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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) May 1, 1989

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 •i—I—r~r n—hi—I—I—rT: yt-"7«iA
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r^.'-^wR au>gbsv* DiScORDER
That Magazine from CITR FM 102
May 1989* Issue #76
EDITOR Kevin Smith
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Viola Funk, Miss Finch
WRITERS JB Hohm, Michael Leduc, John Ruskin,
Janis McKenzie, Warren Whyte, Viola Funk
ARTIST Jeanna South
PHOTOGRAPHER Mandel Ngan
COVER Dean Paravantes
LAYOUT By Scott ChernofT, Harley McCauley
PROGRAM GUIDE By Kathryn Hayashi
TYPESETTING AMS Desktop Publishing
ADVERTISING REPS Bill Baker, Andrea Lupini
DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Pierre Huish
ACCOUNTS AND SUBSCRIPTION GUY Randy Iwata
PUBLISHER Harry Hertscheg
Discorder is That Magazine from CiTR lOl.fM/pub-
lished monthly by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Co /printed in Surrey, Canada.
Discorder prints what it wantsAhe CiTR On the Dial
program guideAhe CiTR Spinlist record chart/17,500 copies
to over 200 spots. Twelve-month subscriptions are $12
in Canada/$12(US) to the US/$20 elsewhere/payable by
cheque to Discorder Magazine. We want your stuff: send
in stories, drawings, photos/and we won't give it back.
CiTR 101.9fM is 1800 watts of stereophonic bliss/on
cable fM from UBC to Langley, Squamish to Point Roberts,
USA, but not on Shaw Cable in WHite Rock (bug them
about it)/now available on most clock radios and in cars
too.
Office hours for CiTR, Discoirder, CiTR Mobile Sound
Rental are Mon-Fri, 10am - rpm (please avoid Fri-afts.)
Call Office 228-3017/News Sports 224-4320/DJ228-
CiTR. Send stuff to Discorder Magazine or CiTR Radio/
SUB Rm 233/UBC, Vancouver, BC/V6T 2A5/Fax (604)
228-6093.
THIS ISSUE
O   EUGENE
CHADBOURNE
That goddamned Alex Vorty
9   RED HOTS
A loss of rook 'n' roll lrmoc*nc»
lO   THAT PETROL EAAOTION
Post-Beefheartlan popmelsters
12 THE DO-IT-YOURSELF
REJECTION KIT
Th© first step towards success
15   TEENAGE AAONEY AAUSIC
Teen bands are happening
22   HOLY BAD TRIP, BATAAAN!
Slang and Its future
MOST ISSUES
Iou
4   AIRHEAD
readers who write
14   UNDER REVIEW
, lilac time and more
16   REAL LIVE ACTION
fun for the whole family
16   LOCAL AAOTION
In a city near you
20 ON THE DIAL
everyperson's guide to cltr
21 SPINLIST
the hipper sounds
yjTj.iijI
Sizzling Summer Specials
Sunday
Jugs of Ice Tea
Bottle o' Oly
Movies:
7 pm & 9 pm
Monday
CaBsar
Bloody Mary
Bottle o' Hanks
Tuesday
Bartender's
Root Beer
Bottle o' Hanks
>               Dancing •
$%, /       |                   Movies •
Darts •
1|              f Satellite TV'
w^ -*J$ *% M    Bur9er Bar *
^,Mw                 Eight •
"**9f    ^             Selections
of Beer
on Tap
11am -1 am
4pm - 1am
4pm -11 pm
^9Sk
Wednesday
Pepsi Paralyzers
Bottle o' Hanks
Pint o' Hi-Test
Top 40 Night     _^0^
Thursday
Highballs
Bottle 0' Oly
Pint o' Hi-Test
V   CiTR Alternative
Hours
Mon-Fri
Sat
Sun
Friday
Long Island
Ice Tea
Pint o' Hi-Test
o/.3^ ^     Rock & Roll 'til
Saturday
Peach Party!!
Peach Cider
Fuzzy Navels
Coolers
Pinto'Hi-Test
Ya Drop Nights
Cool off this Summer at the Pit Pub • Lower Concourse, Student Union Building, U.B.C. AIRHEAD
c/o CITR
6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C
V6T 2A5
What Was The Point?
Dear Airhead,
Now Yin-Yang (in the April airhead), let me
see if I understand your point: things are the way they
are because that's the way they are. This is assuming
that we're not participating in the general decline of
the world.
Theenvironmentisn't crumbling orpeople being
repressed by accident. Apartheid, unlike your dick, is
not an intrinsic state of nature. It exists because we
make it exist. Do you think that a few million whites
could effectively repress 25 million blacks all on their
own?
Don't be a sucker. It happens because the west-
em world (that means you and I) actively support it.
To change it we must actively support the people who
are trying to change it.
Simple eh?
But if you're too much of an old lady to do
anything, that's fine. Go to the mall, be petty, live life
to the fullest. But never, ever equate being trendy with
actually caring.
Peter Pie Face
P.S.Knowledge without action is ignorance. Steven
Biko wasn't a yuppie.
Are You With The Band?
Sweet Airhead O' Mine
Yo! We're two kinda alternative guys who
really dig CiTR—You guys are crazy! We're really
into this *70's revival bit—Fuckin' A! Not only do we
like the Metal "tunage", but we also figure that if the
trend continues, punk should be cool again in about
four years (give or take 2-3-4 months) and then we can
wear our Dead Kennedys T-shirts and start hanging
out at Odyssey Imports again. But we're a little
perturbed at a recent incident concerning CiTR and
our favourite new band—Axl Rose's Hose. We tuned
in to hear our favourite DJ—that balls-up guy NARDUWAR—cuz he was supposed to interview those
aforementioned Rock Gods. But get this babe, alls we
heard was "Hello Vancouver—Look out you motherfuckers" and then they were cut off—we timed it—it
only takes seven seconds for the boys in the "Hose"
(Gizzy Stradcum, Buster Hymen, Pud Metuggit,
Snatch and Cherry Finger) to say "Hello Vancouver—Look out you motherfuckers"—Is that censorship or what? I've heard people say that right-on word
before on CiTR, what's the friggin' prob? We are
aware that Snatch threw some vodka bottles around
the SUB and the band was picking up so many hot
babes that the Proctor got jealous—but hey, they'd
been on the road a long time, far from their home in
Hollywood, California—they're just sensitive artists,
and had to blow off some steam! We're also upset cuz
NARDUWAR got suspended—without him to listen
to we got no social life (except when GRUNT is
playing). What?—is CiTR becoming part of the totalitarian-police state-Fascist-Imperialistic-CIA-
lacky-Nazi squad? We reserve sincere hope that this
is not a truism. Anyway, bring back NARDUWAR,
bring back the Hose—Rock Against Censorship!
Sincerely yours,
Two rockin', but angry alternative guys,
Brad Scott & Laurent
It was all just a misunderstanding, okay? Narduwar
has served his one month sentence and is now back on
the air. And we think he's a better dj and person for
this whole experience. And remember, you can say
motherfucker on the air but it must be non-gratuitous
and in context. For example, if the drunk and disorderly band had read some of their poetry which just
happened to contain the word motherfucker at some
point. That would be acceptable. Understand?
Montreal Is Heard From
Dear CiTR Folks:
I can't help noticing what a good bunch of stuff
you always have on your demos V cassettes list.
Okay, you're helped by the fact that, unlike in Montreal, bands don't put out albums after they've done
four gigs, but it's still an impressive list.
So anyway, I'm writing to encourage you
(especially any local/demo show hosts) to encourage
your local musicians to get demos off to us here at Og.
The West is definitely under-represented on our It
Came From Canada and other compilations, but
that's because we get so few tapes. We listen to
everything we get, and write back (albeit slowly), and
tapes that are obviously completely out of our style
we forward to someone who cares (usually Music
Underground Canada).
As for us, we're having fun these days, going
back to Europe for two months this summer, recording a few new tunes for a greatest hits record (LP in
Germany, CD and cassette in the US), and looking for
cool new bands to release. So again, tell people out
there to send us more tapes.
Stay hip, look for a new Train in six weeks or so,
Gerard Van Herk
Og/Deja Voodoo
c/o Og Music
Box 182, Station F
Montreal, Quebec
H3J 2L1
And From Comox
Dear Airhead,
I have three questions to ask you: CiTR's future
transmission power; a subscription to Discorder; the
downtown Vancouver scene.
A friend of mine, someone you know and,
therefore, whose identity I would not like to make
public, has informed me that CiTR's future transmission power will be greatly enhanced. Will it soon be
possible to receive CiTR over here, in Courtenay, on
the Island? I am sure that, should it happen, CiTR
would gain a dedicated Northern Vancouver Island
audience! Yes, contrary to popular opinion, there are
actually quite a few lifeforms over here who would
greatly benefit if they were to be given a strong,
healthy dose of CiTR! It would mean that, after all
these years, we would finally gain some sort of
understanding about how things actually happen in
and around UBC and downtown Vancouver. I, and
we, desire feedback from yourself about CiTR's
future transmission power!
If it is possible I would like to subscribe to
CiTR's fabulous Discorder magazine. Enclosed in
this letter is $2 for at least one issue of the Discorder.
I would like to know about how much it actually costs
for a one-year subscription. If you do send an issue to
me, please note that my real address is listed at the
beginning of this letter. Do not send it to the Comox
Hospital's Psych Ward because I do not plan on being
an inmate here for very much longer! I am going to
bust out! Besides, the Discorder would not make it
past the hospital's official censor (I am supposed to be
mentally ill right now and am not allowed to read any
literature that is "not in your best interest")!
Speaking of mental illness, just what the hell is
it about downtown Vancouver anyways? Why is it
that whenever I hang out in the city centre, I get the
strange feeling that it is a big, strange, magical gauntlet that innocent people, like Mon Soi, have to run in
order to gain something known as social acceptance,
or, as I am told by strange "voices", a place in heaven?
How come everybody ridicules and laughs at me? Is
it really because everybody who is anybody studies
either: Economics; Biology; Engineering; or Chemistry; unlike myself who am only capable of (gasp)
English Literature (and sometimes Computer Science)? Or is it something else; about how things
happen? Something that is mysterious, transcendent,
universal, maybe even divine? I asked my therapist
and she replied, "As far as I am concerned, you are
merely a paranoid schizophrenic telepath and that is
just the way that ordinary people relate to other people
who are "possessed" by your type of mental condition!"
Aaargh! Okay, I admit it; I am experiencing
some mental difficulties right now, but...Aaargh!
Downtown Vancouver drives me mad! Is it really
because when they hang out in their cute office
buildings, they practice Economics, while I, when I
hang out in an office building, am only capable of
English Literature? What is wrong with us people
who study English? Is it because we are too artistic?
Not mathematical enough? Only understand Psychology yet are not holistic enough since we are not
all that capable of understanding Biology and Chemistry? Maybe what bothers me is the way...Females
and males...relate to each other? Yes, I like this
one...Something about running a gauntlet; about deep
relationships; about female and male convergence
and unification? Aaargh!?!
Steve Olkovich
Psych Ward
Comox Hospital
Vancouver Island
P.S. Is it true that the people who attend UBC have a
yellowish aura while the people who attend SFU have
a greenish-bluish-red aura? Why?
And Of Course, Sydney
Dear Mr Discorder,
This is Geoff Tanner addressing Vancouver!
Hallooooo Vancouver. Hey, I'll bet this is your first
letter from the burgeoning metropolis of Sydney, NS.
Home of Smooth Hermans, whose Twin Cabaret is
'86 Street and Dick's on Dick's combined! We also
have Roy Mercer, our infamous CBC weatherman,
who calls BC, Quebec and Detroit a cold front. But I
suppose that's a bit colloquial. [And I suppose that's
a bit of a malapropism—sub-ed.} You'll just have to
come here and see it to believe it!
But I digress. The ultimate purpose of this letter
is to ask you to throw me a life preserver (otherwise
known as Discorder) before I drown in this morass of
Top 40 music, acid-washed clothes and Big Macs
(yes, those goddam Golden Arches even made it
across the causeway). Sooooo enclosed is my $12
subscription fee. If at all possible, please send a
couple of extra issues each time so I can spread the
good word. Also, I would really appreciate if you
could send me back issues up to (or back to) August
'88, which is when I left the land of pink condos, black
clothes, mountain bikes and Discorder, Discorder,
Discorder!
Geoff Tanner
P.S. Kirk, if you're reading this, send me my $150
because I'm starving on Rogeyland! 829 frajiv/'//e Strut
Telephone: C60P) 684-8900
<j\CR05S ffl)H CAF/7VL 5 CltiEfjAS)
6all&iyArt ShovlBy
Comfna Soon:
"(fames Lews
'Eleanor Brodv
open 7 dm a wet The interview began with him explaining
all he knows about Ten-foot Henry's:
Eugene: I used to walk by that building all the
time. It was just a furniture store. There used to
be a rumour that there was an illegal strip club on
top of the furniture store. You'd sometimes hear
somebody on a bus saying, "Strip joint! Strip
joint on top of Robbins." This was a long time
agOjjfflx>ut fifteeflfflixteen jjprsV
^.   ^tkihttfilllll    -JBt        _ i , 11
Discorder: What questions do you get asked all
the time and are sick of answering?
hockabilly break j
D: Why did
EC: How did you invent the rake? Does anybody ever get really mad at you about your
songs? How did you first start playing guitar?
Goddamned Alex VartyintheGeorgiaStraightsaideverything aboutEugene Chadbourne
that I was going to say and then Kevin the Editor tells me they probably won't run this piece
until April or May and so I was tempted to paraphrase the Varty article and I bet nobody 'd
notice. And then I had to spend most of February 12 studying English 355 and 365 and so I 'm afraid
my perceptions of The Little Eddy Chatterbox Tour visit to Vancouver that night are slightly
tainted.
I'd give very good odds that when they came up with the name "The Little Eddy Chatterbox
Tour" they were working under the influence of the Nevill Coghill translation of The Canterbury
Tales, specifically The Manciple's Tale which clearly states "A chatterbox is hateful to the Lord;/
Here Solomon the wise is in accord." Of course a purist would have used the original Chaucer text
which reads, "A j angler is to God abhomynable./Reed Salomon, so wys and honourable" (ManT
343-4). Anyway, Chaucer's spelling is more appealing than Coghill's, and Chadbourne is as much
a jangler as he is a chatterbox.
His show featured frequent cameos from the likes of American first lady B arbara Bush and cov -
ered a range of contemporary history from OIlie (North) 's Playhouse back to John Loves His Dick.
(Remember the seventies? Richard "Dick" Nixon and his attorney-general John Mitchell, number
one law enforcement agent in the land and arguably the States' biggest lawbreaker.) With Eugene's
chatter comes a mess of jangling. Chadbourne, in his own psychotic/bluegrass/jazz fashion, is a
formidable guitarist, though frequently the noise he makes degenerates into utter nonsense, kind of
like John Cage with monkey glands.
For his finale that night Eugene broke out the rake, a crudely-made device formed from electrician's tape, gardening implements, guitar pickups, and the body of a skateboard (?). Creating all manner of mayhem, Eugene dragged the rake around the Waterfront Theatre stage which just
happened to be set up for a production of Shakespeare's Measure for Measure, a play about an
ostensibly puritanical magistrate who suddenly develops ayearning to sleep with anun. You get the
idea — corruption of justice. It's the kind of theme that Chadbourne often sinks his chops into.
And so I watched Chadbourne grind the rake into the floor behind a stage prop pillar which,
during daytime rehearsals, Duke Vincentio lurks behind as he thwarts the lustful plottings of
Angelo. I watched and thought, clever, very clever. The selection of the name Chatterbox, the word
that is key to understanding the condemnation of the crow in the Manciple's Tale. Clever, clever.
Choosing the theatre that just happens to be running Measure for Measure, one of Shakespeare's
most irritating "problem" plays. It was painfully obvious what they were trying to do to my mind
but I wasn't going to give them the satisfaction of breaking down. Run this in July, Kevin, it's not
going to get to me. I' 11 do the interview straight. I '11 pretend not to notice all the items carefully placed
in my path, so as to push my mind over the brink. All the little coincidences, right down to the twin
Henry stickers on Eugene's guitar case, a reminder of my favourite club, Ten-foot Henry's, which
used to be on Ninth Street West before the C-train right-of-way came through. That was back in
Calgary, of course, where Eugene claims to have spent seven years, after growing up in Colorado,
and before going on to New York and later North Carolina.
6    DISCORDER
D: I bet you had a fairly standard upbringing —
Mel Bay's Six Chords to the Stars, ^bj^jjmw
EC: I didn't really see any of those books till
years later when I started teaching guitar for
Edward's Music Academy in Calgary. They
showed me these books. The Albert System. I'd
never even seen them before. I had a guitar and
I'd play along with the radio and people would
show me stuff. Some guy from California finally showed me some chords. He said, "You
have to play chords." For a few years I wasn't
playing chords. I tried to play an F once and it
was like (grimaces) "My God" — I gave up. I
had to learn to play the stuff out of a Bob Dylan
songbook. I started playing 'cause I saw the
Beatles on TV and I realised that girls liked
them. I thought here's something you can do to
get girls and you don't have to play sports. That
was the original motivation—to get girls. Later
I got more interested in music.
D: Do you like playing with groups?
EC: I like being by myself mostly, and doing
projects with groups that have a finite end. I
don't like having a real long involvement with
somebody with every aspect of what's going on.
It gets kind of old and you have to compromise
a lot of things as a result.
D: On your album I've Been Everywhere you've
got a Jewish woman telling about her experiences in Nazi Germany.
EC: Ya, that's my mom. She did a documentary
for cable TV back in Calgary with a Hungarian
woman. They gave me a video cassette of it. I
found some sections I liked and used for this
project. I started on it about a year after she died.
She doesn't know it but she's getting more
airplay than me now.
D: Is that where you getalotof your social views
from — the fact that you've got that history in
your family?
EC: There's two sides to it. I've got a lot of
respect for what she went through, at the same
time in my childhood we fought constantly about nothing. As soon as I grew my hair out it
was the last thing I ever heard about. I remember
her looking for me at some Grateful Dead concert and she said she wanted to drop a bomb on
the hippies. There's two sides — the things she
went through you can appreciate — but a lot of
people like her became reactionary when they
came to America. Her parents were even worse.
At least my parents were opposed to the war in
Vietnam, but my grandfather became this insane
anti-communist. He kept a club under his bed to
hit the hippies in case they came in the middle of
the night.
D: Do people get mad at your songs?
EC: Well, a few.
D: I noticed during Woman Against Pornography a few women sitting back and kind of
crossing their arms.
EC: Sometimes I'll get a bad reaction on that
from some people but they have to think about it
— the lyrics and what I'm trying to say. At least
there are some issues that are controversial. Not
everybody agrees on everything. It's funny.
D: Do you like preaching to the converted —
EC: Well that's one thing that happens.
D: — when you can say anything and the audience goes "YA, YA!", or do you like it when
there's a bit of tension?
EC: I think a little bit of tension is good sometimes. You can't avoid the other thing though.
They're converted and you agree, so? But I can
give them a little bit of a release. I can come up
with a humorous song that will make people
laugh at something that concerns them.
D: You first heard Phil Ochs in Colorado?
EC: Ya, I used to hear him at the University of
Colorado. He was definitely a big influence —
seeing him play solo, and all the different messages he put across and the different styles of
music he played. It was a real inspiration. Also
Tim Buckley was an inspiration. He had a band
that was really stretched out. The guitar player
opened my ears up, this guy he had playing lead,
Lee Underwood. He was sort of acoustic/electric, folk, jazz, country; sort of mystical lyrics.
D: I've seen you in a couple magazines. You
write a lot.
EC:^Vell, as much as I have time for.
D: Do you write every day? Do you keep a
journal?
EC: No. I have a real hard time even keeping up
with the little things I have to do. When I'm in
Europe I try to keep a journal. I keep that pretty
regularly there.
D: You do 2000 words an issue for Maximum
Rock and Roll.
EC: It's not every issue. I miss a lot.
D: Did they call you or did you call them?
EC: They asked me for a couple years before I
could finally get it together.
D: Do you get a lot of response?
EC: I try to get response. It's hard to get things
that interest people. The most response I ever
got was saying they should legalise drugs. I got
so many letters complaining about that. This
generation now is really anti-drug. They get
really upset about that. I was thinking about
writing about it again just to piss off more
people.
D: Ho w' s the response to your Free Trade article
going?
EC: I'm waiting to see. It was just in pretty
recently. I just want to get people to talk about it
because it seems like there hasn't been much
discussion. I've had a lot of people who just
don't understand what's going on.
D: They say you've got an autobiography coming out.
EC: I'm trying to get it published. I haven't
found a publisher yet. They'll touch it. They'll
read it. But they don't want to print it.
JB Hohm
iBIDGEj
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Photo:MandelNgan
After a couple of cancellations, the Red
Hot Chili Peppers finally saw fit to
make a return visit to our sleepy little
town on March 31. The Peppers have a well
deserved reputation for putting on great live
shows. The high-speed funk they blazed through
and their seemingly endless onstage energy made
it an evening to be reckoned with. However, for
me, an innocent, young, smalltown boy, it was
more than just a conceit, it was an evening when
the whole rock and roll lifestyle was revealed to
my uninitiated eyes. It was a good thing my
mother decided to opt out at the last minute...
The Red Hot Chili Peppers have been something of a band in turmoil as of late. This is
mostly because of the death of guitarist Hillel
Slovak last year due to a heroin overdose.
Consequently, founding member and drummer
Jack Irons decided that it was time to step out
of the scene that had killed his friend, and left the
band. It was then up to the remaining two
members, vocalist Anthony Kiedis and bassist
Flea, to either establish a new lineup, or fold.
Not surprisingly, they chose the former option.
New drummer D.H. Peligro, formerly of the
Dead Kennedys, and guitarist John Frusciante
have rekindled the fire of the Peppers. A follow
up to their 1987 album The Mofo Uplift Party
Plan is said to be soon forthcoming.
There are many types of bands and only a
few ways to see them. Basically the choice is
between seeing a band with or without artificial
enhancement. The Chili Peppers are essentially
a loud, fast, brash party band and, they being
them, the day being a Friday, and me being me,
I saw them quite drunk. From what I could see
and hear in my state the band was musically
extremely tight and more than just a little impolite. Anthony's lyrics and song intros were essentially insults directed to the audience or trib
utes to The Chili Pepper's sexual supremacy.
However, judging by the way the Commodore's
spring-loaded dance floor was bouncing, this
was not really an issue for us inebriated partiers.
After only one encore the Red Hot Chili Peppers
left the stage.middle fingers raised, shouting at
the crowd to "fuck themselves". This not only
convinced me that these guys had bad manners,
but also that inteviewing them might not be a
continuation of the party.
I had no tape recorder and no real questions
I wanted to ask the band. It seemed to me that
eveything about them was pretty straight forward. Their music is "in your face" funk/punk
and is an extension of their "life is one big party"
attitude. The combination of these two elements
is the key to their success. Despite realising that
my speech was somewhat slurred, and being
really quite hot and tired, there I was, hanging
around backstage waiting for the doorman to
clear things with the band. After about fifteen
minutes I was given the okay to proceed to the
dressing room. About a dozen girls were packed
into a room about the size of a shoebox along
with Anthony, Flea, John and a very stunned
Discorder writer. A roadie walked in, plunked
down a cooler full of Corona and handed me
one. I noticed that Anthony had an impressive
tattoo of a northwest coast style raven across his
shoulders. "Do you have a particular interest in
northwest coast Indian art?" I asked, thinking
that this would be a good place to start. He
grabbed a beer.looked at me, and then strode
past me into the hallway muttering,"No, I just
have a respect for their way of life." Flea was
busy telling a fan that the new album would be
due out quite soon so I decided to try to ask him
a question or two when he was free. Meanwhile,
John was busy talking to a black clad young girl;
looking very interested as she blurted, "Oh, I just
love L.A, it's such a beautiful place..." It was
enough to make me wish I was safe at home in
my bed where stupid things only happen in my
dreams.
"Hello Flea," I said, "I was wondering how
you got your nickname?"
"My friend Tree gave it to me," he grunted.
"How about the name of the band, how did
that come about ?" I asked, thinking that such a
great name must have required a lot of thinking
and argument. He half turned as if to walk away
and said, "We just thought of it." Then he strode
back towards the stage. Things were not going
well, but I decided to follow him out and try
again.
The Commodore was now nearly empty.
John had left the dressing room and was now
sitting on the edge of the stage listening to a
different girl. "Where did you get the cool
hairdo?" she gushed, stroking his scalp longingly. I decided that he probably would not be
interested in chatting. Anthony was also talking
to someone, although occasionally he would
glance over at me and look annoyed that I was
still around. Admittedly, I was feeling pretty
stupid, so I asked Flea another question.
"How did the Red Hot Chili Peppers get
started?" Flea slowly looked up from the
floor,"Anthony and I met in high school." I
asked if there was any real story or anything that
might make my interview interesting. "No," he
said, "there is no story." I swallowed another
gulp of beer and played my last card. "When you
were auditioning new members for the band,
what were you looking for?"
Flea looked up at me and tiredly mumbled,
"Look, we don'thave to do this. This is abore."
"You're right, it is," I said, "thankyou very
much for your time."
As I took a swig out of my bottle of Corona,
which had since grown warm from sweaty palms,
I mulled over the prospect of a country home
far.far away from the romance of rock and roll.
I stepped out onto Granville and back into
reality.amazingly none the worse for my illusion shattering experience.
Michael Leduc
MAY 1989  9 Thai Petrol
Emotion
As they say, he's all arms and legs and hair. Flailing and bobbing about the stage is
Steve Mack, lead singer and all-round energy pack for That Petrol Emotion. Not for
a moment is this ragged urban Howdy Doody of a vocalist motionless. Possessing a
body consisting of one large sinew, the TPE frontman ricochets around the stage, glancing off
invisible objects like an all too excited young colt that has just not quite found its legs yet;
friendly and harmless but chock full of get up and go. Egged on by the too loud, post-
Beefheartian popmeister twin guitar attack of the rest of the group, Mack puts on a high energy display that, if tapped, could solve all of our BC Hydro problems.
It's now three albums along in the career of this Irish/American band. Three different
labels as well. First, Manic Pop Thrill on the independent Demon label. Then, in order to make
a living, to Polydor for their second release, Babble. They didn't care too much for the
management so when the label mistakenly failed to re-sign them, TPE took off to Virgin. End
of the Millenium Psychosis Blues is now out. And with an album comes a tour. And with a tour,
an interview. Discorder recently spoke to drummer Ciaran McLaughlin.
You put specific statements on the album
sleeves but your songs are more general in
nature. Why?
That is deliberate because with a lot of the
so called political bands of the past, their songs
didn't amount to that much because they were
tailored to a political ideal. First and foremost,
we're a pop band. We write pop songs but at the
same time we're trying to raise awareness of a
problem in Northern Ireland, especially for
people in England because it's basically England's problem. The amount of people who
aren't aware of what's going on is frightening.
That's part of the problem. The only way to
solve a problem is to become aware of it and
address yourself to it. What we're trying to do is
raise the profile of the Irish situation. Hopefully
the people who read the sleeves will go away
and find out more about it. They may disagree
with us, but at least they're better informed. All
we're trying to do is be an information service.
How can a North American audience relate
to that or do you expect it to get across?
The songs have been deliberately written
so they can be applied to political situations in
the rest of the world. Even the sleeves I suppose.
There are parallels between Northern Ireland
and the Middle East, South Africa and Central
America; where there are injustices going on.
It's up to people to use their own initiative. It's
a matter of applying it to your immediate situation because there's injustices throughout the
world.
It seems that the band is coming together in a
very focused way, despite everyone writing
songs, when you compare the three albums.
The last lp was very diverse and I think that
reflected our confidence at the time. We were
quite prepared to record a song like Groove
Check and also record a song like Cellophane.
There are very few records where you can find
10   DISCORDER
two songs as different as that. We're now playing 7 or 8 new songs. I think we've stepped in a
different direction again; the songs are a hell of
a lot more guitar based, much more straight forward. Better songs to play live, also. A lot of the
songs on the last album don't come across live.
So we're changing again. And again the songwriting is spread throughout the group.
I've always considered TPE to be different
but obviously there are influences.
A lot of bands try to say that what they are
doing is completely original. But we've never
said that. We're very aware of our influences.
It's inevitable that what you play and listen to is
going to affect what you do. That comes through
on our new songs. We're listening to groups like
Sonic Youth, The Pixies, Dinosour Jr. We
don't see anything wrong with acknowledging
your influences.
Where is the group based now?
London.
Does that change your perspective on Northern Ireland?
Inevitably. That's a good question. That is
something I've felt more and more. I've lived in
London now for four and half years and I almost
feel not aware enough to comment on Northern
Ireland anymore. You do feel less qualified to
speak becuase the only way you can comment
on a situation like Northern Ireland is to actually
live there. Even though I lived there for 21 years,
for the last 5 years living in England it has been
difficult to keep in touch with what's going on in
the day to day reality. When I go back on
holidays, it suddenly brings it all back; what it's
really like to live there. It's very easy to comment on things sitting in London. I think sometimes now we've been there so long we're not
really qualified to do that.
photo: Mandel Ngan
Do you feel a sense of loss for having left?
You do have a sense of loss for the good
things but I'm also glad to get away.
Why did you choose Roli Mosiman as producer?
When we were writing the songs for B abble,
we heard a group from Switzerland called the
Young Gods who Roli had produced. We were
knocked out by the single Envoye. We thought
it was the best thing we had heard in years and
we still do. We were actually friends with the
Young Gods anyway. So we got in touch with
Roli through them. He had never heard any of
our material but he agreed to do our album solely
because we liked the Young Gods. He thought
that if we liked them them we must be good.
We wanted to do something aggressive.
We were listening to the Swans, Jim Foetus and
the Young Gods. We wanted to sound like that
- aggressive and big.
Was there record company resistance to Roli
Mosiman producing?
No. I was surprised because at the time we
half expected the people to go, "Who?" They
went "Who?" but also said "Go right ahead." So
far each label has given us a free hand. With the
fourth lp, Virgin might say they want some input
in the choice of producer. Hopefully, we'll pitch
someone they'll agree to so we won't have to go
through that.
Why did you move from Demon to Polydor?
Because we wanted to make a living. We
were actually getting social security in Ireland.
It was impossible to do that and also tour because to receive social security you have to be
present at your home all the time. We also
wanted to have enough money to make the
record we wanted to make. The change from Polydor to Virgin was
basically due to a change in management in the
English branch of Polydor. The managing director who signed us and was completely behind
the band left to work for Paul McCartney. The
replacement didn't like the band, and wasn't
sympathetic to our ideals. They told us that if we
didn't start selling a load of records very soon
we'd be in trouble.
At the same time this happened, their lawyer misread our contract. They forgot to pick up
on our option so we were free to leave the label.
They had to resign us with a stated period and
that period had elapsed. So we were a free agent
again and felt it would be best to move on.
Why did you sign on to Virgin?
Basically it had to do with our manager at
the time who favoured Virgin. Having signed to
Virgin we have to say we were unhappy with the
English branch of the label's handling of the lp
when it came out, but the American branch has
been great. They're a young company in America. A lot of the people who work for them are
the same age as us and have come from college
radio.
What does Virgin expect of TPE?
I don't know. I must admit I don't care.
Every time we go in the studio we make a record
we want to do, and just hope the label will agree
and think it's a good record as well. Obviously
they would like us to sell a lot of records. The
model we have is REM who've been going a
long time but only in the last few years have
begun to break into the mass consciousness.
They've been making the records they want to
make. Building up a bedrock of support. That's
what we want to do. I'd rather have longevity
than immediate success.
You seem to be able to maintain the integrity
of what you put out.
That was part of the deal in major labels.
We insisted that we would have control over
even the packaging. All the art work has been
done by people we've chosen - it's all been done
by friends. If the label had said they weren't
prepared to give us that then we wouldn't have
signed.
In Tension you say 'Nothing ever changes/
Don't ask me why.' It seems a negative sentiment for a band so adamant about change.
One of Ireland's problems is immigration.
A lot of the creative people, young people especially, opt out of Ireland, usually between the
ages of 20 to 35. That's too bad because that's a
time in life when you're naive enough to think
you can change things.
We live in London because it's impossible
for a pop group to survive in Ireland. There's no
place to play. There's no independent labels.
There's nothing.
In the song Here It Is, Take It, there is the line
'Gotta go back to go forward'. A seemingly
similar contradiction.
Gotta go back to go forward is simply
looking back to people in history for inspiration.
People have done great things in the past and it
can be done again. It's not all doom and gloom.
It should have really been 'You gotta look back
to go forward.'
The album title End of the Millenium Psychosis Blues doesn't sound very uplifting.
No, it isn't. That came from the REM song
called It's The End of the World As we Know
It. Reamann came up with the idea. We thought
it sounded great. The cover is a collage of things
thathave affected us, bothnegative and positive.
The title seems to have some humour to it,
also.
Ya. A lot of people see us as being completely poe-faced, serious young men, which is
not true at all. It annoyed me when people
thought we were brow-beaten serious people
who never laughed.
There's a quote in Irish on the sleeve of End
of the Millenium. What does it mean?
It means, literally, 'Good running is better
than bad sitting down.' If something is going
badly, it's better to get out than to stay. It's in
reference to Britain'spolicy in Ireland. Britain's
been occupying Ireland since the 1100's and,
basically, it's been one long battle. They insist
on hanging onto six counties. Northern Ireland
has developed in a completely different way
from Southern Ireland and England simply
because of what's going on there. It's almost
like it belongs to no one because it's developed
in a completely warped fashion.
What changes, if any, do you see occuring in
Northern Ireland?
I can't see any at all. It would really need a
massive change of heart on the part of both sides
of the community. At the moment I can't see it
happening.
Does that mean ongoing violence?
Ya, there's too much history, too many
debts to be repaid. I can't condemn someone for
not forgetting their brother was killed. It's a
natural human response. Unfortunately, violence begets violence. It's to the point I don't
want to talk about Ireland because it does depress you. You end up going around in circles.
The band has been lucky because no one has
suffered directly from the troubles. It's difficult
to comment for someone whose father or son has
been killed. Naturally, people are going to feel
bitter.
Why did you record Bohannon's Dance Your
Ass Off (on the Short/Long ep)?
We started doing it live for two reasons. A)
It's a good song and B) at that time in England
there seemed to be a split, that might have been
the creation of the music press, between black
dance music and independent pop music. The
music press was saying the two were incompatible. We were trying to say that was rubbish. A
good song is a good song. We decided to do that
song and Me and Baby Brother by War. In
retrospect, our version of Dance your Ass Off is
rubbish but the original idea behind it was
commendable.
How would you sum up the overall aims, or
intentions, of TPE?
Basically, I think the ultimate aim is to
make great records. For me, the ultimate accolade is that I can file our records alongside my
favorite records without feeling embarrassed.
Hopefully we can also inspire people to form
bands.
Mr. Ed
MAY 1989 11 viR'
urea
Music ot Canada, Ltd.
©A Warner Communication, r
■unicaiions Company
Warner/Elektra/Atlantic
«6
December 9th,
So you're in a local band and you want to
make it big. Well, there are a lot of things
you have to do before the money starts
pouring in and the babes, or hunks, come a-
callin'.
&>    \
\
Dear
A
TbaJ
■j4    '
\   I
THE DO-IT-YOURSELF
REJECTION KIT
Dear (your name here)
Thank you for your Interest in WEA Music of Canada, Ltd. and your recent
submission to our A&R Department.
Vour work has been auditioned and considered carefully by our A&R
staff. Although we listen to all submissions thoroughly, we cannot
always proceed with every tape or artist in whom we recognize potential.
Consequently, I have returned your package at this time, as it does not
fall in line with our present direction in A & R at WEA.
We ask that you forgive this form letter, but the amount of material we
receive for consideration prevents us from giving you more specific
comments.
Thank you, once again, for your interest.
Yours truly, ^^^^^^^^^^^
WEA MUSIC OF CANADA, LTD.
6oX>- RopiA.)'
ML
Bob Roper ,fm^fm^am^am^am^fmm
BR:jr
— the first step
towards success
in the music business
By Rob Boper
The first step on this long road to fame, stardom,
riches, and an eventual overdose death, is THE
REJECTION. You cannot consider yourself
worthy of any kind of success, imagined or
otherwise, until you have received a rejection
K. IWATA TRAVEL SERVICE
SPECIALISTS OF PACIFIC RIM COUNTRIES
ESPECIALLY JAPAN
HEAD OFFICE
1115 E. Hastings St.
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V6A1S3
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RICHMOND
6081 No. 3 Road
Richmond, B.C.
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ROBSON
1093 Robson St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6Y2B2
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12   DISCORDER letter from at least three major labels. And this
DO-IT YOURS ELF REJECTION KIT will give
you all the neccessary information to make your
band look like it, too, has been rejected by the
majors. After that, it's just a matter of time until
the riches and groupies of the world are yours.
The first thing you need to work on in order to
prepare your rejection kit is the cliche. If you
can't write in cliches then you have no hope of
making your rejection letter look authentic. And
a fake rejection can be spotted from miles away.
The usual result of being caught with a fake
letter is ostracism. Other bands will look at you
and say, ''Ha, this band is so bad that they can't
even get a real rejection letter!" At which point
the accuser would whip out his/her own rejection letter, (probably made from this very kit),
and further put you to shame.
So you can see why the cliche is so very important. Let's tackle a few examples. (It would be
helpful at this time to have a pen and paper
handy so that you can practice writing these until
you no longer feel they are cliches. Make them
staples of your own vocabulary.)
1. 'Thank you for your interest in (record
company).' An attempt at demonstrating sincerity on behalf of the label.
2. 'Your project has been listened to, and
after careful consideration, we have decided that
it is not appropriate for the direction of (record
company) at this time.' An effort to make you
think that they actually listened to more than the
MONDAY METAL
PRESENTS
first song and that their label actually has a
direction.
3. 'Please forgive the form letter, but (record company) receives so much material that a
personal letter would be impossible.' Expressing the desire to do more but can't due to the
limitations of the system.
4. 'Once again, thanks for your interest in
(record company) and good luck in the future.'
Don't call us, and we won't call you.
As you can see, the cliche is a very important
part of record company rejection. As a matter of
fact, your entire letter can be made up of only the
above four sentences. It's that simple! It is
equally important that the name of the record
company that is doing the rejecting be mentioned as much as possible, lest you forget who
is actually rejecting you.
The next important step in having an authentic
looking rejection letter is the signature. As a
rule, if you do not know the name of the A&R
person of the record company you want to be
rejected by, any scribble will do, as long as it is
artistic looking and can be interpreted in thirty or
forty different ways. There is one important
exception to the rule — WEA Records. With
WEA, the signature is not done by the actual
rejector, but instead he has someone—his wife,
daughter, secretary, late night janitor—sign for
him. So it is important that you find out who
currently does the signing for the head of A&R
for WEA if you want to include WEA on your
rejection list.
The last thing you need to make it all official is
letterhead. This may pose a problem for some
people, but this is where creativity and a desire
to be rejected come into play. You can visit the
record company office of your choice and, posing as a DJ for a certain radio station, enquire
about press releases, or an artist bio. Voila,
letterhead. Or, if desperation sets in, cut up a
record from your collection and paste the appropriate trademarks on a piece of paper. Don't
forget to include some kind of return address in
the suburbs of Toronto. Scarborough and Mis-
sissaga are the two most popular.
Lastly, rejection etiquette. This is very important because if you don't react properly then
people will begin to suspect you of being a fake.
You must whine that you'll never get signed
unless you sell out. And then vow never to do it.
Complain that the label obviously doesn'tunder-
stand you or your music. Blame it all on the
system. Blame the Americans. Point out that if
only you had (choose one) — a video/more
money/high powered manager/more exposure/
another chance — then you'd show 'em. And
finally swear that you'll never send anything to
that label again.
Follow the steps outlined in this easy to follow
guide. Acclaim from your friends will soon
follow. Work on your cliches, try different fancy
illegible signatures, create some letterhead, and
practice that hurt artist attitude. Soon, all the
rejection in the world will be at your doorstep.
What more could you ask for.
SHOPPE
"DIRECT FROM THE NEIGHBOURHOOD TOUR'
FRIDAY MAY 12
TICKETS: AIM
^^^. locations,
including Lower Mainland Eaton's and
Infocentres in Major Malls
Charge by Phone:
280-4444
PRODUCED BY
PERRYSCOPE
o^
MAY 1989 13 fevfW
TANITA TIKARAM
Ancient Heart
(WEA)
Thankfully, England has a 19 year old phenom
apart from Rick Astley. Tanita Tikaram reassures us
that "young adults" do indeed have some depth. The
main depths Tikaram reaches with her husky voice
are those of gloom and creativity. The lyrics are
haunting and somewhat aimless at times. The music
is a potpourri of instruments ranging from the standard bass guitar to a mandolin to a variety of horns.
This interesting combination makes for an album
mat's perfect for a rainy day.
Jess
FAIRGROUND ATTRACTION
First of a Million Kisses
(WEA)
Schmaltz.  Whitney  Houston has  a  British
competitor. Big deal! Pass a pleasing platter, please.
Jess
HE SAID
Take Care
(Mute)
Graham Lewis: One fourth of Wire, one half
of Dome and the main man of He Said. This is how
the equation of Mr. Lewis seems to add up. In 1986
Lewis releases Hail under the banner of the He Said
with some additional contributions from Wire/Dome
partner Bruce Gilbert. One supposes this was meant
to be seen as Lewis' other pop group as opposed to a
solo album (usually a dreaded concept). Either way,
Hail was one of 1986's better releases and a fine
alternative from the afore mentioned groups.
Take Care is the long awaited follow up to He
Said's debut and A-B type comparisons seem inescapable. Gilbert's absence is quite noticable and thus,
much of the quirks and noisy bits that stopped Hail
from sounding too poppy are ironed out on this
album. Can you say accessible? In this case yes.
Though that's not necessarily a bad thing and this
effort is hardly a sellout. Much of this album is
danceable (as opposed to dance oriented).
The song structures are much more basic and
less cluttered with noise (sigh). Even Lewis' lyrics are
simpler, though in some instances (ie. A.B.C. Dicks
Love), his usual word play is still favored. Not even
the contributions of Tackhead Keith LeBlanc takes
this album into any extremes besides Lewis sounding
as close to a rapper as he'll ever get. The one unforgivable low point, however, has to be the inclusions
of "ooh my baby" type backing vocals on Not a Soul.
All this may make Wire fans throw up their
hands in disgust and wonder why bother. Of course,
if you haven't heard Hail, weren't won over by it or
you're not even a fan of Wire's output, then your
reaction to this disc may be considerably different
since it's not (that) bad. My initial reaction was quite
similar to that of Wire's last release A Bell is a
Cup...Until it is Struck. At first somewhat disappointing but eventually the album grew on me for
what it was, instead of what it wasn't. Either way it's
worth a listen. "Take Care, He Said".
Paul Clarke
14   DISCORDER
CAMOUFLAGE
Voices and Images
(Atlantic)
On this record, three German gentlemen show
that by taking lessons from David Gahan and Martin Gore, one can learn to speak English, play synthesisers, and even write pop songs. However, Camouflage have managed to create the new Depeche Mode
album for fans of the band that can't wait for the real
group to produce another one itself. On the band's
first single, for example, The Great Commandment, Camouflage succeed in carefully combining
four or five songs by the aforementioned British band
to create an instant hit product. On other album tracks,
notably Stranger's Thoughts and Neighbours,
Camouflage carefully dissect Depeche Mode's Get
the Balance Right to create a plethora of new tunes.
This whole effort is, thus, rather forgettable. It does,
however, make a passable industrial album, albeit
with Chipmunk vocals, when played at 45 rpm.
J.W.
ROLLINS BAND
Dolt
(Texas Hotel)
This is Rollins' most ferocious album to date.
Backed up by a super-heavy funky bass and drums,
Rollins, ex-Black Flag punk rock institution/God,
screams through nine tunes (three of which are new)
filled with angst, aggression and power. The tide
song, Do It, really makes you want to "do" something
(probably strangle pasty dance-club types) when
Rollins screams "Do it, do it do it do it...". Side two
was recorded live in Holland and showcases the
Rollins band bashing out older Rollins songs like
Black and White, Wreckage, and Hot Animal Machine. If you appreciate the man for his nasty attitude
and blood-curdling "vocals", you'll love this record.
If you don't like Henry Rollins, he probably doesn't
care.
Mike Lyseng
LILAC TIME
Lilac Time
(Polygram)
Lilac Time is the latest offering ok, England's
foremost pop poseur, Stephen Duffy. Having dropped
his middle moniker "tin tin" and the overly slick
production of Art of Noise member Jonathan
Jeczalik, into the Irish Sea (where, no doubt, his
former bandmates, Duran Duran, belong), Duffy
has gone on to adopt a more guitar based and folk-
oriented approach to his music, while maintaining the
clever lyricisms and nonchalant vocal delivery which
characterised his earlier two albums. These two features stand out strongly on this record's best tracks -
the lead off single, Return to Yesterday, And The
Ship Sails On and the laid back tune, Together.
Musically, Lilac Time successfully substitutes acoustic guitars, banjos, the occcasional Hammond organ,
the odd string arrangement, and only the most incidental massed choir for the overblown excess of
Duffy's first two efforts. Wonderful pop.
J.W.
NEW MODEL ARMY
Thunder and Consolation
(EMI)
Thunder and Consolation, the latest effort
from New Model Army, is not an album full of
surprises. NMA do not disappoint, and are at their
usual, cynical best, with doom and gloom lyrics to
satisfy the most sullen and morose. At any rate,
there's some pretty listenable tracks here, comparable even to the earlier Killing the Bastards, my
absolute NMA favorite. Also some decent instrumentation, in particular on Vagabonds (note the violin),
and Green and Grey. Other songs worth mentioning
here are Inheritance, in which singer Justin Sullivan accompanies a rap-inspired rhythm with thoroughly enjoyable monotone vocals (turn this one
LOUD), and the searing intense Family Life. There's
enough different elements and variety of Style combined to make this album an interesting one. What
more can I say?? Excellent, easy listening from this
socialist trio. Well worth checking out.
Deborah Bach
LOU REED
New York
(WEA)
Get ready for another walk on the wild side. On
New York the Master of Muse covers politics, religion, drugs and poverty. Reed throws in doses of
satire to offset and/or enhance his topics. His trademark chant-like voice remains unchanged throughout, as does the music. Rather than being boring, this
is an advantage, for there is nothing to take attention
away from the lyrics. And what lyrics they are.
If you Usten closely, you can hear or sense, I
don'tknow which, controlled despair in Reed's voice.
It's easy to imagine Jack Nicholson's characters in
The Shining and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
doing these songs. Weird and spooky.
Jess
THE BAMBI SLAM
Long Time Comin'(12 Inch)
(WEA)
Hands up everyone who thinks this is a great
name for a band. Now, hands up everyone who played
this record at 33 rpm by mistake and thought it
sounded pretty cool anyway. The Bambi Slam
admittedly remind one of many other bands practicing the Jesus & Mary Chain/Skinny Puppy mentality (squeal the guitars and pound the drums first, we'll
invent lyrics later), but one more kid on the industrial-
size-speaker block doesn't hurt me (if not my eardrums) one iota. This 12 inch contains three tracks,
my favorite being I and I - maybe because it's the
shortest song (I have a thing against songs that go on
too long, especially if we've heard it all before)
definitely because it's the fastest. A good sampling
for those tortured souls debating whether to plonk
down the bucks for for the full-length album. Then
again, for the name alone-
Annette
INSTED
Bonds of Friendship
(Wishing Well)
If 7 Seconds had continued in the vein of their
The Crew LP, they would have produced this. Good
production, lots of Marshalls and lots of youthful
yelling. This is a fine example of Straight-Edge
HardCore and its limited ideas about the moral superiority of all who smoke, drink alcoholic beverages,
do drugs or partake in gratuitous sex. Good to play
loud while skating your favourite half-pipe.
Chris Sharpies Headless Horsemen
Gruesomes
Photo: Greg Johnston
Today, with an electric guitar a teenager
can not only make a big noise, but he
can also make money. Starting out with
a modest instrument to amuse himself, he soon
finds that people - even friends - will pay to hear
him play in a combo at their parties. So he moves
up in the world, until he owns an electric marvel
costing hundreds of dollars. Teen combos are
fast becoming the country's most popular form
of musical entertainment, and sales of electric
guitars, along with the nation's decibel level,
have nearly doubled each of the past few years.
The teenagers on this page, and thousands
like them, haven't had a free Saturday night in
months, and they wouldn't have it any other
way. In combos of four or five, armed with
electric guitars, supplemented by drums and an
occasional electric organ, they have made play-1
ing for their peers highly profitable. Little Moses
and the Choppers, not pictured, receives 15 gig
offers a week. During the past two years the
group has netted $2000, spent on a trip to Europe, eight shares of CBS stock and a Mod
wardrobe. But, members of another combo admit, "We just like to play. Most of us would play
for nothing." The players are usually top students - but they enjoy the new, Sonic-like prestige their music brings. "Sometimes when we
walk down a street full of kids, everybody quiets
down, and they just look," says Paul McKenzie
of the Enigmas. "Man, that's fame." The combos, who charge $25 to $400 anight, play mostly
at parties for other admiring teenagers. Occasionally, they also play for adults. Successful
groups have their own business managers (for
10%), their own transportation, and their own.
technicians who for free admission to the dance
will cope with the one catastrophe that can
silence any combo: a blown fuse.
The combos put a lot of imagination into
their names, which, one performer says, should
"Be original, sound cool, but not conceited."
Here are some of the coolest:
- The Bird and the Worms
- Joe Banana and his Bunch
- Little Caesar and the Romans
- The Four Gone Conclusions
- What 4 ?
- The Hairy Things
- Studs and the Bearcats
- Deluxe and De Bagals
- Six and the Single Girl
- Jay Walker and the Pedestrians
ii
eenagetAaneylAusi
iHlP mL MAY 1989 15 WORLD DANCE MUSIC
12" SINGLES • CDs • LPs,
CASSETTES
This is where the
MUSIC comes from
2754 WEST 4th AVENUE
(at MacDonald)
736-8556
X'Swffi:
The Arts Club is back! I know this is month
old news, but it's important and exciting
month old news.
Fittingly, Curious George returned from
hiding to re-open the club on March 17th and
18th. They played the 'last ever' Arts Club gig
DONE FOR YOU!" he shouted, creating the
atmosphere of a country under martial law. He
held the crowd rapt for almost three hours,
speaking on a range of topics all relating back to
the situation of martial law.
The biggest show of the month was cer-
able^Sfffear oifffobn tooeTOffsed
four piece skate-oriented band's gigs are always
lively and friendly. In the past the lead singer has
led an Indian-like dance around a burning skateboard. Harmless, hardcore fun. Just like their
song Pitbull Attack and their cover of Cheap
Trick's Surrender, during which the lead singer
bounces around the stage and into the crowd.
Sunday, March 26th saw The Lux Theatre host a night of music and poetry featuring
the one and only Jello Biafra and ex-Squamish
Five member Gerry Hannah. After political
poetry recitations by the Downtown East Side
Poets, Gerry Hannah played folk songs on his
acoustic guitar which will be released on a new
album called Songs from the Underground.
Jello appeared on stage next wearing dark
glasses and a leather trenchcoat. "SHUT UP!
OBEY ALL ORDERS WITHOUT QUESTION! RELAX...EVERYTHING WILL BE
Society's No Fucking Use. Silly Noses For
Unicorns. Social Norms are Fucking Useless.
Sausages Never Fry Unevenly. Call them what
you like, but any doubts about SNFU's greatness were erased the very next night at the Lux
Theatre. They headlined a great line-up of Curious George, Desperate Minds and Ninth Configuration.
Once SNFU came on, the whole crowd
surged to the front and packed the floor all
the way back to 10 metres from the stage. This,
combined with two bouncers repeatedly kicking
kids off the stage gave one the impression of
being at a 'Molson Canadian Rocks' show.
While the idea of a beer company sponsoring an
SNFU cross-country tour may seem ridiculous
at first, their last two albums have created a large
non-hardcore following. SNFU have not lost
Well, GoFour3's still in Toronto, and
so is Tracy Brooks, singer for the
Hip Type, and now there's a rumour that Oversoul 7's stranded there too, at
least until they get some money together. (But of
, course I could be wrong.) Better news is that the
Enigmas ought to be up to more things this
su
thaJpRL1/ Ham been lately (whichJBh'taking
mt|p), but aJjird izcygBktitefflF possibility
(just don't coiHln itb^OBttuchJke the earlier
two).
Now he|Ba samplinHPn this m|nth'f
(75!) c
The Stickfigures - Razor's Edge
Now this tape's been around the station
since February '88, long before the band even
made it to the Shindig finals, so I'm sure it's not
representative of their present sound. The truth
is, I wish I'd heard it before I saw them play —
this recording really captures some energetic,
youthful pop elements, and reminds me a little
of the long-gone Little Ratskulls—seeing them
live, though, has always made me a little nervous, maybe just because they aj£ so incredibly
skinny.
Tin God - So Cold
This is my favourite song from Tin God so
far—it's tight but powerful, and well produced
with a really clean sound. And are Doug's vo
cals sounding a little different?
The Wardells -14,000 Showers
From their aptly named 6-song cassette,
Back to the Drawing Board. The Wardells
have had a tough time of it lately — their original drummer (Rich) has left them, as has their
anager, QrH ftpi'iffi J}n longej
RecoJ^
tWard
've just r
luced (as w|
by the I amous Billftapier-Hempi
nas nf«Lfitv||rwell into
iltemative" or Mmstream" scenes t
bothered by it, or even by the fact that their
Victoria-suburban^flavouredhumour sometimes
tastes a little off to people from other places.
Unfortunately, 14,000 Showers isn't as catchy
and fun as a couple of other songs on the tape,
like What's so Great About Marilyn? and
Under the Johnson Street Bridge, but hey, it's
worth a listen anyway.
Curious George - Pitbull Attack and Hell is in
Hello
Now some people say that Curious George
is the local band to watch these days, and there
is definitely a good classic punk kind of sound
and feel to this, in the style of songs like Slave
to My Dick. Pitbull Attack is especially fun,
with good hard riffs and even a mention of our
16   DISCORDER The Accused rock out, eh. PhotoMandelNgan
their edge or entertainment value as lead singer
Mr. Chi Pig (a.k.a. Ken Chin) was as wild as
ever doing leaps, kicks and stunts including
riding a huge inflatable alligator into the crowd.
By the by, he was wearing an absolutely darling
little pink two-piece skirt and blouse combination that was just to die for.
The Spores played the same night at the
Arts Club, and supposedly it was their last ever
gig. We'll miss 'em, but remember, it was April
1st.
Tupelo Chain Sex brought their wild 'n'
crazy jazz/rock/punk act up from Hollywood to
play Club Soda on Sunday, April 9th. They
were billed as Spot the Difference, the name of
their album featuring adjacent pictures of Adolf
Hitler and Ronald Reagan. The band features
a bouncy young singer (one of the strangest
dancers I've ever seen) and a Santa Claus look-
a-like wearing plaid polyester pants, a hawaiian
floral print shirt and two wide and gaudy ties. He
added a bizarre, jazzy feel with his tenor and
soprano saxes.
Thelonious Monster used its energy to
entertain a lucky few at the Town Pump on
April 12th. Not as powerful as the Chilis nor as
strange as the Tupelos, Thelonious Monster
ranges from a light, harmonic style of hardcore
similar to some Circle Jerks songs, to high
energy blues. Opener Tin God is an energetic,
four piece guitar band that doesn't play so loud
the lyrics become unintelligible.
The only reason I'm even mentioning
Jane's Addiction who were at the Commodore
on April 15th is that they were greatly anticipated. It seems that lead singer Perry Farrell
thinks he's hit big time before it's actually
happened. The surprising thing about them was
that they are from L.A. and actually succeeded
in being boring. The Bunk Pets, the opener,
were not boring. They play an excellent type of
grungy, sub-pop. The final word on Jane's
Addiction is that T-shirts were $18 to $28. Need
I say more?
W.Whyte
very own Province. And lines like "The only
good reason to own a pitbull/Canadians aren't
allowed to have pistols" give you a good idea of
where these guys are coming from. (Somewhere
cool, I think.)
The Fridge Magnets - Marilyn's Ghost Still
Rides the Waves
First of all, I just can't resist a song with a
title like this, and second, I have a weakness for
surf instrumentals, which is what this is. While
Marilyn's Ghost and probably none of the other
songs on this Surf Party cassette break new
ground, this is a fun summertime tape with all
the necessary groovy guitar effects and even (on
this song, anyway) the ocassional eerie kind of
spaghetti Western-type overtones. Three bands
(who all share the same guitarist and bass player)
contibute ten originals and one medley of eight
surf-type hits—'if this isn't for sale somewhere,
it should be.
Hard Rock Miners - Jim Guroo
No one can accuse the Miners of being a
band without a sense of humour — they call
their sound "Top 40 from the Back40" and play
live with somewhere like seven guys and one
girl all squeezed on one stage, all obviously
having a great time. Unfortunately, especially
in situations where the audience is almost as big
as the band, sometimes the crowd doesn't seem
to be having as much fun as the musicians,
which can be a bit of a problem. But while live
they're loose, energetic, and almost overwhelming in numbers, here they're sparsely, cleanly,
even minimally produced. There's something
pure and sincere sounding about this tape, and it
even includes a song I can't help thinking of as
a Led Zeppelin cover (how embarrassing) —
Gallows Pole. And if you go see them, watch for
certain semi-famous parts of other bands making up the membership of this one.
Damage C'est Damage - Jealouscide
(Pronounced, I'm told, like plain English
"damage say damage".) DCD's recently hit #1
at CiTR with this song, recorded live on a 2-
track. No, overproduction is not a problem here
— there's quite a lot of noise and no discernible
lyrics from this growling almost Iggy-ish voice,
and a powerful rhythm section (driven by Kerr
Belliveau, I think, who first came to Vancouver
with the Little Ratskulls and has dmmmed for
lots-o-bands since) gives Jealouscide arealpush.
The Nervous Fellas - Same Girl and Miss
Pearl
I see from the cassette cover that the Fellas
have joined with Sam Feldman et al (like so
many others lately, it seems). Anyway, more of
the same highly danceable stuff we've come to
expect from them ~~> what else can I say?
(Rockabilly still is about the best thing to dance
to on a date, you know.) Janis
CiTR PRESENTS
excited
first
daughter
MA/25a
COMMODORE
with guests
MAY 1989 17 CrU5 H
flc*i*'
V*   Y0U    C *A/T
Slo?     J * E
UBC
Student Union Building
Lower Concourse
All Ages Welcome
We accept the following
methods of payment:
1/ Your hard-earned money
2/ Your mate's hard-earned money
3/ Your Mother's money
4/ Your Grandparents' money
5/ All the money in your savings account
6/ And of course just plain money.
852 GRANVILLE ST.
VANCOUVER BC
John torn
!^'*£
i°fjv<
oe
£*<*/
£?*v
*****
MAY
FRI   SAT
05    06 THE NERVOUS FELLAS Rockabilly!
12    13  TIPPY A-GO GO &
THE VOYAGEURS with THE
HUMANE DRUM SOCIETY
19    20  TIN GOD and EARTHLING
26    27  From Rhode Island: ENIGMA
Recording Artists PLAN 9
Featuring the return of
WUNDER BRED (the enriched
white flower children)
JUNE
FRI   SAT   .
02    03   THE HARD ROCK MINERS
w/Guests, from San Francisco:
weirdo pianist DJ. LEIBOWITZ
DOORS OPEN 9:30 FRI., 10:30 SAT.
Sorry No Minors
THE WEEKEND ALTERNATIVE
ARTS CLUB LOUNGE 1181 SEYMOUR
683-0151 »W* jmHM£m$    i m     r> *»n/r SPORTS DIGEST 5:30-6:00PM
Join Lane Dunlop for all the latest in campus sports and sports
everywhere else for that matter.
THE AFRICAN SHOW 8:00-9:30PM
The latest in dance music from the African sub-continent plus/
minus a few oldie but greats and extras. Your host: Umerah
Onukwulu.
THE JAZZ SHOW 9:30PM-12:30AM
Vancouver's longest running prime time jazz program. Features at 11:00. Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
1st: "Cuban Fire" - The Stan Kenton Orchestra plays the
arrangements of Johnny Richards. Music recorded in 1956but
far ahead of it's time. Your host's favourite Kenton album.
8th: "The Ritz" - a vocal group just as slick but more Jazz-
oriented than "The Manhattan Transfer" A refreshing sound!
15th: "Right Now" - From 1965, one of Jackie McLean's
most powerful recorded statements. Alto saxophonist McLean
and company... an album so good that it will be over before you
know it.
22nd: One of the greatest entertainers of all time was Thomas
"Fats" Waller - his piano playing, composing abilities, and his
influence on Jazz music.
29th: "Conference of the Birds" a latter-day classic with an
all-star band led by premier bassist David Holland that includes saxophone innovators Anthony B raxton and Sam Rivers.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE 1:15-3:30PM
Country music to scrape the cowshit off your boots to. With
yer host-poke, Jeff Gray.
TRANSFORMATIONS 3:30-5:00pm
Simplicity in Design, New Music, new views, new Beliefs,
Old gods, Reinforcement and Negation. In words and pictures. Hosted by Kirby Scott Hill.
4th: Meredith Monk, a seminal force in New Music/Dance/
Multi-Media.
11th: New Music, the latest from Venture, Gramavision,
Nonesuch.
18th: "Rites of Spring" Revisited: a reprisal of significant
works composed by tum-of-the-century composers: Strauss,
Stravinsky, Poulenc, Cocteau.
25th: La Traviata
WEDNESDAYS
THE SPANISH SHOW 1:15-3:00
Music from Espanol and community events as well.
THIRTY THREE AND A THIRD 3-5:00PM
Two hours of the Hottest Vancouver Music.
B.C. FOLK 5:30-6:30PM
Listen to the thoughts and music of B.C. folk artists.
THURSDAYS
ARTS CAFE 5:30-6:00PM
In-depth arts analysis and general miscellany of commentary
on the local arts scene with a concentration on theatre.
TOP OF THE BOPS 8:00-9:00PM
Fifties rock therapy heard across Canada, more or less.
CANCON JOB 9-10:00PM
The latest info on local bands and strictly Canadian tunes,
along with the hottest playlist stuff.
20   DISCORDER
UVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
10:00pm-midnight
4th: ZaZa& Her Angels
11th: Pedestrian Sacrifice
18th: The Gruesomes from Montreal
25th: EARTHLING
ABSOLUTE VALUE OF NOISE 3-5:00PM
Found sounds, tape loops, compositions of organized and
unorganized aurahty, power electricians and sound collage,
and live experimental music. 100% Canadian Industrialism.
MOVING IMAGES 5:30-6:00PM
Host Ken Macintyre takes you on a tour through the silver
screen's back lot of life with film news, reviews, interviews
and soundtracks.
HOME TAPING I.N.T.E.R.N.A.T.I.O.N.A.L. 6-9:00PM
200 proof live mixes, remixes and kilomixes.
STOMP ON THAT BOPPA-TRON 9:00-MIDNIGHT
House hip hop, funk, new beat. The latest & greatest in dance
floor grooves.
SOUP STOCK FROM THE BONES OF THE ELEPHANT MAN 12:30-3:30AM
Independent music from around the world ranging from
spoken word to the latest in club tunes.
SATURDAYS
THE SATURDAY EDGE 8:00-NOON
Vancouver's biggest and best acoustic/roots/rogue folk music
radio show.
6th: SPECIAL 200th edition
POWERCHORD 12:15-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show with the underground
alternative speed to mainstream metal; local demo tapes,
imports and other rarities.
SATURDAY EVENING MAGAZINE 6:00PM
The first and finest news programme. Giving you everything
and more.
RADIO LAND midnite-3:00am - NEW!
Hey, this is your show! Send in your tapes c/o this station and
I'll play 'em at least once. I'm looking for new stuff, never
heard sounds. Don't worry about audio quality, radio is for
communication.
c
FM102-
CABLE102
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SATURDAY       SUNDAY
THE CiTR MORNING SHOW - BBC NEWS AT 8:00
Breakfast
with the
Browns'
Soup de Jour
Linus
Lovelace
Pest
Control
Way Too
Early
i*1
CITR AFTERNOON REPORT; NEWS, SPORTS, WEATHER
Total
Harmonic
Distortion
Blood On
The Saddle
Tribes &
Shadows
Spanish
Show
Spike
Bird
Droppings
Fine Lines
The Idealist
Hour
W*1
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Access
Narduwar
Absolute
Value of
Noise
NEWS, SPORTS, WEATHER, GENERIC REVIEW, INSIGHT AND DAILY FEATURE
Sports Digest
Hot
Pink
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Show
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Jazz
Show
Environmental!
Scatology
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Show
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Knight
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Arts Cafe
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Vinyl
Frontier
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The Bops
Can-Con
Job
Live From
Thunderbird
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Eating
Vomit
Home
Taping
International
Stomp On
That
Boppa-Tron
Soup Stock
From The
Bones
of the
Elephant
Man
The
Saturday
Edge
Are you
Serious
Music?
Power
Chord
Megablast!
Deadly
Doom
Sat. Magazir
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Night
Tunes
'R'Us
Radio
Land
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and
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i. Magazine
Just Like
Women/
Electronic
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Signals
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In The
Grip
Of
Incoherency ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC 8:00AM-NOON
Schoenberg, Varese, Berio, Carter, Maxwell Davies, Bus-
sotti, Scelsi, Xenakis, Schafer, Cage, Webem - Artistic Evel
Knievels. Nouveau post-modem instrumental compositions
in a classical vein.
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12:15-3:00PM
Reggae, Rock Steady, Soca and Ska.
THE BLUES AND SOUL SHOW 3-6:00PM
Blues, Blues, Blues and every second Sunday, the best of Post
War Chicago blues and more.
ELECTRONIC SMOKE SIGNALS 6:30-9:00PM
Information, news interviews and political analysis from the
global cultures of resistance.
7th: Live round table debate from 1989 BC Environmental
Network Congress.
21st: Alar's last show: 'The Decline and Fall of Empires,
Egos, & Eggheads" Heroes & Martyrs.
JUST UKE WOMEN 6:30-9:00PM
'Feminist news and analysis and a broad range of women's
music.
COMMUNITY
CiTR provides free airtime for Community Access by community groups and organisations. If your group would like to
say something, please phone the CiTR Community Access
Director, 228-3017.
ois^t^s
ARTIST
TITLB
LEGENDARY PINK DOTS
THE GOLDEN AGE
NEW ORDER
TECHNIQUE
CLOCK DVA
THE HACKER
GUADALCANAL DIARY
PUP FLOP
MARSHMALLOW OVERCOAT
TRY ON THE...
THROWING MUSES
HUNKAPA
SIOUXSIE A THE BANSHEES
KILLINGJARir
•FRONT LINE ASSEMBLY
DIGITAL TENSION DEMENTIA
THE PIXIES
MONKEY GONE TO HEAVEN If
VARIOUS ARTISTS
SUBPOPI00
MORRISSEY
LAST OF THE FAMOUS
LOVE AND ROCKETS
MOTORCYCLE If
ROBYN HITCHCOCK AND...
QUEEN ELVIS
UPTOWN
DOPE ON PLASTIC l*'
NASTY ROX INC.
CASH
LOU REED
NEW YORK
XYMOX
OBSESSION ir
BLACK SUN ENSEMBLE
LAMBENT FLAME
'VARIOUS ARTISTS
MR. GARAGE'S NEIGHBOURHOOD
BARRY ADAMSON
THE MOSS SIDE STORY
THE DEAD MILKMEN
BEELZABUBBA
WEE PAPA GIRLS
THE BEAT. THE RHYME. THE NOISE
•NOMEANSNO
SMALL PARTS ISOLATED...
N.WA.
STRAIGHT OUT OF COMPTON
PSYCHIK TV.
ALLEGORY AND SELF
VIOLENT FEMMES
S
•S.N.F.U.
BETTER THAN A STICK IN~
CICCONE YOUTH
WHITE* ALKUM
•THESTRATEJACKETS
ARE YOU CRAZY
DAGMAR KRAUSE
TANK BATTLES
THE DESCENDANTS
HALL RAKER UVE
HE SAID
TAKE CARE
K-9 POSSE
S/T
PANKOW
ART AND MADNESS
SMERSH
THE PART OF THE ANIMAL-
*UIC
LIKE 90
JUSTICE
THE DESOLATE ONE
THELONIOUS MONSTER
STORMY WEATHER
THE BEVIS FROND
TRIPTYCH
SKIN YARD
HALLOWED GROUND
SLAMMIN'WATUSIS
KINGS OF NOISE
VARIOUS ARTISTS
WINGS OF DESIRE
•GRUESOMES
HEY!
•DENOTES CANADIAN ARTIST
CO
l*@$^
tyULwf      (tyt,       \Qi4t*«n4«t
-RELAX—
Live Music
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COMING TO CiTR IN JUNE ON WEDNESDAYS 10AH-1PH
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Hot bands  '/~S
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I0l.<hri     *
NARDWUAR   THE    HUfAAN    SERVIETTE   PRESENTS:
-(HATS cT^-WS^/^y/
<* GRUESOMES
THr VINDICATORS
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™B 5MUG6LEKS
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FfUDAY   MAY   1*TH - 7:30
CI MOE p. ELLA   &ALLR.OOAN   (AAAIN AND HTHj
ALL   AGES!
INFO.
PH. 92 6-9 W
MAY 1989 21 Og Music presents heaps of fun sweaty garage music
for your listening pleasure! Try these:
THE GRUESOMES-HEY!
See 'em here on their 3rd Canadian tour, then take
home this wild stuff! The world-best 60s band and
more!
MISTER
GARAGER'S
NEIGHBOURHOOD
What Wave mag picks 17 top garage combos across
North America, inc. Gruesomes, UIC, Cynics, Thee
Fourgiven, Mystic Eyes, & Calgary's Vindicators!
UIC
LIVE/LIKE
NINETY
This LP finally captures this Ontario band's great
sweaty MC5-Stooges-punk live show! "Great R&R"
—Rear Garde, Mtl.
" CAPTAIN
CRUNCH
& LET'S
DO  LUNCH
Weird Mtl. female psych-pop, like Shaggs meet Jesus
& Mary Chain, with ex-Terminal Sunglasses!
DIK  VAN    fBifcvswK/fcesj
DYKES,"
WASTE
-MOR-
VINYL
Greatfunny punkygaragy2nd LP! Rezillos-Ramones-
Cramps with a goofy Canadian slant. "Fun fun fun
fast...basic stupidity" —Rear Garde
In the past 6 years, Og Music's released fun stuff by
over 40 great Canadian undergrounders.
Get these fine recent LPs at cool local stores, listen to
campus radio for a sample, or get our free mail-order
catalogue of over 150 neat disks!
OG MUSIC —————
Box 182, Station F, Montreal H3J 2L1
22   DISCORDER
When you catch yourself thinking,
"Fm mellow as Hell", yon gotta
start to wonder. Every day — even
as we speak — the language is being devalued
— particularly in the colloquial realm. Nifty
slang becomes cliche overflight.
To wit, even that wonderful alliterative
phrase "Hip and happ'nin'" ~~ the byword, if
you will, of disenfranchised youth, has been
milked for all it's worth. My own example
above represents the situation quite accurately.
-Hell" is dead of overuse. "Hell has left the
building..." Hell is all-pervasive, in fact, in
order to be considered Hip and happ'nin*, the
catchphrase Hell must take a front scat in your
vocabulary.
Ah yes. The emasculation of the mother
tongue. (Waiiiit a minute there...) Some might
reason that colloquial talk by very definition
thrives on cliches. Feeds on me ferule ground of
cool expressions and shits out unglnrified lumps
of banality. Others might think, "Who gives a
fuck about all this language crap anyway?"
Fuck. Now there's a perfect example. Admittedly, in the right context it can still pack a
powerful punch (no, not the act, the word itself),
but sadly, this once-famed expletive is another
victim of mass marketing. Ya wanna see something taken to its furthest logical extension,
check out Blue Velvet (Actually more than just
the word fuck is taken there, but hey.)
I remember in Grade Eight when the cool
phrase just entering widespread usage was
"Excellent!" (heavy emphasis on the "ex" there),
a kinda groovin' guy, expounded his fears about
this burgeoning popularity. "I mean, after
v Excellent*, what is there? What'll we use when
kExcellent' has lost its meaning because of
overuse?!" A man of foresight. Today "Excellent" languishes on the back burner, though still
possessed of acertain suave polyester-like early
*80*s quality. (NB—Whoops, since this article
was written, Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure
has resurrected the term plunging this paragraph
into obsolescence. Revenge of Excellent...)
Let us backtrack to the Cod/Hell thing.
Yep, even God, that venerable ''ude, is getting
the short end of the stick. It has got to the point
where, in an effort to convey supreme greatness,
a band was the other day described as being
"beyond God".This leaves us in astatc of severe
theological quandary, being as how, if a thing is
beyond God, "God" is strippedof any relevance
he may once have possessed .Maybe the speaker
meant "out of this world', butldunno about the
concept of anything being beyond God. Not
unless one has read much too much Nietzsche.
Some words, notably "cool" and the aforementioned "fuck", have to all intents and purposes wormed their way into household-word
status. (Like it or not, all you right-wing fundamentalist Discorder readers.) Attempts to mitigate this effect, such as coming the phrase "Cool
as all Hell", have their own shortcomings. "Sin"
is in the limelight as simile of the month but
liii
again, we are faced with the problem of there
being nothing beyond sin to which we could
later resort.
Granted, a lot still has lo do with timing.
And delivery. A good, hearty "Fuckfdunno"
still beats the pants off a host of contenders.
But then we're faced with retch-inducing
variants from the rich suburbs like "Fuck a
duck" and "Poo on a stick". The former might
perhaps earn redemption if looked upon as a
hostile reaction to the duck sweatshirt craze, but
unhappily since that craze incorporates the word
"fuck" (except with a D), this cannot be. Take
soap to your mouth if ever you hear yourself
using the latter term (Or eating it...)
On the other hand, expressions which
gits introduce into the vernacular often
stand us in better stead than their in-
crowd equivalents. Examples: "harsh"; "dude"
(sometimes preceded by a mind-bendirigly innovative "Hey"); "chick"; "rockin*"; "fucken-
A"; even "unreal" still retains a certain cachet.
And phraseology like "How/.ithangin'?"; "Rock
on!"; "Ya! Slayer kick ass!"; and the classic
"You got 'cr". I draw the line at "party hearty".
But hey, if it was never cool to say it in the first
place, there's less chance of suddenly waking up
and realising "God, I'm uncool!"
Sometimes it's fun and trippy to flashback
to the idioms of one's childhood and/or early
adolescence. "Grab a reality pill" was right up
there for a while and in fact remains a guilty
pleasure of mine. And that ever-impressive,
level-headed comeback, "I know you are, but
what am I?" Or the scathing sarcasm conveyed
by statements like "It's not cold in here or
anything, NAAAO!" And "My name's Sense,
I'm not made." (That last one courtesy of my
brother, who as ayoungster when ordered "Don't
do that" would respond "Make me not!" Kid has
always had problems.)
But, nostalgia ain't what it used to be. All
these handy-dandy rehashed hippy terms, you
know, "groovin"', "bad trip/drugs/acid", the
ubiquitous "hip and happ'nin'", they're all kind
of tired-sounding. I notice however that "slick"
is coming into ascendance, as an adjectival
stamp of approval; probably another sign that
the '70's arc due to come back in vogue any day
now J mean, "SLICK". Can't you just picture it
right up there with " AKS-ellent"? It's glorious.
So, like, aaaaaaaahh... what's the prognosis
for slang in the '90's? (What's the prognosis for
my getting speech therapy, might be more to the
point...)
There is hope ahead. As evinced by the
coining of futuristic new terminology like
"groovin*-ness", "tou-fucking-che" and 'Tantamount to God*', there are yet patches of fertility in the terrible wasteland of generic English.
Too, one can always fall back upon the git
phrases which have so well stood the test of time
(seelitany above). Unfortunately, I think it's too
late for Hell.
Viola Funk the first     OBJECTIVITY: REVOLUTIONARY
ILLUMINATING FASHIONEZiL'lVM
date: june 2nd 1989    time: 8:00pn» to 1:00am
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place: the new york theatre
639 commercial drive
phone 254-5934 NAM
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MUSIC
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