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APRIL 2010//THAT SOMETHING CLEVER MAGAZINE FROM CiTR 101.9 FM// supporting Vancouver's independent music communty for over 25 years
il
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www.citr.ca  EDITOR
JordieYou?
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Rets
COPY EDITORS
Debby Reis, Mine'Salkin, Al Smith
AD MANAGER
David Stansfield
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Mine'Salkin
RLA EDITOR
Al Smith
WEB EDITOR
Reilly Wood
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Melanie Coles
PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR
Leanna Orr
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn, Debby Reis
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society of UBC
COVER
Eden Veaudry
EDITOR'S NOTE
Dear Discorder:
Before I talk about the issue, I would like to talk about
the excellent fundraiser that we had on March 5. The night
was unquestionably a success raising almost $5,000, all of
which will go towards operating costs to keep us in print in
the upcoming year. We would like to thank everyone who
volunteered their time, played music or donated something
to the silent auction as well as all the wonderful staff at
the Biltmore. We'd also like to thank everyone who came
out to enjoy the party. It was great to see so many people
out to support us and the local music scene. We believe
that we do the necessary job of providing commentary in
Vancouver's music and cultural scenes and it's nice to see
that people out there agree.
Getting back to that, though we also have a great issue
for you with features on three ofVancouver's greatest up-
and-coming bands. If you haven't heard them yet, hopefully
you'll be inspired to go check them out after reading about
the electro pop duo Fan Death (page 12), the not-indie-
jazz band Brasstronaut (page28) and the eccentric live
performers Role Mach (page 15). We're also embarking
on a two-part series that will educate you on how you can
get a bit more involved in the music scene yourself as a
DJ (page 30). This issue we have a piece on the technical
side of things, and in our next issue we'll have a piece on
the social and business side of being a DJ. As usual we've
got a bundle of reviews of records and shows and if you
want more you can check out discorder.ca.
Enjoy the magazine and once again thank you to
everyone for your continued support.
Until next month,
JordieYow
CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!
DISCORDER.CA IS HOME TO LOADS OF CONTENT WE CAN'T FIT INTO THE PRINT
ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE, LIKE EXTRA FEATURES, REAL LIVE ACTION AND
UNDER REVIEW.
CHECK DISCORDER.CA REGULARLY FOR NEW ARTICLES, PHOTOS AND ALL
THINGS MUSIC RELATED!
CORRECTIONS
In the March issue, some of the show descriptions were not updated in the program guide, including the Jazz
Show. We're very sorry and have now fixed the program guide
MARCH
WRITERS
John Bartlett, Sarah Berman, Katherine Boothroyd, Nathaniel Bryce, Slavko Bucifal, Sarah Charouf, Simon
Foreman, Robert Fougere, Andy Hudson, Doug Mackenzie, Miranda Martini, Brent Mattson, Sancho
McCann, Sean Nelson, Mark PaulHus, Debby Reis, Jasper Walley, Andrew Wilson
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Merida Anderson, Robert Fougere, Leigh Righton, Eden Veaudry
PROOFREADERS
Simon Foreman, Debby Reis, Reilly Wood
©Discorder 2010 by the Student Radio Society of the
University of British Columbia. All rights reserved.
Circulation 8,500. Discorder is published n times a
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Rock. Call the CiTRDJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's
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always looking for new
friends. TABLE OF CONTENTS
APRIL 2010
DISCORDER.CA
// FEATURES
12/FAN DEATH
Dandilion Wind Opaine and Marta Jaciubek-McCeever have been making some big waves with their electro pop duo Fan Death. On a break between tours and
music videos the girls took some time to talk about what they've been up to.
15/ROLEMACH
Patrick Geraghty's band (really they're almost an orchestra there's so many of them), Role Mach has become a staple of the local music scene. After playing
countless shows the only thing they still need to do is actually record something so people can listen to them at home.
28 / BRASSTRONAUT
Edo Van Breemen, front man of Brasstronaut, took some time out of their busy tour to chat with Discorder's Debby Reis about their creative process and how
they are definitely not an indie jazz band, (although they will be playing the Jazz Festival later this summer).
30/H0WT0BEADJPT.1
Wanna be a DJ? Free drinks? Party all night? Be known for laying down the phattest beats and the freshest mixes? Well take a look at the first article in our two
part series and begin your journey into the world of record spinning.
21/UNDER REVIEW
Archie Bronson Outfit / Caribou / Jason Collett / Gigi
/Chin Injeti / jj / Massive Attack / MotherSpace / Old
Man Luedecke / Owl Drugs / Philoceraptor / Sean
Nicholas Savage
25/REAL LIVE ACTION
The Big Pink / Brand New Unit / Devo / Efterklang
/ Four Tet / Immaculate Machine / Kidnap Kids! /
The Sadies / Stars
06 /TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
Another Green World by Geeta Dayal
07/VENEWS
Fauxbalt / Zoo Zhop
09/ART PROJECT
Art by Eden Veaudry
16 /CALENDAR
ArtbyTobyReid
18/PROGRAM GUIDE
31 /CHARTS //TEXTUALLY
ACTIVE
ANOTHER GREEN WORLD
BY GEETA DAYAL
Continuum Press a 1/3
BY ANDY HUDSON
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
MttNCMjJ
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7EU»w
ANOTHER
iREEN WORLD
by Geeta Dayal
Jo
41acy\
&UO\
Geeta Dayal's take on the Brian Eno album Another Green World is, just as she
says, a short book about process.
Process? Oh no. Roll eyes. "Process" sounds dull, or too brainy, or both,
as in: "His process links Brechtian dramaturgy to the urgent post-materialism
inhered in the swallowing of wood glue."
Luckily, as Dayal found out, Brian Eno's process is invariably playful. It also
comes, more or less, in a box.
In 1975, the same year he recorded Another Green World and Discreet Music,
started his own record label, Obscure, and put out Evening Star with guitarist
Robert Fripp, Brian Eno and his painter friend Peter Schmidt began producing a
little black box called Oblique Strategies: over a hundred worthwhile dilemmas. Inside
the box were 113 cue cards, and on each one they printed a tactic ("Change
the speed"), a principle ("Gardening, not architecture"), or a prompt ("Do
nothing for as long as possible")—random, fortune-cookie koans that had
helped them escape a creative fix.
At age 60, Eno apparently still uses Oblique Strategies, which have so far got
him through 41 studio albums, producing Devo, U2, the Talking Heads, the
Windows 95 start-up sound, and the chimes for a ten-thousand-year clock.
And, as Dayal tells it, the summer of 1975 was definitely a time that Brian
Eno needed the cards and the "developed sense of play" that Robert Fripp rates
so high in his music-making. At the outset, Eno had invited the likes of Fripp,
John Cale, Percy Jones and Phil Collins into a £500-a-day studio with just one
holdover song ("I'll Come Running") but little else in the way of a set plan.
It does not spoil Dayal's book to say that what followed involves a cake,
or an 80-foot tape loop strung up on rolling pencils, or Brian Eno telling his
severely talented musicians things like, "Right, we'll now play a piece that lasts
exactly 90 seconds and each of you has got to leave more spaces than you make
noises." Nor does it hurt to mention that Eno gave the strategies a credit on
the back of Another Green World.
Itdoesn'tmuch matter because Dayal's is a book about process, nota "making of." Among the now 70 entries in 33 1/3—a series that invites writers to
wax on key albums in a slim back-pocket book—Dayal's is a stand-out. She is
an MIT whiz kid who graduated from cognitive science to arts reporting at the
Village Voice and the New York Times. And to write this book, Dayal herself
took cues from Oblique Strategies.
Fifteen of the cards make up her chapter tides, and only one—"Ask people
to work against their better judgment"—offers the kind of track-to-track safari
you might expect from this series. Another two chapters skip mentioning Another Green World entirely, choosing instead to cover Discreet Music, Brian Eno's
other, almost ambient album of that year, and to slightly deflate the myth that
surrounds its bedridden beginnings.
Dayal's approach sees her work, Eno-like, by going at a problem sideways:
rather than interview the musician himself, she dug into the a$$hjves, Eno's
favourite books list, and spoke to number of collaborators, assistant engineers
and ex-girlfriends who were around him at the time Another Green World was
made. The result is a book one quarter the length of David Sheppard's On
Some Faraway Beach: The Life and Times of Brian Eno, but Dayal's has a rich little
bibliography full of John Cage lectures and texts on cybernetics.
Personally, Another Green World is one of my desert island discs and, especially
when listening to an album that's got just a handful of rock songs scattered
through a set of two- and three-minute tone poems, I am glad not to remember
a detailed, track-by-track backstory every time I play it. As well as the music,
Dayal's book evokes a lot of the insights that shaped Another Green World, insights
that may be useful to pretty well anyone. // VENEWS
BYJORDIEYOW
& SIMON FOREMAN
Let's talk about the Fauxbalt, the New Cobalt, 917 Main or as some people still
call it, the Cobalt. The plethora of names that have sprung up for the place since
it's reopened speaks to the controversy that surrounds it. In an article posted
on the reopening of the space by Patryk Drozd and Ezra Kish on the Georgia
Straight's website, a flame war erupted. Adrian Mack (who had written the
article) was called a liar, Wendyi3 waded in decrying the fact that it all boiled
down to money and commenters rushed in on both sides of the issue.
Let's get this straight, the Cobalt will be sorely missed. It was a wonderful
venue that provided a home to everything loud, angry and noisy in Vancouver's
music scene. All that doesn't really change the fact that Wendyi3's landlords
either wanted to make more money or just didn't like the way the bar was run
and chose to evict her. This is shitty, but technically legal. Just because that
happened though does not mean that the metal scene in Vancouver is dead or
that there won't be any more noise music (Fake Jazz has already found a new
home at Lick). The d.i.y. punk scene will continue in Vancouver as it always
has, but is it fair to take this out on the new proprietors who seem to just want
to run a bar and have bands play? That question was rhetorical, it's not fair
to them, they should be given as much chance to run a venue in Vancouver as
anyone else. Anyways we can't really afford to turn our backs on a venue that
seems to really want to help support the Vancouver music scene.
The debate may move past everyone in it as some Vancouver artists and
promoters are just going to be booking shows there anyways. Local dub-punks
Sorcerers will be playing there on April 8 and Tristan Orchard from No More
Strangers has gotten a show together for Humans' music video release party
on April 3rd. What if s probably going to come down to is that bands need
the space and it's still there and available. We don't have to forget about the
Cobalt and what it stood for, but let's not let a grudge get in the way of supporting our music scene.
IN OTHER VENEWS, CHECK OUT ZOO ZHOP:
Billed as a record store, a vintage clothing store, a second-hand store and
a d.i.y. supporting space, the Zoo Zhop has recently opened it doors to the local community. Formerly a medical clinic, the location at 223 Main now does
triple duty as a home for several Vancouver artniks, a retail store chock full
of esoteric records and paraphernalia and a host for local and experimental
music events. Past performers include the Apollo Ghosts, Haunted Beard and
the Nihilist Party, and the store stays open during shows, so you can browse
through old Devo albums while grooving to the sounds of Shipyards or Role
Mach. For more info, check out the fan page on Facebook, or drop by the
storefront during business hours.
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EDEN VEAUDRY
EDEN VEAUDRY IS A SELF-TAUGHT ARTIST WHOSE PRACTICE
ENCOMPASSES DRAWING, CROCHET, VIDEO, PHOTOGRAPHY
AND DIGITAL COLLAGE. HER WORK HAS BEEN EXHIBITED IN
GALLERIES AND ARTIST-RUN CENTERS THROUGHOUT CANADA
AND THE UNITED STATES. SHE OCCASIONALLY RECORDS PIANO/
SYNTH-BASED MUSIC UNDER THE MONIKER AVE EVA. SHE LIVES
AND WORKS IN VANCOUVER.WWW.EDENVEAUDRY.COM m
ART PROJECT//
10 EDEN VEAUDRY  FAN DEATH
'HOTO BY LEIGH RICHTON
COMING SOON TO SOME SPEAKERS NEAR YOU
I FEEL LIKE THE FAN DEATH THING IS A
CRAZY WHIRLWIND ADVENTURE
1
Fan Death is at a unique point in their career: one where it appears that
they are just poised to make it big.
"I feel like the Fan Death thing is a crazy whirlwind adventure," said
Marta Jaciubek-McKeever, half of the band over the phone. Vancouver
bands that are getting buzz outside of the city happens infrequendy enough that
when it happens you take notice, and Fan Death's career is well on its way.
The duo, made up of Jaciubek-McKeever and Dandilion Wind Opaine, just
got back from opening for Vampire Weekend in the UK leg of their tour.
" [Vampire Weekend] like dance music and... I think that's why they picked
us," said Opaine. For the tour they brought along two extra people, Tony Dallas
from Boogie Monster and the SSRIs to drum for them and a violinist named
Marlene Ginader.
"[Vampire Weekend are] rocky and we wanted something a little more
familiar for the audience," said Opaine.
Fan Death was a project of Opaine's and her Dandi Wind collaborator
Szam Findlay who had written most of the songs before Taciub-McKeever
got involved.
"They [Opaine and Findlay] are kinda music geniuses," said Taciub-McKeever. "They know like every song."
To this date only one of the songs on their forthcoming May album Womb
of Dreams is written by Taciub-McKeever. The song "Side by Side" is a ballad
originally performed by Taciub-McKeever's other band e.s.l. but reworked as
a Fan Death song. Though most of the songwriting was performed with just
Opaine and Findlay the conception of the sound the band was going for was
conceived as a group.
Fan Death was conceived out of a strong desire to recreate the heyday of
'80s electro pop, drawing on influences like Depeche Mode, OMD, Human
League and even Alphaville. Combine this with a love of the epic soundtracks
of '80s fantasy movies like The Neverendin^ Story and you start to approach
their sound.
Conceived after Opaine had moved to Montreal and Taciub-McKeever had
moved to New York, they worked on the project until, eventually, they both
settled back in Vancouver. Originally conceived on a smaller scale, string arrangements that back most of the tracks on the album and EP were rearranged
for a quartet by UK musician Leo Chadburn, who also records under the name
Simon Bookish.
"He's a very obscure artist, but he's very important to a lot of people,"
said Opaine.
The band gets their name from a South Korean urban legend which holds
that it is possible for an electric fan left running in a closed room to kill the
occupants of the room. There's little scientific basis for this, but it is something
worried about especially in South Korea. Their name is not a reference to fan
homicide or the blurring of the lines between fans and artist, though apparently
thinking it might be one of these things are common mistakes.
Though Fan Death is a band, the aesthetic of everything associated with
them is also worth noting. At this point in time they've got three music videos
released for a five song EP and a single. Opaine works with the Salazar film collective (who did the video for their song "Veronica's Veil"). Opaine did styling
on the new Babe Rainbow video and an upcoming Blue Violets video.
They have another video coming out soon for the song, "When the Money
is Right" (see that rad picture over there? that's what the video will look like)
which features the girls robbing middle-class victims in a mansion. They will
have a video release party at Little Mountain Studios, though it seems like
they may not play it as it's difficult to play anything with any level of volume
at Little Mountain. Check their website (www.fan-death.com) for details on
that party soon.
It's been a while since Fan Death played a show in Vancouver, though they
had one booked on March 5 that got cancelled when they couldn't get visas to
continue the tour into the States.
"We kinda want to do a bigger show [in Vancouver] with a [string] quartet,"
said Opaine, and in theory they will sometime soon. Taciub-McKeever also keeps busy in between tours working on her own
projects. "I find it a bit selfish to just perform, to just play music," she said.
This tis why she enjoys working with Girl's Rock Camp to teach young girls
how to be musicians. Lately she has expanded this idea to be more than just for
young girls (not that she's opposed to the idea of the Girl's Rock Camp, which
she considers to be a "feminist establishment"). With some of her band mates
from e.s.l. she has been continuing the camp's endeavours with young children,
both boys and girls, on Galiano Island. She hopes that she can take the program
I up to northern B.C. to work with
I children in the smaller towns up
there and native reserves.
On the other side of their career Fan Death recently returned from a photo
shoot for Elle Canada that their new label, Last Gang Records, flew them out |
to take part in.
"It seemed so surreal," said Taciub-McKeever. The shoot had 12 crew mem- I
bers and the entire purpose of it was for a single photo to run with a piece on
them in the upcoming issue.
"Do these people not know who we are?" Taciub-McKeever asked, wondering why Elle would be putting so much effort into an article on such obscure I
artists as themselves.
1 Tlaongh Taciub-McKeever may not have clued in yet, these ladies have struck |
a cultural nerve and odds are that they won't be obscure for much longer.
5 ,k~--!«,' ----{ - „;'-  , m IBl
Ffln Diflri
His name is Gary, UMMM... HIS NAME
is Gary," said Opaine of the actor
SHE FOUND ON CRAIGSLIST WHO IS
HOLDING HER IN THIS IMAGE. HER
COSTUME IS "FOR PEOPLE WHO HAVE
FETISHES OF BEING A MERMAID AND
BEING BOUND, YOU CAN'T MOVE.
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BY BRENT MATTSON // ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
For years fans have been waiting for Role Mach to throw them a bone,
but they keep getting tossed xylophones.
"We haven't put out a real album yet of our actual songs," said front-
man Patrick Geraghty. "People are always complaining to me that we
haven't put out any music that they want to listen to."
A staple of the live scene in Vancouver, their one album, 2009 's orffesques and
fugues is inspired by the lullaby-like compositions of Carl Orff, mostly features
glockenspiel, wooden xylophone and tubular bells, and has very little in common with their explosive live performance. To rectify this, Geraghty plans to
flood the market with Role Mach material in the coming months and years,
including several EPs, seven-inch records and two fully-written albums. Now
they just need to be recorded.
The first to come out will be a seven-inch of garage rock songs, or at least
Geraghty's literature grad version of garage rock bands. He promises that it will
be more representative of Role Mach's live shows than orffesques and fugues.
Geraghty is simultaneously prolific and a perfectionist. Besides leading Role
Mach, he is also a member of the Greenbelt Collective. He has songs that he's
been tweaking for six years, like a nihilistic Spaghetti Western ballad with 13
verses, influenced by Ennio Morricone.
"Some of these songs I've been working on since 2000 and I'm still retooling them," he said.
Conversely, he's recendy been working on an EP due in the next couple
months featuring only his vocals and conga drums. That concept was inspired by a scene from film noir director Allen Baron's Blast of Silence from
the mid-'60s.
"I'm much more of a cinephile than an audiophile," Geraghty said. "I
think I approach songwriting if not from a literary perspective than from a
cinematic one."
His love of cinema has led him to put on film festivals in his studio space,
including Thankless Cinema, where people submitted "the lamest and most
radically inept films" into one god-awful night Viewers were all given microphones to turn on when they couldn't stand a film any longer, creating a horrible
feedback to drown it out. The film that was shut down the quickest won.
After playing in alt-rock bands in middle school and high school, Geraghty
finally found a song-writing style that worked for him thanks to his time studying creative writing in England.
"I never really liked poetry very much, but I did like writing stories that kind
of [had] a rhythm to them, so I just ended up turning them into songs," he said.
"I realised the other day, I don't have a refrain in any of my songs."
Though the group has had a fluid lineup over the years ,b it has recendy solidified with Geraghty on guitar and vocals, Jarrett Samson (of Shipyards) on
bass, Tom Whalen (a.k.a. gr8-2ooo) on drums and a four-piece horn section
comprised of Rich Sexton on alto sax, Aaron Cumming on tenor sax, Michelle
Mayne on trumpet and Liz Horner on clarinet and vocals.
Though he's only 26, Geraghty has every intention of retiring after Role
Mach has recorded and released their backlog of material, probably six years
from now.
"Maybe New Guinea. I'd like to go to New Guinea," he said. "Then I'll just
live there and then I'll die and that'll be it"
Their next show is April 24 at Grave Level before its tenants get evicted.
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BQ CO
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s //CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
SUNDAY
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Blood On
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CiTR Ghost Mix
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KolNodedi (World)
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7
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9
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%■
3
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mNhI1
5
Career Fast Track (Talk!
Queer FM (Talk)
Rhythms I Awesome*
(Woid)     (Eel)
This Side ofMonday
(Eclectic)
Exploding Head
Movie*,'',   \
(EclectieS'/
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(Hardcore)
Sam-
squantch
Are You Aware
CBclectie)
Hot Mess (Eclectic)
NastM Volna $&>rld)
Life On Jumpstreet
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Exquisite Corpse
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African Rhythms
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Notes from the
<;-;- »IS^erground
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Folk Oasis (Roots)
Mondo Trasho
(Eclectic)
-*- ^p^cendance
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Hands (Eclectic)
Hans Kloss Misery
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Hypnotic Groove
(Dance)
Shake A Tail Feather
(Soul/R&B)
Synaptic Sandwich
(Dance/Electronic/
Eclectic)
Beats From The
Basement (Hip-hop)
Aural Tentacles
(Eclectic)
CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
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Dreamscene Radio
(Dance)
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7
&
IMIIlHI
9
10
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12am
1
HR11I
mm
I
3
5
IS UlIk lUl.y hM KKUUKAIVl faUlUt
SUNDAY
TANA RADIO
(World) 9-ioam
SHOOKSHOOKTA
(Talk) io-nam
A program targeted to
Ethiopian people that
encourages education and
personal development.
KOL NODEDI
(World) nam-i2pm
Beautiful arresting beats
and voices emanating from
all continents, corners and
voids. Always rhythmic,
always captivating. Always
crossing borders.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) 12-3 pm
Reggae inna all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
boots country.
SHAMELESS
(Eclectic) 3-5pm
Alternatina Sundays
Dedicated to giving local
music acts a crack at some
airplay. When not playing
the PRshtick, you can hear
some faves you never knew
you liked.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
British pop music from all
decades. International pop
Oapanese, French, Swedish,
British, US, etc.), '60s soundtracks and lounge.
SAINT TROPEZ
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternatina Sundays
Welcome to St. Tropez!
Playing underrated music
from several decades!
st. tropezioi. 9(cDgmail. com
QUEER FM
(Talk) 6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual and transexual communities ofVanedover. Lots
of human interest features,
background on current issues and great music.
queerfrnradio@gmaiI.com
RHYTHMSINDIA
(World) 8-9pm
Alternatina Sundays
Featuring a wide range of
music from India, including
popular music from the
1930s to the present;
Ghazals and Bhajans,
Qawwalis, pop and regional
language numbers.
ALL AWESOME IN YOUR EARS
(Eclectic) 8-9pm
Alternatina Sundays
MONDOTRASHO
(Eclectic) 9-iopm
The one and the only Mon-
• '## Trsiho with Maxwell
Maxwell—don't miss it!
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) iopm-i2am
Join us in practicing the
ancient art of rising above
common ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
latest trance cuts.
trancendance(<D
hotmail.com
MONDAY
PROF TALK
(Talk) 7:30-8am
Prof Talk is a radio talk
show that brings UBC
professors in to talk about
current/past events at the
local and international
level. http://ubcproftalk.
wordpress.com
proftalk@gmail.com
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 8-nam
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns(cD
hotmail.com
STRANDED
(Eclectic) nam-i2pm
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present,
from his Australian homeland. And journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores the alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Talk) 12-ipm
Hosted by David Barsamian.
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) i-3pm
An indie pop show since
1999, it's like a marshmal-
low sandwich: soft and
sweet and best enjoyed
when poked with a stick
and held close to a fire.
THE RIB
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
Explore the avant-garde
world of music with host
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
From new electronic and
experimental music to
improvised jazz and new
classical! So weird it will
blow your mind!
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live,
volunteer-produced,
student and community
newscast. Every week, we
take a look back at the
week's local, national and
international news, as seen
from a fully independent
media perspective.
CAREER FAST TRACK
(Talk) 6-6:30pm
Join host and author
Philippe Desrochers as
he teaches you how to
dramatically INCREASE
your income doing work
you LOVE.
THIS SIDE OF MONDAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-7:3opm
Fun and independent music
supported by a conversational
monologue of information,
opinion and anecdotes
focusing on the here, the now
and the next week.
becktrex@gmail.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
THE JAZZ SHOW
(Jazz) gpm-i2am
Vancouver's longest
running prime-time jazz
program. Hosted by the
ever suave, Gavin Walker.
Features at 11pm.
April 5: We celebrate Stanley
Turrentine's birthday who
has one of the most distinctive sounds on the tenor
saxophone. Stan The Man
was his first name recording
and began his long career.
April 12: Another birthday
celebration and this time the
celebrant is very much alive.
70 year old pianist/composer
Herbie Hancock and his
classic Maiden Voyage.
April 19: One of the most
identifiable writer/arrangers
is Canadian-born Gil Evans.
His Out qfThe Cool is a masterful big band recording with a
group of all-star players.
April 26: Drummer/leader
Terry Clarke is considered
to be one of the finest in the
world. Born in Vancouver,
he just released his very first
recording at age 64. If s About
Time has Terry with Don
Thompson (bass & piano),
Phil Dwyer (tenor saxophone), the great Jim Hall
(guitar) and others. Terry
will be coming to this year's
Jazz Festival with his band.
SORE THROATS, CLAPPING
HANDS
(Eclectic) i2am-iam
Sore Throats Clapping
Hands relies on simple
melodies and poignant lyricism to drive our passions.
We embrace music that
takes little production and,
for that reason, is extremely
accessible to play, share,
create and enjoy—music
that can be produced with
little more than clapping
hands and sore throats.
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music,
and its derivatives with
Arthur and the lovely
Andrea Berman.
pacificpickin@)yahoo. com
SOUNDS OF AFRICA
(World) 8-9:3oam
Showcasing music, current
affairs & news from across
the African continent and
the diaspora, you will learn
all about beat and rhythm
and it will certainly kick-
start your day.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
(Rock) 9:30-n:3oam
Open your ears and prepare
for a shock! A harmless
note may make you a fan!
Deadlier than the most
dangerous criminals!
borninsixtynine®
hotmail.com
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) ii:3oam-ipm
An eclectic mix of Canadian
indie with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk
and ska from Canada, Latin
America and Europe. The
Morning After Show has local bands playing live on the
Morning After Sessions.
LAUGH TRACKS
(Talk) i-2pm
Laugh Tracks is a show about
comedy. Kliph Nesteroff
from the 'zine, Generation
Exploitation, hosts.
generationexploit(a)yahoo.
com, musicalboot(a)
yahoo.ca
WINGS
(Talk) 2-2:3opm
REEL TO REAL
(Talk) 2:3o-3pm
Movie reviews and
criticism.
RADIO FREETHINKER
(Talk) 3:30-4:3opm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we
examine popular extraordinary claims and subject
them to critical analysis.
The real world is a beautiful
and fascinating place and
we want people to see it
through the lens of reality
as opposed to superstition.
WENER'S BARBEQUE
(Sports) 4:30-6pm
Daryl Wener talks about the
world of sports. Everything
from the Canucks to the
World Rock Paper Scissors
Championship.
emanwener@hotmail.com
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore
since 1989. Bands and
guests from around the
world.
LIFE ON JUMPSTREET
(Dance) 8-gpm
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) 9-npm
crimesandtreasons@>
gmail.com
CABARADIO
(Talk) npm-i2:3oam
For the world of Cabaret.
Tune in for interviews,
skits, musical guests and
more. It's Radio with sass!
WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) 8-ioam Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information
and inanity. Not to be
missed!
dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) io-n:3oam
ANOIZE
(Noise) n:3oam-ipm
An hour and a half of avant-
rock, noize, plunderphonic,
psychedelic and outsider
aspects of audio. An experience for those who want to
be educated and EARitated.
lukemeat@hotmail.com      I
THE GREEN MAJORITY
(Talk) i-2pm
Canada's only environmental news hour, syndicated by!
CIUT 89.5 FM Toronto or
UJUHU.greenmajority.ca. I
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-5pm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:3o-8pm
Alternatina Wednesdays
All-Canadfen music with a
focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.com
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big emphasis on our local scene.
C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997.
folkoasis@gmaiI.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-iipm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
HANS KLOSS'MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) npm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET AND HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and hot
jazz from the 1920s, '30s
and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by
donuts.
duncansdonuts.
wordpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we interview a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:30pm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World) 3:30-5pm
French language and music.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
(Talk) 5-6pm
A national radio service
and part of an international
network of information and
action in support of indigenous peoples' survival and
dignity.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
Celebrating the message
behind the music: Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art,
sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended for
the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-npm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
HYPNOTIC GROOVE
(Techno) npm-i2am
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie
rock, hip-hop and reggae to
bring you up with the sun.
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) 9-ioam
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality, health
and feeling good. Tune in
and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun! This is not your average
spirituality show.
SKAT'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program.
djska_t@hotmail.com
BARNBURNER
(Eclectic) i-2pm
The greasier side of rock
'n' roll, rhythm 'n' blues,
and country... Crack a beer,
order some BBQ, and get
your boogie on.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...dootdoo!
nardwuar@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
HOT MESS
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
With banging beats of rock,
funk, electro and more music
from the beautiful DJ Blonde
Tron and entertaining banter
from seasoned hosts Handsome, Jay and Eddy.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(Eclectic) 7:3o-9pm
Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present and future
including jazz, soul, hip-
hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
Plus interviews with local
and international artists.
Truly international flavour.
RAINBOW GROOVE
(Dance) 9-10:3 opm
DJ BEAD presents a kaleidoscope of funky grooves for
your mind, body & soul. Tune
in to hear everything from
Underground Disco, Roller
Boogie, Space Funk, Rare
Groove, Jazzy House, Dub
Reggae, and anything from
Chaka Khan to the Clash.
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) io:30-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampiresball.
blogspot.com.
thevampiresball@gmail.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.c0m
GENERATION ANIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk
and old-school hardcore
backed by band interviews,
guest speakers and social
commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by
Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and blues
roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
codeblue@
buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada.com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment
and music for the Russian
community, local and
abroad.
nashavolna.ca
NOTES FROM THE
UNDERGROUND
(Electronic/Hip-hop/More)
7-9pm
Start your Saturday night
off right with our weekly
showcase of the local
underground DJ and
electronic music scene.
notesundergroundradio.
blogspot.com
notesundergroundradio@
gmail.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-npm
If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www. synapticsandwich. net
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip-hop) npm-iam
Mr. Joi, being a cinemaphile
as well as a DJ, will surprise
you with the likes of:
French New Wave, Golden
Age, Noir, Action, Adventure, Comedy, Coming of
age Drama, Epic/Myth,
Fantasy, Gangster, Horror,
Romantic Comedy, Science
Fiction, Social Drama,
Thriller, the Art Film, the
Black Comedy, the Musical
and the Porno.
DREAMSCENE RADIO
(Dance) iam-3am
Immerse yourself in cutting edge electronic music
from every point on the
spectrum. Christoker spins
the latest tracks taking over
dance floors around the
world and introduces you to
the producers behind them.
Turn the stereo up and have
a dance part with your cat
(cats love Electro!) \p&*t
</ UNDER REVIEW
ARCHIE BRDNSON OUTFIT
COCONUT
(Domino)
The Archie Branson Outfit's third release, Coconut, sounds like the work
of a band weaned on the darker side
of early British punk and new wave.
The trashy buzzing? riffs and primitive stomp of opening track "Magnetic Warrior" owe as much to die
Fall as they do to the band's garage
blues roots, while the leading single,
"Shark's Tooth," could very well be a
long lost Factory records' release. This
theme, whether intended or not, runs
throughout a majority of the album,
as the ironically titled "Wild Strawberries" blasts like a tribute to the more
abrasive side of Joy Division. It would
be irresponsible not to mention that
tracks like "Hoola" and "Chunk" tip
their hats to the tropical beats of the
Happy Mondays.
That being said, Coconut is not a
work in petty plagiarism. The Archie
Bronson Outfit manages to draw on
these references aa<iweave them with
their psych-garage sound to make
something all their own, a feat particularly noticeable on the final track
"Run Gospel Singer." Add to all this
the very suiting production style of
Tim Goldsworthy (formerly of DFA
records) and you have a dark, driving yet oddly danceable album that
makes amends between the sound of
present day London and 1980's Manchester; an album that is undeniably
English!
—Mark PaulHus
CARIBOU
SWIM
(Merge Records)
You would think winning the prestigious Canadian Polaris Prize In
2008 might have caused a certain
performance anxiety in bedroom
composer Dan Snaith—known to
his fans as Caribou. Following up a
glistening and critically-acclaimed
album like 2007's Andorra stands as
no easy feat.
And yet, with a kaleidoscopic collection of distorted electro-drums,
chubby horn lines and spacey atmospherics, Surim seems to extend beyond his previous achievements into
triumphant and unexpected territory. '
Snaith set out to make a dance record
that sounds like it's made of water.
The resulting nine songs are predictably abstract, yet simultaneously rife
with extremely danceable hooks.
Recorded somewhere between
Wales and Junior Boy Jeremy Greenspan's Hamilton, Ontario studio,
the album features several stand-out
moments. The last song "Jamelia" is
one such gem, including expert guest
vocalist, Luke Lalonde, from Born
Ruffians, and the curious sound of
Jamaican chimes scattered across an
aquatic centre floor. The track builds
to an ecstatic climax and once again
returns to its muted backbeat.
While there are less overtly psychedelic effects on this record, each track
brings a truly unique sonic experience. "Lalibela" offers two and a half
minutes of subdued droning cadences
reminiscent of an Aphex Twin effort,
while minimal vocals on "Sun" and
"Bowls" allow for ravey madness to
shine though. "Kaili" is held together
by an echoey house beat adorned with
fluttering flute trills, with hints of dub
buzzing in the background.
Such tactile and dynamic layers
make Surim quite an inviting listen.
—Sarah Berman
JASON COLLETT
RATATATTAT
(Arte & Crops)
Jason Collett's new album was not
recorded in a studio, but in a rag-tag
garage in Toronto, where Collect and
members of the band Zeus fleshed
out a few of his songs, armed with a
pile of vintage gear and instruments.
With such an origin, this disc spunds
good. The first noted impression is
the drums, because they crack and
bite as if they're beside you. All the
instruments have that presence—
the acoustic and electric guitars, the
piano, the cowbells, handclaps and
vocal harmonies, not to mention the
touches of brass.
It is easy to get lost in the sound
of Rat A Tat Tat. Everything works together very synergistically, and it's
clear that all those sounds exist only
in the service of the songs. They're a
lush kind of country-coloured rootsy
pop, and Collett's slightly Dylanesque
vocals are the focal point Also, you
can hear echoes of his past in the
extended family of Broken Social
Scene, particularly in the full harmonies and the propulsion of "Long May
You Love."
Singing about Canada, the realities of love, piano players and slow-
dancing, the album seems a genuine,
natural musical expression. The lyrics
have a cool stream of consciousness
vibe, and the tunes have an expansive yet intimate sound. Because of its
handmade feel, the album is easy to
recommend for people who are into
organic, musical sounds. You can
hear the guitar frets buzz and the kick
drum's pedal squeaking. There's no
auto-tune and what keyboards there
are are employed so subdy as to enhance the music without any artificiality whatsoever.
Rat A Tat Tat is an unapologetic,
very likeable musical expression. Void
of sophistry or pretension, there's a
sense of sincerity to it that is as appealing as the detailed production.
—Doug Mackenzie
6161
MftlKTINftNT
(Tomlab Records) ■ #•=
The first album from Gigi, the side
project ofNick Krgovich (ofP^uno and
No Kids) and producer/engineer Colin
Stewart, has been about five years in
the making. Maintenant was originally
an opportunity for Stewart to use vintage plate reverbs to pay tribute to the
back to mono sound, and for the most
part it treads familiar territory of that
aural dimension. There is no shortage in the world of sunny, Motown-
reminiscent pop tunes that sigh over
heartbreak, heartache and anything
that rhymes with lovin'.
Fortunately, on Maintenant, these
familiar subjects are touched on with
such a light hand that rather than
seeming tiresome and cliche-ridden,
the songs come off as refreshing twists
on a well-worn favourite—like a lime
in your apple pie. These are the songs
that an articulate, world-weary teenager would write in their notebook,
sporting lines like "Just because it's
springtime / doesn't mean that it is
I'11-give-you-everything time," which
add a touch of whimsy that throwback
albums frequently lack.
21 For the mostpartthe album sounds
like a slightly less modern version of
other Nick Krgovich projects, with a
troupe of guests (including Owen Pailett of Final Fantasy, Mirah, and Zac
Pennington of Parenthetical Girls)
replacing Krgovich's familiar vocals.
Since the recordings are live-off-the-
floor, there are obviously moments
when the singers don't quite gel. But
like the mole on Tammi Terrell's face,
these imperfections are comforting
and, in the end, more winning than
perfection would have been. This is
the summer of 2010's official album
for singing along to with a hairbrush
microphone and drapes firmly shut.
—Miranda Martini
CHIN IWSTI
(Sparks Music)
On the cover of D'tacfi, the latest musical offering from Chin Injeti, there
features a curious image of the artist suspended by marionette strings.
He's frantically cutting himself loose
TBS- BACK sw&r
album raleasa party
Friday April 23
kThe Biltmore Cabaret
t!*»ng«rs
with scissors as a pair of crutches
fall out from under him. Completing the scene is an acoustic guitar,
some headphones and a handwritten
note at his feet that simply asks, "Who
am I?" Like the artwork foreshadows,
this question is a definitive theme of
the album.
This collection of tunes is a departure from the work he has been
known for in the past (Bass Is Base
and his current status as big time
producer). Call this a deeper introduction to an artist and his work laid
bare, unashamed of the blemishes or
frailty of it all. It's a bold move in an
unexplored direction and one that he
ought to be quite happy with.
Armed with a beat-up acoustic
guitar, tablas, hand-drums and some
other fun organic instruments as well
as a lot of studio know how, Injeti
has created an upbeat easy vibe of
an album that comes just in time for
spring/summer. With excellent tracks
such as the funky bouncer, "Mask
On My Face" (featuring K'naan) or
the conga laced "Love Is Not
More," D'tachis is geared to be
a must have for 2010. If it's
feel good anthemic vibes that
get you going, then this one
is for you.
—Nathaniel Bryce
CD & Limited edition 180 gram Satefold W
wlta digital download
9 moKBSt mmi» 27 2010
miatreosSaoa / tb«paolraf%erdeatiuooa f^js
RET YOUR MiNT FIX AT FINE RETAILERS LIKE THESE!
Jj
NO. 3
Secretly Canadian
Mmmmm % Nothing ifee a
group with a little mystery to
get everyone interested. In
2009, jj released No. 2 creating quite a buzz further hyped
up by their allusiveness.  ■
The Swedish group have
notonlyjustreleasedNo. 3 but
have revealed themselves as
Joakim Benon and Elin Kast-
lander. Perhaps it was never
really much of a secret, or
perhaps everyone was really
more interested in the music
they were making, but knowing who jj are hasn't really
changed the mystique surrounding them.
Beginning in familiar ter
ritory, the first song "My Life" is jj's
take on the Game's track of the same
name. Having previously remixed Lil
Wayne's. "Lollipop," Kastlander's
throaty voice accompanied by a piano
truly does wonders for gangsta rap.
"My Life" sets a very high bar for the
remainder of album.
The remainder of the album is
a mix of calypso and sample laden
electronica. Very summery, breezy,
waves gently lapping against the pure
white sand is the vision the album
induces. "Golden Virginia" virtually
floats out the speakers. In "Voi Par-
late, Io Gioco," the myriad of samples
is both fun and a challenge to identify
when listening to jj.
This reviewer has listened to the
album about 30 times since she got
her mitts on it and there are still layers to find here. It will be interesting
to see what jj come up with in the
future.
—Katherine Boothroyd
MASSIVE ATTACK
faSOLAND
(Vtigin) ,
Massive Attack's firstalbum came out
mio^i, which means they were turning out their first trip-hop beats while
jnost of us were grooving to the latest
tunes from Sesame Street. Heligoland
comes six years after their last proper
album, and is only the band's fifth
effort, so it's easy to see that Massive
Attack is a band that works meticulously at perfecting their music. The
album does certainly sound that way.
There are many layers of interacting
rhythms and complementary textures.
The songs contain a seamless blend
of synthetic and acoustic instruments
spread across stereo space. The eerie and complex rhythms in tracks
like "Paradise Circus," for example,
bring this obsessive music-making
to light.
Add to that sonic smorgasbord
guest vocals from singers like Tunde
Adebimpe, Damon Albarn and longtime collaborator Horace Andy, and
you should have a perfect aural experience. Heligoland does sound incredible.
One track is completely different
from the next, and the songs are actually hard to describe, due to the massive scope of sounds each comprises.
That said, there is a sense of mystery
to this music that is intriguing. It is
there in the simple, inexorable chord
progressions and the breathy vocal
melodies, the opaque instrumentation.
The album opens with "Pray for
Rain," a track that promises greatness, with its initial spectral, sparkling synthesisers, dissonant piano,
and; tunde Adebimpe's vocals. That
song, set to a slow beat, marches
through a solid arrangement, and
the groove is balanced with a moody
atmosphere.
Each song on its own is interesting, and seems complete unto itself.
But one stumbles when trying to conceptualize the album as a whole. It's
obvious that Massive Attack have a
massive studio loaded with all kinds
of wonderful gear, and computers fiill
of the latest programs. But do they
need it all? It may be that they could
do better by scaling things back and
focusing more on a unified effort
than the painstakingly put-together
jungle of sounds presented here. Will
they? In another five years, we may
find out.
—Doua Mackenzie
MOTHERSPACE
LAST LESS
(Self-Released)
The Vancouver-based band Mother-
Space doesn't seem to have a lot of
coverage, but this needs to change.
The three members William Young,
Delean Ellerbeck and Andrew Kent
were roommates in an old house
in suburban East Van at the time of
recording Last Legs. The result is an
impassioned and harmonious five-
track EP. Instrumentally, MotherSpace
is composed of guitar, synthesizer,
drums with an added floor torn and
a keyboard.
The album begins with "Same
Old," which features a steady, ryth-
imMilrum pattern and guitar feedback
build up for about a minute that is
finally broken by Young's political dissatisfaction manifest in lyrical form.
Political jams can be overdone and
22 sometimes arduous, yet most good art
must be taken in the social-political
context in which it was created. Even
if you disagree, you can tune out the
content while enjoying the structure of
Last Legs, because for anyone that likes
indie, this album has musical merits
that can't be outweighed by political
apathy. Perhaps it's been overstated
though. Only track one is really worth
this mention.
Though all the songs involve political critique, it's hard to notice exactly
what they're singing about. You'll be
more entranced by the enchanting
instrumentals.
ip *iUng Ring" is the particularly
lovely third track, dominated by soft
keyboards and chorus with all three
members. In the same way that Amber
Webber sings in unison with Stephen
McBean from Black Mountain, Eller-
beck is perfectly well tuned to match
Young. And while all three members
sing, it's hard to overlook the alluring
femininity of Ellerbeck's voice.
In track four, Ellerbeck sounds like
Karen O singing into a telephone mic.
One synthesizer plays an eerie echo
throughout the background, while a
more prominent guitar fuzz is heard just
below those Karenesque vocals. It ends
abrupdy and "Geostationary Eye" kicks
in. This is where it becomes obvious
that backyard sounds lurk somewhere
behind the rest of the music. For twenty-
five minutes ofLast Legs, about the entire
EP, a recording of their house's backyard, though almost inaudible, is the
foundation of this album.
You won't be able to rip this one
off, so you'll have to find your way to
Zulu or Red Cat where it is available
for purchase.
^^S^h^hOTouf^
OLD MAN LUEDECKE
MY HANDS ARE 8N FfRE ft OTHER LOVE
sdnrs
(Black Hen Music)
Anytime a banjo, a fiddle, and a mandolin get together, it's usually a pretty
good thing. Place this bluegrass combination into the Juno Award-winning
hand of Old Man Luedecke with guest
Tim O'Brien (Grammy Award winner for Fiddler's Green, among other
accomplishments) and the result is a
fantastic collection of folk songs and
songwriting. Chris Luedecke has once
again teamed up with legendary producer Steve Dawson, Kelly Joe Phelps,
Sojourners, founder of Black Hen Records and a resume list that requires
its own magazine) to produce songs
that are heavy and devilishly beautiful.
The list of who's who in Luedecke's
third album also sees the trio of super
folksters team up with accomplished
musicians Keith Lowe on bass and
John Rahan on drums.
The record delivers a little Ca-
nadiana, some country and a lot of
bluegrass. Each song is a standout
offering up unique storytelling and a
well crafted roots sound. Couple that
with interesting cover art and you get a
must have album. The only complaint
here is the absence of a lyrics sheet
which leaves me attempting to decipher Luedecke and O'Brien's drawl
on my own.
My Hands are on Fire and Other Love
Sonas may get you up dancing or down
drinking. Either way, it is a folk masterpiece worthy of all the accolades it
is sure to receive when released at the
end of March.
—Slavko Burijal
0WLDRU6S .
fpHEHS
jgEiprieased)
Tense is the energetic quality that
comes to mind when listening to
Heathens, Owl Drugs' debut recording. This isn't as much a commentary
on the style of music being played as it
is the feeling that creeps up while listening to it, like you're waiting for the
pieces to fly off and hurt somebody as
the turbulence they create threatens to
loosen the screws holding everything
together. The end product is kind of
grubby, kind of loud, kind of scary and
kind of alienating but empowering in
its delivery all the same.
Hard-Wtting and edgy drum-work
adds substance while singer Ryan
Scott's mentally fragile voice, though
drowning slightly in the mix, adds
tension. This combined with ragged
blasts of guitar-work make for some
interesting and not so traditionally
//UNDER REVIEW
fleshed out songs that suffer a little
due to what appears to be a shameless nod to Fugazi throughout, which
is fine in controlled doses and when
you're Fugazi. But aside from that,
Heathens is a good time. "Where The
Whores Are Headed" gets a gold star
for sheer drive and "When Spring Rolls
Around..." is just plain awesome.
In the end Owl Drugs may not
be for everyone. This is another one
of those bands that sound good on
tape but probably just kill it live and
if Scott's salad days in Deadsure and
Sparkmarker are any indication of
their potential for power then certainly this band is one not to be missed.
—Nathaniel Bryce
PHfLOCERAPT08
Awm
(Self-Reles^l^i-
4 Son$$ is an impressive debut for a
band that hasn't even begun playing shows. The three members who
comprise Pbiloceraptor were brought
together by their s hared love for cheap
beer and songwriting (a good start for
any promising musician). Soon after
jamming, they wrote their first song
"Grammar," and were led to record 4
Sonas before ever playing a live show
together.
The EP starts off promisingly
with one droned out guitar, one lead
guitar and a synchronous drum beat
to carry the sounds through. Often
times, when an album begins this
well, the vocals kick in and it's a total
deal-breaker. Thankfully, Steve Mann
and Justin Penney have harmoniously
shared the vocal duty. At times, the
eccentric style of the two guitar players is reminiscent of Shellac. And the
drums are as drums should be: rhythmic beats broken by a cacophony of
fills and crashing cymbals.
The EP doesn't stray too far from
the indie rock prototype. In lieu of
its orthodoxy, or maybe due to it, 4
Sonas is a kind and easy listen. Younger
crowds will appreciate the potential
that the album harvests, while older
generations will appreciate the nostalgia that accompanies the feel-good,
college radio musicianship of the trio.
Philoceraptor is certainly a band to be
on the look out for.
—Sarah Charrouf
SEANIMDMOLASSAVA%y
SPREAD FREE LIKE A BUTTERFLY'
(Arbutus Records)
Sean Nicholas Savage's .a#w album
is quite simply an excellent pop record. The songs are short and sweet
with few of them cracking the three
minute mark.
Savage's voice is worth a mention
for it's warble (I'm told the technical term is vibrato, but whatever). It
warbles and quavers like a leaf in the
wind. If he spoke like this you would
think he might be constantly struck
by a case of nerves, but when he uses
it to sing, it makes him sound like
he is laying his heart bare. The clear,
sweet voices of his back up singers
only serve to put his voice in sharp
contrast and stand out ever more
starkly.
The music that backs his voice is
simply strummed guitar rhythms accompanied by the occasional other
instrument from track to track: drum
machine and live drums, violin, some
sort of synth or hand claps. These
other instruments are applied with
an ear for minimalism and the instrumentation is scaled back for an
intimate sound.
The song crafting on this album
is simple but superbly executed. With
few frills attached Savage has put together an album that brilliantly shows
off the skills of a talented songwriter.
Recommended listening and available
at fine local music shops.
—JordieYow  tUL Lift AL I ■*.'*- //
STARS/ HEY ROSETTA!
February 19 / Orpheum Theatre
As the world's athletes competed on the biggest stage in international sports,
Vancouver 2010's Culmral^ns^clputthe spotiighton the bestand brightest
from our country's giving arts communi^^cpectations were high as the crowd
filed into the majestic Orpheum Theatre, and openers Hey Rosetta! would not
disappoint. The six-piece indie rodfactfrom Newfoundland stunned the crowd
with a whirlwind tour of their latest album, Into Your Lun^s;^3iis young band has
nearly perfected the art of §i| build-up, and fron$fo|an Tim Baker commanded
attention from the barely audible opening notes of each song right through
to the crashing finish. When the band cleared the stage a mere handful of
songs later, the audience burst into a standing ovation that continued until
the theatre^ lights revealed that there would be no encdfe.-^
When Stars finally motj|e&tatge» they immediately called the crowd to their
i feet for a set heavy on fan favourites. This is a band known for its theatrics,
so no one flinched when vocalists Torquil Campbell and Amy Millan started
to toss the white roses that littered their set into the hands of their delighted
fans. The band also unveiled some new songs that mostiy followed the same
formula as their reeeaf^t^ pop duets. The highlight of the performance
came when the Montreal-based band was joined on stage by Hey Rosettal's
small string section for "Your Ex*|x^er-l|fcvDead." At one point, the always-
dramatic Campbell announced that Hey Rosetta! would not be opening for
Stars again: ^They're too fucking good—they can do it on their own." In the
midst of Olympic fever, it was nice to se^j||i||^istablished band like Stars
passing the torch to the up-and-comers.
—John Bartlett
BRAND NEW UNIT /THEE MANIPULATORS /HARD FEELINGS
February ig / Eldorado Hotel
Looking for a much neede^e#CTp$||om Olympic mayhem, I loaded into my
time warping phone booH|tnd set the place and date for a punk rock show
in the Ix>wer,,Mainland, circa 1994.Expecting to end up in a dingy basement
in Cloverdale.or at the Langley C^If Center, I was quite surprised when the
portal spat me out in the parking lot behind the
Eldorado Hotel. When I stepped inside though,
I knew I w4pln the right place—the bar looked
like someone's rumpus room, the crowd was full
of familiar faces and the bill had the words Brand
New Unit at the top.
Hard Feelings started things off, blasting into
a furious set of scrappy, yet technical* melodic
punk rock, prompting Eldorado regulars to seek
refuge in the abandoned smoking room. Next up
was Thee Manipulators, who blazed through a
set of warp speed garage rock that got everybody
sweating. Then the time came for Brand New
Unit to take the stage. The growing crowd of
aged hardcore kids, some even sporting their
vintage Brand New Unit basketball jerseys, filled
in, eager to revisit one of the greatest eras of
Vancouver punk rock. Aside from a few grey or
missing hairs, the band looked much the same
and when they played that first note, they defiantly
sounded the same. They were amazingly tight
and crisp for a band that hasn't played together
in ten years. They ploughed through a set of melodic hardcore that had their
friends and fans running in circles, raising their fists, grinning and singing
along. Most importantly, the band was having just as much fun as the rest of
us. They reminded us what hardcore was all about and proved themselves to
be the best band to ever come out of Surrey.
—Mark Paiig^^
SIGNAL & NOISE MEDIA ART FESTIVAL
10th ANNIVERSARY MAY 27,28,29 2010
www.signalandnoise.ca VIVO Media Arts
Centre. 2001-2009 artists include Jeffrey Al
Iport, Julie Andreyev, David Askevold, Daniel
Barrow, Eli Bornowsky Kevin Lee Burton, Paul
Chan, Shawn Chapelle, Dana Claxton, Aleesa
Cohene, Thirza Guthand, Francisca Duran,
Sylvain Duval, Kevin Jerome Everson, Geof
fray Farmer, Flatgrey, Coin Gutter, Nelson Hen
dricks, David Hoffos, Hoizkopf, Mike Hoolboom,
Oliver Husain, Lee Hutzulak, Intermission Artist
Society, Luis Jacob, Anne-Frangoise Jacques,
Miranda July, Mike Kelley, George Kuchar, Mee-
soo Lee, Amy Lockhart, Anne McGuire, Julia
Meltzer and David Thorne, Frederic Monet Mo
nique Moumblow, Shana'Moulton, Takeshi Mu
S Vine! a>, A*?r 11 25, ZQ10,„ 11 -4 PM'
' ^.rc?^ r~£>f?        '
wjto     3i^F   I CsT
•W %
25 DEVO        '>v;-v\;{r :•;•' - VA^\\v"X VW
February 2 2 / Whistler Medals Plaza
; it must have been a struggle for VANOC to figure out how to put on the Cultural
Olympiad. Still, it's strange that they thought the Neil Young Project would be
enough to balance out our music being represented by Hedley ("for the kids"),
Michael Buhle* ("people listen to him"), and Avri! Lavigne ("it's still aooa up
here"). It makes you wonder if the Arcade Fire, a band that would have been
perfect for something higher profile, just said no, causing VANOC to call off
any attemptatcfedibllity. No surprise, then that Devo were the last band announced for the Whistler victory ceremonies: "quick, we need one more. Hey,
what about those guys who used to whip things?"
The ceremony itself was a strange, unpolished tiling. Whose idea, was it to
raffle off the tickets to Sea-to-Sky residents? Every night was under-attended
and every concert was mostly fans-less. Bow fortunate for Devo that they came
up with the hats all those years ago. After an unremarkable intro by Hank from
Corner Gas, the guys rolled out—wearing their new shiny silver suite and phantom
of the opera masks—and Energy Domes were dealt to the crowd. Instantly,
drunk hipsters and elderly Norwegians alike were into id Thus is the obvious
power of the ziggurat headware, now in powder [j&a\ Olympic?! blue.
The band started out with new material, all of which was surprisingly relevant. "Don't Shoot (I'm a Man}" was a highlight (as well as die only new song
whose name I caught} After that, they moved into as much of a hits parade as
Devo has—but after 30 years that*s not necessarily a bad thing. It's not like the
crowd knew "Uncontrollable Urge* was any more important than any of the first
songs. Then, about halfway through the set, came the trademark whip cracks,
and the light bulb came on for everyone. The hats started bobbing around with
some sort of purpose, and even the half full, lottery ticketed "Mosh Pit Area"
looked like they were having as much run asthe handful of people in the crowd
who knew "Whip If* was a Devo song before it started.
That seemed, in the tndt to have been enough to win the crowd. Overheard
on the bus ride back down the highway: "Wow, the foam rings in these hats
were a good idea, right?"
"Yeah, it was really thoughtful of them."
—;Jasper Wattey
FOUR TET/NATHAN FAKE
February 24 / Biltmore Cabaret
The idea of the live electronic musician is strange. By virtue of having total
^control over all of their sounds, they are wont to be meticulous, to tweak and
fine-tune processes that lend themselves to being done gradually. And since
they can create all kinds of tones and timbres, a performance can be a solitary
endeavour, with no need for other musicians. That's why it was exciting to see
an artist like Four Tet succeeding at live electronic sonic exploration.
Opener Nathan Fake brought a danceable yet interesting set of techno, with
lots of big drums and strange rhythmic samples, touched with glitchy digital
laptop noise. He also made use of some intricately sequenced synth lines—
coupled at times with tribal drums, it was a unique sound.
Four Tet then took the stage, commanding a tabletop packed with computer
screens and other technology and overflowing with cords. Kieran Hebden
opened with a melodic haze of vocal samples, chopped so that no words were
complete, but each fragment was connected to another. Samples of xylophones
and bits of white noise crept in at the edges, until a watery four-on-the-floor
kick drum galvanized the affair, and the vocals became more repetitive and
insistent
This set the tone for the evening In terms of sonlcs if not mood, which went
front contemplative to celebratory without a pause. The common musical thread
was an imaginative whir£»--a layered, busy textural composite of percussion,
acoustics, vocals, and synthesizers. Hebden was awesome to watch, mo, with
his big bulb of hair nodding, wide eyes fixed on the mass oftechno-gear before
him, knowing that this human, controlling those machines, was orchestrating
EFTERKLANG / CERTAIN BREEDS/AUNTS & UNCLES
March 12 / Biltmore Cabaret
Returning to Vancouver to support the release of their latest album Magic Chairs,
the Danish group Efterklang were simply brilliant.
Opening the show, Aunts & Uncles played and sounded a lot better than the
last time this reviewer saw them. While much of their material was die same,
their sound was tighter and they were more confident on stage. Hell* they even
seemed to enjoy themselves up there. Certain Breeds followed and they blew
the roof off. Lead vocalist Jen Riego was mesmerizing. Their gothic pop felt like
tentacles of black smoke swirling around, slowly constricting your heart
Next was Efterklang. Where to begin? Bringing their vast, sweeping, epic
soundscapes to the slightly cramped Biltmore seems like a contradiction In
terms. That said, it was a treat to see them so close. The Danish use the ward
"hygge" to describe everything warm, close and cozy, and this show fit that
description. Predominantly performing cracks from Magic Chairs, die band was
simply perfect head vocalist Casper Clausen used the roof as his drum set,
engaging the audience in cheerful banter between songs. BassistlUsmus Stol-
berg didn't wipe the grin from his race all night, and touring backing vocalist,
Heather Woods Broderick, added an extra dimension to the sound.
The only awkward moment came towards the end. Justas diey were launching into "Cutting Ice to Snow," the crowd chatter gota litde loud. Efterklang
waited patiently for It to die down, which it eventually did) and they got on
with the song. Manning the merch table after the show, Efterklang proved
themselves to be as likable offstage as they are on. Vancouverites, yon'te lucky
bastards to have witnessed such a magnificent show.
fpwitaOTenne Boothttnjd'
THE BIG PINK/A PUCE TO BURY STRANGERS
March 13 / Venue ■■* ^j(r <i,„> J^G.% *■'"' &JC\ 'f-'fj' '■'[ "^<''; i'-\$0' 4:7%"*'
this was a great time for tans of the new shoegaze, with these two groups each
passing the finery-honed fuzz of My Bloody Valentine through distinct filters.
Both made ample use of sustained feedback and strobe lights to complete the
sensory overload, hut of the two, it was really openers A Place to Bury Strangers
who were interested in pushing to extremes.
A sparse crowd, clad mostly in black and peppered with shaved heads, had
the vaguely masochistic pleasure of witnessing post-apocalyptic dirges spewed
forth from die formidable amp stacks behind Oliver Ackermann etal Hints of
surf {"Deadbeat"} or gloomy pop ("Keep Slipping Away") surfaced and were
just as soon subsumed into auditory chaos as Ackermann stomped effects
pedals and Jono Mofo hunched over his bass as if to protect it from hostile
sound waves in the air around him. They played through a haze of smoke, even
becoming completely obscured through the searing jam that cut *Bgo Death"
m two. Despite all this, the band skirted the borderline between actual songs
and formless sprawls of noise—it was never too long before a familiar melody
emerged from die murk.
In contrast, the Big Pink were aU about slick showmanship with singer Robbie Furze playing to the crowd like a young Richard Ashcroft and bassist Adam
Prendergast flinging his Jong, straightened halt to and fro. Blockbuster tunes
like "Velvet" and "Crystal Visions* were imbued with pomp and power while
the classic balladry of "A Brief History of Love" prompted a lone raised lighter
mm %t^ from the crowd. As the slower songs piled up though, things ground down to a
snail's pace. If not for an explosive take on "Dominoes'' to cap offthe evening,
the previous song, which saw Furze's lone vocals noticeably dragging nextto the
other musicians, would have been a sad soporific and a poor last impression.
Thankfully, in the end, the Big Pink induced morecheers than yawns and showed
us that the spirit of Kevin Shields is alive and kicking in music today.
1 —Simon Foreman
IMMACULATE MACHINE/ A PALE BLUE/SUN WIZARD
March 19 / Thje Biltmore
fe Opening tins show was A Pale Blue. The six-member country-rock act started
their set off quickly—perhaps too quickly, because they had several minor
soundboard issues and slightly out of tune harmonics for their first two songs.
Once their third song began however, the planets all aligned and they, frankly,
kicked ass for such a new band. While a little rough around the edges, they
showed good technique and genuine talent, occasionally transporting me
briefly back to the country and bluegrass concerts held in my Texas hometown.
I am looking forward to seeing this band grow and develop into something
potentially great—not bad for the first of two opening acts. The next set, performed by Sun Wizard, was much more polished. They had a great flow and
pace, getting the crowd ready for Immaculate Machine. All told, a talented,
well put-together opening act
When Immaculate Machine came on, people crowded around the intimately-
sized Biltmore stage. The first couple of songs were from their new album,
High on Jackson Hill, recorded entirely in one night Fortunately for older fens
like myself, they played a lot of old songs too. The performance of "So Cynical"
was so passionate and so powerful that it turned out a lot better than the album
version (which isn't to say that the original isn't great), "ton Destroyer,"* one
of their new songs, showcased Kathryn Calder on lead vocals well. "Jarhand"
and "C'Mon Sea legs" also stood out All the Immaculate Machine concerts I
have seen have been outstandingly well performed. Their stage presence and
rapport with the audience Is refreshing and light-hearted—frontman Brooke
Gallup talked about their tour to China and told tales of his crappy apartment
The first time I saw them in concert, they were the first of two opening acts but
were by far the Best of all the performances that (as they were on this night). If
yon get a chance to see Immaculate Machine live, don't miss out!
^^^^rm?^^t'"°
KIDNAP KIDS / LOST LOVERS BRIGADE / HERMETIC /
BEDROOMS OF THE NATION
March 2 0 / Media Club
Apparently there were a few other shows happening on this night Fans of
British singer-songwriters and Ontarian roots-rock may have gotten their fill
elsewhe^e,'"^!^they missed out on seeing what great talent exists within their
own city. Bedrooms of the Nation, in their very fi^it'lflg;, warmtdnp die audi*
enee with some smooth indie rock befitting the best of CBC Radk^The group
;Snowcaaen* somtTneetiarmonies, i^^i^|ow|^te^one female in attendance,
who asked tile band to *he my bedrooiiip [id. What does that even mean?]
Mext up was the hand that won over Shindig back in aoo8, Hermetic. The
poppy post-punk duo played an energetic set laden with ItiHe? tffts, and even
Hl&fe house wasn't packed, singer Brie Axen seemed thankful for tiseteBOut
given everything else that^S-^^^^ .T|t£ group alsotnlanaged to. work in
what may he my new faWalEfoe vocal accoutrement harmonized whistling—
overall the& infectious sound w$$ hard to deny.
tip thlt^WMtliel^stiovK*sBrigade with a set that sounded spot-on. Singer
Elisha Rembold was pleased with the work the Media Club's soundman was
doing, and it was noticeable to those in attendance. Rembold's ait-country
croon is nothing short of breathtaking, placing her alongside stalwarts like
Neko Case and Carolyn Mark. The rest of the band wasn't slouching either;
the seasoned Vancouver vets performed vibrant accompaniment to Rembold's
vocals, especially on the band's knockout finale. Nearly everyone in die room
was floored by the furious, powerful closer.
Closing out the night was Vancouver's cutest band, Kidnap Kids. Though
not veterans of the scene like the members of tost Lovers Brigade, Kidnap
Kids still know how to put on a great show. With light-hearted lyrics, an upbeat tempo and an enthusiastic audience, the Kids practically defined *fun."
The performance wasn't without a hitch, though, as guitarist Alie Lynch had
tuning problems towards the end of the set The band soldiered on, though,
and as Lynch quipped, "I think it got better." A clamouring audience kept the
twee sensations going for an extra two songs after their finale, which led to
some joyful dmcing before the stage, It was clear that everyone present was
having a good time with the talent being showcased—ifs too bad mote of
the city wasn't in on it
^^an Nelson
THE SADIES
1 The Centre/or Digital Media f March 20
The Sadies are a ceremonious band, Dallas and Travis Spiller's dad, Bruce Spiller
is a member of the Good Brothers, inductees in the Canadian Country Music
Hall of Fame—hence the boys were born into a musical life. Their years on the
road wear heavy on the shoulders of their tailored country and western suits. The
cigarettes they've smoked and the whiskey they've downed on their perpetual
tour of the finest ballrooms, bar rooms, festivals and legions this fine country
has to offer, shows in the wrinkles around their smiling eyes. The brothers play
with the accompaniment of Mike Belitsky on drums and Sean Bean on standup
bass. In their travels and numerous studio collaborations, the foursome has
polished their act and become one of die tightest acts on the road.
Every live performance the Sadies play feels like a homecoming. They've
played so many great shows in so many cities that they've amassed a real cult
following and fostered m extended family of friends, fans and fellow musicians.
The sellout show at the Hive had members of local favourites Spoon Rjvei; A
Pale Blue, Blood Meridian and Chet, amongst others, in attendance.
The Sadies didn't need any openers and played their usual rapid fire set of
their original blend^^^S^Stti Western, garage, and surf rock that everybody
expec ted, but was still pleasantly surprised to receive i n the way that only they
cart dish it Highlights inch&kd the u sual fan favourite "Stories Often Told,*
originally recorded by Blue Rodeo and a cover of "Gloria* thatwas musk to my
ears. Every member of the band is larger than life^ad the showmanship was
Incredible, hlMuding their trademark playing-eatll-other's-guitar move that
>yo$ siftstsee to understand. The band happily obliged fans with two encores
and graciously thanked everybody for voicing their appreciation of me show.
* When the mask was over, the band stepped dirtscdy lifpftie stage and into
the crowd, Travis heading for a cigarette and Dallas joining the folks at the
bat, accepthlg any hand that was offered for shakes. With their suit jackets
'<Wiip|C&§^blended flawlessly into the crowdJi^Wte® the fact that the
Sadies truly are a band of the people.
—-RobertFo^ferg '*
// RFI
L N
■■ ■ w Until  n w ■ ■ w 11
97
As i BY DEBBY REIS
ILLUStRATISM BY MERIDA ANDERSON
EDO VAN BREEMEN, BRASSTRONAUT'S VOCALIST AND KEYBOARDIST, ADMITS THE BAND IS HARD TO
CLASSIFY. WITH TRUMPET, CLARINET, FLUGELHORN AND LAP STEEL TAKING PROMINENT ROLES, THEY
DONT QUITE FIT IN WITH OTHER INDIE BANDS, AND THE CONSTANT ASSOCIATION WITH JAZZ MAKES
THEM CRINGE. THEIR NEW ALBUM, MT. CHIMAERA, MIGHT HAVE TO SIT IN A FEW DIFFERENT SECTIONS
AT THE RECORD STORE, BUT WHICHEVER SECTION YOU FIND IT IN, YOU'LL FIND THAT ITS SOOTHING
BITTERSWEET MOOD PASSES TOO QUICKLY.
BRASSTRONAUT ARRIVED IN MONTREAL ON MARCH 23.
Discorder: You guys recently wrapped up at SXSW. How
was it?
Edo Van Breemen: Yeah, it was a pretty grueling day yesterday.... We were in
Austin for the week and it was awesome.
D: SXSW has a reputation for being a festival that
introduces a lot of bands to a much wider audience. Do
you think it's done that for Brasstronaut?
EVB: I don't know yet. I think so. There were a lot of people at our show but I
don't know who those people were. But, there were some guys from different
blogs around the world, so I'd say that's true.
D: Did you guys discover any bands while there?
EVB: I guess the biggest surprise for me, well, I knew about this band before,
but there's this band called Liars and they're definitely the best thing I saw at
the festival... Duchess Says was also amazing. Again, I've known about her, but I've never seen a live show and it was phenomenal.... at one point in the <
performance she actually tackled me. She jumped off the stage and tackled
me to the ground. It was a visceral performance to say the least.
D: Tell me about how songs are written for Brasstronaut.
Who does the writing? What's the process?
EVB: We all kind of do the writing. At this point we've done a lot of writing
where one person brings an idea to the group and then the song, we jam it out
as a band and then we kind of work on it for months. Usually, before it goes
to recording, it's taken us, well, our average time is probably a year. We're
trying to speed that up a little bit. I think it's sort of like we'll get it to a point I
where it can be played live and then play it live a bunch and then rework it so I
we tend to take our time with arrangements.
D: I heard that there was a lot of back and forth with
the recording and your producer Will Howie with what
you had initially recorded at the Banff Centre.
EVB: Yeah, that's true. When ... we came out of the recording sessions [in
Banff], because we recorded everything in seven days, it felt a bit rushed and I
I don't think we as a band were prepared for the level of post production that I
we were about to go into. We thought that we could record these songs, mix
them and that would be it When we started hearing the songs, we realized
that they didn't sound the way that we wanted them to sound. But we didn't 'y
even know how we wanted them to sound on a recording.... so we took them
back to Vancouver and then for the next nine months, or eight months, we I
worked on them at our own studios.... like mixing them and then overdub-1
bing them at our houses. I did a lot of stuff, actually in my garage, just putting things through re-amping them and trying to get different sounds and ■,
analyzing what we had.... there was a time that I was quite frustrated because
I didn't really know where I should stop. Fortunately we were working with
great producers.
D: Do you feel that "Slow Knots" and "Lo-Hi Hopes,"
the album's singles, are the most representative of the
album?
EVB: No. I don't think that the album has a single song that really represents
the overall quality. Maybe in terms of instrumentation "Lo-Hi Hopes" is good
because you can really hear everything, all of the different instruments get a <
chance to play out. Also if s got a blaring trumpet solo. There was some discussion as to where and when we should let the improvisational skills of the horn I
players shine through because we didn't want it to be just like a jam record.
We wanted the songs to all have intent and work as fully composed pieces, so
we were pretty adamant about not being blase" about those land of things. But
yeah, those songs represent a good cross section of the record.
D: I read an interview that you guys did with Left Hip I
back when you played the Victory Square Block Party,
and this quote that seems to come up in a lot of media,
I where you said that Brasstronaut's sound is like "a
soundtrack to the first day of really getting over a really
bad break-up."
EVB: Oh, it was really kind of a joke and Pitchfork ran with that one, so we're 1
dogged by it but yeah I know it I mean, it's just one thing of a thousand,'
million things I've said. That's not a representative quote.
D: What do you think of the media for latching on to
that, especially with Pitchfork?
EVB: It was just them, and people need hooks to write. And I've come to terms
with the way that things get misconstrued in the media, especially with people
trying to classify the band within a genre or a set of genres. I found that to be
very annoying, butyoujustkeep doing what you're doing and hope that some
people get it... Like one thing the media says, "this is a jazz indie band." I
Thafs like an awful thing to read sometimes... we're just making music and I
we're using all of our influences to make theses songs. We're definitely not |
just like a jazz-rock band. I'd say that we're writing more pop, experimental
pop songs. Sorry, I'm kind of going on a bit of a tangent.
D: That's okay.
\ EVB: I think that the media, a lot of the time will try and create a kind of a
hook to frame the story and then they'll build around their hook and they'll I
use the music or what their interpretation of the music is, or what's existing 1
! in the media already to support their hook. So thafs not really saying anything |
\ objective about the music.
D: Do you think that Brasstronaut is more prone to being
classified with these hooks because your sound is eclectic
and not really like anything else that's going on?
I EVB: I think so and I think maybe some people think that if s a deliberate
| thing that we're trying to do—that we're trying to be so different and if s
I really not what we're about. We're really good friends who are primarily just
interested in making music together... if s not like we strategized to create
something that would be weirder or a little bit more unique than other rock
bands. I think that people go for that because if s got a horn and then people
say, "oh, a horn, this is like a jazz band." Even "Requiem for a Scene." The
| EP was called jazz so many times, but thafs just a bunch of chords that work
I like any other sort of indie thing, or emo, or whatever? If s just got a horn on
| it instead of a guitar.... Well Tariq [Hussain] and I have not gone to music
school, but the other four guys have. And they've played in jazz bands, like,
a lot of them, and they've also played in a lot of other kinds of bands as well,
like classical ensembles, Latin bands. So you can hear the influences that will
1 come in, and certiply in the way the trumpet is played by Bryan [Davies],
like he's taking cues from, like, Miles Davis or whoever. He's influenced by
I people within that genre, but not necessarily by the genre. I think thafs what
I've been trying to get out there.
D: And is the band as a whole excited about John [Walsh,
their bass player] and his wife's baby on the way?
I EVB: Oh yeah totally totally! At this point,... we're definitely over the mid-mark
of the tour and we're pretty excited to go home and see our friends and family.
But yeah, John is very excited, and you can put that in print we all are.
| Brasstronaut will be playing a homecoming show at St. James Hall on May 6 and
) opening for Bonobo at the Commodore durina the Vancouver International Jazz Festival
onJune 30.
29 YHIBfcRiKHWSOF     I
ttCoMNOApJ
PT C
1.  I   InC ICbn olUC
BYSANCHOMCCANN
THIS IS THE START OF A TWO-PART SERIES WE ARE DOING. THIS SIDE DEALS WITH THE TECHNICAL
SIDE OF DJING, BUT NEXT MONTH WEIL BE DOING AN ARTICLE ON THE SOCIAL AND BUSINESS SIDES
OF THE DJ GAME, WHICH WILL AIM TO HELP YOU GET GIGS AND GET NOTICED
Spinning top 40 hits at a Granville club, mixing some hard drum and
bass or dubstep at the Lotus, or just playing requests from the crowd
at a wedding, the DJ is in control.
Think you could do it? Think you want to do it? Don't know how
to get there? Then read on. With a mix of my own experience and a chat I had
with DJ Brad Winter, CiTR's music director, here is some advice for those out
there wondering how to be a DJ.
You might already be the one thafs always asked to run the playlist at a
party. You're already on the way. If you can read a crowd, play what you want
and what they like, thafs a large part of the battle already down. You really just
need a way to play the music you want to play the way that you want to play it.
That means getting the tools and the practice. That is the difference between
an iTunes DJ and a DJ you'll see at a club: a set of tools and techniques that are
used to keep the music flowing, to keep the crowd dancing.
A basic setup involves a way to play two tracks at the same time so that you
can transition between them smoothly. There are a few options for you here.
Traditionally, this would be two turntables to play vinyl and a mixer allowing
you to fade smoothly between the track playing on one of the turntables and the
other. Other setups might replace the turntables with CDJs. These are CD players
with a turntable-like control platter that allow you to manipulate the music as
if it were a vinyl on a turntable (scratching, cueing). Another common setup
thafs become very popular in the past five years is based around the turntable,
but instead of normal vinyls, DJs use special control vinyls to manipulate the
playback of mp3S on their computer. If this all sounds expensive, you're right,
but don't be too discouraged: there are some software-only setups (Abelton
Live, Mixxx, for example) to get you started mixing sounds.
Ableton Live, by the way, isn't just a way to get started. "This is production
software, at heart," Winter explained. "You can jam on it, play more than two
sounds at once. It lets you see many ideas at a time, taking advantage of the
freedom a computer brings." While many traditional DJs are uncomfortable
with new technology, Winter advocates embracing it. "Get as good as you can
with it and go as far as you can with it."
Next, go get some music.
If you're using regular vinyl, this can be really fun and rewarding: digging
around in a record store all afternoon, finding a track with a sweet breakbeat
on it, or an instrumental remix you'd never heard before. If you're using digital
music, you'll need to find yourself the equivalent of a record store [ed. yarrrr!]:
an exposure to a diversity of music genres, an exposure to the newest tracks,
both the popular and the little secrets that reflect your style and that will have
people asking, "what was that last song?" Community or online radio stations,
online music magazines and music blogs are great sources.
You'll eventually want to organize your music collection by tempo and key.
You can either start doing this right away, or realize down the road that you
should have done it right away. With vinyls, you can simply tag each record
sleeve, or write directly onto the vinyl's label. With a digital collection, any
decent piece of DJ software will let you store this information.
Tempo? Key? What are those? If you just asked that, a short introduction to
music theory is definitely needed. You probably don't need more than you can
find online, but you really should know about how music is structured.
Once you've got your setup, and some music, just start practicing. You'll
want to learn how to beat match (adjusting the playback speeds of two songs
so that their beats line up. You might want to learn some basic scratching
techniques (not every DJ does). This is also a lot of fun, and quite challenging.
Winter believes that basic scratching, while not as novel as it once was, does
develop an improved control over the vinyl—and makes a better DJ. There's
a large number of videos and tutorials online, a variety of named techniques
and even a scratch notation format!
Although you'll be alone with your music and just playing for yourself,
you need the time to "just figur[e] out what sounds good and develope your
own style," Winter said. "Have a lot of fun with it. This stage is kind of important."
That is the start of your path. Choose a setup that will let you play music the
way you want to play it. Practice, explore, find your style. Then get out there
and have fun sharing it with others.
30 //CiTR 101.9 FM CHARTS
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF MARCH
 #	
ARTIST
ALBUM
 LABEL	
 #_
ARTIST
ALBUM	
LABEL
1
Petroleum
By-Product*
Superficial
Artificial
Independent
26
Fanshaw*
Dark Eyes
Mint
2
Moon Duo
Escape
Woodsist
27
TheMolestics*
A Farewell to Hokum
Independent
3
SubtractiveLAD*
Life at the end of the
World
nsMD
28
Pavement
Quarantine The Past
Matador
4
Fan Death
A Coin For
The Well
Last Gang
29
Acrassicauda
Only the dead see the
end of the War
Vice
5
Brasstronaut*
Mt. Chimaera
Unfamiliar
30
Modern Creatures]
TWin Crystals*
Split EP
Nail In The
Coffin
6
Sonic Avenues*
Sonic Avenues
Going Gaga
31
Various*
MusicWorks 106
MusicWorks Magazine
7
Gorillaz
Plastic Beach
Virgin
32
Happy Birthday
s/t
Sub Pop
8
The Summerlad*
Blue Skinned
Independent
33
Eddy Current
Suppression Ring
Rush to Relax
Goner
9
The Besnard Lakes*
Are The
Roarina Nyht
Outside
34
Cursed Arrows*
Telepathic High Five
Noyes
10
Electroluminescent*
Oban
Chat Blanc
35
Role Mach*
Orffesques and Fuges
Independent
11
Joanna Newsom
Have One On Me
Drag City
36
Los Campesinos!
Romance Is Boring
Arts & Crafts
12
Liars
Sistenuorld
Mute
37
Spoon
Transference
Merge
13
Yeasayer
Odd Blood
Secretly Canadian
38
Four Tet
There is Love in You
Domino
14
Gigi*
Maintenant
Tomlab
39
Strapping
Fieldhands
Discuss (Reissue)
Shangri-La Projects
15
Quasi
American Gon^
Kill Rock Stars
40
Hot Chip
One Life Stand
Astralwerks
16
Harlem
Hippies
Matador
41
Various*
Hockey Dad
Compilation
Hockey Dad
17
Cotton Candy
Top-Notch and
First-Rate
Teen Beat
42
A-Frames/Climax
Golden Twins
AFCGT
Sub Pop
18
Jaga Jazzist
One-Armed Bandit
Ninja Tune
43
Woodhands*
Remorsecapade'
Paper Bag
19
The Splinters
Kick
Double Negative
44
Owl Drugs*
Heathens
Independent
20
Ruby Suns
FiahtSojily
Sub Pop
45
100 Mile House*
From Fall to Fall
Independent
21
The Souljazz
Orchestra*
Risina, Sun
Strut
46
Dadfag
Scenic Abuse
Broken Rekids
22
Various*
Megahmes 21st
Anniversary Compilation
Megatunes
47
Oorn*
Life is too Short to be
Worthwhile
Independent
23
Golden Triangle
Double Jointer
Hardly Art
48
Devendra Banhart
What Will We Be
Warner
24
Hard Drugs*
Hard Drugs
Stay Gold
49
Nouvelle Vague
3
Love
25
Excepter
Presidence
Paw Tracks
50
Zeus*
Say Us
Arts & Crafts
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian. Most of these excellent albums
can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. His name is
Luke Meat. If you ask nicely he'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.com.
31 E OF YOUR DREAMS!
Zulu picks the finest spring releases to send you spinning.
C;        ' I    1  STOCK!
ROGUE WAVE - Permalight CD
THE CLOGS - The Creatures In
The Garden CD
HOLLY G0U6HTLY & THE BROKEOFFS
* Medicine County CD
SHE & HIM-Volume Two CD/LP
THE WHITE STRIPES - Under Great
White Northern Lights CD/LP
BROKEN BELLS -s/t CD
THE WEAKERTHANS - Live At The
Burton Cummlngs Theater CD &
DVD/LP
SURFER BLOOD ~ Astro Coast CD
YEASAYER - Odd Blood CD/LP
JOANNA NEWSOM - Have One On
Me3CD/LP
UARS-Sisterworld CD/LP
POSTDATA -s/t CD
GIL SCOTT HERON - I'm New Here
CD/UP
FRIGHTENED RABBIT - Winter Of
Mixed Drinks CD
SHEARWATER - The Golden
Archipelago CD/LP
GONJASUFI-ASufiAndAKiller
CD/UP
STRANGE BOYS - Be Brave CD/LP
BONNIE PRINCE BILLY - The Wonder
Show Of The World CD/LP
ROKY ERIKSON & OKKERVIL RIVER -
True Love Casts Out All Evil CD/LP
BILL CALLAHAN - Rough TYavel For
A Rare Thing LP
EFTERKLANG I Magic Chairs CD/LP
AUTECHRE- Oversteps CD/LP
GOLDFRAPP - Head First CD/LP
HIGH PLACES - Vs Mankind CD/LP
DESTROYER - City Of Daughters/
Thief/Streethawk CD/LP
PLUS!!!!
CELEBRATE RECORD STORE DAY
SATURDAY APRIL 17*2010
AT ZULU RECORDS'i
Check out full details and announcements at
www.zulurecords.com or twltter.com/zulurecords
*£COT?D3
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Hon to Wed   10:30-7:00 \
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00 |
It 9:30-6:30
Sun 12:00-6:00

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