamo Arts Association, January 18 (one-day only).
*H
Print Ready is a showcase for self-published art sines including works by: -
Amiel Gonzales, Doug Wideen, Josef Carhoun, Justin Gradin, Linton Murphy,
Michel Groat, Michael Lachmah, Nathan Jones, Phaedra Harder,
Sarah Davidson, Stephine McDonell, Tylor MacMillan, and more.
''«- Photo on pages 34 and 39: a performance at Unit/ Pitt Projects as part of the exhibition
and event series Vancouver, Crawling, Weeping, Betting (January 21 to March 1) featuring
dancers Maxine Chadburn, Michelle Lui, Brian Solomon. Photo courtesy Unit/Pitt. M
31 :4':{%m
Qneohtrix Point Never
@ Fortune Sound Club
10
Quilt
© The MediafClub.
Lucius, You Won't
© The Media Club
17
Ane Brun, Linnea Olsson
©The Electric Owl
•Vwvv*^
n
18
w
Paul Anthony's Talent Time
@ The Biltmore ;|^
The Cut Losses, The Vidos,
Northern Rain
© Astorino's m$j$
Pure Bathing Culture,
LaLuz
@ Electric Owl
TH
6
Failing, Cowards, Peace
© The Biltmore    .
Lures, Thee AHs, Diane,
Watermelon        '",£&;
© Astorino's
White Lies, Frankie Rose
@ Venue- fel
12
Mi'ens, Yes Bear,
Karen Foster,
Porn for the Blind
© The Astoria
1
Fantasy Prom,
OK Vancouver OK, Village,
Philoceraptor
©Astorino's
20
Rah Rah
© The Biltmore
24
Com Truise, Phantoms
© Fortune Sound Club
26
XiuXiu, Tearist
© The Media Club
27
The Wild Feathers,
Jamestown Revival
© The Media Club
FUNMWII
FEB. 27 to
MAR. 7 7
Sex Church, Cult Babies,
Candela Farm, KMVP
©TheMedia Club
Needs, Charm,
Modern Aquatics,
Get Over It, Stress Eating
© The Astoria
Bobby Draino
© Fortune
D.O.A.© The Rickshaw
14
True Crush, Chris-a-rifflc,
Rooms, Purple Hearts
Social Club,
Katie and the Lichen,
Cave Girl
© Astorino's
Shearwater
©TheMedia Club
21
The Pack A.D.,
The Courtneys, Dead Soft
© The Rickshaw
28
The Cave Singers
@ The Rickshaw
What's Wrong Tohei?,
Man Your Horse,
Subtle like a T-Rex
@ The Railway
Together Pangea
@ The Media Club
San Fermin, Son Lux
@ The Biltmore
1   Winter Waste:
Tough Age, Skinny Kids,
Dead Soft, Cool, Pups
and more... © The Astoria
White Denim, Clear Plastic
Masks @ The Biltmore
Redrick Sultan,
The Psychic Alliance, Brass
© Electric Owl
Washed Out, Kisses
© The Commodore
St. Lucia, Sir Sly © Venue
8
Sisyphus, Bloom, Taxa,
Keep Tidy, Disworship
© Astorino's        \.'h
Wooden Horseman
© The Biltmore
15
La Chinga,
The Electric Revival
© The Electric Owl
Greenback High/Boats,
Tough Age
©Funky Winker Beans
22
Sun Kll Moon
© The Biltmore
PUNDRDVI1
FEB. 27 to
MAR. 7
FUNDRIVE FINALE
MAR. 7
AT THE BILTMORE
16
Marissa Nadler
© Electric Owl
23 J   ART PROJECT
ZINE-A-PALOOZA
' .-if
,3g^-.^*». ''■^Mjm^ub^tM ART PROJECT
ZINE-A-PALOOZA O^ ^S __       lKe:H \Xm
After the festive hangover of December, it's understandable why people are a bit weary
of the holidays that follow. That's right. I'm talking about the supposedly special day in
February that's become so over-eommerclalized and bloated with expectations, It's begun .
to lose all moaning*
Pm of course referring to Groundhog Day and no matter how many people toll mo
that it was Just a holiday Invented by Hallmark to serve as a vehicle for soiling cards, it truly
Is a special day. Without It, we never would've had the 1993 classic starring Bill Murray as an
arrogant meteorologist who's forced to relive Groundhog Dog over and over again   which
brings me to the actual Staff found-off question: Just as BIN Murray is forced to relive
Groundhog Day repeatedly In the film, what album could our staff have on repeat and never
grow tired of? S3?
Illustration by Britta Bacchus
41 DISCORDER STAFF SOUND-OFF
!|| Willa Bao, Contributor^^
Dookie (Green Day)
Punk snobs may scoff, but the number one album
IVe been putting on repeat for years has been Green
Day's Dookie. I remember being 11 years old and
listening to the CD for hours on end while decorating
poster boards. Currently, if you take a look at my
recently played list on my phone, you'll see it in the
Top 5. The big guitar sound and melodic hooks keep
my energy up while the lyrics—from ridiculously
hypothetical to those based on experiences—keep me
entertained. The drum parts are consistent enough
for the mood of the songs to not fluctuate too much,
making for a smooth listening experience./    .$S
Natalie Hoy, Contributor
MM: Reach for the Sun (The Dangerous Summer)
There are few albums that could-Satisfy my listening
pleasure for days on end, but Reach for the Sun,
the debut album by the Dangerous Summer, has to
take the cake. It never really bothered me that the
majority of their songs sound the same: fast-paced,
with infectious hooks and AJ Perdomo's distinctive,
raw vocals. It's the lyrics that put the album in a
category of its own—focussing on the struggles of
growing up and finding satisfaction in life, without-
being angsty enough to possess only teenage
relevance. A good listen that never fails to heighten
my spirits,   ■mm iff-'.  '■'
Robert Catherall, Contributor
Haunt Me, Haunt Me Do It Again (Tim Hecker)
For a day whose only projections are either slightly
more winter or an inexhaustible extension of this
city's least favourite season, Groundhog Day has got
to be one of the year's least celebrated. It's hard to
imagine the effect facing those grim options every
morning for eternity would have on you. Although I
imagine the desolate beauty of Tim Hecker's classic
Haunt Me, Haunt Me Do It Again would make an
excellent accompaniment. At least on a desert island
you get to go swimming.
Pyra Draculea, Contributor
Crystal Pistol (Crystal Pistol)
Crystal Pistol's self-titled debut from a few years ago
has spent loads of time on repeat in my CD player
on and off and on again—and I'm still not sick of
it. Good, gritty, obnoxious rock 'n' roll sleaze with
smartass lyrics for us to listen to while having illicit
fun. I'd rank it right up there with the better Hanoi
Rocks, Jetboy, or Faster Pussycat releases, and
that's pretty high praise coming from me.
Chloe Hoy, Contributor
The Way We Learn (Farewell Fighter)
No album will relate more to my 18-year-old self
than Farewell Fighter's The Way We Learn. With its
upbeat tunes, skillful guitar riffs, and honest lyrics,
this album doesn't stay on my shelf for long—or in
my iPod's case—unlistened to. Kenny Fleetwood's
stellar set of pipes helps make this record all the
more worthwhile, an impressive collection of melodic
pop-punk songs. Energetic and anthemic, without
falling into the trap of overused cliches, the four-
piece band continues to leave a lasting impression
on my always growing musical palate.
-   Avash Islam, Contributor
mf^rThis is Happening (LCD Soundsystem)
I'm going with LCD Soundsystem's terminal record,
This is Happening. There are songs from that album
I have listened to for days on end, but the album
itself is a perfectly crafted emotional rollercoaster of
wild dance-punk and unrelenting melancholy fused
into the perfect bittersweet cocktail. A perfect party
album for the end of the world, the end of a band,
or the end of anything, so it's fitting that it's the last
album I listen to.
42
Illustration by Elyse Gerstenecker DISCORDBR STAFF SOUND-OFF
Mike Lakusiak, Contributor
Separation Sunday (The Hold Steady)
I must have listened to this album hundreds of
times and it hasn't worn out yet—and I often
overplay albums to the point where it takes years
to voluntarily return to them. It's a monument to
narrative songwriting and it doesn't wallow or let
up from start to finish with stories of hoodrats,
skaters, nitrous and hallucinogen abuse, unhinged
born-again Christians, and the scenic locations of
the Upper Midwest. And what day is Groundhog Day
this year? Fucking right, it's a Sunday.
• j£.<*    Erica Leiren, Contributor
Heart-Throb Companions (Cannon Health. Down)
Hear%-Throb Companion by Vancouver's Cannon
Heath Down is an album I can put on repeat
and never tire of. How do I love it? Let me count
the ways. Songsmiths Jeff Hay-Roe, Christopher
Davenport, Jonathan Brotherton, and Cameron
Brown peer mischievously from a light-dappled
meadow grove on the album cover. These charming
men are the anti-Smiths, and singer Jon Brotherton,
the anti-Morrissey. Cannon Heath Down's ethereal '
harmonies and perfectly confected songs will lift
your spirit like feeling the sun on a winter's day.
Coy, fey, but bouncy and with monster hooks
everywhere, their songs are playful, heartfelt, and
without a trace of irony. Whether your seasonal
disaffectation is Winter Dreariness, Spring Fever,
Summer Open-Road Itch, or Fall Introspection, drop
Cannon Heath Down onto your turntable and all's
right with the world.
Steve Louie, RLA Editor
Sweet Sensation (The Embassy)
The Embassy's 2013 release Sweet Sensation was
one of my favourite albums of 2013 and it's an
album I'm still addicted to in 2014. Self described
as "punk disco," and eight years since their last
full-length, all the perfect album tracks still remind
me that the Swedes craft pop gems.
Keefer Pelech, Contributor
Maroon (Barenaked Ladies)
Maroon was the first album that I ever owned. While
the album starts off fun and upbeat, BNL use their
trademark wit and humour to covertly discuss some
heavy topics throughout. In the span of 52 minutes
they manage to cover themes such as suburban
depression, infidelity, the awkward aftermath of
office romances, and the grizzly outcome of falling
asleep at the wheel. IVe been listening to this album
for over a decade and it'll be a pleasure having it in
my life for a few more.
Omar Prazhari, Contributor
Up the Bracket (The Libertines)
The one album I could have on repeat for eternity
would be the Libertines' Up The Bracket. This fuzzy
fueled garage-rock album sticks to your head with
its catchy melodies, beautiful poetic lyrics while
drenched in heavy distortion. The LP also features
classics like "Time For Heroes," "Death On The
Stairs," "Boys in the Band," and "I Get Along." This
album is what got me into garage-rock and lo-fi—-
meaning I could play this record forever.
James Olson, Contributor
||||    Bilo 3.0 (David Maxim)
David Maxim Micic's Bilo 3.0 is unlike anything IVe
ever heard and it keeps getting better with every
listen. Micic's sound is a powerful and unforgettable
blend of progressive metal, classical, and jazz played
With staggering proficiency, Beginning with the
soaring strings oh "Everything's Fine" and concluding with the triumphant bombast of "Daydreamers,"
Bilo 3.0 is too enthralling to get sick of. Backed by
accomplished vocalists and musicians, Micic's work"
is complex, unique, and powerful.
Max Wainwright, Contributor
' Abby Road (The Beatles)
Few albums are so equally absurd and perfect
as Abby Road that I might be able to relive them
forever. The Beatles' classic backtracks like it cant
resist itself. "You Never Give Me Your Money* bears
its melody again proudly in "Carry That Weight."
Right when it would make sense for the album
to finish with "The End," the cursory closer "Her
Majesty," nods right back to the middle sequence
it was derived from. That aside, Abby Road is an
album marked by concision and detail. It masters so
many lenses of pop so quickly that it demands to be
revisited. W$$
43 VENEWS
SBC RESTAURANT
written by Robert Catherall
illustration by Tlerney Milne
Plug Smilin' Buddha into Google and you'll draw
more hits about the neon sign alt-rockers 54-40
famously dragged around on tour than the business
it originated from. However, ask any local musician
in their 50s and you'll hear the cultural history the
iconic sign was a beacon for.
There are few addresses in the Downtown
Eastside more storied than 109 E Hastings.
Through a colourful history that began as a Chinese
restaurant in 1894 to hosting cabaret dancing in
the post-war era before showcasing up-and-coming
musicians, the Smilin' Buddha Cabaret has seen
it all. In the '60s Hendrix was famously fired for
playing too loud and in the late '70s<local legends
like Art Bergmann and Joey "Shtthead" Keithley
used the club to showcase Vancouver as a hotbed of
alternative culture while Sweeney Todd were busy
breaking hearts. It's where the original all-female
punk trio the Dishrags made their mark, as art
school graduates like Bev Davies flocked there
late at night to document the unfiltered satire and
aggression.
As the punk adage goes, living fast does
come with consequences, however, and the Buddha
halted operations in 1993. Cramped between
derelict businesses and seedy hotels, the doors
at 109 E Hastings remained closed for nearly two
decades until musical enthusiast Andrew Turner
and his business partner Malcolm Hassin were
approached by Peter Ducommun (of PD's Hot Shop),
who liked the renovations Turner had made at the
nearby Sheppard's Pie Gallery. Turner, who left his
Kerrisdale home at the age of 15 to move in across
from the legendary punk bar, had been watching the
location go into further disrepair and became intent
on resurrecting it.
Of course, it just wouldn't be the Buddha if
this incarnation didn't have its own twist though.
"We went at it with the idea of creating a private
community centre," Turner says between sips of
coffee at the recently opened SBC Restaurant.
They're doing a good job so far; the place was a
revolving door of suburban parents bringing their
kids to skate the 65-foot indoor half-pipe that makes
the restaurant look like an afterthought.
Skull Skates memorabilia hangs from the
wail, checkerboards lie casually on wooden tables,
waiting to be played, while the words, "In honour of
the former venue* are feverishly scrawled in spray
paint below a photo of the original neon Buddha.
"People don't see the sense of community here. There
is a network of community here though," he main-'
tains. The brainchild of Ducommun and Turner, its
slapdash eclecticism indicates they weren't the only
ones who helped revive it.
"There must have been over 100 people who
helped put this together," says Turner before staring
blankly at me. I couldn't argue, as calling this
hyperbole would have been an insult.
While SBC could be an acronym for its
previous name, Turner and Hussin want to move
forward, dropping the seedy connotations in
exchange for a safe and welcoming all ages space.
"One positive indicator is that parents are starting to
bring their kids here. They're running the gauntlet
with their kids and the neighbourhood's respectful
of that." Recently granted heritage status by the Jsp?
Vancouver Heritage Foundation, and with names like
Cecil English already coming to produce live albums,
things are just beginning.
"The Smilin' Buddha Cabaret was never,
ever a bar. It's always been a restaurant licence,"
Turner says, recounting his lengthy conversations
with duly officials. Don't worry though, they'll be
bringing in a few cold ones under special occasion
licenses when they hold shows until they are eligible
for a full licence. For the time being, small intimate
performances that can remain all ages will take
place in the restaurant while they've been given the
green light from the city to let performers take to the
skate ramp for larger gigs, which, as Turner put it,
"is going to make for one hell of a slam dance."
44 VENEWS
SlMlffe
Of course, It just wouldn't be the
Buddha if this incarnation didn't have
its own twist though. |H
45 FEBRUARY 2014
UNDER REVIEW
The Backhomes
Only Friend
(Shake! Records)
The Backhomes   mm, ^§pS*Sl
It is hard to believe that the Backhomes consists of just two
members. Kees Dekker and Aimee van Drimmelen's 'Only Friend
is the Victoria-based duo's promising debut album that puts an
energetic twist 6n dreamy psych-pop. Listening to Only Friend feels
as organic and exciting as a live show, yet it is clear that Dekker and
van Drimmelen have put careful thought into every single one of the
album's fuzzy reverberating tracks. •
What is impressive about Only Friend is that Dekker and van
Drimmelen have crafted a sound distinctive to the Backhomes. While
their sound is unique, it is also flexible, as their album effortlessly
ebbs and flows between raucous romps like "You Gotta Move" to
more subdued psychedelic numbers like "Changing Me." On the
album's highlight, "Tear It Up," Dekker sings "I'm gonna tear it up /
I'm gonna scream and shout" and what not only this song but also
the album as a whole demonstrate is that The Backhomes are not to
be ignored. —Mariko Adams
Ian William Craig/Drogue/C. Diab/
Theia ait the Archive/Long Metrics/Interludes
Ian William CraiglDroguelC. Diab
Theia & the Archive!
Long Metrics/Interludes
(Vague Records)
Vague Records, a newly founded Vancouver-based label, is focused
on distributing a variety of works from the city's experimental music
community. The first three releases for the label are the works 6f its
co-founders: Ian William Craig, Fraser Dobbs (Drogue), and Catoh , ,
Diab (C.Diab), respectively. These artists approach ambient music in
a distinct fashion, promising great things for this young label.-
Ian William Craig's Theia & the Archive is his fifth overall release and
his first physical release through Vague. Utilizing analog synthesizers
and feedback loops, Craig crafts a cinematic atmosphere for his
listeners. "The Always Mountain" evokes a sense of profound foreboding, thanks to a mercilessly sustained tonal shift that gives way to
ethereal piano work.
Fraser Dobbs challenges the listener over the course of Long
Metrics under the guise of Drogue. Through extensive distortion and
sound manipulation, Drogue displays the evocative depths of his
guitar work in crafting expansive soundscapes."Post Riseau Xs" is a
highly recommended listen.
C.Diab's debut album Interludes is a haunting experience.
"Is Winter Mike Country?" is a chilling marvel featuring tastefully
delayed acoustic strumming over a heavy, sinister loop. One of Diab's
strengths lies in his acoustic work, especially in "Stone." His use of
the cello bow throughout this album is staggeringly effective.
Together, these three records showcase the exciting sonic possibilities of ambient/experimental music. Vague Records is off to a good
start. —James Olson mm§
46 UNDER REVIEW
Rust/ Ford
My Truck, My Dog, and You
Independent
Rusty Ford
Does Rusty Ford take off his bolo tie at the end of the day? My Truck,
My Dog, and You is a hard album to read, and much more so as a
debut effort. Deeply entrenched in the country and western genre,
the real complexity lies in whether or not Ford is taking himself
seriously.
Song titles and their related content—like quasi-sexy "I Hate
Every Bone In Your Body (Except Mine)"—are the kind of mouthfuls
that make for good Simpsons jokes, but each of the 11 tracks on
...And You are played so sincerely it's hard to tell just how much
Ford is playing with his audience. Flourishes of lap steel, call-and-
response vocals ("If The Phone Don't Ring, You 11 Know It's Me")
and rollicking bass work is a small example of the instrumentation
delicately, and classically, arranged atop simple guitar chords and
Ford's pebbly voice. There aren't too many distinctions to look for
that might place this album as a product of Vancouver circa now
over '70s Nashville, and whether that's a bad thing or not depends
on the listener. ||g;M
Ultimately, I couldn't write a country joke better than Rusty Ford's
lyrics, but that doesn't mean My Truck, My Dog, and You should be
dismissed. If Ford is poignantly aware of country's history as the
brunt of musical puns, or if he's blissfully oblivious to it, he's not
telling, and neither is his record. —Fraser Dobbs
BURN YOUR FIRE
^^^^^^^s
FOR NO WITNESS
Angel Olsen
Burn Your Fire for No Witness
(jagjaguwar)
Angel Olsen
If this is the first you've heard of Angel Olsen, you owe it to your ears
to engage in a bit of worthwhile musical exploration. Albeit small,
the Missouri-born songstress' discography delivers an unparalleled
listening experience not easily reduced to words. Her recorded
material spans from rare, obscure accordion tracks (including an
enchanting Charles Manson cover), to Strange Cacti, her hauntingly
beautiful self-produced EP, to her more polished and highly-praised
2012 release, Half Way Home. This time around, Angel debuts a
backing band on her anticipated sophomore LP Burn Your Fire for No
Witness, set to be released on February 18. The record is distinctive
from her previous material, yet flawlessly meshes Strange Cacti's
beautifully excessive reverb with the minimalist spirit of Half Way
Home. Angel's music does not easily lend itself to a specific genre,
as is made evident on Burn Your Fire. Charged-up tracks such as
"Forgiven/Forgotten" and "Stars" introduce fuzz and heavy drumbeats to the uniquely austere folk style she so expertly honed on
Half Way Home. Nevertheless her characteristic melancholy allure is
sustained by the album's intensely poignant tracks "Unfucktheworld"
and "Dance Slow Decades."
The album's stylistic variety is far more refreshing than
it is confusing. Angel has a knack for heavy, confrontational
content, which is wondrously conjured by the interplay between her
hard-hitting, honest lyrics and arresting voice. Her guitar playing
is well tamed, allowing her voice, an instrument in its own right,
to cut through heartstrings like a hot knife through a Dairy Queen
ice cream cake. Her range and vibrato are equal parts strange,
47 UNDER REVIEW
bone-chilling, and addictive. Throughout the record Angel seems torn
between the opposing conclusions that life is a downright disappointment, and that it is something worth sticking around for. "White
Fire," a wistfully Leonard Cohen-reminiscent track, expresses the
former view with its opening lyrics "Everything is tragic / It all just
falls apart." Such desolation is elegantly balanced with more hopeful
tones; on "Lights Out," she assures us that'we are alone in this
world, but that it's possible to find profound beauty in this loneliness. And we have to believe her because she asserts with a voice *
that seems to come from a place beyond the realms of our physical
universe and a tone rich in unparalleled wisdom. To some, her voice
is an acquired taste, perhaps because it packs more raw, pulsing
emotion than Roy Orbison singing hymns at your grandmother's
funeral. But regardless as to whether musically-induced impassioned emotional states are your thing or not, I strongly recommend
devoting your ears to this captivating crooner and her angelic music
(pun intended). —Lindsay Stewart
Dylan Rysstad
Harbours
(Independent)
Dylan Rysstad
Dylan Rysstad, formerly performing as Dylan Thomas with various
backing bands, is back with another folk-influenced album of very
well-crafted songs. Having left the glorious life of Vancouver rock
'n' roll (the Badamps, the Jolts, the Neo-Nasties) to move to Prince
Rupert (where he spent his childhood), the leather seems to have
been permanently discarded in favour of the plaid. I'm not saying
that is a bad thing; in fact, this is some of Rysstad's strongest
writing. From the mostly acoustic songs to those that tastefully use
arrangements of a full band, the consistent songwriting and lyricism
are the stars of this record. Lyrics are crucial, but never more so
than when you turn your Marshall stack off and expose them, naked
and raw, to your audience. That's why lines like, "Sometimes we
lie in silence, sometimes with words" ("Sparks & Gasoline") or the
playful story of a banker named Shirley (Yes, he uses the Shirley/
surely double entendre, and yes, he pulls it off) are so important. In
"Shirley," the lines "But I never did hold a gun to her head / Like all
those other men she knew," are a perfect example. Remember... she's
a banker.
Great playing, including some really good slide guitar and
fiddle parts tastefully employed throughout the record, and a few
duets with singer Mercedes Taylor, keep the album interesting and
ear-catching. In fact, I would say every song is strong, although
I personally find the album too long. Clocking in at almost six
minutes, the Neil Young-esque "Matador on Acid" might be better
served released elsewhere. It's a great song, but it almost seems
like it belongs on another record. Another shorter record. Overall,
though, thumbs up. —Justin White
48 UNDER REVIEW
She Divides
f|   Gold
(Independent)
She Divides
Led by mesmerizing vocalist Tess Roby, accompanied by the musical
finesse of bassist Alex Nicol and guitarist Zac Macarthur, She
Divides' first EP will not disappoint. This lo-fi new wave composite
projects an ambient, dark and experimental edge, one that Lassure
.will lead you through a euphoric journey.l||l||
The musical intricacies of each track, enhanced by the soothing vocals of Roby, cannot be subdued. This arrangement begins
with the absorbingly methodical tune of the initial track, "Western
Waves," which eventually delights us with almost a synchronous
medley between instrument and vocals. Before long, however, the
composition livens with the second track, "Revenir," luring you in
with a rapid pace that perfectly transitions to the unhurried tempo
enjoyed in the first track.
With an introduction this blissful, you cannot help but
believe the best is to come. This musical journey, conversely, is only
on an upward pursuit budding from what's now before us. The third
track, "Gold," personifies the physical qualities of brilliance through
oratory exhilaration. One cannot help but be entranced. If youVe
been left longing for more, the final track will lure you in with a
simple jingle. A masterpiece that quickly builds, a mesmerizing duet
emphasizes the daydream that Gold has become.
Traversing through blissful hallucinations, your heart will
liken to the fullness of a lion's roar upon experiencing Gold.
—Ibrahim Itani
Skinny Kids
SfT
(Local Art Collective)
Skinny Kids
The premier EP from Shindig runner-up Skinny Kids is an all-too-
brief collection of reverberating psyched-out surf pop that is sure
to get you grooving. Released only on cassette and Bandcamp (with
some nifty artwork by David Ullock), these six slick rockers avoid
getting snagged on kitsch and instead manage to create a collection
of honest, timeless songs that could very well be released in 1967,
1985 or 2013. f§
"Small Room" starts things off with a cool anticipation, like
an early morning drive to the beach with the boards in the back
of the truck. It then fades into a unrequited love song that finds
singer Trevor Gray pining for attention from "Cool Fetish Girls."
Things continue to stroll along with "Greek Women," and then, with
a cautionary warble of feedback, "Sandalwood and Peppermint*
comes crashing in like an epic set, the song offering you no choice
but to drop in and take a brisk ride. The very 1960s-souhding "Love
Cult" ducks into the curl, rocking right along while the crisp water
splashes your face. Finally "All Gold" closes out the set and brings
you drifting back to the beach with a smile on your face.
Skinny Kids' first effort is more than solid; they have put
together six songs that define cool. The only foreseeable gripe anyone
may have with the EP is that 16 minutes and 29 seconds of this
sleek surf rock. —Mark PaulHus
49  Tennis   photo by Jensen Gifford FEBRUARY 2014
REAL LIVE
ACTION
0- TENNIS
0- POOR MOON
<► THE SHILOHS ||
January 6, Fortune Sound Club
Gathering the spirited gravitas of the Byrds or
maybe the Hollies, venerable Vancouver act the
Shilohs were in the midst of a jangling, honeyed-
harmonied set when I ambled up the steps of the
favoured Fortune Sound Club. The always inviting
abode was filling fast, particularly for a Monday
night and, while a little let down at myself for my
tardiness, at least I caught a conquering rendition
of "The Place Where Nobody Knows I Go" from the
Shilohs' debut, So Wild.
It was a speedy changeover and next up was
Pacific Northwest act Poor Moon, which featured
Christian Wargo of Fleet Foxes. Casey Wescott,
also of Fleet Foxes, is also a regular part of the
Poor Moon line-up, but the tour is a solo effort and
Wargo's ruminative and pastoral folk song selection
reflected this warmly. His mellow, likable cover1
of the Kinks' "Sitting By The Riverside" certainly
accentuated the yearning, nostalgic British folk-rock
leaning that both the Shilohs' and Poor Moon were
aesthetically revisiting.
With two critically lauded and much loved
long players to their credit and a new 5-song EP,
Small Sound, Denver husband-and-wife duo Alaina
Moore and Patrick Riley, collectively known as
Tennis, touched down to secure a night of light,
relaxed pop pleasures, and the ardent audience was
overjoyed. Both were joined by James Barone on
drums, as well as a Patrick Meese on keys and bass.
..The Beach Boys influence is undeniable on
\ such sun-kissed pop pearls (with doo-wop detours
tossed in) like "South Carolina," "Marathon," and
"Take Me To Heaven," making introspective and
attentive melodies that share an "In My Room"
soothing, sweet, and warm, all in one. Moore's voice
is strong and powerful, oozing blue-eyed soul (in
"Petition" especially, one of their catchiest). The
fresh material from Small Sound as well as some
sparkling new numbers from a forthcoming LP,
ups the fuzz and garage-y ordinance, frequently.
"Dimming Lights" and "Timothy" feature Moore's
layered keys and tense synths which move a little
away from the blissed-out guitar binges of previous
works, suggesting that Tennis is on a course bound
for deeper waters.
N A surprise saxophone player joined Tennis
as they closed their set, adding extra oomph to the
already impassioned crowd-pleaser "Origins" (I admit
it gladly, I got goosebumps from the smooth sax). To
nobody's surprise, Tennis was barely absent from
the stage before caterwauls commenced, urging
them back. Moore was joined by the Shilohs' Johnny
Payne for an unforgettable encore as they paid a
touching tribute to the recently departed Phil Everly
(of the Everly Brothers). The pair did an impassioned
rendition of "Crying in the Rain" that was both ^
wistful and wonderful.
If this triple-bill is any indicator, 2014,|jkwg<J '
musically speaking, is going to be tops, with Tenmw
scoring a perfect game on the outset.
—Shane Scott-Travis
4> THE BACKHOMES
<♦» SLEUTH
<$> ZEN MYSTERY FOGG
January 21, The Railway Club
Ambiguously West Coast the Backhomes have played
but a handful of Vancouver shows. A quasi-release
party for the Shake! issued cassette of their debut
alongside Sleuth and Zen Mystery Fogg further
establishes the potential for this act to become a
(nomadic) fixture of the Vancouver scene.
The evening of music at the Railway Club
started with recent Shindig finalist Zen Mystery
Fogg, a band for which my appreciation increases
each time I see them. Though they play fuzz-drunk
stomp-happy garage, Fogg work equally well in a
less distracting setting, the haze of their faux spooky
tenor more palpable. Chase Franson'S vocals are
clearer, the ooos and ohhhs ring out further. The
band is haunting in the sense of a plastic skeleton:
earnestly delightful. Fogg builds an aloof intensity
52 REAL LIVE ACTION
in each song, choosing inevitable aggregation over
sudden force. This tension-is more coherent in  $$$\
Thomas Mo-lander's deviations from drumming onto
the keys, distilling the melodic progression into
gripping simplicity.
Next up were Sleuth, the champions of
Shindig 2011. Like their idiosyncratic sartorial style,
Sleuth tow a line between twee and something more
quotidian, affective in an ecstatic neighbourly style.
Much credit for this is owed to Jasper Lastoria's
calmly potent singing. Other elements of their
jangle-pop came off perhaps quixotically, especially
the sharply airy synth. That said, overall their sense'
of effervescence is cogent in their live performance. 1
look forward to hearing them again in the future.
Lights out and projector on, the Backhomes
took the stage. Appropriating the visual motifs
of the psychedelic, Backhomes craft with super
saturated reverb in the service of hook driven indie
rock. The projection of shimmering waves against
the stage speak both to their musical style and
Pacific sensibility. Both members on guitar, the
tracks were inaugurated by the template swap
of their programmed backing. This mechanical
throb of percussion keep Backhomes disciplined
despite their drifting tones and melodies that
want to flare out into space. In this sense I felt the
band successfully entangled garage workmanship
with the ethereal, evoking shoegaze highs without
shoegaze indulgence. And speaking to the discipline
of their play, like the prior two bands, Backhomes'
achieve intensity not out of capricious divergence
but focused aggregation. Their final song sweltered
to a powerful high before fading into cries for an
encore that they gave with modest aplomb. Standing
ovations require that much at the least.
—Jonathan Kew
Its LIVE MUSIC
VANCOUVER!
53
y:t»as<Brafr'«a«»MiBBaSt';   NyPMLLOWMOON
"There's something special about feeling connected
to the past and present through music."
After opening for an array of revered acts-—Including the Growlers, the Night Beats, and Wooden
ShJIps—Vancouver's most '70S Induced psych-
four-piece, Hallow Moon, are paving a lush road
to acclaim. Their shows are like murky reveries
of long haired sways and ruminating sound waves,
alluring the attention of folk/dream pop lovers of
the West Coast. DhcoMor recently sat down with
Randy Kramer (bass/vocals), Dan Ross (guitar/
vocals), Colin Jones (drums), and Craig Mechler
(guitar/vocals) in the smudgy charm of their jam
space to discuss songwriting, favourite candles,
and their blossoming romance with music.
Who do you liken yourselves to? Who are your
influences?
Ross: We hope other people do that for us. We don't
really liken ourselves to anyone; we just like music.
Mechler: We're big fans of how the Beatles put songs
together. They're definitely a band to strive towards.
They almost make you feel dumb after listening for a
while because they put so much attention and care
into each song.You can't try to sound like another
band though—you have to do your own thing, i
Jones: Otherwise, you're just going to make a bad
version of what they already did.
We think you sound like Tame Impala.
Mechler: That's good. They're so good and young.
They're the first band I fell in love with, who weren't
from the past. They just hit everything right.
Tell us about your process for making music.
Mechler: Sometimes we write individually and show
each other for input. All of Us enjoy the process
of recording. We did the last one at Colin's place
; with our friend JP; Randy played a big part as well
because he went to school for recording and is pretty
much a sound technician,    ^kg
Jones: There are so many different elements to the
processes of both playing and recording. Rather
than go to a big studio and pay someone to do
everything for us, we took it into our own hands and
let the songs evolve, naturally.
Ross: We've had problems at studios before with
time constraints and such.     ||||^
Mechler: We've tried going to record really late
at night but it almost drives you insane. There's
nowhere to go. Over the summer we recorded at
Colin's place during the day and drank beers on the
porch. lipl
Kramer: It's interesting, to see how things come
together during the process and how the songs
develop from before to after. You learn a lot from
the process of recording and you get a chance
to really dig into a song. Sometimes I bring in
elements from elsewhere or from what I like
56 HALLOW MOON
musically. We all add to each other's taste.
Ross: I was in more of a rock and roll band when 1
was younger. The music was important but we really
liked to party and our shows consisted mostly of
that—not exactly like Hallow Moon, where we savour
the process itself.
Is there a common theme carried throughout in
your music?
Kramer: Sometimes a song makes its own meaning
after we put it together; other times I write it like
prose, like a short story.
Mechler: They usually sprout from something
bothering me about society... or just upset about
something in general. I finally get all the words out;
meditate on it, and sometimes the song ends up
having a different meaning in the end.
Name a band that made you take music
seriously. What's a band now that you look to for
inspiration?
Ross: The first bands I was inspired by were Black
Sabbath and Nirvana. Nirvana's easy songs, just
power chords and lyrics with really thought out 1^
catchy melodies. Black Sabbath was just awesome.
Lately, IVe been listening to Cass McCombs 'cause
he's an amazing songwriter.
Kramer: Led Zeppelin. I was going through my
Dad's record collection. I was about 16, and I got
a record player for my birthday. I laid down in
my bi$> just plugged in the headphones and put
on Led Zeppelin One. It's like the best record ever
made. I was like, "This is amazing." Now I listen
to a lot of Cass McCombs too. There's something
special about feeling connected to the past and
present through music. It makes you feel like
you're part of a stream of people who lived
before you.
Mechler: My birthday is around Record Store Day,
so Dan got me a sweet gift: a record by Townes Van
Zandt. 1 was playing music already, but I hadn't
heard of him. He's such a thoughtful songwriter
and that really changed the way I play and changed
me as a person too. I started drinking a lot more
wine after that. Nowadays, I listen to a lot of Cass
McCombs too. He's a lot like Van Zandt. He puts a
lot of thought into his lyrics where he just writes
about a lot of things that piss him off about society—
and does it in a way that's groovy.
Jones: The first time I heard rock music was Goat's
Head Soup by the Rolling Stones. My uncle Carl gave
me a cassette player and the tape when 1 was six
or seven. 1 listened to it over and over again. Today
I was listening to Fela Kuti, this Nigerian guy who
plays danceable, sometimes jazzy afro-beat.
What does the future hold for Hallow Moon?
Jones: We spent so long sitting on this record so
we'd like to make another record soon. We have ia^
quite a few more songs now. :M|
Kramer: It would be cool to tour to California at
some point.
Ross: Pretty much we just really like playing music. ■
together and we're friends, which makes it easier Vv*i;
and more fun.
Mechler: I think the fact that we're friends compli-*'-'
ments the music. It's easier to bounce ideas off of
each other. We Want to have fun with it while it lasts..
And lastly, what is your favourite candy?
Jones: Licorice.
Mechler: Chocolate-covered raisins.
Kramer: 1 guess I'm a Skittles kind-of guy
Ross: I don't really eat candy. 'A^£*ie
There are so many different elements to the
processes of both playing and recording. Rather
than go to a big studio and pay someone to do
everything for us, we took it into our own hands
and let the songs evolve naturally.
57
ltjg§mmm%mM
— IH f i  HERE'S THE THING
MY FRIENDS
& PARENTS
written by Bob Woolsoy
illustration by John C Barry
Worlds are colliding. This month, my parents
will bo moving to Vancouver from their home In
Vernon, British Columbia. Family Bob will moot
Independent Bob.
1 hold a vivid memory of a very chilly Boxing
Day in 2004, when 1 loaded a small U-Haul truck
with my belongings and made for Vancouver. I was
a Northern BC kid through and through. I had the
long winter jacket, as many T-shirts as there are
days in a year, and only one pair of jeans. That
morning, as I left my mother with a hug and a kiss,
she cried.
That leap south was my flight from the
nest. I had an unfinished history degree in my back
pocket, I was still firmly in the closet sexually-
speaking, and I had funded my entire trip on a loan.
My family was concerned (rightfully so, I suppose)
as we weren't really city folk, but I felt a deep need
to go and do something on my own. I felt I needed it
in order to grow up and figure out who I was away
from the loving home I'd grown up in. Much like
Emile Hirsch in Into the Wild, only the opposite. My
movie would be called Into the Concrete and instead
of dying of starvation in an abandoned bus, I'd most
likely die of a Starbucks overdose in the middle of
crowded public art installation where no one bothers
to notice that I even need help.
I don't think I could've done all the things I
did if Vancouver wasn't so far away from where I'd
Started. I met people in Vancouver from ail over the
world. I spent Way too much money on beer and
cooked some really disgusting meals for myself. In
spite of my many childish decisions along the way,
I have grown up. A big part of being able to do that
was being alone. Or at least, being around people
who didn't know me prior to my arrival here. It's
been my place away from family.
For many friends of mine, the idea of
having your parents move to your town would be
catastrophic. Me? I'm extremely happy about this
development. IVe always been very close with my
parents. They're still together after over 30 years of
marriage—they're one of those couples who seem
more in love the longer they're together. It's mildly
disgusting but in a very heartwarming way. Still,
their addition to my Vancouver world has got me to
thinking about ail the things IVe gone through here
without them and how their presence will change
things slightly. Sometimes I wonder if my nine years
living away from my family is one of the reasons why
our relationship remains so healthy. What if it's the
people who never get to define themselves apart from
their family that get stuck in this roundabout of
uncomfortable dynamics with their parents?
I certainly understand the feeling of awkward
relationships with your parents. TheyVe known
you as a helpless, drooling infant so it's expected -
that their idea of you is going to have to evolve
as you grow older. Not to mention the fact that
their experiences growing up are going to lead to
certain misunderstandings about the challenges
you face as a member of this new generation that's
been (lovingly? charmingly? annoyingly?) labeled
"Millennials." Sometimes these differing circumstances and personal issues surrounding their dear
little ones growing up can lead to horrible parent/
child relationships.
Here's the thing about my parents that I'm
extremely appreciative of: theyVe let me grow up.
Yes, I moved far away from them and pursued a
passion that was deeply important to me and had
many formative experiences along the way but they
helped me do that. They were as supportive as they
were concerned every step of the way. Financially,
emotionally, oftentimes unwittingly, and always
ready to be tough on me when I needed it. I'm sure
my parents held preconceptions about what I would
become but theyVe been exceptionally good at letting
go of those as I become my own person. They're kind
of like the parents in Into the Wild but opposite.
60 HERE'S THE THING
I don-t think I could've done all the things I did
if Vancouver wasn't so far away from where I'd started.
I met people in Vancouver from all over the world.
I spent way too much money on beer and
cooked some really disgusting meals for myself.
In spite of my many childish decisions along the way,
I have grown up.
^Vk  Ik ^k ON THE AIR
EXPLODING
HEAD
written by Sam Tudor
illustration by Sitji Chou
photo by Sam Tudor
In its biography, Exploding Hood Movies claims
to explore the music of cinema to "encompass
composers, genres, and other categories, but all
In the name of discovery and ironclad whimsy."
Apparently, when you take your whimsy as seriously as the show's creator, Gary A. Korhonen
(a.k.a. GAK), it must be well armoured. I sat down
with GAK to mine his extensive knowledge of film,
music, and forgotten Vancouver soundtracks.
What it Exploding Head Movies?
It's a pretty playful show. There's a lot of space for
things just to happen. People often assume it's going
to be structured soundtracks all the time, but I
like the idea of a little flexibility. If you can surprise
someone, introduce them to something new, and
show them how it connects to something they are
more familiar with, then you can open up their ears
in that way. It's really a type of premeditated chaos.
How did the show get started?
It came about when I first moved to Vancouver. I'd
been working in Tokyo for quite some time, and
Vancouver was the first place I'd moved to where I
didn't have a job or any planned commitments. I'd
always wanted to do radio, and had listened to CiTR
often before, so I thought I'd see if I was up for it.
Soon it became a case of looking at the music library
I had and looking at what was available at the
station, and asking myself what I could contribute.
I listen to a fair amount of soundtracks, and I only
knew of a couple other shows like this, so I thought
I'd do it. I wanted to explore any sounds that were in
that atmospheric or cinematic vein and potentially
create a "soundtrack to be." The whole show can be
a soundtrack to a film that's running through your
mind or something that can annotate the way you
are living.
62 ON THE AIR
With a show focused on cinematic tunes,
how do you take a local approach?
It's a hard angle to pursue because a lot of
soundtrack stuff is in Hollywood, but there are
actually a lot of people in the video game world in
Vancouver who work on composing. That's a pretty
extensive industry for music in Vancouver. But
there are musicians doing it, and Vancouver has
a long history in the film world, although a lot of
it isn't documented well. There's a great film that
used to air on VH1 called Ladies and Gentlemen, the
Fabulous Stains. It was filmed in Vancouver, and had
one of the guys from the Clash and a couple of the
Sex Pistols in it. A lot of the history behind it has
disappeared, because the show bombed; in terms of
film and music in Vancouver, it's important.
That bedroom aesthetic slowly started creeping in.
You'get artists like John Carpenter who not only
directed, wrote, and edited his films, he also would
provide simple synth lines for them. So yes, there
is a lot of recycling, but there are always different
evolutions in effect.
What are the benefits of broadcasting from CiTR?
We have the flexibility of being a non-mainstream
campus community radio station. We can really
get wacky, and you can have a show that's always
changing. So, I like the idea of all those random noisy
bits and even the mistakes. I did a Joy Division
profile a few years back, and played one of the songs
at the wrong speed. I realized afterwards that Ian
Curtis sounded like a Chipmunk.
As movies have changed over time, how
have soundtracks? Are individual composers
still important, or is there more sourcing of
individual songs?
I think the idea of sourcing songs as opposed to
having a specific composer has always existed.
Even old films like Casablanca and the song/As
Time Goes By"; that song had been floating around
10 years before they used it in the film, and it
only really became a part of the cultural dialogue
once they did. But there's also the idea of moving
away from the studio system to more independent
productions. When synthesizers got small you could
have your own orchestra in one keyboard, and that
really changed the way a lot of people composed.
What are your future plans for
Exploding Head Movies?
Something IVe yet to do is a proper show with songs
from musicals. But instead of talking about the
songs you've just played, the show becomes a semi-
musical itself. A musical about musicals. I'd also like
to tie more into the UBC community and work with
the UBC Film Society and the Drama Club. I want to
do an on-air radio drama... I've got a lot of lofty ideas
to tackle. ?3§$!
Tune in to Exploding Head Movies on Mondays from
7 to 9 p.m. on CITR.
63
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DIFFICULT
Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7-9am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-up/collage and
general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: ©bepicrespan. Blog: bepicrespan.
blogspot.ca
Arts Report WED S-Bpm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film, theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and more) by host Maegan Thomas and
the Arts Reporters.
CLASSICAL
Classical Chaos SUN 9-1 Oam
From the Ancient World to the 21st century, join host Marguerite in exploring
and celebrating classical music from around the world.
4'33"
fil                                      MON 6-7pm
TALK
Democracy now
Alternating Wednesdays 1-2pm
Arts Project WED 6-G:30pm
(Alternating with UBC Arts On Air) Stay tuned after the Arts Report for Arts
Project Interviews, documentaries and artsy stuff that doesn't fit into CiTR's
original arts hour.
UBC Arts on Air WED 6-B:30pm
(Alternating with Arts Extra!) On break from June-September 2013.
Sexy In Van City WED 10-11pm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in the realm of relationships and sexuality, sexyinvancity.com/category/sexy-in-vancity-radio.
End of the World News
THU 8-10am
News 101
See Monday for description.
FRI 5-6pm
REGGAE
The Rockers Show
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
SUN 12-3pm
ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
Synchronicity MON 12-1 pm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into.good vibrations that help you remember why you're here:
to have fun!
News 101 MON 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and community newscast.
Every week, we take a look back at the week's local, national and international news, as seen from a fully independent media perspective..
  Blood On The Saddle                        Alternating Sundays 3-5pm
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded                          TUE 8-10:30am Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of I	
Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background on current issues Pacific Pickin'                                  '(0%           TUE 6-8am
and great music.queerfmradio@gmail.com Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and the lovely
  Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
Programming Training TUE 3-3:30pm 	
^■■■•■■■■■■■■'■■■:- Folk Oasis                                                       WED 8-10pm
Radio Free Thinker                                     TUE 3:30-4:30pm Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on our local
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular ex- scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997.
traordinary claims and subject them to critical analysis. Email: folkoasis@gmail.com
The City TUE 5-6pm The Saturday Edge SAT 8am-12pm
An alternative and critical look at our changing urban spaces. A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin, and
New Website: www.thecityfm.org. New Twitter handle: @thecity_f m. European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters,
  Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@mac.com.
Terry Project Podcast Alternating Wednesdays 1-2pm  	
There once was a project named Terry, That wanted to make people wary, Code Blue SAT 3-5pm
Of things going on In the world that are wrong without making it all seem From backwoods delta low-dowh slide to urban harp honks, blues, and
too scary.   '£0$ blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
  Email: wcodeblue@buddy-system.org.
Extraenvironmentalist WED 2-3pm
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth. Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sustainable economics and our
global ecological crisis. mS$
67 CITR 101.9 FM • PROGRAM GUIDE
SOUL/R&B
Twofold THU 4-5pm
Twofold, a Mandarin/English radio program featuring people and music from
the community. Hosted by Sandy.
Intergalactic Soulship Enterprise SAT 7-8pm
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and afrobeat .
tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as the world's foremost G4E Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around the world, a
named Robert Gorwa and/or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III. thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House, Techno, Ambient, Dance Hall,
  Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise, Experimental, Eclectic.
POP :-:-..
  NashaVolna SAT 6-7pm
Parts Unknown MON 1-3pm News, arts, entertainment and music forthe Russian community, local and
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow sandwich: soft and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and held close to a fire. 	
African Rhyhms FRI 7:30-9pm
Duncan's Donuts THU 12-1pm Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com      ,|I||
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by	
donuts. -http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com. Rhythmsindia Alternating Sundays 8-9pm
 — Featuring a wide range of music from India, including popular music from
E L ECTR 0/ H I P  H 0 P *ne 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and re-
 1  gional language numbers.
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9-10pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in forthe finest remixes from soul to dubstep and
ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist for 'Canadian college radio
show of the year 2012' Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards. Soundcloud.com/doe-ran
and search "Doe-Ran" on Facebook. •
The Leo Ramirez Show
The best of mix of Latin American music.
Email: leoramirez@canada.com
MON 4-Spm
Crimes & Treasons
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
TUE 9-11pm
So Salacious MON 3-4pm
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local and Canadian Content - good and dirty
beats.
EXPERIMENTAL
More Than Human SUN 7-8pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past, present, and future
with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
Pop Drones
WED 10-11:30am
WORLD
La Fiesta Alternating Sundays 3-5pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your host
Gspot DJ.
Shookshookta SUN 10am-12pm
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and personal development.
Radio Nezate SAT 7-8am
A mix show with music and discussion in Tigrinya the language of Eritrea.
Give Em The Boot TUE 2-3pm
Sample the various flavours of Italian music from north to south, traditional
to modern on this bilingual show. Folk, singer-songwriter, jazz and much
more. Un programma bilingue che esplora il mondo della musica italiana.
Website: http://giveemtheboot.wordpress.com
Mantra THU 4-5 pm
Kirtan, Mantra, Chanting and Culture. There's no place like Om. Hosted -
by Raghunath with special guests. Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com.
Website: mantraradio.co.
DANCE/ELECTRONIC
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9-10pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to dubstep and
ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist for 'Canadian college radio
show of the year 2012' Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards. Soundcloud.com/doe-ran
and search "Doe-Ran" on Facebook.
BPMVibe FRI 10:30pm-12am
Every week, tune in to BMP Vibe for the latest and hottest tracks from various genres and BMP. We also discuss various artists from the tracks we
play and bring up ftuny news-related topics. DJ Crave will be bringing you
genres from Hip Hop, Trip Hop, Trap, Dubstep, Drum & Bass, Glitch, House,
Electro, and Moombahton. Tune in for a good laugh, to learn new facts, and
to discover new tunes, mash-ups, bootlegs, and remixes.
Techno Progressivo Alternating Sundays 8-9pm
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house and techno. .
68 CITR 101.9 FM • PROGRAM GUIDE ||||
       explores what's new, what's good, and what's so awesome it fights dragons
in its spare time. As always, Evan ends the show with a special Top 5 list
that's always fun and always entertaining.
Discorder Radio TUE 4:30-5pm
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear excerpts of
interviews, reviews and more!
Trancendance SUN 10pm-12am
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001. We favour Psytrance,
Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic
Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed. Current influences include Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace     	
Ventura, Save the Robot, Liquid Sou! and Astrix. Older influences include Morning After Show TUE 11:30am-1pm
Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, An eclectic mix of Canadian indie with rock, experimental, world, reggae,
Platipus Records and Nukleuz. Email: djsmileymike@trancendance.net. punk and ska from Canada, Latin America and Europe. Hosted by Oswaldo
Website: www.trancendance.net. Perez Cabrera. ,||§ mM
Inside Out TUE 8-9pm Samsquantch's Hideaway Alternating Wednesdays 6:30-8pm
  All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Radio Zero FRI 2-3:30pm Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams from New Wave to 	
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever else. Stereoscopic Redoubt THU 7:30-9pm
Website: www.radiozero.com 'Wj$$ Ijijfl '■■ v.-	
  Hans Von Kloss' Misery Hour WED llpm-lam
Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9-11pm Pretty much the best thing on radio.
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-bit music/retro '80s, this	
is the show for you! Website: synapticsandwich.net Mantis Cabinet TUE 1-2pm
TheBassment FRI 9-10:30pm || Tweets & Tunes WED 6:30-8am
The Bassment is Vancouver's only bass-driven radio show, playing Glitch, We practice what we Tweet! Showcasing local indie music and bringing
Dubstep, Drum and Bass, Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks, and UK Funky, while bands, artists and fans together through social media.
focusing on Canadian talent and highlighting Vancouver DJs, producers, Website: tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:@tweetsandtunes.
and the parties they throw. 	
 —\ •_  Suburban Jungle WED 8-10am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix
|  of music, sound bites, information and inanity. Email: dj@jackvelvetnet.
UPBEAT
Good Morning My Friends
MON 6:30-8am
  Student Special Hour WED 11:30am-1pm
EC L ECTIC/ MIX Various members of the CiTR's student executive sit in and host this blend
■ •  of music and banter about campus and community news, arts, and pop cul-
Breakfast With The Browns MON 8-11am ture. Drop-ins welcome!
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury blend of the fa-	
miliar and exotic in a blend of aural delights. Duncan's Donuts THU 12-1pm
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com. Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by
 ' ••:•;  donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
Chthonic Boom! Alternating Sundays 5-6pm	
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the spectrum Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6-7:30pm
(rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock. Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and musicians
 ;|| that take the route of positive action over apathy.
Crescendo SUN 6-7pm -	
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and building to the' Peanut Butter ¥ jams Alternating Thursdays 6-7:30pm
INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE, Crescendo will take you on a mu- Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll hear
sical magic carpet ride that you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams. interviews and reviews on eats and tunes from your neighbourhood, and a
Besides overselling his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds weekly pairing for your date calendar.
throughout the hour and features both old classics, and all the greatest     	
new tracks that the hipsters think they know about before anyone else does. Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9-11pm
   Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge. Most are
Definition Soundwave THU 1-2pm from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the country and around
The now of folk. The now of rock. The now of alternative. Join Evan as be the world. f&& ii;
•
69 CITR 101.9 FM • PROGRAM GUIDE
Aural Tentacles THU 12-Bam
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and the weird, or
.it could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
Stereo Blues FRI 11am-12pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld sinks into blues, garage and rock n' roll
goodies!
It Ain't Easy Being Green FRI 12-1pm
CiTR has revived it's long-dormant beginner's show It-Ain't Easy Being
Green! With the support of experienced programmers, this show offers fully-
trained CiTR members, especially students, the opportunity to get their feet
wet on the air. p^'
Nardwuar FRI 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuarthe Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment.
Doot doola doot doo... doot doo! Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
Randophonic SAT 11pm-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversal jukebox which has'no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even space-time relevance. But
it does know good sounds from bad. Lately, the program has been focused
on Philip Random's All Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest
records you probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
Stranded FRI 6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds, past and present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
HARDCORE
SKA
Ska-T's Scenic Drive
MON 11am-12pm
.CINEMATIC
Exploding Head Movies MON 7-9pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and
any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric pieces, cutting edge
new tracks and strange old goodies that could be used in a soundtrack to be.
JAZZ
The Jazz Show MON 9pm-12am
Vancouver's longest running prime-time Jazz program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at 11 p.m. Feb. 3: As a tribute to Black History Month
all the Features this month will have relevance to Black History. The first
is drummer Max Roach's incendiary suite "WE INSIST! The Freedom Now
Suite" Mr Roach with vocalist Abby Lincoln. Powerful! Feb. 10: Another great
drummer: Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers with Wayne Shorter and Lee
Morgan. "The Freedom Rider" Feb. 17: Herbie Hancock's tribute to Black
History with "The Prisoner" his final Blue Note record and one of his masterpieces. Feb. 24: Composer/arranger Oliver Nelson and his Orchestra in
the moving "Afro/American Sketches".
Flex Your Head pp     TUE 6"8on1
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands and'guests from around the world.
LITERACY/LANGUAGE
Sne'waylh WED 4-5pm
In many Coast Salish dialects, "sne'waylh" is the word for teachings or laws.
The aboriginal language-learning program begins with the teachings of the
skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish language). Originally aired on Coop Radio
CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver, Tuesdays 1-2 p.m.
Simorgh THU 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the Persian
speaking communities and those interested in connecting to Persian oral
and written literature. Simorgh takes you through a journey of ecological
sustainability evolving within cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator
in the storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
Language to Language
THU 2-3pm
PUNK ROCK/POP
Rocket from Russia     ' THU 10-11am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international and local
punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in brokenish English.
Hosted by Russian Tim. Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com. Email:
rocketfrom russlacitr@gmail.com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com-
RocketFromRussia. Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
Generation Annihilation SAT 12-1pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the non-commercial side
of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The Foat" Kraft.
Website: generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: faceboQk.com/generationannihilation.
NDUSTRIAL
The Vampire's Ball
WED 1-4am
Industrial, electro, noise, experimental, and synth-based music.
thevampiresball@gmail.comthevampiresballoncitr.com.
SPORTS
Thunderbird Eye THU 3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus and
off with your host Wilson Wong.
70 CITR 101.9 FM • PROGRAM GUIDE
DRAMA/POETRY
Skald's Hail FRI 1-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story readings, poetry
recitals, and drama. Established and upcoming artists join host Brian
MacDonald. Interested in performing on air?
Contact us on Twitter: @Skalds_Hall.
METAL
Power Chord SAT 1-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
GENERATIVE
The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2-6am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries.
linnnm
5UBSCRI
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■§191   mr'j$$k   iiW^V Br    <•  wk. ^ mrld

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