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 d i s c o r df e r
May 2005
that   magazine   from   CiTR   101.9fm
Girl Culture Issue
Valery Gore The Underminer The Nein stripping Margaret Cho The Donnas & The Sights & The Riff Randells Regina Spektor A Northern
Chorus The Ends Marta JaciuDek The Ditty Bops The Lazy Cowgirls Keren AnnJo anna NeWSOttl Ben Lee & Zykos & Har
Mar Superstar Kinnie Starr Caribou Aesop Rock The Riverboat Gamblers Raking Bombs 8C Bakelite & Primes & Parallels Lila Nelson The Distraction
Stinkmitt Bike Comix Hooking Up Po Girl The Cool Jerks The Hatepinks Jean Grae Alexisonfire & Rise Against & The
Fullblast Make Your Own Books Joel Plaskett & Peter Elkas Great Lake Swimmers Pyramids on Mars Fiona Apple Jfvatllleen JLiann.5
Paper Dolls Maplewood Lane The Deadly Snakes Royal VaUCOUVer Pottl Society Housewives Tarot Stars &
Montage & Apostle of Husde & Feist British Sea Power Sodium Glow Death From Above 1979 & controller.controller 8C Elizabeth Steve Vai & Eric Sardinas
The Chicago Women's Liberation Band Queens of the Stone Age & Throw Rag A Cardboard Cut-Out of jL/indSaV -LOlian Guest Edits DiSCORDER- May 2005 a
inrw&ciTR
present
Sun, May 1st
A NORTHERN CHORUS
Jonathan inc.
mohawk lodge
Fri, May 6th
MYKE MADISON
DAN MANGAN
Stephen Hedley + Tea
Fri, May 13th
JEFF JOHNSON
CD Release Party
CROP CIRCLE
Astoria + Dan Swinimer
Fri, May 20tf3
Hinterland
As The Poets Affirm
HEJIRA CD Release
Maplewood Lane + Lynn Coady
Fri, May2o|
themasses
DAVIS TRADING
Lotus Child + Mark Hildreth
Sat, May 28th
BIG TALL GARDEN
Sir Hedgehog, Ryan McMahon
& The Dirty 5 + Orange Whip
"T bhe media club
I3IC LOUNGE
695 CAMBIE ST.    604-608-2871   www.themediaclub.ca
JHELOSTW
_d__z_k_______^?u7 SSa&rr! z_z_mm__i
l^liltl
BILLY & THE LOST BOYS
IN MEDIAS RES tour 10 ftf^
You Say Party^We Sayj)ie^
The Feminists^
@ UBC's Pit Pub*
Ifc'Wk
.independent musicians unite.
Visit wwwJmuproductions.com for full show details
DiSCORDER
That magazine from CiTR 101.9fm. May 2005.
EDITRIX
Kat Siddle
GUEST EDITOR
Cardboard Cut-Out     j
of Lindsay Lohan
AO MANAGER
Jason Bennet
PRODUCTION MANAGE!
Dory Kornfeld
ART DIRECTOR
Graeme Worthy
TA EDITOR
Vampyra Draculea
RLA EDITOR
Kimberley Day
LAYOUT & DESIGN
Graeme Worthy
Jason Bennet
Kimberley Day
Vampyra Draculea
Dory Kornfeld
Kirsten Pudas
Kat Siddle
Jenn Harvey
Kalin Harvey
Aili Meutzner
PRODUCTION
Dory Kornfeld
Graeme Worthy
Kat Siddle
Vampyra Draculea
Jason Bennet
Saelan Twerdy
Alison Benjamin
Robb Breckenridge
Michelle Chua
Andrew Hudson
(These names are listed™
in the chronological     1
order in whjch they
worked on the
production of this
magazine.)
ON THE DIAL
Bryce Dunn
CHARTS
Luke Meat
DATEBOOK EDITOR
KatSiddle
DISTRIBUTION
Lasse Lutick
US DISTRO
Frankie Rumbletone
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society
of UBC
Features
Joanna Newsam
MC Betti Ford
Birds of a Feather Boa
Jean Grae
Girls. They're the Ones
With Boobs.
Vancouver Royal Porn Society
Last Night I Dreamt a Banjo
Saved My Life
p.10
p. 11
p. 12
p. 17
P.?
p. 19
p. 18
Regulars
PerpetuaHy Imminent Disaster
p.5
Riff Raff
p.6
Strut Fret and Flicker
p.6
Textually Active
P.7
Seamrippers
p.8
Mix Tape
P.9
Calendar
p. 14-15
Real Live Action
p. 20-21
Under Review
p.22-23
Charts
p. 25
Something that Happened
p. 25
Program Guide
p. 26-27
The word 'discorder' on the cover is 'm 113pt Didot. It.is
also 'm Didot at Ihe top of this page, but smaller, and the words
beneath are hi Adobe Jenson Pro, as are all the titles throughout
the issue. The skirt, legs* and shoes on the cover belong to our
production manager Dory Kornfeld; the socks belong to Kksten
Pudas, who designed the calendar and drew the the dingbat.
Our body text is set in 7pt, Century Gothic, with 9.6pt leading,
some say it is too small, we disagree.
The cutoufcthat decorate many of the features and articles
are designed to be paper-doH clothes (and unclothes in one
case) for the figure of Kathleen Hanna, which you wBI ftnd in the
centre-spread pull-out calendar.
© DiSCORDER 2005 by the Student Radio Society of the University ol British Columbia. All rights
reserved. Circulation 17,500. Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents are $15 for
one year, to residents of the USA are $15 US; $24 CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to cover
postage). Please make cheques or money orders payable to DiSCORDER Magazine. DEADLINES:
Copy deadline for the June issue is May 15,2005, not that any of you will care. Ad space is available
until May 27 and can be booked by calling Jason at 604.822.3017 ext. 3. Our rates are available upon
request. DiSCORDER b not responsible fbrtoss, damage, or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts,
unsofieited artwork (including but not limited to drawings, photographs, and transparencies),.or
any other unsolicited material. Material can be submitted on disc or in type or via email. As always,
English is preferred, but we wiH accept French. Actuaty, we won't. Send email to DiSCORDER at
discorder@club.ams.ubc.ca. From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be heard
at 101.9 fM as well as through all major cable systemlin the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White
Rock. Call the CiTR DJ One at 822.2487, our office at 822.3017, or our news and sports lines at 822.3017
ext. 2. Fax us at 822.9364, e-mail us at: atrmgr@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at www.citr.ca
or just pick up a goddamn pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1, CANADA. Every Monday play at Urban
n m- ■»    ••••■    -:       _,   _,m "•"••___• ■ "
& Alter Party at the Box
932 Granville St | 604.331.7999 | www.roxyvan.com
tall       ^^Hflflal?
U vyV^iVi/LJ lH<^i __ /\_m_V_t__\ ^~~^y^y_^y^~~'\
THEATRE |     Haf^^H
Golden Shaft Awards
918 Granville St 604.331.7909 www.voguetheatre.com
Produce £r direct your own beer commercial
for
[$10,000.in Cash Prizes,
||'$5,000Rrst priz^yi^fpr^the Golden Shaft Awards!
|&^hancefof^air4time oniTyj
^$37uWSecond prizeT
L$2>0TOjThircl prizei
Deadline for entries Friday, April 29th.
Drop off your Quicktime Movie on CD/DVD at Doolin's Irish Pub to Christine Van
For more info christine@doolins.ca or 604.605.4328
DOOLIN'S
IRISH PUB
irUm,    ~-~—'
cejlar     m*?
DiSCORDER - May 2005
UEFA Champions League
Semi-Finals
Tuesday, May 3 @ 11:30am:: Liverpool vs Chelsea FC
Wednesday, May 4 @ Noon:: PSV vs Milan
UEFA Finals
Wednesday, May 25:: Live @ Noon
Teams to be Announced
POOLING
.HUSH PUB
654 Nelson at Granville I 604-605-4343 I www.doolins.ca
cellar
ell
9pm I
present
TV©
Nerve Sunday^
Bringing the Bemt of Underground Rack
back fact Granville St*
& ban dm, BJ punk, indie rack, hardcore* mkmic reuuemtm
May 1:: Mandown, Sul turro & Crime Scene    ;
May 8:: Nailer & Guests   j§?
May 151 High Five Drive a 6aests
May 22:: NERVE SUNDAYS OFFICIAL LAUNCH PARTY!
with Power Clown
SpreadEagle & Buesti^iip^
May 29
$3.50 M.G.D & Bacardi, $415 J.D.
.Hit
SiilUiHffs^H
Vancouver's No. 1
Brit pop night
For More Info www.shafteburv.com
The Best in British Music performed LIVE!
1006 Granville at Nelson :: 604-605-4350 :: www.cellarvan.com
f^BmiHVIlll [NflBlffljjjfl (illOIIP   "We wrote the book on partying!'
^^ www.granvillevan.com stamb our w*T"
_  rW9___/±TWE JjUff
W^mM WEBS,TB'
Limited time offer
$500 Flash website
package including
2 hours of free updates
All of our websites are custom designs tailored to ft your needs.
To view examples of our work visit our website @
Ol
VI MEDIA
ign
Red Cat Records
4307 Vl«iii St-
i-#^^,-  !
m^mL^im
ISi^M»
pimefiLefiit
rdfaoard cutout
Welcome, gentle reader, to our long-awaited
Girl Culture Issue. Allow me introduce you* Jo this
month's special Guest Editor, a cardboard cut-out
of Lindsay Lohan.
The whole staff at DiSCORDER
has spent the last month muling
l|||rwhat exac%*>Jj$|W culture"
means to us. Knowing that we
hadHhis girt-themed issue ahead
of us made me look around
.' wffhren^lld clarity. Where are the gMs at In arts
' and music? ffkysu watch MuchMusic or listen to
commercial radio they seem to be everywhere. The
major-label entertainment industry is one of the few
job markets that actively seeks out young women
specifically because of their age and gender. Of
course, the positions offered .to them are notoriously .
constricted: there's a narrow palate of character
types to chose from, and the options may only
span the difference between Britney and Beyonce.
Most attempts at creativity and self-expression are
suffocated under, the pressure to make money.
While girls are hired because they are girls, these
industry employers are interested only in the idea of
"girl" as palatable for mass consumption (i.e., shiny,
skimpy, and skinny). While Lindsay Lohan, vanguard
it-girl of the moment, is rumoured to actually be
a real person, her role in the media is no more
meaningful or sustainable than the cardboard cutout propped against a wall in our office. Cardboard
Lindsay and real Lindsay are, for most intents and
purposes, the same thing.
Hopefully, by placing cardboard Lindsay next
to our delightful three-dimensional contributors, we
highlight some of the authenticity, complexity and
dynamism that characterize the best aspects of girl
culture.
We chose to define "girl culture" very loosely,
as the collected cultural expressions by women
that take experiences of being female for granted.
However, we're also aware that, by highlighting
select instances of girl culture in this issue, we also
help construct and participate in the' idea. To
acknowledge fjh&, we chose the Kathleen Hanna
Paper Doli as the visual theme for the issue. By
presenting the patron saint of girls (in my mind) as
a hand drawing, we want to make it clear that
all stories in DiSCORDER, all the band profiles and
interviews and record reviews, are basically hand-
drawings. Attempts at accurate reflections of reality,
they are as inherently flawed and disproportioned
as any other. This goes for all magazines. But we're
interested in more than two-dimensiorts, despite our
(imitations, which is why Kathleen is an interactive
part of the magazine, and not just a photo prop a
la Ms. Mean Girls. (Dress her up as Betti Ford, Joanna
Newsom, or Robyn Volk! Draw your own clothes if
you don't like ours. Or draw your own rockstar girl
roll model. We won't feel insulted.)
In an effort to celebrate girl culture rather
than just write about it, we put a special emphasis
on fhe autobiographical. The features in this issue
capture some of the intersections between music,
community, and growing up girl. We let boys help
us, because boys are a part of our girl culture too.
I hope you like this one, kids. It's dedicated,
naturally, to the girls.
Your Best Friend Forever,
Kat Siddle
This is a picture of DiSCORDER
editrix Kat Siddle highlighting her
authenticity, complexity, and
dynamism by standing next to the
guest editor, a cardboard cutout
of Lindsay Lohan.
ph. 708-9422 * email l>iiddy®redeat.ca
HONEY JAM AUDITIONS
PhemPhat Productions, a Toronto-based company, is searching across the country for women with star power to take
the stage for the 1 Oth anniversary of Honey Jam, Canada's
national all-female talent showcase. Past performers include
Nelly Furtado, Jully Black, Amalia Townsend, Masia One and
more. Phenomenal artists representing all genres from hip
hop to opera are invited to the auditions on June 5, 2005 at
The Mod Club (722 College Street, Toronto). Those outside
Ontario are encouraged to audition by sending a videotape,
photo and bio by June 2. The Honey Jam showcase will then
take place on August 14 at the same venue. For full details
and contact info, visit www.phemphat.com m
ink
D)
^...oiikii
by Bryce Dunn
'    9008
DiSCORDER - May 2005
•A!t§f d wejl-cteserved break (as well-deserved as a
break ^orii^^^^^^S^V self-indulgent cnf iqu^KEI'
one'sfavourife vfoyf releases can be) I m backjMltf ^
■ ears a-bfazfog, ready to split hairs ana topple cfjalrs *
with j|1§KrP&- seven inch affairs for your reading
pleasure.'l^^^^^^pf my absence, you ask? Well,
you can re^^pbout that elsewhere in this her^^^»
but some orWie- bands tf.GHp^iQ to task in $hjy*
here space performSBpIhe big winj^^fe,ih Austin,
including The Lazy CowgW^^^^these tough-as-
nails cats have been known to show a soft spot here
and there for the acoustic side of their rollin' and
tumblin', blue-collar rock and roll, and their latest
single is a prime slice of melancholy. The cut "When It
Comes To You, I've Got No Dreams To Lose," is a song
about hard-luck women, and even harder drinkin' as
a result. The A-side sports a rollicking number called
"You" which could be about anyone, but chances
are it's about you. (Gearhead Records, P.O. Box
421219 San Francisco, CA USA 94142).
Speaking of hard luck gals. The Cool Jerks
are just tryin' to find one on their latest seven-inch
offering, and they'll search the "Whole Wide World"
to'be witfcv.her,-even it's only "For A Little While." The
&&!_$ Jerfe are Memphis crooners Jack Yarber (ex-
|OJ{$!MaM) and friends strummin' and hummin' some
•grftiy guitar blues/roots-flavoured tunes and they
I^^^^^Smile and want to take a trip of my own,
not to find a hard luck gal, but to find more material
.fromThe Cool Jerks.' (Misprint Records, P.O. Box 40211
ISlinville, TN USA 37204).
In the pantheon of punk rock heroes. The Big
Boys hefd a prestigious spot in the hearts of many
Texans for their individuality in an overpopulated
genre and of course, like the credo of Texans, for
doing bigger and better with each album. Who
better to pay tribute to these giants than Texas' own
over-the-top rock royalty The Riverboat Gamblers?
On a joint venture with a band called Throwrag,
who contribute a Pogues-like sea shantey version
of "Red/Green," the Gamblers knock out "Fun, Fun,
Fun" which in all its four-track glory, is exactly that;
snappy, overdriven guitars, gut-busting bottom end
and raspy vocals on a mustard coloured side o' vinyl.
(Dateshake Records, www.dateshakerecords.com);
Our Canadian ambassadors of soul-shakin'.
foot-stompin' rock and roll. The Deadly Snakes, want
to remind you that they can't sleep at night knowing
that you've forgotten the greatness that was their
last album Ode To Joy. In The Red has issoed a
double 7" memory-enhancer which includes their
aforementioned "smash hit" (can you believe a clip
of the video for that song is used in the Muchmusic
Loud commercial fer chrissakes?!). But you also get
the bonus original "Nasty Boots", and two awesome
covers of Eddie Floyd's "Big Bird" and Neil Diamond's
"Shot Down," perfect examples of the rock and soul
influences prevalent in the Snakes sound. Help curb
their addiction to Nyquil by adding this fine piece of ■
vinyl in your record collection.-(In The Red Records,
P.O. Box 50777, Los Angeles CA. USA 90050).
Some stuff for the skinny tie/white belt crowd
now: The Distraction and The Hatepinks give us
two tunes apiece of pogo-inducing punk rock.
The Distraction sing (if you consider Johnny Rotten
sucking helium balloons singing) the merits of "False
Advertising" and being "Too Late For The Trend," with
their French counterparts doing a admirable job of
covering Swell Maps' "International Rescue" and an
original "Bored On Pills." Boring this isn't, however,
as I was prone to bouncing around the room when
playing these tracks. (Lollipop Records, 7 Imp.
Monsegur 13016 Marseille, France).
The Ends bring this column to an end with two
new mid-tempo tracks of '77 punk crossed with
New York gutter rock. On "New Rome" the band,
demonstrates their affinity for The Sex Pistols with
some down-tuned choppy .guitar propelling the
swagger into "Saw It Comin," a little more melodic
and peppy, reminiscent of Stiff Utile Fingers or
Cocksparrer. The vocals are raunchy and beer-
soaked, but not grating, and the band plays loose
but not sloppy, with the two guitars given equal time
to show their chops. If you like this single, check out
their full-length feature Sorry...XOXOXO on Pelado
Records. In the meantime, this 7' is on...(Dirtnap
Records, P.O. Box 21249 Seattle, WA USA 98111).
Well enough from me, it's time you went out
and got some of these rekkids. Happy hunting and
see you next month!
*"■
0)£fUf fe(S
L-*i
FREEPORT, TEXAS
Sodium Glow
Wednesday 9 Aprlfr ,•
international Village
Who'd have thought that the commercial disaster
commonly knovm^^^pseltdwn Mall would be hiding
such stunning wasteland behind the barricades?
ThanWtrt^fr^as sniffed <^^^fe^^ft|fr Glow, a
troupe of graduates from SFU's School for fhe
Contemporary Arts, who activated JWpjl^dreamlike
hybrid of site theatre and soap opera Vast and slick,
the space boasted an entire wall of floor-to-ceiling
windows overlooking a twinkling tangle of. viaducts
and skytrains—eerily apt for a play about corporate
greed.
In terms of story cffiS- character, Freeport,
Texas is classic Dynasty-style Americana—movers
and shakers, frustrated trophy wives, rebellious
daughters and financial scandal—but playwright
Michael Springate has included a few subplots that
delfoerately mess with the formula. One, concerning
a young stripper smuggled out of Russia as human
cargo, gives greed a global face; another enabled
some jabs at America's preposterous self image.
("No, you didn't beat us," a Russian immigrant
corrects his Texan boss, apropos the fall of the Soviet
Union, "A bad system collapsed.")
Although it often seemed like the characters
had tumbled out of a television set, the staging was
more experimental and the company met this stylistic
challenge beautifully. Diector Olivia Delachanal
treated the performing area as a neutral field,
scattering scenes around it while our focus rotated.
Aretha Aoki's choreography worked best when
most naturalistic (some of the abstract sequences
came off a bit artificial and strained) and her use of
fcj'Penelope Mulligan
physical theatre was ingenious. The actors gave us
textured, believable characters and stayed true to
them. The only mistep was requiring a young woman
to play an eccentric old crone. This sort of up-aging
is always a minefield of physical and vocal cliche
and tt definitely didn't work here. But that's a minor
kvetsch. it's always a thrill when secret places are
penetrated tSpPtiiX.
fOXYMOrdNlC
Coriograph Theatre
- Thursday 7 April
Firehall Arts Centre
k^tW. Caulfield could probably run a degree course
in Women's Studies from her dance studio. In 2002
the local choreographer and performer explored
patriarchy's erosion of the goddess in Eve, a work
which dissected classical mythology with a lethal
combination of kinetic sensuality and academic
precision. In her first full-length solo show, she shakes
down classical ballet and documents its parallel
course in neutralizing female power. Unlike the
earlier work, which employed a teasingly didactic
tone to present a thesis, fOXYMORONIC felt like a
very personal journey in which Caulfield was using
dance to work things out.
As if to allude to what had been lost, the piece
began with the enormous shadow of a Valkyrie
looming across the upstage wall. This awesome
presence would recur like an avenging, angel amid
the firebirds, swans, and other trapped or enfeebled
chickadees in the classical repetoire. When Caulfield
inhabited the Valkyrie costume with her long, strong •
body, her movements were angular, yet sinuous.
She oozed psycho-sexual power—and for the most
part, played it straight. It was the other stuff that
got detoumed: a tutu bouncing perkily on her hips
proved to be a big, circular saw blade and the
Firebird's flaming headdress was dangled before her
on a pole which she chased, en pointe. with anxious
little bourees. (Actually, there are quite a few male
dancers who'd love to be wearing toe shoes and
tutus, but let's not even start on that.)
Voice-over narration, from text written and
delivered by Caulfield and collaborator Myra Davies,
offered provocative historical insight as well as droll
commentary. ("The swans are dancing for daddy"
was choice.) Tim Matheson's video projections were
so compelling that they were almost a performance
unto themselves—particularly those on a circular
screen suspended, moonlike, downstage. Mark
Taylor's music and sound design was alternately
cheeky, dreamy and disturbing.
As good as the various elements were, they
didn't always feel well integrated. There were long
periods when only narration or video held the stage;
without the dancer's powerful, unifying presence,
the piece seemed fragmented.
Those slight misgivings were all but forgotten,
though, with the closing segment: an exquisite
routine on the stationary trapeze. Working first with
the trap enclosed in a golden cage, and then free
to swing sans cage, Caulfield left us with the perfect
combination of spectacle and metaphor.
ESCAPE
Shirka Urechko
Sat 9 April
The Dance Centre
When a strong, experienced performer looks
frightened and awkward on stage, they're acting,
no? Let's just leave that question hanging for a bit.
One of the most intriguing things about
multimedia artist Shirka Urechko is that while her
work is very clear, her intentions are not. Usually
the ambiguity is wonderful but with Escape, it was
maddening.
The work's undeniable centerpiece was a
marvellous, hooded gown (designed by Montreal-
based Jen Gilpin) which Urechko wore while runnjng
on the spot in profile. It was a lovely image, especially
with Sera Lynd's voice-over of lost-girl poetry adding
to an ■ atmosphere that was both innocent and
sinister.
When Urechko crawled out of the dress wearing
a cat costume that looked like it had been designed
by Hugh Hefner, things began to fall apart. She
prowled and preened in a painfully cute manner and
then sang a plaintive song about a whore. Nothing in
her demeanor betrayed any irony, and the audience
squirmed. She then began a slow striptease, looking
so terrified and abject that I wanted to call out that
it was alright, she could stop. Of course I didn't and
eventually she was naked on her hands and knees,
dry heaving. The vulnerability was excruciating.
Taken at face value. Escape seemed to be
about facing fear, doing battle with one's inner critic
and making the leap to freedom. Yet there was no
triumph or even defiance from our protagonist—only
an expression of defeat. So was Urechko attempting
a parody or was this performance truly tough for
her? That I'm even having to ask means she has, in a
sense, succeeded. tLULS
cuwt
OR, THE BT FRIEND WH~
SUALLY (pTROYS YOUIL
miiumiiitjiiii
The Undermtner
Or, the Best Friend Who Casualty Destroys Your Life
Mike Albo with Virginia Heffeman
(Bloomsbury Books)
When I started The Underminer, I was so delighted with it that I forced
three of my friends to start reading it BEFORE I HAD EVEN FINISHED IT.
That's how funny it is.
Most people have had friends like the Underminer—masters of
the backhanded compliment who subtly eviscerate you every time
they open their mouths. The truly evil ones actually intend to demolish
your self-esteem, while others are simply insensitive. Family, friend or
lover, constant figure in your life or banished grade-school chum,
everyone recognizes the Underminer. The Underminer is written as a long
monologue punctuated by time and the silent words of the Underminer's
"best friend." It's funniest when read aloud in the voice of your most
undermining friend (to others or to yourself, it's great either way).
Albo and Heffeman take something most of us have experienced
and distill it into a single, hilarious narrative. While the story itself spins
into unreality by the book's conclusion, the idea of the Underminer is no
less true. I honestly think it's safe to say that the phrase "Was that kind
of Underminer?" has entered my permanent social vocabulary. Most
importantly though, it gives4he rest of us a chance to strike back. I know
exactly what my own underrnining friend is getting for her birthday: A
nice hardcover copy of The Underminer, and a note that says, "Read
this and thought of you. I mean, thought you would like it. Love, Kat."
KatSiddle
The Housewive's Tarot
Paul Kepple and Jude Buffum
(Quirk Books/Raincoast Books)
First, J was thrilled with the campy retro art. Each of these cards is<t"
delight to look at. I especially liked the novel way of approaching each
image in a manner true to the officially sanctioned "American Dream"
of 1950's housewives-as welLas the day to day realities of their actual
lives {well, they did add in some subtly subversive twists, too, but that's
the fun of it). For example, in the Major Arcana, Strength is represented
by steel wool scrub pads, the Devil is a leggy and homed chocolate
cake a la the old cigarette box girls, and the Hermit shows the housewife
hidden away in every woman's refuge - the bubble bath. There are fifty
other great examples here, too. I loved the recipe box style packaging,
and only recently noticed that each divider has its own recipe on the
back. Mmm, Neopolitan ice cream cake, must try it.
Of course, looks only get you so far. The real question with a tarot
deck is "does the damn thing work?" So, when I was having one of
those quarter-life crisis moments, I tried the Martini Spread (really it's a
Celtic Cross with a funky new layout). Surprisingly, the answers I got did
Pfiifport my underlying feelings on the issue and seemed to say that my
|||||rrent course of action, involved with art and music but not so much
jllpth money, was really where I should be. And really, no one likes a tarot
Beck that tells you to be practical, give up your silly dreams, and get
Fa real job, so I rank this one as being fairly accurate and likeable. And
that was without downing the recommended two martinis per spread.
Thumbs up all around.
Vampyra Draculea
The Hookup Handbook: A Single Girl's Guide to Living it Up
Andrea Lavinthal and Jessica Rozzier
(Simon Spotlight Entertainment)
This book was really stupid. Funny also, to be sure, but mostly stupid. Why
it was in the actual relationship section instead of the humor section is
beyond me.
And no, I am no prude. I did the hookup thing long back when
it was still called "slutting around" and the heavy praise of the mostly
anonymous roll in the hay for fun is fine by me. What I object to is
the underlying tone of desperation in this book. The authors are really
just promoting the same old bullshit rules of dating but with a sexual
enticement for the men up front. They spend an entire chapter on what
it means if he doesn't call you, or if he does, what it means if he calls
you two days later versus three days later and why you shouldn't really
call him first unless it's playing telephone tag, etc. How pathetic, that
in this day and age, there are still chicks out there too chicken to call
him up themselves. Apparently those of us who do are the same ones
who fix our own flat tires, and apparently there's something wrong with
that—how dare we be independent instead of helpless mice waiting
on our cell phones? Ugh. And the funny thing is that these authors seem
so eager to know what guys like. Well, the truth is they don't ice bullshit
phone games.
The other thing I find a little weird is the heavy promotion of booze
throughout this book—I'm pretty sure if you need to get drunk to do
something, you're not doing it for fun. Sure, loads of people drink a little
for fun in and of itself, but to imply being hammered Is a requirement for
a successful hookup smacks to me of women who aren't ready having
fun at all.
The tone may be playful, but the message is the same as The Rules.
As the closing chapter on hookups fumed long term relationships implies,
women don't want men, they desperately need them, and if what you
have to do to get your prince is fuck a lot of frogs, so be it. It's of course
hidden under a thick layer of "no, we really are doing this just for fun and
empowerment" icing. The authors may say on the dedication that this-
book is for girls who live by their own rules instead of The Rules, but their
text and subtext belie that.
Vampyra Draculea
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lepers |
How To Make A Girly Diary or A Blank Book for a
S|ess Clearly Designated Purpose
bf Georgie Russel and Gaile Addison
Since this is the gri culture is$$s$gwe wanted to combine somefning gjriy with a nod to our upcoming book
show. What's really more "girly Ihen a chary? Thmk Sixteen Candles and broken hearts. Also this teaches you
simple bookbinding techniques that can be used later for other projects.
You Will Need:
Paper (S.5 by 11 photocopy paper to start)
Sewing needle or an awl (the needle should be the
biggest one you can find and the awl the smallest.
Please be careful with sharp objects)
Thread (thick, button thread should be strong
enough) or dental floss
Bone folder (available at stores like Paper-Ya,
it looks sort of like a letter opener. You can use
anything else that is smooth and slightly curved,
like a spoon)
Binding tape (fabric or medium weight paper
works too)
Cutting mat or corkboard
Utility knife/ X-acto blade (new sharp blades!)
Ruler with metal edge
Giue (there are special book PVA glues but white
glue is fine)
Bookboard (very dense and strong, also available
at Paper-Ya)
Paper clips
Cover paper (light-weight)
Ribbon
Scissors (always!)
4^uv£
Bookmaking is done in several steps. You should know what they are before you start, just so you're not
daunted by the project. The steps are:
1. Making signatures
2. Sewing the signatures and joining them together
3. Binding the book
4. Making the cover
5. Finishing it all
Signatures
Signatures are the pages of the book in sections. Each signature requires a stack of five pieces of paper
of identical size. Fold each piece carefully in half and press firmly with a bone-folder (remember: you can use
the back of a spoon, a ruler or any flat smooth hard object). Make at least four or five of these. The more you
make, the thicker your book will be.
Sewing the signatures together h&?&p
Each signature needs to have its pages sewn together before the signatures are joined. For each
signature, undo the pages and paperclip the edges of the pages together. Mark five evenly spaced holes
down the centre, along the fold. The centre hole should be 4.25 inches from each end and the holes should
be 1.5 inches apart from each other. Punch the holes in the paper with an awl or thick needle. Make sure the
pages do not slip and do this on a corkboard or cutting-mat.
Thread a thick needle with a piece of nylon (or strong thread, or dental floss) twice as long as the fold.     Finishing the book
Starting with a hole at either and sew through the holes in sequence in a figure eight pattern. Gently tighten
the slack in the thread before you go on to the next hole. See figure #1.      :t___W___
Pull the thread ends together and tie in a double knot. Cut off the thread leaving one inch from the knot.
Repeat this step to create all your signatures.
Binding the book
Cut two pieces of fabric or medium weight paper that are 1.5 inches wide and 4.5 inches long. These are
the binding tapes. Gently pull the threads from the first and last set of stitches and slip the binding tapes under
them. If you have trouble lifting them you can use a nail file or a needle. These tapes will keep the spine from
slipping. When these are in place, fold them across the pages and glue theminto place. See figure #2
The cover
The simplest cover has a soft spine,
which we are making here. If you are
feeling ambitious there are many sources
of bookbinding information and you can
find other more complicated alternatives.
Cut two pieces of bookboard or
heavy non-corrugated cardboard. They
should be a quarter of an inch larger on
three sides than the book pages. (5.75 x 9
inches). Cutting bookboard can be tricky
as it is quite dense. Use a metal Tuler and a
very sharp blade; the best knife to use is a
thicker utility knife.with the snap off blade,-
and you may need to change blades
several times in this process. The edges of
the bookboard need to be very smooth.
Choose paper for your cover: it should
be lightweight. Wrapping paper works well
and so do colour photocopies. You can
also use fancy textured hand-made papers from stores like Loomis and Paper-Ya. The size of your cover paper
should be one inch longer and wider than the bookboard. (It will be 10 inches in height but the width will be
determined by the number of signatures that you have made.) Line up folded sewn edges of the pages with
the two pieces of bookboard irrrhe shape of a closed book. Fold the cover paper around these. Make sure
that there is a small amount of space that runs between the spine and the signatures. This will allow the book
to close without straining the spine. Mark the cover paper where the bookboards will be placed, making sure
to leave half an inch on the three outside sides of each piece. Then, and this is important, reinforce the strip of
cover paper between the bookboard where the spine is by pasting a piece of tape or fabric down the centre.
This reinforcement should end half an inch from the top and bottom edges of the cover as well.
Coat the entire surface of the cover with white glue and spread it smooth with a scrap piece of board.
Once the glue has been spread, place the two pieces of board in place. Make sure that the cover paper is
smooth. Fold the top half inch over the cover and glue in place. Repeat with the bottom and then either side.
Weigh the cover down with heavy books or other objects while it dries to prevent warping. Once the cover is
dry you are ready to attach the signatures.
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Hold the pages irvlhe folded cover where you want them, make sure that the front and back covers are
even. Glue the top page of the signature stack to the inside front cover of the book, and glue the last page .
to the back cover. There should be an even border around the glued-down endpaper, this will be the pretty
partem or colour of your cover paper. This is how the pages are held in place—look at any hardcover book
you have around and you will see that there is space for your pinky finger between the spine and the pages.
Trust that this will hold.
If you want your book to be a true diary, you have to make your ribbon closure before you glue in the
pages. To do this, glue two pieces of ribbon to the inside covers, from the spine outward, one on the front and
one on the back. The ends pieces must be long enough to tie the book closed. Glue the endpapers in place
over these. These ribbons will provide maximum security for all ypur dirty secrets. Decorate the cover in any
girly way that you see fit.
If you still have a stomach for books after you finish this project, please come to the Seamrippers
Book Show. The opening is May 14th from 7-11pm and the show runs until June 11th when we are visited by
the bookmobile (www.mobilivre.org). For more information and gallery hours check our website at www.
seamrippers.ca
Joining the signatures to each other
Re-fold two signatures and stack them so that the edges line up. Have the spines facing you. Thread a
long piece of whatever thread you are using. Sew through the five holes on the bottom signature, from left to
right and then sew through the holes on the top signature from right to left. Then tie your thread to the leftmost
stitch on the bottom signature, which will attach the two signatures on both ends. Add a third signature on
top of the pile, and retrace the holes on it from left to right, then loop the end through the rightmost stitch of
the signature below. Do this until all your signatures are connected.
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kornfeld
To get to the room where ffie stripte
is, you have to walk past the halNvcify where the doctors'*
offices are, down a few stews, ancMhrough fberoom>wlth'
five floor-to-ceiling brass pom. The«pace blijee any other
exercise space with smooth floors and mirrored walls, and
the actual workout session is just like any pther aerobics
class. It is a hip-hop dance class combined with yoga
for people with no attention span, except the instructor
keeps reminding us to "let our hands wander," points out
the appropriate moments to "pretend you're taking off
your shirt," and has us slapping our bums every time we
bend at the wdist.
This is the Aradia Fitness studio at 16th and Granville,
the hot new exercise sensation that has been written up
in all the publications required to prove that this risque
workout can't really be all that edgy. Articles in the
Georgia Straight, the Vancouver Sun, the Vancouver
Courier, the Metro, and others all dutifully repeat the
studio's tag line, "Explore your sexy side!" as they praise
Aradia for finally providing a place for women to be
sexy and sexual. The thing is> though, that all this talk
about taking the taboo out of stripping seems less about
embracing the often-marginalized existence of women's
sexuality and much more about simple capitalism and
stark business sense.
Aradia fitness, so the story goes, was started by
two women, Tracy Gray and Ghristine Boyer, who were
both dance and fitness instructors, but never strippers.
They just thought that pole dancing seemed like fun, but
couldn't find anywhere that offered classes. Thus, Aradia
Fitness was born, and since opening a year ago, it has
expanded greatly. They offer a wide variety of classes,
from lapdancing to a much more demure "Sensual
Stretch & Strength" course. They are opening franchises
in Edmonton and Toronto. They are launching a Bne of
clothing specifically designed for pole dancing fitness.
They sell brass poles for $490. As for the 'sex' side of it
aH, weU, in the Vancouver Sun article one enthusiastic
participant in the studio's classes was quoted as saying
"This is not about stripping...Stripping is objectifying. This is
empowering. It's embracing femininity."
In her article, "Lip Service on the Fantasy Line."
Feminist Anthropologist Kka Hall writes about how women
working as phone sex operators complicate "notions
of power in language, because the women working
within the industry consciously produce a language
stereotypically associated with women's powertessness in
order to gain economic power and social flexibility." The
same can be said for stripping, where women consciously
objectify themselves to make money. The feminist analysis,
supported by. UBC professor Becki Ross, is that stripping is
women's work and needs to be understood, historically
and academically, as something that has existed for
a long time and has been used by many women to
their advantage. Dismissing stripping as degrading or
is simplistic and dangerous; it also ignores th&
ctass issues inherent in Hie profession. Stripping is mostly
the domain of undm-edveated women with limited job
prospects who realize thatiney can make a comfortable
wage by showing off their boobs—and though they have
to put themselves in an obviously objectified position,
S^^^^wpowerfrom that.
So it's frustrating, then, that this mainstream
incarnation of stripper kitsch just wants to pretend-that
strippercize ha* nothing to do with this. The instructors
have dance arid aerobics training, not field experience,
and the winking in the mirror and running your hands
through your hair while doing fhe workout just seems like
an afterthought. Women are encouraged to "explore
their sexy side" by emulating striptease without any
acknowledgement of what it actually is. The studio is not
decorated with posters of Gypsy Rose Lee or other famous
strippers in history, and it is clear that these classes are not
professional training. This is exercise. You are supposed to
wear yoga pants, not stiletto heels.
Recently I read an autobiographical travelogue
called Strip City, in which ex-stripper Lily Burana goes on a
stripping road trip across America to exorcise her stripping
demons before getting married. In the book, she writes
about the competition between dancers, the sleazy club
owners, the stage fees that strippers are required to pay,
the increasingly explicit things that women are required
to do to make money, and psychological "stripper
damage." Burana is not hesitant to admit that she likes
stripping and the money she makes, but she doesn't gloss
over how hard the job really is. At one point, she says
that she often wonders if the power through deliberate
objectification theory is just a rationalization women use
to soothe their beat-up sense of self.
When women use that rationalization, they talk
about the money and the power they get from exploiting
men's weakness. They rarely talk about how stripping
makes them feel more sexy. Stripping is a job, and they
know it. For Aradia founders Tracy and Christine, stripping
is a job too, but in a much different sense. Instead of
capitalizing on men's desire to see bared breasts and
cleanly shaven twats, they are capitalizing on women's
desire to play with the taboo around sex and power. I
don't want to look down at anything that encourages
female sexuality, and I'm pleased that the courses they
offer are not about choreographing a show for your lover
but about looking in the mirror and reminding yourself, as
the instructor insisted, that "you're hot, you're sexy, you
know that, right girts?" SM, I find it distressing that ft is so
easy and profitable to take something as complicated as
stripping and polish and shine it and disassociate it from
anything real.
Jf?
This is a picture of Dory Kornfeld
standing   next  to   a   cardboard
cutout of Lindsay Lohan. DiSCORDER - May 2005
T¥»Of » jjt; *_0& * ^Uk^l^^^t^Bi_^^_^,
Joanna Newsom
Narwhals, Tractors, Unicorns
Joanna Newsom made my Vancouver springtime even more sublime.
Her first full-length solo effort came out in this past November, and
didn't make it into my reverent hands until January, due to financial
constraints. I didn't want to listen to it without actually purchasing the
tangible record, cover art and all. I'd only seen the video for "The
Sprout and the Bean" the first single, before I bought the album months
later, and didn't let myself see it again before I made the anticipated
purchase.
It's a love, hate, or tear inducing album. I listened to it non-stop
for days, singing along as much as possible (occasionally in very
inappropriate situations), feeling even more blissed out than normal. My
roommate was nonplussed. A few friends were shocked and irritated by
her voice. My sister, then enduring yet another long separation from her
touring musician love, couldn't hear two seconds of any track without
bursting into tears. The rawness and emotion in Ms. Newsom's inimitable
vocal style pokes and provokes.
The album, The Milk Eyed Mender is a folktastic soundscape of
dramatically whimsical proportions. The cover art is exquisite, a rare
tactite offering in world of digital art. Furnished by her sister Ms. Emily
Prince, embroidered images of narwhals, tractors, and unicorns float in
bubbles around the artists' embellished photograph, a stunning visual
accompaniment to Joanna's equally distinctive music. From first to last
track, the album is a perfect fusion of classical composition, feminine
folk, and Joanna's mind-blowing lyrics and vocals. All communicated
via a Lyon & Healy style 15 harp, an electric piano, an acoustic piano,
and a harpsichord.
In the tradition of only writing about artists I love, I knew I had to
try and interview Joanna. After a few phone calls last month. Drag City,
her lucky label, made it clear that it wasn't going to happen. She was
about to leave on a European tour and did not want to deal with the
press in general. In most cases I would let it go, but I didn't feel like
DiSCORDER should have a girl culture issue without a little something
about my favourite harp toting girl. So I've combed the internet and
resorted to using bits and pieces of interviews conducted by others.
Not the usual quality journalism you're used to from us, but acceptable
given the super woman at hand.
So first things first. Girlhood. How does where you grow up
shape your artistic body? I grew up in Abbotsford. Despite an ideal
geographic location, the beauties of the Fraser Valley are just slightly
marred by the worst air quality in western Canada and a few too many
fundamentalist churches and strip malls. My adolescence in this cultural
. wasteland Was replete with angst ridden diary entries, skipping school
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to smoke pot in parking lots, and shoplifting from various businesses in
the aforementioned strip malls. Most twelve to seventeen year-olds
living in the suburbs experience a similar reality: a feeling of entrapment,
isolation and despair. Our energy and latent talents are channelled
into crazed partying and drug consumption. Rather than being able
to reaUze or even identify our potential, we squander it in a Wal-Mart
parkade.
Compare this to Nevada City, a lively Californian gold rush town.
A section about live music on the community website actually lists
Joanna's harp teacher as a resource and an artist available for eventsl
"The community that I grew up in was very musically rich. Terry Riley
[considered to have launched the Minimalist composing movement in
the mid 1960's] was our neighbour" Joanna told Alexander Lawrence
in-2003. "There were a lot of composers living in Nevada City. There is
a composer's guild there. Howard Hersh, Terry Riley, and Jay Sydeman
and a punch of new composers all live there. I love Terry Riley. I love
a lot of his piano stuff especially. I heard some stuff at my school. He
didn't teach there but he had a strong relationship with my school."
Add a similarly talented family: "I played piano for about two years
when I was a kid. I didn't play long enough to be really great. I started
playing harp about fourteen years ago. My parents are musicians. My
mom was aiming for a while to be a concert pianist, but she became a
doctor instead. So she still plays piano, and conga drums, and hammer
dulcimer. She plays all sorts of stuff. My Dad plays guitar. My sister plays
cello. My brother plays drums." In fact, Joanna may have a family band
in the works, now that she's on a record label. "If I have a label funding
a record, I am going to have my family flown to one spot. We are going
to do at least one song. They can all sing better than me. They have
great pitch. Especially my sister she has an amazing voice. I am going
to get all their various talents on my CD." A whole family of Newsoms
might just push me over the edge.
High school? The music program at in my school district got
eliminated in grade six. By high school there were a few volunteer band
teachers, but nothing institutionalized. Joanna attended secondary
school with alt rock luminaries Zach Hill and Spencer Seim, now of Hella
and The Advantajge fame. Joanna must have had some pretty rad
English teachers too, as her lyrics cast inspired shadows over the usual
folk fare. Consider the following stanza from "En Gallop": "Never get so
attached to a poem/You forget truth that lacks lyricism/Never draw so
close to the heat/That you forget that you must eat." What brings about
such fully realized poetics? "I am always trying to write. Lyrics are very
different: There is a clear line between that and a poem. Something
By Sasha Webb
that has been a source of great excitement and delight for me is this
idea that I get to rhyme. That is a big "no no" for a lot of writing. In high
school, we studied a lot of poetical forms. I was really interested in the
math that was involved and the strange live break ups. That gave me
a great amount of respect for a rhymed stanza. The way that words fit
together is always interesting to me. I love words".
It is clear that Joanna's skill is the combined product of a rich
cultural environment, years of hard work on her part, and perhaps a few
lucky stars in the sky the night she was conceived. I fell in love with Bjork
at the tender age of twelve; her voice, perhaps not even as distinct as
Joanna's, had me rapt at first listen. Ten years later, god has sent me
yet another elfin offering, this time from my own continent! If this means
I get to see her live before another ten years have passed, I'm ecstatic.
And I'm even more ecstatic that there will always be women out there
making soul piercing, innovative, and just plain beautiful music.
This is a picture of Sasha Webb
pretending to exchage a knowing
glance with a cardboard cutout of
Lindsay Lohan. Betti Ford
StinkMitt MC Sounds Off
By Caroline Walker
11
There are so many questions we would like to ask former
CiTR DJ Maren Hancunt, AKA MC Betti Ford. As one
smeary, beery third of Vancouver's only "Trailer Clash"
Bo, StinkMitt, Hancunt/Ford raises hell and eyebrows
onstage with MC Jenni Craige (who moonlights as
Lady Precise) and Dr. Do This. Caroline Walker caught
up with Hancunt after the band's last gig to quiz her
(jbout Peaches, Femcon, and Doing It (Yourself).
You were involved wtth the National Campus and
Community Radio Association (NCRA) as a gender
consultant for the Women's Hands and Voices initiative.
Could you describe the purposes of the initiative?
Women's Hands and Voices is an initiative to get more
women's music heard on the air, and also to get
women's perspectives heard on the air, because
college and campus radio is lacking involvement
from women—I think it is 30% or less, maybe 20%
women, 80% men at a station. So what happens is
that women's music gets left out. It's a vicious cycle,
because less women get played on air, and then
there is less money and interest in women's bands,
so less get recruited, so less women are played on
air. Women's Hands and Voices is not a perfect
mechanism—nothing is—but it is an attempt to-
address that vicious circle, in the hopes that if we
play and promote more women on air, then record
labels and distribution will get more interested in
women artists. Women artists are rad and they
are underrepresented on college radio, for many
reasons.
It's a pain in the butt to be looking for Femcon that's
indie and Canadian and recent and all that stuff,
but if you do look you will find it. I was on the radio
when the internet was not as thorough as it is now.
I started in '98, and so at the time we'd dig through
filing cabinets for names of bands. The point is that it
is there. If you take the time you can totally program
your show according to Femcon. You only need 30%.
The other thing with Femcon is that it doesn't have to
be an all-women band. If you're playing a Pixies song,
talk about Kim Deal, talk about how she wrote or she
produced. Play bands that are produced by women,
play it up, just talk about it. It's about reminding the
audience that women are always making music,
that we're always a part of it, that music would not
be being made if it weren't for \
So what do you have to say to programmers who
fear that these regulations will limit their freedom
(especially when mediums for free expression are
increasingly marginalized)?
Your freedom is not being taken away. We're asking
you to program 30% of your program to be women's
music. We're not telling you it has to be country. Go
find it—if you don't like any music being made by
women in your genre, then get on the mic and tell
us that you think all music being made by women in
your genre sucks ass, and you don't want to play it
because it's shit. Because we don't believe you. I get
suspicious when you don't feel your freedom is being
taken away by the indie requirement or the Cancon
requirement but suddenly you feel your freedom
[is being taken away by Femcon], I get suspicious.
Maybe it isirot your freedom you are losing, it is your
privilege, and you need to look at why you want to
hold a privilege over anybody else in your world, and
I   if that's really doing you any good.
When we're talking about issues- of justice and
equality we have to really refrain from looking at
things in a black and white way. We can't think
"Oh, because I'm forced to promote this person I
am being robbed of my freedom." It's not a black
and white thing. It's about compassion, and love,
and trying. It's a compassionate thing, it's a beautiful
thing, I don't see how it is detrimental. And we are
not beyond affirmative action because women
only make—excuse me, white, straight, middle class,
able-bodied women—make 71 cents to every dollar
a man makes. Women of colour make less, women
with disabilities make less. First Nations women make
the absolute least. If you are a First Naljions woman,
who's a lesbian, with a disability, do the math, you're
making a lot less.
How did you get to know Peaches?
I got to know Peaches because I used to work at CiTR,
and her CD came into the station sometime in J 999
or 2000. It was an EP, and it just looked like a folk CD-
there was a sketch on fhe cover that looked folky—
so I never bothered listening to it 'cause I thought it
was folk music. No one actually bothered to listen to
it for a couple months, finally I looked at it again, and
it said "Lovertits" and "Suck and Let Go" n' shit so
I thought, maybe this shit is dope. I put it on and it
was wicked, so I started playing it on my radio show
all the time. I played it for a couple years. I met her
management and her Jabel because I contacted
them to interview her; they came to Vancouver
for New Music West and they wanted to score pot,
so they scored pot through me. I had just started
StinkMitt and I invited them to the show, not because
I wanted to get anything out of it but I think I was
trying to end the conversation. "Oh we got a show
I'm in a band, this is our second show but come."
They came and they loved us and asked us to do a
record for Teenage USA.
Even though The Teaches of Peaches, her first record,
was on Teenage, we actually met. her because my
friend Denise Benson, who does Rock for Choice,
wrote her liner notes for Fatherfucker. So I said,
"Denise, can you email Peaches cause she's coming
to Vancouver? Can you say these guys are the
shit, they should open for you?" So we opened for
Peaches at Richards with Electrocute in 2003 for
$100. She saw us and she loved us; and so ever since
then she's helped us out.
You have a big European tour aH lined up. How did
you organize this after StinkMitt's management was
"shuffled"?
We did it ourselves, totally indie. We did all the
booking, we sent really crappy bums in envelopes I
taped together from other envelopes that were sent
to me. But we are playing tons of huge venues... if
your band is really good, just network. That's how you
do it. It's funny, I used to work with Lydia Lunch a lot.
She did this speaking engagement where she talked
about creating without a budget. How you can get
your art made when you don't have a budget? The
best thing to do is network. Just hook up with people
that are doing what you do, see if you can do them
a favour, if they can do you a favor. That's how we
got this huge tour, just networking and doing favors
in exchange—everyone that got us a show gets a
show?in Vancouver through us. If there is a moral to
this story, it's that you can do it yourself.
This is a picture of Carofine Walker
giving an enthusiastic "thumbs
up" next to a cardboard cutout of
Lindsay Lohan.
B^ Billy and Krista
Bones Had A
Baby Boy!
April 23rd, 2 AH
Raise A Fuss!
Raise A Holler!
■ ; I ■ J kM = I
Tije Best of
FEST #3 '
l___J*!!** i*B|tfN^»Wls»   ". I
masterpieces both visually and aurally!
n9K0AU«|jumiiB|| ■
nEian»r*iittiHir,2iii|
THE LO0OST*D.O.A,
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I THE CANDY BAR!
12866 Wngsway (at Victoria)«(604)877-10661
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FOND OF TIGERS!
SATURDAY May 20
BELLA
THE PARALLELS
RAIN&THESIDEWALK
THEPOLIAKFALLS
SATURDAY May 28
JOHN FORD
THEMANVILS
-HE CANDY BAR
20^ Kingsway (at Victola|»(804}877-1066
| MUSIC WASTE |
lliurs May 19 • Hie Media Club
IMMACULATE MACHINE
REGIONAL HATS
PARLOUR STEPS
BASEMENT SWEETS
Doors: 9:15pm, Show: 9:45pm
Fri May 20 • The RaifwayClub j
Flemish Eye Recording Artists from Calgary
THECAPEMAY
BW SINISTER
THE CHRISTA MIN
PRINTS
WAY OUT WEDNESDAYS
1     atthe RAILWAY CLUB -9pmto Midnight
Wed May 11
SALMON ARM
CHAMPION ALBERTA (Calgary)
^^"        HANDS(
Wed May 18    ,
Melinda'sB-day^rtyw/
BUGHOUSE 5
KNAWS <*"
CHRIS READ'S MIDNIGHT DRAGON
mM um as
COSTA VERDE o
The POKIOK FALLS
COLLAPSING OPPOSITES
Sat May 21
The Anza Club (8th & Ontario)
Mint Recording Artists from Winnipeq
NOVILLERO
The NEINS CIRCA
CADEAUX
The SOMMERLAD from Calgary
Also: DJOL' DIRTY BALOGH!
Doors: 8pm, Show: 9pm
Sun May 22 @ The Media Club I
Maple Recording Artists from Toronto
UNOY
BONTEMPI
MY PROJECT BLUE
THE WEATHER
IALANALEVANDOSKI from Winnipeg
Doors: 7pm, Show: 8pm
(604) 878-GOGO
RUMBLETONE  PRESENTS
There comes a poinJ in everyone's evolution when
we start to realize that there might be a better way
to do things. We start seeing through old patterns
and our deep-rooted social programming and we
try to live d;Kappier and healthier life. I've been lucky
enough to do so with a little help from the girts closest
to me and with a hell of a lot of fun. Collage is an
avant-garde collective of my best friends" Ste^^# ..
Markspn, Mgj||?BeJgue and Angela Fdma. Together
we are dedicated to stimulating and providing a
forum for our creativity in all its manifestations. We
are also willing to push our own boundaries in order
to de-progijgnjp ourselves and to discover our true
will.
Growing up Catholic in Communist Poland, I am
g^lteteicfrdf jguHt-ridden generations, steeped deep
in years of cultural repression of all kinds. The Church
took care of my sex education, demanding that any
impure thoughts were confessed and repented. Self
love was beaten out of us every Sunday mass as we
were scorned for being the ungrateful children of
God. "Thou shalt not masturbate" was the unspoken
11th commandment.
What weighed" heaviest upon my self-
confidence was my name, which, like a lot of other
Polish names, came with a proverb-like rhyme. In my
case, it's "Marta grzechu warta," literally meaning
"Marta is sin worthy." Too young for sexual innuendos,
I grew up thinking I was worthless. As I grew older and
I found out it actually meant that I am worth sinning
for, elements of a Madonna/whore complex slowly
started creeping in.
Feminism escaped me, since socialism, in
theory, claimed equality for all workers, male or
female- After all, with WWII killing off the majority
of the male work force, women doctors and
professors were their natural replacement, eolfjifng
the same amount of money as anyone else under
communism. Besides, you e@t)'$ fight for wpnkmi's^
rigjiite v^Sfriy^^^^alfSfclirig in line for food stanwy. ,
i_10t;an, however, count oWoiaejanother. A strong
<8|$js3Jk©f commyriltyj^^y^eii^iprevairec^in EelierwO
Europe, but -under communism, it was all we had.
By Marta Jaciub|k/*J.:-
That,, and entertainment...andvodka. Both of which,
sadly, became the domain of men, leaving worften
no choice but to support one another. No door was
ever closed; there was always a -stranger willing to
help out with food, clothing, or babysitting. Together,
'mqfhff r| learned to overcome the shame of loneliness
aftdj^Jj^aRtkack, proudly rt^T^*ii§a^^J3ite%§ in
true solidarity. That being said, the^rnfejf^^^^&st
they could.under the pressure-<>f5^^nff.no way of
providing for their families.
As for enteifajpment, I was raised on puppet
Sh^v^-^^^Btodrets. Even though the communist
party estapiisj^ed harsh censorship; q^JSW- aspects
of art, somehow even harml^-fchildren's puppet
shows ended up pbl^aJly.cTkir^^^feroo more so,
The Cabaret, originally held in nightclubs, became a
social commentary and was fefei&ed once a week
on our one and only national television channel. It did
help ease the frustration of ttw'33stire country,j^st it
was never an outright and honest artistic expression.
This suppressed creativity lacke&'jrhe power that is
now available to all of us.
Capitalism and the sexual revolution helped
shape a completely differer^sfynamic in North
America. At this point we seem to be part of a
generation with the potential to be social pioneers,
since there are no real role, models for equal,
balanced relationships. This is the impetus behind
Collage's first production, a revolutionary multim^lia
puppet show/cabaret in the same vein as Animal
Farm (originally a critique of the hypocrisy and
brutality of the Stalinist regime) meets Lysistrata
(ancient Greek satire where women end a war
with a sex strike, leaving men disoriented with huge
erections).
To raise money for.th%;puppet show we will
be having an Arabian Nights party—complete with
belly-dancers, sword fightsf.cM|asf, make-out room—
sometime in May. Our inspiration?; Mata .HarL- the
exotic dancer and iflfeirteflo^^spy. Our goafig? to
make .our lives our greatest work of art, so We^t^ee
you aU in-fhe make-out roomjfWBfe.th.e one smoking
the hookah.
&
This is a picture of Marta Jaciubek
attemping*fbOteach a cardboard
cutout of Lindsay Lohan a thing or
two about ladies. wwm
IN STORES NOW
fW&Mipi
~~ii*se wags ate ioesfesaie.J*
- Jfce War Kir* ftmar
Perishers
ON TOUR WTTH SARAH MCLACHLA^S
June 7&8 - Save on Center, Victoria
June 10 - Prospera Place, Kelowna
fane 11 - Sport Mart Place, Kamloops
June 12 - CM Place, Vancouver
Debut album in stores now                                                 www.perishersmuslc.coin
THEDEVUNS
i
ON SALE
NOW AT
PI
1972 West 4th Ave
604-738-3232                                                             ^
tffitwgm
www.nettwerk.com   «mm_ j                       2. e" ©        1
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M~^'
k-g^a  DiSCORDER - May 2005
Daniel Lanois
OJtelladonna
in stores June 7th
-.. rail
MAY 19-22
minu m
*mm mmm
mm bm
MISTER  BAKING BOMBS
wmmt fmf
-=_ m mm
■   THOUSAND AWD FIVE   5 fiADOTSHANDS
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
All-Access Festival passes available for $15 through Red Cat,
Zulu, Scratch Records, Only Magazine and Limelight Video
nramisnowsm venues mm but www.musicwaste.ca or swe only a call at bo4-408 gsgs
&ff»MieMT vine®
RED CAT RECORDS
If Shirely Manson wanted one of your CDs, she would totally
come to your door
and demand it from you. Then, when you
hesitated, she would totally unleash
her trio of bespectacled goons.
But if you wanted one of hers, you'd just have to ask us for it.
The first five people to email discorder@club.ams.ubc.ca with
the subject heading, "I hereby unleash my trio of bespectacled goons"
will each win a copy of the new Garbage album, Bleed Like Me. By Zach Goelman
Rapper Jean Grae (nee Tsidi Ibrahim) delivers a form of art that doesn't
comply with the cookie-cutter expectations stamped in our minds of
hip-hop. Not just how it should sound—hip-hop has been transformed
into a marketable lifestyle of designer clothes and slurred slang and
we know that the music is only a part of that—but how hip-hop should
be. She isn't prescribing a. lifestyle that follows the sex-and-violence
checklist of disposable consumption like so many of the contributors to
the art form, nor is she merely describing the pitiful condition of Black
America's streets. She takes you into her thoughts about her childhood,
her adolescence, her loves, her losses, and she treats you with respect
throughout. Hip hop, generally treated so disposably, picked up only
when one is in the mood, isn't familiar with manifestos so human. She
brings intimacy into an art form that is more easily left packaged and
analyzed from a distance. Breaking with presuppositions is more difficult
that simply decrying the public view, it requires a reorganization of
where the public view comes from.
In 1945, Christian missionary Placide Tempels "discovered" African
philosophy. Africans, he explained, see themselves as composed of life
force, immaterial, and influenced by their ancestors' spirits. Tempels
successfully contributed to the tar pit of European ideas about Africans,
reducing them from humans with memory and creativity to a community
caught up its myths and ancestors. Tempels' conclusions were easy
on the palate of white Europeans and Americans who needed
Africans "explained." The missionary's conclusions translated into the
understanding that African-Americans were composed of an essence
inherently libidinous and lacking in sense of history; the claim that this
description was how they described themselves gave a carte-blanche
to the continued portrayal of African-Americans in this context. It isn't
surprising that the familiar image we have of the indigenous people
of Africa is drumming and dance; in America, the descendents of the
Bantu are celebrated through displaying a diamond-chained Jay-Z, or
the watermelon curves of Foxy Brown. In many elements, Blacks are still
easiest seen through Tempels' lenses.
Tsidi Ibrahim was born in South Africa, the daughter of Jazz
musicians. Her parents took her to New York in their self-imposed exi]e
from the Apartheid regime. Raised in a house of music and education
(her mother was a teacher as well as a singer), Tsidi absorbed a love
of music and literature and was willing to put forth the hard work
required to pursue the performing arts. As she grew up in the right place
alongside others exploring hip hop, her talented identity solidified in the
pseudonym Jean Grae, who Rolling Stone Magazine called "the best
kept secret on New York's indie hip-hop scene." Three albums in, Jean
Grae has increased her profile and received praise from Spin, The Village
Voice, URB Magazine. XXL. and more. These cultural soundboards credit
her with stunning lyrical talent and honest and emotive storytelling, but
you shouldn't be surprised if you haven't heard of her before. Jean Grae
doesn't fit the music industry's machinery. Those gears are in place to
grind down, not refine their product.
In the years following Placide Tempels' publication, scholars began
to assert claims contrary to the missionary's conclusions. In his book The
Fight, covering Muhammad Ali's competition with George Forman in
Kinshasa (the "Rumble in the Jungle"),. Norman Mailer took Tempels'
ideas of primal life force, and combined them with his observations of the
African-American struggle to create a complimentary understanding:
that a man was not only himseff, but all of the generations past that still
lived in him, not only a human but part of the resonance about him;
one did one's best to live in such a way to increase one's own life force
through struggle.
Sandra Harding, a feminist theorist, further rebelled against Tempels
by linking feminist and African struggles: "We [women and Africans] are
different, not primarily by nature's design, but as a result of the social
subjugations we have lived through and continue to experience." Both
women and Africans are similarly characterized by systemic sexism and
racism: women as emphasizing love, caring, and compassion over
rationality, Africans as primitive, intuitive beings. The most direct route
to unified liberation of women and African-Americans.is through.the
establishment of institutions that raise pride and promote respect for
inherent human dignity.
If anyone still nods when it is said that there are inherent social
differences between sexes and races, Jean Grae is a razor blade hidden
in their candy apple. Prior to her three solo records (all released in the
last three years), Jean Grae had the nickname "Cameo Queen" for her
multitude of appearances on other rappers' records. Her collaborations
carry the same honesty that her so|o records contain. Some briBant
examples are the song "Black Girl Pain" on Talib Kweli's Beautiful Struggle
where she aids his Buslration of the hardships of African-American
women, and on the Roots album The Tipping Point where she combines
her jsgjents with Black Thought's as they explain their jobs as free-thinking
emcees on "Somebody's Gotta Do It." On her solo records, her lyrical
flow stitches together songs that alternate between groove-heavy bass
lines, crasriing drums, and straight head-nodding hip-hop. Occasionally,
she replaces the standard falsetto of female back-up singers with a
choir of baritone male thugs. If there are inherent differences between
the genders and the races, and if Black and female encompass so
much that is to be desired, what remains the sole property of the white
male? Once Jean Grae delivers, you're forced to confront her skin-soft
humanity, backed by resolute bones, wherein lies the same marrow that
Apartheid chased.
FRIDAY MAY B
Fireball Productions Presents
MOMMY AMD DADDY (NYC) / HACK
HORSE (SEA) / CHANNELS 3&4
FRIDAY MAY 13
Friday The 13th Parly
NIM VIND / A SPECTRE IS HAUNTING
EUROPE / THE ALMIGHTY TRUTH
r MAY 20
Global Symphonic ♦ Music Waste present
PRIMES Ip/cd release party / BAKELITE /
P(VH»
MAY2S
Special Casbah! event
YOU SAY PARTY! WE SAY DIE! / ZOM
ZOMS (Austin) / YIP YIP (FU
&*^
FRIDAY MAY 87
■ Bands TBD
This is a picture of Zachary
Goelman opening his mouth next
to a cardboard cutout of Lindsay
Lohan. Last night
I dreamt a
banjo save
Last March, Val Cormier interviewed Klein (best known as a founding
member of the Be Good Tanyas) about her newest side-project-turned-
success, Po' Girl, and herformative experiences of music and community.
Founded in the wake of the Tanyas sometimes stifling popularity, Po' Girl
embodies Klein's desire to get back to the creativity and community
that brought hef to where she is today.
The piece originally aired as part of CiTR's special International Women's
Day programming. We are happy to present the following excerpts from
Val's interview.
Trish: Po' Girl's history goes back about seven years now. I met
Allison [Russell] at this house we both used to live at, which was actually
an eight or nine bedroom house around 29th and Main. It was a total
artist/musician crash house. Allison was new to Vancouver and I had just
moved back here from Nelson, where I was going to music school. That
was around the time the Be Good Tanyas formed as well. Then we both
watched each other as musicians in the scene, and liked each other's
stuff. Maybe four years later we ran into each other on Commercial
Drive. I spontaneously asked her if she wanted to start a project with
me. I said, "I've been playing old jazz tunes," and she said, "I really want
to get back into the clarinet." I had always had this fantasy of being
in a prohibition-era jazz band. I was fascinated by 19.20's New Orleans
blues and jazz at that point. That was the original collaboration. We
researched old songs together and did a lot of old jazz covers. We did
a demo of that stuff, but it very quickly evolved into a writing project for
both of us as we began sharing our songs with each other.
We decided to do a recording of this new material. We did it while
the Be Good Tanyas werestffl touring, finding a week here or there to do
a show or do some recording while I was in the middle of this grueling
tour schedule. We actually put the Po' Girl debut album together in
about four days, running between Baker Street Studios and our friend's
basement. That album was distributed by Festival Records and ended
up being picked up by an American label and a UK label. Just after
we put the debut album out, we met Diona [Davies], who is now
\  the third member.
Our history goes back about five years, from the time
4 when I was touring in California with the Be Good Tanyas
and ran into Diona playing in Santa Cruz with a band called
the Red-Eyed Rounders. Her old bandmate, Anna, is now
sort of a Po' Girl as well, playing bass with us. So they came
j .    to our show and I kept seeing Diona—and Anna—playing
/   in all sorts of projects, playing with Carolyn Mark, Ford Pier,
Geoff Berner, Rae Spoon. Diona's an incredible fiddler and
multi-instrumentalist. I really liked her energy so I tracked her
down and emailed her and invited her to join Po' Girl. She played a
show in Victoria with us and has played every show with us since.
Immediately, we left all that this was the connection we were
looking for, in terms of musicianship and personalty. We bonded on so
many levels, because of aH these eongruencies with our histories. We
all share weirdly similar pasts. AJh'son and Diona both have adoption
histories, and we all have a history being street kids as teenagers,
being runaways, living on the margins and being part of the punk rock
^^M.'WL^_tW^$^^^_^^^^^^^^^&^
community. Me and Diona both came to folk music by way of punk
rock. She had grown up playing fiddle—she was a fiddle prodigy as a
child, but gave it up as a teenager. She was living on fhe streets, doing
all kinds of illegal and terrible things to get by. A woman working at a
drop-in centre in Quebec city bought her a second-hand fiddle as a
present when Diona was seventeen. She started playing again, busking
with it. Later she walked into a royal conservatory, auditioned, and got
a full scholarship. The fiddle basically pulled her off the streets. It brought
her back. Now it's taken her around the worid.
I had a similar music-saving-my-life experience. [When I was
younger] I was just so fucked-up and didn't give a shit about anything
or myself. Then I discovered one folk club that basically became my
home. This was in Winnipeg. It was a place for me to go at night. I would
stay there until four in the morning. They had live music seven nights a
week, touring bands, a house band, open mic nights. It was that rich folk
music community that was a saving grace in my life.
Allison also had a very similar experience growing up in Montreal.
She left home at fifteen and began haunting an Irish folk club. Her
biological grandmother, who partially raised her, taught her a lot of
Scottish folk tunes. So 'she was really drawn to the Celtic music scene.
She lived at that folk club for the last few years of high school and had
her first performances there.
That's how the band came together. We've been touring a lot,
we put out a second album, and now we're working on our third. It's
an uphill struggle to make this project happen but we're a very loving
family for each other, and I think we have a really deep understanding
of where we're all coming from.
[...] Maybe being in a predominantly female band is nice for
us because we all have an understanding of what it's like to grow
up in patriarchal culture. We all have an awareness of how much
negative conditioning women receive, especially in industries that are
male dominated. I think now women growing up now, who want to
be musicians, get a lot more positive reinforcement then we did as
childre'n. There were definitely some female role models when I was
growing up, but there weren't many female guitar players, for example,
or instrumentalists, or women on the technical side of music. Or the
business side. I think that's changing a lot. There're lots and lots of
women out there, and it's less of a "thing" to be girls in a band.
[...] In both bands I've felt really rewarded when young women
approach me and say "I started playing guitar because of you," or "I
started playing banjo because of you." So many women have said "I
started playing banjo because of you!" I've probably got that at least
a-dozen times...Actually, the other day, me and Frazey [Ford] and Sam
[Parton, both of the Be Good Tanyas] were in Cafe Monmartre and this
young woman came up to us. She was nineteen, maybe twenty. She
was freaking out that we were there. Apparently, she has a band that
does Be Good Tanya's covers. I would just love to hear those songs, you
know?
r*
This is a sticker-picture
of Val Cormier with a
picture of a cardboard
cutout of Lindsay Lohan
placed atop it. ^rf%^
The Royal Vancouver Porn Society
Article and Photo by Rob Brownrage
It's a beautiful spring evening in a pleasant
neighbourhood just off Main Street. Inside a typical
old East Van house, fifteen people fill the living room,
seated in an assortment of second-hand couches
and chairs. A 16mm film projector whirs into action,
and an old home-movie screen lights up with a
film title: Hot Rackets starring Candida Royale.
This month's meeting of the Royal Vancouver
Pornographic Society (R.V.P.S.) has begun.
The grand tradition of society groups dates
back to 1660, when Sir Robert Doyle and other
famous thinkers founded the Royal Society in Britain
to further the pursuit of science. Since then, countless
societies have formed, focused on geography,
literature and,everything.in between.
Pom still remains on the outer fringes of polite
society, but the R.V.P.S. is bringing pom out of the
cultural closet. Upon first hearing of the R.V.P.S.,
one might picture a group of homy, middle-aged
men watching pom in private, and then meeting
to discuss it like some creepy book club. Instead,
it's a diverse group of everyday people who make
watching pom a tongue-in-cheek social event.
The purpose is not arousal, but—as the group puts
it—fun. Even more surprising: the person behind the
R.V.P.S. is a woman.
"Attention everyone. I hereby caH this meeting
of the Royal Pornographic Society to order." Twenty-
eight year old Robyn Volk presides over the meeting.
She wears a dark suit, signifying tonight's importance.
Her trademark fanny pack is, as always, around her
waist. Thick blonde curls flow down over a silver
beauty pageant style sash with the word "President"
in bold red letters. This reminds everyone that Robyn
is founder, and president of the R.V.P.S.
R.V.P.S. meetings are held once a month
in Robyn's home, which she has nicknamed The
Manor. The night begins like any other social «jvent,
with a mixed crowd gathering at the house: men,
women, gays, straights, professionals, artists and
students, most in their twenties and thirties. Cookies
and tea are served; people mingle and chat. Then
the official meeting begins, as Robyn. reads last
month's minutes and discusses new business such as
upcoming events. Finally it's time for the main event:
watching porn.
The film shown tonight is not same modem,
no-plot sex video, it's a vintage 16mm film from
the 1970s, and it's given a comical introduction by
R.V.P.S. Secretary Sean Q. Lang. This cheesy film, with
its awkward dialogue and bizarre storyline (about a
posh tennis club where the term "grand-slam" gets
a new meaning), is perfect fare for the raucous
heckling that ensues. Attendees call out during the
film, making jokes and hilarious critiques.
With its cookies and tea, meeting agendas,
and official titles such as "founder and president,"
the R.V.P.S. makes many ironic nods to the traditions
of royal societies. As "secretary" Sean charismatically
states, that's exactly the point.
"The whole reason for having a formal pom club
was simply the ludicrousness of taking pornography
and having an interest group," explains Sean, a thirty-
something filmmaker. "You think of interest groups as
organized committees with political objectives. So
what more of a ridiculous organization could there
be than a society dedicated to the watching of
pom?"
The humour and irony of the R.V.P.S. is
demonstrated by the e-mails promoting their events.
A recent invite reads: By personal request of Robyn
Volk, serving president of the Royal Vancouver
Pornographic Society, we are pleased to present a
small historical sampling of gay male pornography.
We will view clips from a selection of films, discuss the
genre with our panel of esteemed researchers, and
of course have tea and cookies. Ah. the history of
smut is one of the few things as entertaining as smut
itself, so join us—won't you.
If you do join the R.V.P.S., expect a highly
organized affair. "Each meeting has a focused
theme, so everything we show or talk about relates
directly to that," explains Robyn. Past themes have
included the gang-bang, cartoon pom, a focus
on a director or star, and anti-pom vs. pro-porn
propaganda. Tonight's theme is hooked-on-the-
classics, and the vintage 70s film is shown in its, er,
full length.
According to Robyn, the focus on 16mm films
from the 1960s and 1970s is no accident. "I think the
new stuff is boring. There's so much bad new pom
out there. I like a little bit of plot. Plus with the old
stuff you have the kitsch factor of interesting outfits
and old furniture!"
But the R.V.P.S. is not just about watching pom
at The Manor; special outings are organized as well.
Thus far, they have ventured to the Penthouse for
amateur strip night, and have twice paid visits to the
Pacific Cinematheque to watch art-pom.
The most illustrious outing they have planned
is an event they tested at The Manor. "Pornaoke!"
explains Sean, "is a cross between karaoke and old
pom movies. The film is shown silently, and people
volunteer to improvise the words and sounds of the
redrhot performances. In true porno style, the scenes
range from awkward living-room drama to full-
throttle action—often in a matter of mere seconds."
Always the intrepid trailblazer, Sean proudly boasts,
"When we take if aufto a bar or a club, we'll have a
DJ spinning music for each scene. We're gonna go
international wilh this. i4h»ik the Hiterest is there."
The question remains, how did a nice girl like .
Robyn end up president of the R.V.P.S.? "Sefcm has a
friend, Dimitrios Otis, who is our Archivist. He bought
the entire collection of the Venus Theatre's 16mm
films," Robyn begins. Sean jumps in, adding, "They
had been sitting rotting in a guy's damp garage
for five or ten years since the Venus switched to
video. Dimitrios feit he had to save them, otherwise
they'd end up in the trash." Robyn continues, "We
talked about how we'd Hke to watch the films, and
I suggested we start a pom club, because I ran one
when I was in college in Red Deer, Alberta. Once a
week we got together ta either watch pom or see
strippers. Anyway, Dimitrios got these films so we
started the R.V.P.S."
But does Robyn think it is significant that she, a
woman, is the leader of the R.V.P.S.?
"i Think it's very important. 1 am the founder
and president because in the end, what I say goes.
I wear the sash, i tell Sean, the secretary, what to
do and he does it. Besides, if Sean were President
it would be badly run," she quips. In a more serious
tone, she adds, "When I tell other girls that I'm the
president, they're less threatened, definitely- Girls
like to-watch pom too, and when they hear how we
do it they want to check it out."
This view is echoed by R.V.P.S. regular Cecile
Neff, a 29 year old from France who's in Vancouver
working in animation. "1 went to the pom club
because I knew it wouldn't be sleazy. It's more of
a fun time. It's great to have Robyn as President
because she makes the girts feel comfortable—and
the guys too. It's usually 50/50 guys and girts, and she
puts everyone at ease. It's great to have another
approach to pornography, something,that's not
taboo. It's a bit liberating as,a woman to have this."
As tonight's screening of Hot Rackets wraps up,
I ask Robyn the classic question: what's her response
to critics who would say the R.V.P.S. is contributing
to the exploitation of women? WeU, it is clearly a
non-issue for tier. Without the slightest hesitation or
concern, she replies, "Even my own mother knows
about the R.V.P.S. She not only knows, but aiso
approves and sometimes sends cookies—she's a
very good baker. You see, there's too many good
cookies and tasty teas served for it to be wrong."
With that, she returns to her duties as founder
and president of the R.V.P.S., seeing tonight's guests
out the door after a night of good, dirty fun.
. TO CONTACT THE ROYAL VANCOUVER PORN SOCIETY, SWAM. THEM MAIN
IT rOKNCLUI@TElUS.NET
^
This is a picture of Rob Brownrage I
giving a cardboard cutout of§
Lindsay Lohan a "noogie."
* ^Rolancii
I%al|Live
A*    .$ 'if
ction
Peter Elkas
March 25 & 26
Media Club
Joel Plaskett and Peter Elkas came to the West Coast
and bought an old, reliable car to take them across
the country. The first stop on the six-week-long journey
" of touring and travelling was Vancouver, where the
pair of musicians played two sold out shows at the
Media Club.
Peter Elkas, of the Montreal band Local
Rabbits, played quiet, beautiful songs from his 2004
solo release Party of One. Elkas' clear voice and
impressive talent on guitar and especially piano
combined wonderfully, and he ended off his set
each night with "Still A Rame", a great lead-in to the
perforrhance to follow.
For Joel Ptaskett, the first night proved to be
an in-depth introduction to his latest album La De
Da—his first solo release since 1999's In-Need of
Medical Attention^-a bit more upbeat, but just as
-sophisticated (lyrically and musically) as that release.
Plaskett, occasionally joined by flower-bearing Elkas,
played nearly every song from the album; catchy
songs like "Natural Disaster" and "Television Set"
were spread out among the more soft and intense
"Happen Now" and "Love this Town" (complete with
its shout out to Kelowna, BC, a town Joel Plaskett
certainly does not love). He had a very witty story for
every song, which he told before, after, and while he
played.
Joel Plaskett's second performance was even
better than the first. Not only did he play songs from his
solo albums, his two albums with The Emergency, and
several Thrush Hermit albums, but he managed  to
form several motifs with recurring lines and melodies
I from the songs "I'll Wait" by Van Halen, "Sweet
I Emotion" by Aerosmith, "Piano Man" and "Sleeping
I With the Television On" by Billy Joel into his songs. As
I he did the night before, Joel Plaskett kept the mood
I Ight and the performer/audience interaction at an
. oittimeJTigh Jo/^ntpst of, the jsot.Jsyjteitog hilarious
anecdotes deRvered with impeccable comedic
timing. The mood was only brought down ton the
more somber songs like "Before You Leave" and *The
Day You Walked Away".
The second night ended with Plaskett playing
several requests including the "Clueless Wonder"
single B-side "Please Don't Return," "AH DressedsUp"
from the 1994 release Smart Bomb, and a special
expanded version of his yet-to-be-recorded (ond
probably will never be) song "Drunk Teenager^' ir\
honour of the guy from Nova Scotia who had been
l kicked out for being intoxicated. There were rrjqrty
at the show just like that poor sap, but those of us
who were physically capable of listening to the rrpse
were treated to yet another enjoyable and musically
wondrous Vancouver performance by Joel Plaskett.;
Kimberley Day
Ben Lee
Zykos
Har Mar Superstar
March 28
Richard's on Richards     j^_W&
Peter Pan, Elvis Costello and Ron Jeremy walkiiftto
a bar...No, this isn't the opening line for some 1903©-':
joke; these were the alter egos that took the stage
tonight.
I don't like Mondays. Usually. Zykos got to rock-
out first on this Easter holiday without the bribe of
chocolate eggs. With only two-fifths of the bbnd
present, they used the vocal stylings of Elvis CosteRo
and classical keyboard chord progression to \ fhe
best of their abilities. Their brand of alternative pop-
rock that borrowed from a lot of 50s standards )&&■
more about storytelling lyrics than catchy hdoks.
Their material got stronger near the end of their^f,
enough to get the attention of the crowd. This Was
the PG-13 portion of the evening.
Har Mar Superstar is Ron Jeremy reincarnated.
The viewer discretion sign must have burnt out but Har
ifH|||i|declaration was a good substitute: "I'm gonpa
||||j|Kg make out with every one of you!" And try he
did. ffie mood suddenly changed into some warped
|j|||||bisco as smoke and people trickled onto the
dahce floor. His eerie resemblance to the porn star
ifllHpsed as he eventually stripped down to his bd»
SIB Amongst the ubiquitous "fuck yeahs" and
pelvic thrusts, Har Mar and his two-man backup baf^d
tore up some high-pitched 80s disco rap funk. Like a-'
deer paught in headlights, it was hard not to stare at
his shock antics, ranging from his impromptu dance
atop ,a bar counter, to sprinkling his pubic hair o\|||f
thijrcfowd. Tunes like "Body Request" and "DUI" were*
equally cheesy and over the top. To say that Har Mar
^^Hnfortable with his sexuality is an understatement.
if you came for a spectacle, you got one. <j.
I I - ^Welcome to Neveriand (no, not the ranch). BJKt'
tee seems to be the Peter Pan of Indie pop/rock.
ttSiwtting was definitely PG: band equipment wjas
||||j|Pied with flowers given by crowd members. Me
had p great group of bandmates, all providing, a
happy vibe. A lot of the latest release. Awake is the'
^^Ks/eep was performed, including "Begin," with
pfNHkit bass and drum beat. Lee's warm tenor was'
M^ipg tonight, working with the electronic beat and.
l§fHH§>ard arpeggios of "No Room to Bleed"; he topk
ftistime to pause and stretch each syllable. Lee was
very falkative, telling stories like make-out rules of,o
past relationship that resulted in the keyboard pop*©?
-"Apple Candy".
Hhe Aussie rocker was very relaxed on stage,
||HfH' stopping his set to do a quick Q&A session,
Wher} someone asked, "Were you in Lord of the
Rings6" he laughed and asked if he looked likes a
hobbjt. The highlight of the evening resulted from] o
broken guitar string. Lee had to borrow a guitar and
discovered that the strap was too long. Rather than
-fcjst.t*djust it, he got a girl from the crowd to be His
human guitar stand. Fittingly, his next song was the
classic "My Guitar". The current sunny single, "Cat|:h
My Disease" was a great way to end the set; a tall
■ -"guy.with a big fro was picked to do the stomp c\<^p
rhythm and his smfle was Hifectious. Lee was genuine
whenjne sang, "And the radio doesn't play my songs
•^|^Wfeiars"tlTe"wti? ntReir.Tie?i6^r?rrrtiiTo*TJr»asay
Lohan,ep0r-
Emtty Khong
ixclaiml 13th Anniversary   '
Sfttrs
' Mdnfag
Apas$e of Hustle
Feist
March 31
Commodore Ballroom
Exclaim! Magazine got some top-notch Canadian
Indie ox$|$fblp celebrate their 13th birthday. The
4-act bill might as well be dubbed "Broken Social
Scene: Redux" sinojilhe majority are part of that
musical commune.
Up first wis^^wtag, a lone Montreaier, in love
t*M^^oond aH things electronic. His gear surrounded
him flke a fence and included both a Moog and a
violin. While his laptop laid ouiftfto musical blueprints,
it became quite clear that his instrumental pieces
were beiMMhan his weak and offbeat voice. A
female osil^dnton rescued a few ?$i§fe with their
duets. The ambient mood music coutdj^t silence the
crowd. The cheese factor curetted when he asked
the crowd to visualize thot $|ty were sitting on a
comfortable sofa as he scafefbngs Hke "Scrabble
idvis". Odd man out tonight. Needs more cowbefl.
' , Apostle of Hustle delivered not one cowbefl,
but two. The band raised fhe energy level of the
room, aided by members of Stars and Pels! who did
/IfJS^fornonies, horns, clapping ond whatever they
could get their hands on. The band had a wicked
barrage of rhythmic patterns. This was definitely
music fit for different moods ranging from shoegazer
to poppy rock. Their song about living in suburbia
was mettow and melancholy and contrasted with
their funky grooved song for going out. A cool stow
tune sounded like an updated version of the SOs
instrumental classic "Sleepwalker." The performance
was tight; it's obvious that they're playing for the
emotional effect.
Feast on Feist. She didn't have her drummer
with her but she wouldn't need anyone anyway.
You have to see it to believe it when catching one of
Feist's performances. Playing to strains of jazz, blues
and folk rock, she displayed-jieVrnil^rJIfcife on a
giant guitar that srwBpGl her tiny frame. Her trusty
eiecironiCf^Sp pedals and double mics multiplied
and overlapped her equc$jH?l||py and edgy voice.
Thoughts of Jeff Buckley surfaced throughout fhe set.
^^^fes having a blast on stage dancing and posing.
||||||SiB$o seemed quite surprised at the crowd's
knowledge of her ^nprfal. The stroagpst number
was herctt^BftMita Slmone's "See-Line Woman;" she
wailed like sho lived fn ftjo old South The new song,
"So Sofry" was tested out, likely to reappear again
if she's content with it She wasn't entirely alone the
whole time; Apostle of Hustle and Stars took turns io
' provide book-up dnd she slapped each of them on
Hie ass like a proud coach.
the Stars came out tonight. Riding on a wdJtfO
<^"fiti^pcal praise, Stars opened their midnight set wftfe
"Set Yourself on Hfe," For those who caught therrf';
back in No^#|kber, the. benefits just as good but'
fj^ljpd surpnses. tt was delightful hearing, the sweet
toned, two-way monologues of Torquil Cdfnpbefl
and Amy Mflqn during "The Big fight" "He Ued About
y^^r" had a re¥i$4#fWro, 0 killer w^0 trumpets
and being te actw^lppmpbeii spat out the words
I^WHtjIi twisted faces. "One More r^^-had the
^^Wftig heartb^itt^^ie and was the climax of
i^|ll0ht. ComptSi^^rfessed to the crawd'thst a
.^P^^^jeir songs are "about;^^pngH. The band also
tapped into older electronic dance materia!. The"en©
unexpected moment of Stars' set came up whan
Campbell noticed a guy hcdisfcup his cell phone;
he grabbed it and sang into it fike a mic, then threw
it back into the crowd. For the encore^H^romantic
ache of "%ar Bt-Lover is Dead" came alive with a
guest violinist. Lastly, everyone came on stage to
pjay the energetic "The First hive TimSs'*. TnO m^fffyV
of the crowd stayeo|§||p the very (late) end of Stars'
set. Happy birthday indeed.
£mily Khong
! Raking Bombs
; Bakelite
%&~* Primes
[Parallels
< April 01
|fe -J Lamplighter
The Parallels, formerly known as the ska influenced
Hoodwinks, were the first act of the night and
p$ftt%ly got the floor moving with their kinetic brand
of garage rock. Under the threat of a lawsuit by a
UK based Hoodwinks, they've changed their name
and [traded in the ska jams for a full on rock assault,
tearing through the first half of their set with a brand
news batch of bam burners, but also revisiting old
"' l^siirites later in the night.
sNext up was Primes, a duo who were aH
laptop beats and rock star posturing. Their bass
?$£?# was wicked and the bassSt could belt out an
ear Shattering scream, but I really couldn't get into
them. Late into their set, the front man swiped a beer
fromjthe audience and whipped its contents all over
^jfM^back of the stage 1n a fit of rock star fury, only to
gently put back down the empty glass. That moment
f^^rtned up how I felt both about their performance
SfjpM) music. It was supposed to be confrontational
3Sj|fefedgy, but was too calculated to realty get much
'^m^eaction one way or the other.
j Bakelite followed with a similar focus on
electronics but filled out their sound with a live
drunjmer and bass synth. They weren't bad, but
more energy would have been cool.
j Raking Bombs headlined, and after recently
losing their-drummer, this was their first hometown
show with their new lineup. With the singer now
puirjg double duty on guitars and vocals, and the
former guitarist taking up the kit, a monolithic wail
of electronic  manipulation immediately signaled
Sjlpifthe new Bombs were a radically different beast.
^Mjghg shed their post-hardcore skin, now pummeling
Lightning Bolt bass lines were devoured by clouds of
Mentoowian schizophrenic shards only to be spat out
agafi as art-damaged disco beats. Awesome. The
sheer weight of the rhythm section pinned down the
chaos, giving it purpose and direction. For aH the arty
flourishes, it remained a visceral experience, and it
was great to-see Raking Bombs reinvent themselves,
only to rise from the ashes more powerful than ever.
<h%Ben Fussell Death From Above 1979
controller.controller
Elizabeth
April 02
Mesa Luna
The kids were out in full force for this dance-rock
matinee, making for a long and uncomfortable lineup
outside before everyone could finally get in. When
they did, over half an hour later than scheduled,
Elizabeth promptly dove into the opening set. Their
intense, hard-hitting post-punk reminded me of Bloc
Party, but with more riff and less twang in the guitars.
The crowd was passively appreciative; when singer/
guitarist Reggie Gill urged the crowd to "feel free to
dance to these last few songs" near the end, only a
select few took up his offer.
Later on, spacey synth effects emanating from
the speakers signalled that controller.controller
was about to take the stage. Frontwoman Nirmala
Basnayake seemed too spunky and animated to
merit the Ian Curtis comparisons she has recieved:
she strutted and pranced energetically to the dark,
bass-driven post-disco played by her bandmates.
(However, it was interesting to note the bassist's
Unknown Pleasures shirt...coincidence?) Dancing
broke out early and often, but turned rather
aggressive when some songs climaxed in Panthers-
like walls of sound.
Thanks to c.c, a lot of people were partly worn
out when Death From Above 1979 hit, but there was
no. stopping the explosion of energy when the first
notes of "Turn It Out" kicked in. The two-piece was
exactly as you'd expect them to be live: crashing
drums colliding with majorly fuzzed-out bass to
form riffs that are as heavy as they are catchy. The
dancing didn't stop, and neither did the crowd-
surfing—until some kid landed right in front of the
. drum kit. The music cut off right away, and Sebastian
proceeded to lecture the audience about being
stupid. Lots of people clapped, but it was the wrong
reaction: he responded with an annoyed "No, don't
clap. It's just common sense." From there, it was
evident that the band was less-than-pleased with
the crowd: banter was at a minimum compared
to their last Mesa Luna gig, and the whole concert
ended with Sebastian quipping, "Good night...now
go and do your homework." Maybe if some teens
had done their homework instead of attending, the
overall vibe might have been better, but DFA79 still
managed to prove that they can rock hard enough
for any crowd, at any venue.
Simon Foreman
Queens of the Stone Age,
Throw Rag
April 13
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Anyone who likes it heavy was at the Queen E. for
this, the first real rock show in Vancouver in quite
some time (no. Velvet Revolver doesn't count). Burly
trucker types, teen skaters, and mainstream-radio
devotees were all ready for Josh Homme & co.'s
desert-scorched riff-fest to wash over their eardrums;
but first, those who arrived on time had to endure
openers Throw Rag, replacements for the originally
planned Eagles of Death Metal.
Where the Eagles' mock-glam guitar grooves
would have been a perfect appetizer, Throw Rag and
their brand of "sailor rock" just wasn't the same. They
played fairly bland. Warped Tour-style punk, fronted
by a lead singer with overstated flamboyance, sailor
hat, and drowned-out vocals. Comic relief came
when the portly washboard player (!) invited a kid
from the crowd onstage; he got more sincere cheers
than the actual band. I doubt the guy I saw earlier in
the Lamb of God hoodie was very impressed.
But all was forgiven as soon as Queens of the
Stone Age launched into a mesmerizing performance.
Stripped of clean studio production, their trademark
driving rhythms took on a low end and a force that
just doesn't come across on record. Josh's smooth,
dreamy vocals floated above the rhythmic mosh of
guitar, bass, and drums. A lot of the enjoyment came
from having the hard-rocking chords pounding in
your ribcage, but no one complained when things
sometimes took a psychedelic twist. "No One Knows"
and  closer  "Regular John"  contained "amazing
jams that were each over seven minutes long,
demonstrating how easily the Queens can abandon
' structure and just go with the flow (get it?).
The group rolled through track after track from
each of their four albums with confidence and
attitude, but the sheer volume and power of their live
setup gave new life to everything from "The Lost Art
of Keeping a Secret" to the ubiquitous new single,
"Little Sister." Alternate singer and former Screaming
Trees member Mark Lanegan was missing in action,
but Josh picked up the vocal slack during the hazy
sway of "Song for the Dead" without missing a strum.
Meanwhile, the perpetually suited Troy Van Leeuwen
slipped and slid in his white shoes as he worked both
traditional and slide guitars, and drummer Joey
Castillo's ferocity and brawn proved him to be a
Grohl for modern times.        1," " 1
Wherever he was, I'm sure that by the end of
the two-song encore, the Lamb of God guy was
smiling.
Simon Foreman
Margaret Cho
April 15
QE Theatre
Jon Stewart has kiHed stand-up comedy. Or, at
least, he has put a serious damper on a certain sub-
genre of topical, current-affairs-oriented comedic
commentary.
Don't get me wrong—I love The Daily Show
and think Stewart is just what the doctor ordered—
but he has a certain advantage over most stand-
up comedians: he gets to comment on most news
items while they're still hot, often within hours of their
occurrence. By contrast, while most stand-ups are
constantly developing new material, it's virtually
impossible for them to have more than a joke or two
pertaining to the last few days. So if their stock in
trade is political or news-based comedy, Stewart has
probably beaten them to the punchline.
While I wouldn't necessarily have dubbed
Margaret Cho a news-item comedienne in the past,
she seems to be moving in that direction; as you might
guess from my preamble, it's not entirely successfuL
While her jokes about Dubya, Condoleeza, Dick
Cheney, David Beckham,, and the Pope were funny,
their slightly stale feeling can only be attributed to the
fact that we've already laughed at the same foibles
several times over thanks to Jon. Jokes based on
genuinely stale references such as Bjork's swan dress
at the Grammies many years ago didn't help.
Another gripe: while the self-professed "fag
whisperer" knows how to tailor her material to her
audience, her tendency to say emphatically pro-gay
statements is less successful when they're platitudes.
The slightly uncomfortable lack of a response when
Cho paused after saying "being gay isn't a choice!"
did not reflect disagreement; rather, it was the
predominantly gay audience's apparent surprise at
her bothering to regale them with such a line when
she was so clearly preaching to the converted (if
you'll excuse an inappropriate turn of phrase).
With all that said, have I mentioned that it was
a riot? With her signature loud, crass style, Cho kept
the whole room laughing from start to finish. As usual,
she pushed the boundaries of sexual explicitness,
making even the ultra-liberal audience periodically
choke in disbelief. (I was genuinely concerned about
the health of the octogenarian couple two rows in
front of me, who I was sure had to be there in error,
but they appeared fo survive the night.) She kept
references to her mother—many people's favourite
Cho bits—to a brief-but-KBarious astral-projection
story, not surprising given that her mother survived
a heart attack last year, which can't have inspired
much joke writing.
When she was on, she was on. While I still
find her funnier when she talks about herself rather
than current affairs, many of her topical bits were
both funny and bitterly insigrttfaLOn the subject of
pharmacists refusing to dispense birth control "on
conscience" while serving up the Viagra left and
right, for example, she was spot on: "Doesn't it make
more sense to take the bullets out of the gun than to
wear a bullet-proof vest? Especially if it's an old, rusty
musket..." Pure Cho.
Mo Meat
Alexisonfire    «**£^,.J|
Rise Against
The Fuliblast
April 16
Commodore Ballroom
Because of the recent onslaught of final exams at
UBC, I almost forgot to show up to this gig. OOPS. So,
I waltzed into the Commodore 20 minutes late, and
who's the first person that I see? Why, it's media icon,
George Stromboulopoulos, surrounded by fans - HIS
fans. I actually couldn't tell if they were there for the
bands, or were just stalking Mr. S.
Because of my tardiness, I only caught the
last song from The Fuliblast, who reminded me of
Belvedere or Propagandhi. But those Canadian
punksters did not fail to impress. How they managed
to go completely insane on stage and still play
properly is beyond my understanding.
I was actually under the impression that Rise
Against were the headliners of this show, but it turns
out I was mistaken. Although slightly disappointed by
the short length of their set, I still enjoyed their onstage
energy. As they played songs from their latest, Siren
Song of the Counter Culture (which was recorded in
BC), and also 2003's Revolutions Per Minute, fans did
not hesitate to sing along and form what was, quite
possibly, the biggest circle pit I've ever witnessed. I
was unfortunately stuck beside a large man who
decided to continually pound his fist in the air, 2
inches too close to my head. At one point, he even
put down his beer to get both fists going.
What can I say about Alexisonfire that you
probably don't already know? I wasn't even going
to stay for their set, but previous recommendations
from Chris-a-riffic convinced me otherwise. There
were coherent lyrics, screaming, and erratic body
movements, much like Atreyu, Avenged Sevenfold
or Coheed and Cambria. The band played most of
their songs from their latest release. Watch Out! and
a few from their self-titled debut. During the encore,
guitarist, Dallas Green, performed "Side Walk When
She Walks" solo and acoustic, which was a nice
deviation from the norm.
Despite the bands' extremely short sets, I
actually did enjoy this scream-and-dance fest. I also
learned that this type of music especially appeals to
large amounts of kids whose wardrobes consist of
only black logo tees.
Marielle K.'
Steve Vai
Eric Sardinas
April 23
Commodore Ballroom
Opener Eric Sardinas can best be described as a less
laid-back Stevie Ray Va ughan. Or maybe Stevie when
he was still on the blow. His mix of aggressive blues and
incredible chops had most of the crowd cheering,
save that one guy who kept yeHing, "Where's Steve
Vai? You SUCK!" I was pretty impressed with Sardinas'
playing and music, but not so much with some of his
antics. Dude, the lighting your guitar on fire thing was
done already. And you're not Jimi Hendrix, so the 30
second flame thing just doesn't impress us. Ditto the
spitting beer at the tension and pitch high points of
your solos—that just reminds me of something Frank
Zappa wrote about wanking guitarists and that
makes me drift off into Zappaland instead af paying
attention to you. Plus, Sebastian Bach of Skid Row
used to get far greater beer-as-ejaculate bang for
the buck when jnasturbating an actual beer bottle
15 years ago, so that's been done to death too. Stick
to your own music and chops without the ripped off
antics as you did in the first 45 minutes of your set, and
you're much better off and more entertaining. And
one more thing —when you turn the guitar volume off
and try to sing away from the mic, no one can hear
you, even those of us 15 feet away. Don't bother.
Anyway, the yeHing guy soon got his wish and
Steve Vai came on and smoked out asses with his
unbelievable musical prowess for the next two and
a half hours plus an encore, including a half hour
acoustic set in the middle. His band was spectacular
also, and each of them got to show off kjst how
awesome they are in a series of solos that kept the
crowd on the edge of their seats. The whole show
was a series of highlights, so it's hard to pick out
21
just a couple, but certainly the performance of
"The Audience is Listening" complete with sampled
teacher's voice was loads of fun, and the encore
version of "My Guitar Wants to Kill Your Mamma"
featuring Sardinas was also great, although I preferred
bassist Billy Sheenan's guitar solo to Sardinas' (then
again, I've always been partial to Mr. Big). Material
was covered from all eras of Vai's career, and Vai put
on his usual mugging and smirking humorous spiels
for the audience. At least those were his'own antics,
and were in keeping with the music. Kids who want
' to grow up to be rock stare—pay close attention, you
can learn a lot. Just remember to come up with your
own routines, not Jimi's.
Vampyra Draculea
The Donnas
The Sights
Riff Randells
April 23
Richard's On Richards
Our local trio of rockin' ladies stepped up to bat
first and played a solid set of crunchy pop .tunes
reminiscent of what our headliners used to sound
like so it was nice to see the contrast and with nary
a mistake as new bassist Natasha (also of The Nons)
plowed through what was her first show with tier
new bandmates. They also graced us with some
new songs, of which ^Bandana" stood out with its
Ramones-like guitar leads and snappy drumming.
Hopefully they'll have some new recordings in the
works to tide us over, as Vancouver doesn't often get
to see these gals in action.
The Sights have seen their fair share of
Vancouver fans grow, as their appearance on this biH
is now lucky number four and the trio was definitely
on top of their game with twirling organ dominating
a majority of the set from these Detroit practitioners
of soulful garage noise. Choosing to stick to material
from ther recently released album (and regretfully
omitting their prior album) was, I think, a mistake,
because there are some damn good tunes on Got
What We Want that would have fit nicely between
new songs like "Circus" and "Sticks And Stones" (the
set's closer), but they did reach way back to their .
debut for a cut, so I digress: The drums were mixed
awkwardly too as I couldn't really hear the cymbals
and snare, but the bass drum was punching a hole
in my gut wrtneach kick. Whatever, The Sights kicked
ass and took names (on their mailing list of course).
Last time I saw The Donnas, I was a bit choked
by the way they took some the older songs and
slowed them down to the pace of newer songs
so they could attempt to create some flow to the
entire set. Weil, they did it again and while it worked
for some points in the set, I just wished they had a
pitch control knob l-could turn to speed up tunes Hke
"It's On The Rocks", 'cuz they just felt a little sluggish.
They did have some new tricks up their sleeves
though, as singer Brett {they've dropped the familiar
Donna moniker dontcha know) actually uses ah ear
monitor so she can...wait for it...SING! And what's
this, she's playing piano? Yesskee, she sat down at
a Fender Rhodes to tickle the ivories on a couple
of numbers including "Hook It Up". The star of the
show was undoubtedly guitarist Alison, whose skills
have grown hcredibly over time. Barely breaking a
sweat and uttering only a whisper during their set,
she set the room on Are particularty on "5 O'clock In
The Morning" where she gave us a little schooling in
Angus Young 101. As she left the stage, she gave a
wink to the crowd that knocked the male attendees
on their collective behinds.
Drummer Tory was the comedy relief portion,
making faces and hopping Off her throne with
each thwack of a cymbal, and bassist Maya was
the robust anchor, with her time to shine allotted to
the bass solo start of "Don't Break Me Down" and a
quick Michael Jackson joke. Sticking mostly to tunes
off Gold Medal they did treat the DonnahoHcs to
some classics fike "You Make Me Hot," but in the end
the new tunes like "FaH Behind Me" and "It Takes
One To Know One" seeed to gamer the biggest
response. In the end, new fans left converted, older
fans left content, and The Donnas left exhausted.
Bryce Dunn DiSCORDER - May 2005
_m®fc
fiew
■jjhe listeners
Aesop Rock :*^f
Fast Can, Danger, f%e and Knives
■ (Def Jux)
Aesop Rock's latest release proves that
intelligent, homegrown rap is too often
being passed up for mindlessly listenable
material; mark my words, the amount
hype over U.K. grime or any beat that
Kanye West farts out for whatever emcee
will pay him enough (ahem. The Game) is
disproportionate to the depth of the talent
puddle that mainstream rap is drawing
from right now. The circus handbill layout,
sums up the album nicely—Aesop is
demonstrating his freakishly acrobatic
affinity for wordplay and the thick book
of lyrics to every song from every Aesop
album from "Float" to "Fast Cars" helps
clarify his difficult to decipher delivery.
Clocking in at just over 30 minutes.
Fast Cars is a succinct release from one
of the more challenging emcees to
emerge within the last 5 years or so. Of
course, Aesop has been criticized for an
obscurity that at times slips into nonsense,
but rarely does it interfere with a song's
given message. Aesop is jumping back
and forth over the personal/impersonal
fence on every one of his albums, and in
every one of his songs. "Holy Smokes" is
an assertion of Aesop's religious stance,
an issue that anyone who considers
'broader-questions' (pardon the cliche)
can relate to. Aesop's message is clear
enough, but it is wrapped up his signature
bizarre word associations, that only at
times take away from the value of his
songs. Much of the album follows suit (i.e.
"Food, Clothes, Medicine" and "Winners
Take All"), and each song serves as a
microcosm for Aesop's aim which seems
to balance an obvious social awareness
with chaHenging and obscure word
, associations.
This album is by no means a novelty.
The themes tackled, the hardness of
Aesop's rhymes (coupled with input from
guests Camutao (S.A. Smash), El-P (those
of you who've become acquainted with
Prefuse's new album should be familiar
with El by now) Cage and Metro (Camu's
SA Smash counterpart), and some beats
courtesy of Blockhead, Rob Sonic and
Aesop himself that will get those heads
knocking, leave the listener with a good,
gritty New York taste that will likely linger
longer on the palates of hip-hop fans
than the blandness of the multitudes
of mainstream rappers that remain
uninspired.
Mike Barrow
Keren Ann
Nolita
(Blue Note Records)
When I played this album at work, my
c6*worker Alex described it as sounding.
'."t'-jSost-ooitaK" i thought-"If was going to
put me to sleep. WftQt'fttifsays about
my sensitivity as a iovdr, I'm hot sure.
f/rV^!^r^^^^S^|8HHKp describe
French  singer-songwnter. Keren  Ann's
NoSta would be '\jffreinarkable." The
mUjSic  fe  pleasing' ^dftVr Keren  Ann's
breathy sjegpy voctSs. are lovely, but
nothing '"about Ken§B Ann's approach
seems very ongmal   Feist, Cat Power
ond Stfna  Nordenstam  al!  come  to
mind here—which is a good thing—but
HfNHpP^n9 much that would make
BWwant to listen to this album over those
by similar artists.
There are standout tracks, like
"Greatest You Can Find," which nicely
showcases Keren Ann's voice, and "Midi
Dans Le Salon De La Duchesse," a French
language track (of which there are four
on the album), which chugs along nicely,
greeted occasionally by steel guitar.
There's one doozy, the album's closer, a
spoken word number performed by some
guy who was in some movies, about a
troubled young woman deemed "the'
patron saint of 23rd street." Maybe this
has something to do with the Nolita thing.
(Is 23rd Street in Nolita? I don't know New
York. These cultural references are lost on
me.) Anyways, the track's sort of silly and
an off-note to end the album with.
As for the other songs, who knows? If
you can stay awake after sex, maybe this
album's for you. Personally, I'll stick with
drunken snoring.
Duncan
if*
JH
KmmAm
mosmm
Fiona Apple
Extraordinary Machine
(Sony,  If they  ever get around to
releasing it)
Fiona Apple's third album was shelved
more than a year ago by Sony, but a
certain renegade DJ in Seattle has been
playing it on the at night, and it is available
on the internet from sources like www.
torrentspy.com. Extraordinary Machine
may not have any obvious singles, but it
certainly is a stunning piece of work for
Fiona Apple. Her voice is as sexy as ever
as she sings in that offbeat vocal style that
makes her unique. Less radio-friendly than
Tidal or When The Pawn..., it sounds like
a Fiona" version of Broadway show tunes.
Not that there aren't stand-out tracks—
they're just so foreign from anything that
would usually be played on mainstream
radio. The title track is a deUghtfuty playful
little song about the artist's personal
perseverance. A new level of maturity
shows in Fiona's songwriting. Certain
music   executives   should   recognize  it
and just release the album, dammit.
Jordie Sparkle
British Sea Power
Open Season
(Rough Trade)
I like this album. I really do. It's a very good
record. In fact, songs like the anthemic
"Please Stand Up" and "Be Gone" are
some of the better songs of their kind
I've heard this year. Open Season is
a bit of a grower, and I have to say, I
found myself fiking it more and more with
repeated listens, telling people to check
it out and so on. And then...my growing
admiration plateaued. There seemed to
be nothing new to discover with more
listens. Like I said, this is a good album:
very melodic, unpretentious guitar rock,
and usually this wouldn't bother me at all.
The thing is, for this record, it's frustrating.
You can hear the possibility for more.
You can tell that they were just short of
turning this above-average album into
a fantastic one. I read write-ups and
reviews of Open Season, justifying this by
lauding the band's "restraint." What are
they restraining? Why are they holding
back? This record is just a bit of oomph
away from being stellar. Hopefully this will
happen for the next record. If so, then I
can see Open Season turning into a more
cherished album in retrospect, the jewel
before the real treasure.
Robert Ferdman
Caribou
The Milk of Human Kindness
(Domino)
When I saw Manitoba play last year I was
floored. While a little psychedelic. Up In
Flames—the album the band was touring
at the time—seemed clean and dreamy.
The live show, however, was dirty and
loud. And while the name Manitoba has
been dropped (due to a legal dispute
with some Dick), the newly named
Caribou has retained the messiness of
their live show on the bombastic new
album The Milk of Human Kindness, an 11-
song collection that whirls and screams
and hums and bangs. The album is
inventive and unpredictable, veering off
on tangents and slowly reconnecting
disparate sounds, yet manages to avoid
sounding forced or jarring. It finds pockets-
and windows for intimacy, making room
for Dan Snaith's hushed and tender
voice, particularly on "Yeti," the album's "
first single, and "Hello Hammerheads."
Basically, the album's solid gold and you
will love it.
Duncan
The Ditty Bops
S/T
(Warner Brothers)
The Ditty Bops sound like two best friends
caught in a sticky situation in some rodeo
bar, in one of those universes where you
can sing your way out of trouble, like in
Adventures in Babysitting, or Crossroads.
In order to save themselves from mortal
peril, two Los Angeles gals leap on the
stage, pull out banjos and mandolins, and
play through a bunch of high-energy, old-
tyme ballads and rags, get everyone a-
dancin', distract the bad guys, and make
a break for their freedom and their lives.
With twelve sweet little ditties—these
gals certainly have named their outfit
appropriately—the Ditty Bops play with
a variety of music forms. They do country
square-dance songs, sad ballads, show-
tunes-y numbers, and bouncy jigs. This is
an album full of cutesy musings like, "Why
can't little kids tie their shoes? / Why can't
white people play the blues?" instructional
advice, lost love, and a bit of jealousy.
Thankfully the jealousy is aH staged, taken
from the 1919 jazz classic "Sister Kate"
and is not best friend jealousy. No Siree!
The Ditty Bops are totally together on this
one, singin' their way out of trouble and
into a world where the banjo is mightier
than the sword.
Dory Kornfeld
Great Lake Swimmers
Bodies and Minds
(Weewerk)
This album is the wet dream that a lot of
you more subdued readers have been
having for a while now, but haven't been
able to quite realize. Considered Toronto's
answer to the Red House Painters, Nick
Drake, and err... Neil Young, the Great
Lake Singers. have returned on their
second album to the atmospheric folk
that got them voted the best folk/roots
artists in 2004's Canadian Independent
Music Awards (though where their first
album was recorded in a deserted grain
silo, this one was recorded in a lakeside
rural churc^i, giving it, like, a totally
different flavour). For those wary of yet
more "folk/roots Canadiana," you can
also have the comfort of knowing that the
Great Lake Swimmers' lap steel guitarist
is none other than the Constellations
Records rising star, Polmo Polpo, and that
Bodies and Minds was engineered'and
mixed by the same guy who works with
the Constantines and Royal City. That's
not to say that this is the be all and end all
album to come out in the past decade,
though. While apparently more varied
than their first album. Bodies and Minds
still never quite reaches the intensity of
any of the above-mentioned acts, even
in its loudest moments, but instead finds
its greatest strength in the quiet moments
where there are chirping crickets in the
background, and Tony Dekker's plaintive
singing seeps into the head, making
everything else wait on the backburner.
Soren Bros.
Valery Gore
SA
(Six Shooter Records)
Valery Gore certainly has a neat name,
a name that sounds like something you'd
see on a green sign on the side of the
highway, like "Valery Gore 12 miles."
You'd drive by it, briefly consider taking
the turnoff, and then you'd forget about
it almost completely until maybe three
years later you'll be reading a novel and
two characters will go visit Valery Gore
and you'll think, "Why does that seem so
familiar?"
In real life, Valery Gore is Toronto-based
piano-player and song-singer who has
just released her first album. And she does
seem sort of familiar. The Fiona Apple/Tori
Amos comparisons are the obvious ones
to make, and they're not inaccurate.
Her piano playing is jaunty and energetic
and her voice is smooth with warbles in all
the right places. The songs are this album
are pretty and pleasing, but almost too
much so. The Fiona Apple elements lack
the angst and torture (and Valery even
looks genuinely happy in all the CD-
sleeve photos), and the Tori Amos-y bits
come through in repeated melodies up
in the high notes, but have none of the
haunting secrets that Tori conceals and
reveals so well.
Still, this album is good. Valery's lyrics
are thoughtful and un-flowery. She sings
about how fantasy relationships wHI age
on "Dancing" and she personifies years
on "Augustine" with Hnes like "you are my
1952." There is even a sweetly nostalgic
super-Canadian song called "CBC" on
the record that touches on the distance
between people in .a very large country.
I think that Valery Gore would be a very
worthwhile act to catch live, something
I'd Hke to stand up close to the stage for,
in the hopes that she makes great faces
and does really sexy things with her legs
under her piano.
Dory
Maplewood Lane
The Golden Sides
(Annledale Records)
Memory and music go hand-in-hand,
one recalling the other. The first time I
listened to The Golden Skies EP, it conjured up images of winter nights spent in front
of a hearth with close friends. The music
of Maplewood Lane feels well worn, with
the nostalgia of a sepia-toned print.
This EP builds upon their earlier material,
applying a subtle yet lush ambiance
of swooping guitar effects, organs. ,
omnichord and other instrumentation
to dress-up Maplewood's acoustic pop.
Perhaps this is the problem with this
album—on first listen, I could have sworn
that I had heard it before. This is not
necessarily a fault, as it sounds like a lot
of my favorite music; I am a sucker for
subdued music and this release has me
locked in.
Rebecca Rowan is the songwriter and
vocalist, propelling the group with her
genteel voice. She carries the group,
comprised of siblings from two families,
through a trio of easy three-minute pop
ditties to start off. It is with the fourth song,
"Tears," that the band is let loose. The
brooding centerpiece allows the music to
run its course. Thick atmospheric guitars
quickly build to the point of domination
before the song transitions to a solid
downbeat.
After another two songs, twenty-three
minutes in total. The Golden Skies is
complete. It is a quick listen that is really
nothing new; nevertheless I recommend it
to anyone else who is a bleeding-hearted
dupe for acoustic pop.
Rick Vugteveen
The Nein
Wrath Of Circuits
(Sonic Unyon)
Minimalists they are not. The Nein have
no shortage of ideas, movihg from one
to the other without blinking an eye. On
their latest release. Wrath of Circuits, they"
introduce the willing listener to a large
variety of sounds and samples, found
throughout this album in their postpunk-
flavoured songs.
Second track "Foreign Friendster," for
instance, is a feast for the ears. It is typical
of how the different sounds are melded
into the song, rather than put in simply as
gratuitous blasts of superfluous junk. It's
not totally unlike what Disco Inferno did in
the mid-90's, although not quite as front-
and-centre as with that band.
A good example of how they bring
their many ideas to the table without
sounding overblown is the eerie "Jim
Morrison in Desert." It starts with a simple,
slow bass guitar line and perfectly placed
sad horns and clarinets. It builds gradually
with a nice-and-creepy piano, then
kicking in with drums and quiet stabs of
distorted guitar. This leads into the title
track, completely frenetic by comparison.
It sounds like it is sung by a severely
malfunctioning robot whose state is
getting worse as the song progresses,
singing "Wrath of circuits/Elements are
burning Out..." The song finally ends with
screams and guitar scratching, as if on
fire, with live electric wires flying in ail
directions.
Be forewarned, it will take more than a
few listens to absorb and explore details
on this album, of which there are far too
many to describe in this review. But it's
a commitment worthy of your time. The
Nein are a fantastically creative band,
bursting with possibilities.
Robert Ferdman
Lila Nelson
Still Got the Farm
(Independent)
When Lila Nelson came up from Cah'fornia
and played in Vancouver in March, she
played at the Naam. In that whole tour,
actually, she played coffee shops and
house concerts because Lila Nelson truly
is a classic folk musician. She is a singer-
songwriter with an acoustic guitar who
grew up on a ranch. She sings songs like
Dar Williams and Jill Sobule put together;
songs about how pretty the small things
in the world are—like filling up swimming
pools, skipping school, the. sound of falling
rain. This album has harmonica and can
be a bit twangy, but not in the wide-eyed
way of Michelle Shocked or the growly
way of Oh Susanna. These are just simple
pretty songs for listening to in the car in
the rajn or at home when it's dark and
everyone's out having fun but you just,
kinda felt like staying home.
Dory
Pyramids on Mars
Lines
Neoprimitive
(Pyramid Limited)
I'm doing this as a two-in-one review
since these discs are so similar. It would
almost seem there is no distinction in the
recording, as though it's reaHy two sides of
the same album. That lack of distinction
goes for the songs too, seeming more like
one long composition than a collection
of songs. Not that that's a bad thing
necessarily, as Pyramids on Mars seems
to want to provide a meditative journey
through a mishmash of various tribal music
elements and electronic noise textures.
The liner notes on Lines indicate they
feel they've kept "the hardest elements
of rock" along with their Western mythic
influences, but if that's true than Ashlee
Simpson must surely be the new Patti
Lofty ambitions and bullshit aside, the
overall effect is pleasant background
music for a hip new-age get together.
The more you listen to them, the more
you hear in these discs, even if it seems
there's nothing really there on the first
listen. They do dig their ways into your
brain. Of course, this assumes you can
track it down—their website is defunct
23
and who knows about the post office
box. And Google mostly wants to tell you
about the Nazca lines and UFOs, though
there were a scant few useful references.
Happy hunting.
Drake
Regina Spektor
Soviet Kitsch
(Sire)
Sire made a great decision when it chose
to simply re-release Soviet Kitsch, instead
of calling upon the Moscow-born New
Yorker to do another record. While other
solo artists have stumbled a little when
making this transition, Spektor's excellent
major-label debut (originally her third
self-released abum) is devoid of the
unfortunate small-artist-in-a-big-studio
sound. Soviet is confident and convincing,
with exuberant, child-like vocals offsetting
sophisticated songwriting and minimal
instrumentation (check out the heartbeat kick drum in "Ode to Divorce").
Though comparisions to Cat Power and
Tori Amos are fully justified, Soviet Kitsch
is wholly Spektor's own. The re-release/
comes with a bonus DVD of mostly
forgettable content, though the video for
"lis" is neat.
KatSiddle
Various Artists
Papa, Don't Lay that Shit On Me
(Rounder)
Papa Don't Lay that Shit On Me is a
reissue of Mountain Moving Day, the 1972
album by the Chicago and New Heven
Women's Liberation Rock bands. This
time around, the collection of second-
wave feminist protest music is bulked up
with eight additional tracks, including
two by Le Tigre ("TGIF" and "I'm on My
Way") and one by '70s spoken word
artist Naomi Weisstein. This is isn't the first
time Le Tigre has paid tribute to feminist
music of the past: I recognized Weisstein
as the woman who talks about the New
York subway between tracks on Feminist
Sweepstakes.
The older tracks on Papa... range
from ragtime to bluesy '60s rock to folk
and faux gospel. It's an interesting listen
as far as archival material goes, but how
much you Hke it will depend on how much
you like 60's protest music in general.
Personally, it all sounds a bit worn out to
me. Despite catchy titles like "Abortion
Song" and "Fuck You," I don't think this
disc is going to be on high rotation at my
house.
The finer notes claim that the original
Mountain Moving Day was the mother
of aH feminist, grrrl and queer-core music.
A neat idea, but it's difficult to listen to
the music of other people's revolutions
and really understand what they found
'so inspiring about it. Most mind-blowing
of all, though, is the thought that one
day, some fifth or sixth-waver is going to
listen to my beloved "Deceptieon" and
cringe as I do when I hear the New Hdven
Women's Liberation Rock Band sing, "Far
out, yeah! Far out, yeah! Loving our sisters
is so far out!"
KatSiddle
2^
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SATURDAY MAY 21 @ THE ANZA CLUB
NOVILLERO W/ THE NEINS CIRCA, CADEAUX,
THE SUMMERLAD, DJ OL1 DIRTY RALOGH
indie reck for the small people! songs for kids and
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In stores may 3!
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Silent Alarm
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What Keeps Us Awake
Sound Document
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Feathers
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Mm
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Elevators and Oscillators
Ghostly International
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Plays Horses in the Sky
Constellation
22
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The Golden Skies
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Elevator
Sire
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APES
Soba's Mountain
Birdman
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CHET*
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.  Fat Wreck ,
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VR001- Pete Samples; An Unsent Letter (CD)
VR002- Pete Samples; Unsent Letters (12" EP)
VR003- Sinewave; A Ton of Automatons (12")
www.vinylrepublik.coni
THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
featuring the soothing, dulcet tones of
THE HUNTER COMETH and
THE VAN COURTLAND RANGERS
hosted by
DIRTY FERDY BELLAND
THURSDAY MAY 12th 9:00 SHARP!
WALDORF HOTEL (1489 East Hastings)
Admission: $5.00 (20% of door goes to CITR!) Program
SUNDAY
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC
9:00AM-12:00PM
'All of time is measured by its art. This show presents the
most recent new music from around the world. Ears
open.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12:00PM-3:00PM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE alt.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
AFROBEAT
3:00PM-5:00PM
In two hours, I take the listener for a spin—musically—
around the world; my passion is African music and
music from the Diaspora.
Afrobeat is where you can catch up on the latest in
the "World Music" scene and reminisce on the classic
collections. Don't miss it.
<uget_afrobeat@yahoo.com>
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING alt.
5:00PM-6:00PM
British pop music from all decades.
SAINT TROPEZ alt.
5:00PM-6:00PM
International pop (Japanese, French, Swedish, British,
US, etc.), 60s soundtracks and lounge. Book your jet set
holiday now!
QUEER FM
6:00PM-8:00PM
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transsexual
communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest
features, background on current issues, and great
music.
RHYTHMSINDIA
8:00PM-10:00PM
Rhythmslndia features a wide range of music from India,
including popular muse from-Indian movies from ihe
1930s to the present, classical music, semi-classical
music such as Ghazals and Bhqjans, and also QawwaRs,
pop, and regional language numbers.
TRANCENDANCE \-'; t^f.
10:00PM-12:00AM
Jain us in practicing the ancient art of rising above
common thought and ideas as your host DJ Smiley
Mike lays down the latest trance cuts to propel us into
the domain of the rnystic-al.
<1rancendance@hotmail.com>
ELECTRONIC SPECTRUM
12:00AM-3:00AM
FILL-IN
3:00PM-6:00AM
MONDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 8:00AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8:00AM-11:00AM
Your favourite brown-sters, James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the famiTrar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights!
LIONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS...
An eclectic mix of indie rock, pop, electronica and hip
hop, with your host Jordie Sparkle.
11:00AM- 12:00PM
ALT. RADIO
12:00PM-1:00PM
Hosted by David B.
PARTS UNKNOWN
1:00PM-3:00PM
Underground pop for the minuses with the occasional
interview with your host, Chris.
SANDBOX THEATRE
3:00PM-4:00PM
A show of radio drama orchestrated and hosted by
UBC students, featuring independent works from
tocaJ, national, and international theatre groups. We
welcome your involvement.
<sandboxtheatre@hotmaiLcom>
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS
4:00PM-5:00PM
A chance for new CiTR DJs to flex ther musical muscle.
Surprises galore.
THEFLIPSIDE
5:00PM-6:00PM
Join me - Dallas Brodie - for stimulating talk radio
about local, national and international issues.
SONOFNITEDREEMSalt.
6:00PM-7:30PM
SOLARIZATION alt.
6:0OPM-6:3OPM
MY ASS alt.
6:30PM-7:30PM
Phelps, Atoini, 'n' me.
WIGFLUX RADIO
7:30PM-9:OOPM
Listen to Selecta Krystabelle for your reggae education.
THE JAZZ SHOW        | *.   j
9:00PM-12:00AM
Vancouver's longest running prime-time jazz program.
Hosted by the ever-suave, Gavin Walker. Features at
11:00, as listed.
May 2: Ahmad Khatab Salim (aka Albert Atkinson) may
not be a household name even among serious Jazz
fans but SaBm was a very prominent composer/arranger in the 50's and 60's. Tonight a star-studded big
band plats A.K. Salim's "Blues Suite."
May 9: A very special Jazz Show this evening with the
first two hours devoted to Gavin's guest: singer/lyricist/
producer/character colin Lazzerini. Colin will choose
some unique vocal stylists and entertain you with his
witty asides. The feature at 11 will be guitarist Grant
Green in a quartet setting with pianist Kenny Drew on
a disc called Sunday Morning.
May 16: An overlooked gem by tenor saxophone giant Sonny RolBns called "Tour de Force." Not only
does this session contain some of Rdlin's most forceful
playing but some, of his most lyrical and gentle as he
backs up deep-voiced vocals by Earl Coleman on
two songs. Drum great Max Roach is here along with
bassist George Morrow and the reliable Kenny Drew
on piano.
May 23: Some very experimental music that predated
Miles Davis' use of modality by many years lead by
a forward-thinking composer/vibist Teddy Charles in
conduction with saxophonist Jimmy Guiffre and trumpeter Shorty Rogers. AB of these players were seeking
to break away from the mainstream and yet this mu-
sio is swinging and as modem as next week despite
the fact that it was recorder in '1953. Teddy Charles'
New Directions tonight!
May 30: We end the month with obscure tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose and a recording that he was
proud of as it puts him in fhe "jazz giant" category. The
album is called The Message and features along with
J.R. pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Jimmy Gcirrison
and some of drummer Pete Laroca's finest work.
VENGEANCE IS MINE
12:00AM-3:00AM
AH the best the world of punk rock has to offer, in the wee
hours of the mom. Hosted by Trevor.
FILL-IN
3:00AM - 6:30AM
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6:30AM-8:00AM
Bluegrass, old-time music and its derivatives with Arthur
and "The Lovely Andrea" Berman.
HIGHBRED VOICES alt.
8:00AM-9:30AM
FILL-IN
8:00AM-9:30AM
For CiTR 101.9FM
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
9:30AM-11:30AM
Open your ears and prepare for a shock! A harmless
note may make you a fan! Hear the menacing scourge
that is Rock and Roll! Deadlier than the most dangerous
criminal!
<bominsbdynihe@hotmal.com>
LIVE HERE, WORK EVERYWHERE, alt.
11:30AM- 12:00PM
CJLY '- Kootenay Co-op Radio profiles 30 creative
enterprises   in   Nelson   with   markets   and   clients
worldwide.
MORNING AFTER SHOW alt.
11:30AM-12:30PM
REEL TO REAL alt.
12:30PM- 1:00PM
Movie reviews and criticism.
ENGAGING THE WORD alt.
1:00PM-2:00PM
Canadian   authors,   fiction   writers   and    novellists
interviewed by James O'Hedm.
BEATUP RONIN
12:00PM-2:00PM
Where dead samurai can program music.
CIRCUIT TRACING
2:00PM-3:30PM
EN AVANT LA MUSIQUE alt.
3:30PM-4:30PM
«En Avant la musique!» se concentre sur le metissage
des genres musicaux au sein d'une francophonie
ouverte a tous les courants. This program focuses
on cross-cultural it&eic and its influence on mostly
Francophone musicians.
TANSI KIYAW alt.
3:30PM-4:30PM
Tansi kiyaw? Is Michif-Cree (one of the Metis languages)
for "Hello, How are you?" and is a monthly Indigenous
music and spoken word show. Hosted b June Scudeler
(for those who know me from other shows-I'm Metis!),
the show wiH feature music and spoken word as weU
as events and news from Indian country and special
guests. Contact me at jlsexidel@ucalgary.ca with news,
even listings and ideas. Megwetch!
FILL-IN
4:30PM-5:00PM
WENER'S BARBEQUE
5:00PM-6:00PM
Join the sports dept. for their coverage of the T-Birds.
FLEXYOURHEAD
6:00PM-8:00PM
Up the punx, down Itie emo! Keepin' it real since 1989,
yo. flexyourhead.vancouverhardcore.com
SALARIO MINIMO
8:00PM-10:00PM
THE LOVE DEN alt.
10:00PM-12:00AM
<k>veden@hotmail.com>
ESCAPISM alt.
10:00PM-12.00AM
es»cap»ism n: escape from the reality or routine of life by
absorbing the mind in entertainment or fantasy.
Host: DJ Satyricon.
<DJSatyrJcon@hotmail.com>-
AURAL TENTACLES
12:00AM-6:00AM
It could be punk, ethno, global, france, spoken word,
rock, the unusual and the weird, or it could be
somettiing different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
WEDNESDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 7:00AM
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
7:00AM-9:00AM
CITR NEWS AND ARTS
9:00AM- 10:00AM
EXQUISITE CORPSE
10:00AM-11:30AM
Experimental, radio-art, sound collage, filed recordings,
etc. Recommended for the insane.
ANOIZE
11:30AM-1:00PM
Luke Meat irritates and educates through musical
DiSCORDER - May 2005
deconstruction. Recommended for the strong.
THE SHAKE alt.
1:00PM-2:00PM
MIRCHMASALAalt.
1:00PM-2:00PM
DEMOCRACY NOW
2:00PM-3:00PM
Independent news hosted by award-winning journalists
Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez
MOTORDADDY att.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Cyde-riffic rawk and roMJ
RUMBLETONE RADIO alt.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Primitive, fuzzed-out garage mayhem!
NECESSARY VOICES
5:00PM-6:30PM
Socio-political, environmental activist news and spoken
word with some music, too. www.nec3ssaryvdces.org
<necessaryvdces@telus.net>
AND SOMETIMES WHY alt.
6:30PM-8:OOPM
(First Wednesday of every month.)
BLUE MONDAY alt.
6:30PM-8:00PM
Vancouver's      only      industrial-electranic-retro-goth
program. Music to schtomp to, hosted by Coreen.
FILL-IN
8:00PM-9:0OPM alt
JUICEBOX
8:00PM-9.-00PMalt.
Developing your relationd and individud sexud health,
expressing diversity, celebrating queemess and encouraging pleasure at dl stages. Sexuality educators
Ma and A$x wB quench your search for responsible,
progressive sexuality over your life span!
wwwjuiceboxradfo.com
FOLK OASIS
9:00PM-11:00PM
Roots music for fojkies and non-fdkies... bluegrass, shger-
songwriters, wortdbeat, alt country, and more. Not a
mirage!
<fdkoasis@canada.com>
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
11:00PM-2:00AM
This is, pretty much, the best thing on rado.
FIRST FLOOR SOUND SYSTEM
A00AM-6:00AM
THURSDAY
FILL - IN
6:00AM-8:00AM
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
8:00AM-10:00AM
SWEET AND HOT
10:00AM-11:30AM
Sweet dance music and hot jazz from the 1920s 30s
and 40s.
FIRED UP
11:30AM-12:00PM
Ever tdd yourself T can't even boil water, let alone
cook a chicken or stir-fry vegetables!" Let Chef Marat
show you the way to create easy meals prepared in
the comfort of your own kitche'n/bechelor pad or
car. OK, maybe not the car. Wouldn't want to spill
anything on the upholstery.
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES
12:00PM-1:00PM
WE ALL FALL DOWN
1:00PM-2:00PM
Punk rock, indie pop, and whatever else I deem
worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd.
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW
2:0OPM-3:0OPM
Comix comix comix. Oh yeah, and some music with
RHYMES AND REASONS
3:00PM-5:00PM
DJ Knowone slaves over hot-multi-track to bring a
fresh continuous mix of fresh every week. Made
from scratch, samples and just a few drops of
fame. Our tables also have plethora of guest DJs*-
performers, interviews, giveaways. Strong Bad and
the occasional public service announcements.
<eno_wonk@yahoo.ca>
LOCAL KIDS MAKE GOOD
5:00PM-6:00PM alt. CITR BROADCASTS AT 640 WATTS 24 HOURS A DAY. TUNE US IN AT 101.9FM, CABLE 101.9FM OR LISTEN TO US ONLINE AT WWW.CITR.CA
27
Local Dave brings you local music of all sorts. The
program most likely to play your band!
PEDAL REVOLUTIONARY alt.
5:00PM-6:00PM
Viva la Velorution! DJ Helmet Hair and Chainbreaker
Jane  give  you   all  the   bike   news  and  views
you need and even cruise around while doing it!
www.bikesexual.org
PLANET LOVETRON
6:00PM-7:30PM alt
Music inspired by Chocolate Thunder, Robert Robot
drops electro past and  present,  hip "hop and
intergalactic funkmanship. <rbotlove@yahoo.com>
NUTHOUSE RADIO THEATRE
6:00PM-7:30PM alt.
All-original Canadian radio drama and performance
art written and performed live-to-air by our very
own team of playwrights and voice-actors. We also
welcome you to get involved, whether you are a
professional or inexperienced...
ON AIR WITH GREASED HAIR
7:30PM-9:00PM
The best in roots, rock 'n' roll and rhythm and blues
from 1942-1962 with your snappily-attired host, Gary
Olsen.
<ripitup55@telus.net>
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
9:00PM-11:00PM
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell showcases local talent... LIVE! Honestly, don't even ask about the technical side of this.
May 12: Dve from the Waldorf Hotel!! The Hunter
Cometh and The Vancourtland Rangers.
May 19: Ladyhawk.
May 26: Two Dollar Ties.
Also, keep and ear out for Evol Hearted and Raking
bombs!
WORLD HEAT
11:00PM-1:00AM
An old punk rock heart considers the oneness of all
things and presents music of worlds near and far.
Your, host, the great Daryl-ani, seeks r<
<worldheat@hotmail.com>.
LAUGH TRACKS
1:0OAM-2:0OAM
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
2:00AM-6:00AM
FRIDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 7:00AM
PLEASE ROCK THE DOOR
Start your weekend ridiculously early with Vancouver's
super awesome fun time happy radio show. Playing
all the dance-punk, electro, rock, new wave, hip
hop, 80's, etc.- shit that your mom thinks is cool.
7:00AM-8:00AM
CAUGHT IN THE RED
8:00AM-10:00AM
Trawling the trash heap of over SO years' worth of real
rock'n' roll debris.
SKA-T'S SCENE-IK DRIVE!
10:00AM-12:00PM
Email requests to: <djska_t@hotmail.com>
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
12:0OPM-2:0OPM
Top notch crate digger DJ Avi Shack mixes the
underground hip hop, old school classics and
original breaks.
RADIO ZERO
2:OOPM-3:30PM
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS...
3:30PM-5:00PM
THUNDERBIRD RADIO NEWS
5:0OPM-6:0OPM
A  volunteer-produced,   student  and  community
newscast featuring news, sports and arts. Reports by
people like you. "Become the Media."
THE NORTHERN WISH (formerly THE NORTHERN WISH)
6:0OPM-7:3OPM
Independent Canadian music from almost every
genre imaginable covering the east coast to the left
coast and aH points in between. Yes, even Montreal!
<thecanadianway@popstar.com>
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-9:00PM
David "Love" Jones brings you the best new and old
jazz, soul, Latin, samba, bossa and African music
from around the world.
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
HOMEBASS
9:00PM-12:00AM
Hosted by DJ Noah: techno but also some trance,
acid, tribal, etc. Guest DJs, interviews, retrospectives,
giveaways, and more.
I LIKE THE SCRIBBLES alt.
12:00AM-2:00AM
THE ANTIDOTE alt.
12:00AM-2:00AM
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
2:OOAM-6:0OAM
Dark, sinister music to soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Hosted by Drake.
<thevampiresball@yahoo.ca>
SATURDAY
.  FILL-IN
6:00AM-8:00PM
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8:00 AM-12:00PM
Studio guests, new releases, British comedy sketches,
folk music calendar and ticket giveaways.
8AM-9AM: African/World roots. 9AM-12PM: Celtic
music and performances.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12:00PM-1:00PM
A fine mix of streetpunk and old school hardcore
backed by band interviews, guest speakers, and
social commentary, www.streetpunkradio.com
<crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca>
POWERCHORD
1:00PM-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show; local demo tapes,
imports,  and  other  rarities.  Gerald   Rattlehead,
Dwain, and Metal Ron do the damage.
CODE BLUE
3:00PM-5:00PM
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp
honks, blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5:00PM-6:00PM
The best mix of music, news, sports and commentary
from  around  the  local  and  international  Latin
American communities.
BATTLE ZONE
6:00PM-7:00PM
Each show will make you feel as though you're
_  listening in  on  conversations  between  political
insiders. As well, this guest and caller-driven programs
its guest from opposite ends of the corridor of public
argument against one another in ho-holds barred
debate that takes you behind today's headlines.
SHADOW JUGGLERS
7:00PM-9:00PM
An exdting chow of Drum n' Bass with Djs Jimungle
& Bias on the ones and twos, plus gusts, Usten for
givawas everyweek. Keep feelin da beatz.
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9:00PM-1 1:00PM
PLUTONIAN NIGHTS
11:00PM-1:00AM
Cutting-edge, progressive organ music with resident
Haitchc and various guest performers/DJs. Bye-bye
civilisation, keep smiling blue, where's me bloody
anesthetic then? http://plutonia.org
EARWAX
1:00AM-4:30AM
"noiz terror mindfuck hardcore like punk/beatz drop
dem headz rock inna junglist mashup/distort da
source full force with needlz on wax/my chaos runs
rampant when I free da jazz..." Out.
REGGAE LINKUP
4:30AM-9:00AM
Hardcore dancendl reggae. Hosted by Sister B.
SUNiDAY
MONiDAY
TUESiDAY       WEDNESDAY      THURSiDAY
FRIDAY
SATURiDAY
9
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12p«
si •
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REGGAE LINKUP
(RG)
ARE YOU SERIOUS?
MUSIC (EC)
ROCKERS
SHOW(RG)
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE (RT)
AFROBEAT
(WO)
QUEER FM
(TK)
RHYTHMSINDIA
(WO)
TRANCENDANCE
(DC)
ELECTRONIC
SPECTRUM
(DC)
BREAKFAST WITH
.THE BROWNS
(EC)
LIONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS
ALT. RADIO (PO)
PARTS
UNKNOWN (PO)
SANDBOX THEATRE (IX)
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS (EC)
THE HJPSIDE (TK)
SON OF Nil
DREEMS(EC)
WIGFLUX RADIO (RG)
THE JAZZ
SHOW
(JZ)
VENGEANCE
IS MINE!
(PU)
FILL-IN
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(RT)   t
HIGHBRED        FILL-IN.
VOICES (WO)
THIRD TIMES
THE CHARM (RR)
BEATUP
RONIN
W
MORNING AFTER
SHOW (EC)
CIRCUIT TRACING
(DC/EC)
ENAVANT
LA MUSIQUE |FR)
WENER'S BBQ (SP)
FLEX YOUR
HEAD(HC)
SALARIO MINIMO
(WO)        «
THE LOVE
DEN
(EC)
ESCAPISM
(EC)
AURAL
TENTACLES
(EC)
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(EC)
CITR NEWS * ARTS (TK)
EXQUISITE CORPSE (EX)
ANOIZE (NO)
THE SHAKE (RR) 1   MIRCH MASALA (WO)
DEMOCRACY NOW (TK)
RUMBLETONE
RADIO
(RR)
MOTORDADDY
(RR)
NECESSARY VOICES (TK)
AND SOMETIMES
WHY (PO/EC)
JUICEBOX (TK)
FOLK OASIS (RT)
HANS KLOSS'
MISERY HOUR
(HK)
FIRST FLOOR
SOUNDSYSTEM
(EC)
FILL-IN
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(EC)
SWEET'N'HOT (EC)
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES (PO/EC)
WE ALL FALL DOWN (EC)
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW (TK)
RHYMES &
REASONS (HH)
NUTHOUSE
RADIO THEATRE
PLANET LOVETRON
(DC)
ON AIR WITH
GREASED HAIR (RR)
LIVE FROM...
THUNDERBIRD HELL (LM)
WORLD HEAT
(WO)
LAUGH TRACKS (TK)
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
FILL-IN
PLEASE ROCK THE DOOR (EC)
CAUGHT IN
THE RED (RR)
SKA-T'S
SCENIC DRIVE (SK)
THESE ARE THE
BREAKS (HH)
RADIO ZERO (EC)
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS (NW)
CITR NEWS AND ARTS (TK)
THE CANADIAN WAY
(EC)
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(WO)
HOMEBASS
(DC)
I UKE THE
SCRIBBLES (EC)
THE ANTIDOTE
(EC)
THE VAMPIRE'S
BALL (GI/MT)
FILL-IN
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE(RT)
GENERATION ANNIHILATION (PU)
POWERCHORD
(MT)
CODE BLUE
(RT)
LEO RAMIREZ STOW (WO)
RACHEL MARSLEN SHOW (TK)
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(DC)
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(DC/EC)
PLUTONIAN
NIGHTS (DC)
EARWAX
(HH/DC)
REGGAE UNKUP(RG)
DOdance/electronic • EOeclectic • EX=experimental • FR""Fi»neh language • GI=goth/industrial • HOhardcore • HH=hiphop • HK=Hans Kloss • JZ-jazz
LMHive music • LCHounge • MT=metal • NOnoise • NW-Nardwuar • POpop • PlNpunlc • RG=reggae • RR-rock • RT-roots • SK=ska • SP=sports • TK=talk • WOworld
9
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6 DiSCORDER - May 2005
HOME AND ABROAD Zuhfe musical caravan goes the distance.
VANCOUVER'S BKT SOUNDS
L£E HUTZULAK
Angel Trumpets Clicking Death
CD
Whether slipped under the Zulu door, tucked into the
burlap knapsack on the back of a multilingual penguin
or carried by the winds coming from a cherry orchard collectively sighing, Lee Hutzulak s varied musical output has
always found strange ways to arrive at our stereo. Perhaps it is because there is something inherently enigmatic and magical about his delicate compositions of electronics, guitar, voice and acoustics. Perhaps it is just that with all the complexity in his universe,
Hutzulak s beautiful forlorn songs ding to the denizens of his oddly-shaped world, seeking
meaning from the natural form and structures that bind them. Regardless, on this his second triumphant solo outing, Lee leads us through seven fantastic tracks that are densely
packed with in his own words—snow shoes, black forests, rivers restless under ice,
cooling down houses, beach sand and beach shelf, Death playing cat's cradle, a poisoned
hairpin and much, much more! Listen up man, Hutzulak takes you there, if you can't find
your way back, then perhaps you really shouldn't.
C012.98
DUPLEX!
Ablum by Duplex! CD
The more grown-ups I meet the more I like little kids, so
this summer i'm gonna start coaching little league softball
and man-o-man I'm excited! I think our uniforms are gonna
be orange and brown and our mascot's gonna be an armadillo with a top hat on and we're gonna be called the Mount *
Pleasant Class-Acts... We are gonna be boss! I boughj a Jl
boom-box to get the team pumped and picked up the fHw disc by Duplex! It'JIgot a coii-"
pie of kids in the band, which is cool, and a few old people like Veda Hille, mewbers#*»
Pram and A.C. Newman—whoever they are. Songs include "Pooimjf and Peeing"—
which is about just that—as well some about not liking salad, NOT being the best little
boy in the world and a bunch of other stuff that the grown-ups don't know about but the
. little kids understand. It's gonna be a good season. Go Mount Pleasant Class-Acts!
AVAILABLE MAY 3RD.
CD 12.98
THE NEINS CIRCA
Sunday Anthems CD
Somewhere In Vancouver is a magic post offici§||l|j|j
'Blue Curtain' written on it I wish I could give you the
address so you would know where to send your
when I asked the label boss A.C. Newman about
that they were still ordering the blue paint for
that it would all take a while. What d<
while'? What sort of reception area do you have? I'fpg^irland give yot}J^($i
man. I dig everything you ever did. New Pornographers, Neko Case Capozzi PwEXtjfltJT
The Battles all blow small speakers on expensive siretgclext, tasked Newman's representative (for that was who I was dealing with now) if there was going to be a label showcase. He said 'yes' but I spent over two hours in ^^mfws fish factories on Parker
before I realized I was really just a huge pest. Now;^'t^|Fygotto make it up to the
Blue Curtain, especially since they are responsible for releasing the debut recording from
Vancouver's finest future good-time, The Neins Circa Featuring classic pop hooks, good
looks and showmanship worthy of an endless stint at^Jhowboat, these guys are
everything and more I could hope for from Blue Giffbte^ioy. AVAILABLE MAY 10TH.
CD 14.98 m^
IVTAPLEWOODLANE
The Golden Skies CD
Some people dream fn black and white Some people And a little col&iMkiFne people
even swear they can get the sound controls .vdrtaog WeU that s cool Hut what'S'cooter
is Ms brooding dream-pop release from Vanco ii/er's best kept secret   Mipliiieeml I in
Recalling the blissed-out sonic wash of Pale Saints, IMe and Slowdive. V liT st k__
er nugget is the perfect conduit for your nights of Senoi dream theory practice. Recorded
and released by fellow altered states fan Jonathan Anderson (Jonathan toe/Radiogram)
The Golden Skies' cathartic songs are cleverly layered to glorious effect with sun kissed
tremolo guitars, soaring vocal harmonies and rays of warm, glowing keyboards. Highlights
include the whiteout fuzz noise of Canadian Winters' as well as the serene jubilance of
IrhjWest Sar1. Dream on.
CD 9.98
AU SALE PRICES IN EFFECT UNTIL MAY 31,2005
m m
THE WORLD'S BEST SOUNDS
ANIMAL
COLLECTIVE &VASHTI
BUNYAN
Prospect Hummer CDEP
When last summer's A
out a big local room we knew tl
. underground was on the rise. The upsurge of ir
in contemporary roots wreckers Be Six Organs of A
Recordings led many adventdlis types to investigate thjfl
first dug the mossy loam of J|jd foifc vpy back «|p§, It*
' passes without some new uneartt-na of bune 1 treasure;ftom tnis particular altot;
ment—Comus, Forest, Trass and—best ot all ■«- tfje jJ^igntfuity whimsical." .
Vashti Bunyan. So what do you get whenthe masters oi today's psycne-folk Sound
get it together with the scene's vfgaran high priestess?' ■
You get a glorious orgy of harps, guitars, stni gs, melodicas, and electronics-- You
gjf"a truly stunning record vvin h is ,o essence ike a wolf returning ta its mother*
CtiP 9.98
BOREDOMS
Seadrum/House of Sun CD
Om Om Om" Never out of brd^tri, Yashanl is '■*
chanting her magical mantrarto the ocean that
sw<MSJH5woostwvKK>sh»araJ swells in complex
iBffKtrans of vippang eddies out past the breakwate
, etief towarrftytte-tojjefiii Horwon of eternal golden
jtuhrays Saining rriomintijm her fragile turd coos
cue a barrage of pejcuswon that in turn sets loose a stampede of '■
Ijessttfuf/grotesque sonic noise beasts. Many of fReWS^r^^Erjiany heads,
eyes, and arms that shimmer with exotic desire. Next Yoshimi heroically hoists a
baby grand piano to be sacrificed to the gods, who chuckle as this perverse played
out symbol of reason, order and high art, before it is thrust deep into the mouth of
the transcendental sonic chimera. Om Om Om! What is this vortex? What have the
Boredoms unleashed? Five years in the making, Seadrum/House of Sun is their
shining moment—two epic tracks thatinsSil the true possibilities of unrestrained
freeform sound summoning by assaulting the ears with a truly spiritual blast of
hippy-punk mayhem. If you WflpttgM, you need this. Om Om Om!!
CD 22.98
CARIBOU     ^J-^
The Milk of Human
Kindness CD
Though there is, much implicitly shared territory
I between the genres of pastoral pop, psychedelic
rock and ambient electronica, few artists have convincingly and explicitly mapped this particular no-
man's-land. Enter Dan Snaith, formerly Manitoba, now known as Caribou! Using
the trippiest sounds of the late 20th century as his stable reference, Smith has realigned the role of electronic music in the modern milieu. Eschewing the mindless
late-night head-nod of the contemporary beat-scene, Snaith positions programming as a platform for departure into Krautrock drone, Beatles-esque melodies,
free-jazz witdhass aTfd smTtey-taceifsogrihaiSQwa this combination of influences has kjitg been awaiting exploration— It lust needed someone to go the extra
mile and wpre one band fails to cross the universe another succeeds.
SPOON
Gimme Fiction 2CD
Within the first five seconds of Gimme Fiction,
Spoon establish themselves as America's real
rock deal. With its loose arrangement of edgy guitars, bar room piano and frenetic drumming,
Gimme Fiction's lead-off track (Beast and
Dragon, Adored') sees front man Britt Daniels
finally making good on his promise to deliver an American version of the States'
Main Street. Other stellar moments recall oft-maligned Emotional
; smooth bass and disco beat but without Jagger's rock-puppet antics.
1||§ bamyjiat has always had an explosive live show, it certainly sounds nice to
§py6erfiJ|$Bg it out the#aggenng 'I Turn My Camera On'. To sum up: If
^||»'jK"the catchinesM£pbll the Moonlight, then you're really going to
ifflffiP"'s abandoi^8bj§j|ling rambling and high high dramatics of
^M^^io».Oh.and"^i^^P have a strictly limited edition 2CD version of
WS^^^^i^^^iW^^ AVAILABLE MAY 10TH.
teioji-.JV
tMTtrted Editfotf 2C0 vasion in!
ONEIDA ,.,
The Wedding CO
apis most excellent new recofC ft >m Kid
I Millions, Hanoi Jane and big ol Fat Bobby,,
tflkes pveVJthing from wild vocal ^ploraJfonsicr
$f|et stflni erranggmopiS; into Oneida's familiar
#t^nelting^^^jtor»«|^Kou got to see 'em
last tuonth at^^sWs4opeffl^ for label-mates
Black Mountap. you got _ hnt: >ste of things to come on this then-unre- •
leased gem. If you've not yet join 1 the Oneida Utopian rook community, get
ready to dump y&jfflgmBswe punchbowl, 'cuz this is one you're gonna
wanna get on top ot AVAILABLE MAY 3RD.
CD 16.98
STEREOLAB
Oscillons from the Airti-
Sun3CD+DVD
^
Stere<?lab
oscillons
frnm
the Anti-Sun
C014.98
DEATH CAB FOR CUTE
The John ByidEP CDEP
"*   re of yqu may re ""
Death Cab for Cutie shared the bill with the Rev and blew away even the most
experienced of Zulu rock travelers. Today, they are one of the biggest indie rock
acts in North America. Proof? They just rocked the Bait Shop on The O.C. and ate
about to sign on the dotted line with a major record label, inevitably becoming fabulously rich and famous in the process. That said, it should give you comfort that
way back on that awesome night in a Bellingham college gym, they proved first and
foremost that they are super cool guys. Collectors: This EP is their last for Barsuk
Records and features some primo laid-back pop wizardry.
CDEP11.98
Being a Stereolab compiettst h - always been an
uphill struggle. Acquiring all of ihe multifarious
limited edition forty-five$, 10 inch ■ > ind coloured
.Sl^Bdolties that litter the bandr labyrinthine
SaS^cajtalogue is no easy matter ' t vir recent decision to call it a day presum-
. ,a% rtieans the onsfaj^rjjjlphj^-to-find releases will cease but there remains
, ajreatth of intriguing ava'rt-pcjpsgems that even dedicated Caine/Sadier fans
have yet to discover. Oscillons from the Anti-Sun represents a concerted effort
to address this inequity. Spanning Stereolab s most creative period, it features
classics tike Jenny OmHoline, Ping Pong', Cybele's Reverie', French Disko
and Miss Modular', alongside a wealth of cool obscurities. What will make it a
must for ait Stereolab fanatics, though, is the bonus DVD packed with promo
videos and TV spots: Space age!
3CD + DVDfc*98
GET IN THE BtK AND 60 WITH:
asnWWE-AxesOjVlP
mmmtm GOATS -The Sunset Tree GQIP
MMawirsH««iHieiWFm-wom
NOT WAKES-tol Session CD
l3rWCSB0R»~SM»!<g#$ Different Day (with b
THE PONYS-Celebration CastJe CO
MARY TIMONY-Ex Hex CD
AIMEE MANN-The Forjotten Aim CD
THEBOOETWfflB-OcemsApalCO
AQUEDUCT-1SoM Gold CD
LOVE AS LMJGHTER-laughter's Fifth CD
i DVD)
NOVUEHO- Aim Right for the Holes in Their lives CD
zulu news
Am Leopold
orates
May 8lli io June 8th 2005 Record cover art repositioned.
K£Cd7?D£\
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver. BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed 10:30-7:00
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00
Sat 9:30-6:30

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