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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 1985-10-01

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 THAT MAGAZINE FROM CITR FM102 CABLE100
OCTOBER 1985 • FREE
CHRIS AND COSEY
TOUCHE
BRILLIANT ORANGE CD
CO
HOT SPOTS
CORDOVA    STREET
I
PETER FOX SHOES / 662-3040 / PETER FOX SHOES / 662-3040 / PETER FOX 662-
MORNINGSTAR/BOYSTOWN/681-0531/MORNINGSTAR/BOYSTOWN/681-053
THE BLOCK/685-8885/THE BLOCK/685-8885/THE BLOCK/685-8885/THE BLO
SISSYBOY/683-0787/SISSYBOY/683-0787/SISSYBOY/683-0787/SISSYBOY
CUE HAIR STUDIO / 687-8680 / CUE HAIR STUDIO / 687-8680 / CUE HAIR STUDI
POW-WOW/682-3270/POW-WOW/682-3270/POW-WOW/682-3270/POW-WO Contributors
Jason Grant, Larry Thiessen, Mark Mushet,
Don Chow, Pat Carroll, Bill Mullan,
David Firman, Jay Scott
Photos
Ross Cameron
Cartoons
R. Fi lb rant, Susan Catherine,
Chris Pearson,  William Thompson
Cover
Lincoln Clarkes
Production Manager
Pat Carroll
Design
Harry Hertscheg
diScopdeR
THAT MAGAZINE FROM CITR FM102 CABLE100
OCTOBER 1985 • VOL 3 NO. 9
Layout
Pat Carroll, Bev Demchuk, Kathy Johnston,
Bev Best, Toby Tiersch,   Brent Lymer,
IN THIS ISSUE
11  Chris & Cosey
Larry Thiessen snuggles up to Chris & Cosey.
14 Touche
Jason Grant crosses epees....
18 Brilliant Orange
Pat Carroll puts the squeeze on.
Program Guide
H.H., CD., PC, J. Mc.
Typesetting
Dena Corby, Kathie Wraight
Business Manager
Mike Dennis
Advertising and Circulation
Harry Hertscheg
DISCORDER, c/o CITR Radio, 6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C, V6T 2A5. Phone (604) 228-3017.
DISCORDER Magazine is published monthly by the
Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia (CITR-UBC Radio).
CITR fml01.9 cablelOO.l broadcasts a 49-watt signal in
stereo throughout Vancouver from Gage Towers on the
UBC campus. CITR is also available via FM cable in
Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Burnaby,
Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody,
Maple Ridge and Mission.
DISCORDER circulates 15,000 free copies. For advertising and circulation inquiries call 228-3017 and ask for
Harry Hertscheg or Nancy Smith.
Twelve-month subscriptions available: $10 in Canada, $10
U.S. in the U.S.A., $15 overseas. Send cheque or money
order payable to CITR Publications.
Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, cartoons and
graphics are welcome but they can be returned only if
accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
DISCORDER does not assume responsibility for unsolicited material.
The offices of CITR and DISCORDER are located in
room 233 of the UBC's Student Union Building. For
general business inquiries or to book the CITR Mobile
Sound System call 228-3017 and ask for station manager
Nancy Smith. The Music Request line is 228-CITR.
IN EVERY ISSUE
4  Airhead
The revenge of Canada Post II: the story continues.
6   Behind the Dial
How to get your requests played, and much, much
more...(What's Wombat doing here?).
8   Shindig!
A preview of this month's competitors.
20   Program Guide
What's on and when. Indespensible.
22 Vinyl Verdict
Flat round things from Skinny Puppy, Hugh
Masekela et al.
23 Spin List
What's hot, what's merely lukewarm.
26   Demo Derby
More from the tape file.
28   Armchair Eye
Bill Mullan looks at music vids, sort of.
30   Roving Ear
This month from Hawaii. DISCORDER
Wheatfield Soul
Dear Airhead:
Received your renewal notice
about two weeks ago. I took it for
granted that I was the only subscriber "on the prairies" (hate that terminology, by the way—just as easy
to say 'Alberta, Saskatchewan and
Manitoba"). It seems that the
mountains and/or the wide-open
spaces present an isolation theorem here. Anyway, very first subscriber to Discorder...very proud of that
actually, hope there are a fair number in Vancouver suburbs, and
Washington state.
I have also subbed to the Georgia Straight since before Bobby
Geldof was music critic, and have
supported CFRO for years, have
subscribed to NME since 1969, and
Now from Toronto, which makes
the Straight, at times, appear a
comic. Yes, this is no sap you're
dealing with in Regina, and at 34
could probably double-whammy
you a few times—but won't.
In closing, enclosed is enough
for 12 more Discorders, and a new
CITR T-shirt in medium—send a
radical color.
Regards,
The Lone Subscriber,
Saskatchewan
Terry J. Gibson
J'accuse (1)
Dear Airhead,
Turpin and Rennie's interview
with Mutabaruka in the August
1985 Discorder quite possibly had
some important things to say about
the current state of affairs in South
Africa, but I for one was so outraged by the presentation that the
message was lost on me. Your
choice to print the artist's com
ments in eye-dialect offended my
deepest sensibilities.
Let's face it. Nobody speaks
Standard English, and even Standard English is not written the way
it sounds. I cannot speculate why
it was decided to use eye-dialect
for the artist and not for the interviewers, but the effect is a comment on the relative literacy of the
parties. It is implied that Mutabaruka speaks some quaint but imperfect sort of English.
Whether this expression of racism was intentional or not is not the
point. I hope not to see any more
of this sort of material in your otherwise fine publication.
Sincerely,
Ann Pollak
J'accuse (2)
Dear Airhead:
This is further to my letter of late
rh6a£
c/o CITR Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T2A5
August regarding the Mutabaruka
interview in the July issue of Discorder. Since writing that letter, I
have been informed that my comments were "out of line," since the
poet's speech was written in eye-
dialect for the honourable intention
of paying homage to the patios of
Mutabaruka's speech and poetry.
It only follows, then, that since the
interviewers felt competent to transcribe the poet's speech thusly,
greater honour would be given had
they also attempted to mimic the
Patois in their own speech and
transcribe it accordingly. I hope
that should Discorder ever again
have the opportunity to pay such
tribute to this accomplished dub
poet, the moment will not be allowed to slip by.
With new understanding,
Ann Pollak
October 1985
First outrage, now sarcasm.
What delight awaits the Airhead
next? In either case, I think you've
missed the boat on this one.
Dub poets like Mutabaruka have,
in their poetry, attempted to give
written form to a language that previously only existed verbally. We
view the notation used in their
poetry not as an artistic device but
as a real and successful attempt to
achieve this end. Mutabaruka's
comments were transcribed as they
were in simple recognition of this
effort, not as a "homage" nor with
the intent of portraying his speech
as some "quaint but imperfect"
form of English.
And why weren't Turpin and Rennie's questions delivered in Patois?
Simply because they neither speak
nor write it. Simple. Therein may lie
the rub, and the source of your outrage. I allow that the rendering of
Patois in the article may have been
flawed because of the writers' un-
familiarity with the language. If this
was the case, I'm sorry it spoiled
the article for you.
As for the charges of racism, perhaps you should consider your own
prejudices. Where did the implication that Patois is "quaint but imperfect" come from? Mi cyaan believe
it. L
E
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until 31 Oct. 85
3621 W. 4th Ave.
(near Alma)    733-3831 HOW TO GET YOUR
IESTS PLAYED
IITR - or
jht A DJ
Saved IVIy Life
Most dj's will play your requests if
you follow certain moral and ethical guidelines.
Here's a handy list of do's and don't's provided
by some of our crack tunespinners.
DO:
— call 228-2487; if you call our business number,
even after business hours, the DJ will probably ask you to pay him or her for your re-
DISCORDER
quest, after all, it is a business number.
— try to remember the name of the song. Most
DJs have never been contestants on 'Name
That Tune', and humming a few bars rarely
helps.
— try to be courteous. There are ways to tell a
DJ that you are not enjoying his or her show
without saying "What is this shit, man?", and
constructive crifici ecl&led.
Mind you, sucking dmost a
surefire method H I $pest
played. Now, you wc                           jld you?
DON'T:
— ask for any of the following overrequested,
overplayed songs: "Holiday in Cambodia",
"Too Drunk to Fuck", "Bela Lugosi's Dead",
iMrt
October 1985
"Fuck You", "Love Will Tear Us Apart",
"Institutionalized". There are others but I think
you will be able to guess what they are when
the DJ gives a strangled moan instead of the
ubiquitous "I'll see what I can do."
— ask when the DJ's going to play your request.
Home taping really is awful, and besides, isn't
. it enough that we play the song?
— have all of the people at your party call us to
request the same song. Telephones can pick
up every noise in the room when they want
to, and ours are trained to recognize the telltale signs of "partius requestis'.
Finally, remember that CITR is worth diddly-
squat without your input. We rely on:;you, the
listeners. § operate
1      ;ll Hi;    Jf li    II
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under. If you don't call to chastise or congratulate
us we, the DJ's, will assume one of three things:
a) there is not a single person listening;
b) there are many people listening, but our great
choice of music has glued your ears to the
speakers, rendering you incapable of rational
thought, let alone dialing our number.
c) you are all completely apathetic and wouldn't
care one fig if we played Montovani albums
24 hours-a-day.
So you see, we do care how our listeners feel
about our regular programming. If you do too,
then tell us how you feel. Make a request and/or
join CITR and use your talents to help us
improve.
Wombat
The limited edition wombat member-
ship packages are going fast. We've already turned down a bulk membership application from the
staff of Vogue. George Bush wants one. So does
Bishop Desmond Tutu. We can't say no much
longer.
Wombat packages are available only with a 1985/
86 CITR Membership Package. Not available in
stores. The cost? A measly $25 for which you
receive a one-year membership in CITR, a Wombat T-shirt, a Wombat button and a Wombat
bumper sticker.
Don't wait a moment longer. Buy now...
Concerts
Real pity about the cancellation of
the Black Uhuru show last month. And now, to
add insult to injury, the band has been dropped
from Island records. CITR wishes to deny responsibility for both these events.
On to the future: This month CITR will be bringing you The Blasters, October 2nd at the Commodore. The last Blasters show was an absolute
sweat box, sparks flew, legs crumpled and several people saw God. Don't miss them this time.
CITR also brings you Chris And Cosey October
9th at the Luv-A-Fair. They will be appearing at
the conclusion of a five-date Canadian tour. For
more information, check out page 11 of this issue.
On November 16th at the Commodore, CITR presents an evening of Heavy Caribbean Rhythms
featuring four of Vancouver's best reggae bands:
Peter Sandy and the Originals, Fire Temple, Soul
Survivors, Mango Dub.
News
IF YOU FALL ASLEEP AT NIGHT WITH Visions of whimpering Socred cabinet ministers
dancing in your head, you may find a healthy
outlet in the CITR news department. The news
department is looking for reporters, newsreaders,
newswriters and anyone willing to devote their
lives to bringing them back alive. Full training is
provided. For more information call Doug Richards at 228-3017.
Blow Out The Candles
and Make A Wish
IN OTHER RADIO NEWS, CKCU-FM IN OTTAWA
is celebrating their 10th anniversary of FM broadcasting this November. CKCU is the oldest university radio station in Canada and we wish them
all the best, and many happy returns. If you're
a former member of CKCU you are invited to join
the celebration by contacting Joe Reilly at (613)
231-4498.
Late breaking news...congrats to Laurie Mercer
(CAT Productions) and his wife on the birth to them
of twin baby girls. Look for Laurie and the twins at
Husker Du on Oct. 25. DISCORDER
October 1985
Monday, October 7
— The Semi-Finals wherein the Sexual Infections, Little Ratskulls and the winner of the
Sept. 30 round (either Mondo Rip, the Wardels or
the Irritants) have it out to see who advances to the
finals (and thus win a place on the new Shindig
album, recording time, a nice set of Tupperware,
and all sorts of other neat stuff).   -^^^^^^^
Monday, October 14
— THANKSGIVING WEEKEND IS A
time for pivotal football games, roast turkey,
pumpkin pie and family dinners. We've decided
that is is not the time for a Battle of the Bands.
So, on October 14 Shindig will present a Post-
Pigfest Special Feature. Appearing will be Bill
of Rights, (who have followed up their Live at
Wreck Beach cassette with another full-length
cassette release), and The Spores (who will take
the opportunity to host their second record
release party in a week). The cover on this
special no-contest night will be the same as on
regular Shindig nights. But please, remember to
wipe the gravy off your chin.
Monday, October 21
TROUBLE BOYS
Troy Brooks (guitar/vocals), Gary Seronick
(bass/vocals), Todd McGarvey (drums)
TROUBLE BOYS ARE RETURNEES FROM
last year's Shindig. Described at the time as
"unabashed popsters with uncanny songwriting
ability and a bouncy, fluid style", they were unfortunate enough to play the same night as Death
Sentence, a band whose fans are, to say the
least, loyal and legion. Pared down to a three-
piece, they're hoping for better luck this year.
LINE DRIVER
Terry Lynn Ryan (guitar/vocals), Michael Van
Eyes (keyboards/guitar/vocals), Peter Mitchell
(guitar/dobro/mandolin), Lee Holmes (bass),
John Rule (drums)
LINE DRIVER IS THE VEHICLE FOR TERRY
Lynn Ryan, who has previously released a couple
of singles. While the core of the band has been
together for three years, this has been supplemented by other members over the last six
months. Ryan describes the band's sound as
"country-rock, country-swing, country-boogie,
country-anything." Line Driver is currently putting
the finishing touches on a demo, so listen to
CITR for a preview. ^^  ■HklB jtiPtraH
ino
release a single featuring "Drive-through Morti-
cian'V'Teenage Crime Wave". Another track will
be included on a forthcoming Collectors RPM
Undergrowth cassette.
Monday, October 28
DEAD CATS
Rob Thomson (guitar/lead vocals), Steve
Prouse (lead guitar), Beef (drums), Dale (bass)
THIS IS THE FIRST BAND FOR THREE OF
the members of the Dead Cats, who formed last
November. The recent loan of bassist Dale ("I
don't remember his last name," says Thomson)
rounded out the band. Thomson says the band
play Corrodabilly and that "we're just learning
what instruments are."
BAD ATTITUDE
Shane Davis (guitar), Lev Delaney (drums), Jeff
Turner (vocals), Robert McGilavry (bass).
BAD ATTITUDE HAVE BEEN PLAYING Together for about 14 months. Guitarist Davis
L describes the band's music as Demolition Rock,
» a genre they inhabit with the likes of Slow and
o  Idle and Undesirable (formerly Sudden Impact).
a, When asked what Demolition Rock is, Davis
8 hums and haws before quoting late Sudden
£ Impact  vocalist  Mink:   "The  whole  point  of
■ | Demolition Rock is to generate mass power and
|S> help the audience blow their minds."
Bad Attitude have recorded a demo and, in the
event that they win first prize, would like to record
Sexual Infections—First Round Shindig winners     enough for an album.
BAYOU DRACHMA
Cameron   Brown   (bass),   Jeff   Hay-Roe
(guitar/vocals), John Breatherton (guitar/vocals),
Frank Buikema (drums)
SOREHEADS
Rob Elliot (vocals), Ron Yamauchi (keyboards),
Tony Lee (drums), Gary Jones (guitar), Bill
(bass)
AFTER SPENDING TWO AND A HALF
years in the basement, the Soreheads emerged
last March to play what vocalist Elliot describes
as "Angst-Lounge-Rock". While the band has
played a few club gigs around town, they are
gounting on Shindig ("or all the members getting
day jobs") to allow them time to record and
"I DON'T KNOW WHERE WE GOT THE
name," says bassist Cameron Brown of Bayou
Drachma, the band's been together for about two
years although it only came together in the last
six months. Brown describes their music as
"Pseudo-folk-psychedelic-pop-rock" and says
they have a demo about half done and hope to
do some recording next year.
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LINEUP...
OCT. 1 - 54/40; 2 & 3 - YANKS;
4 & 5 - b-sides; 7 & 8 - DAVE HOLLAND;
15 & 16 - CHEFS; 17-19 - BOX PHANTOMS;
24-26 FABULON;
31 HALLOWE'EN EXTRAVAGANZA. CITR fm 102 cable 100
Chris and Cosey
throbbing on
¥"JLT 1981, one of the most controversial musical collaborations to emerge from the
|^y   British Underground, Throbbing Gristle, called it quits. Citing exhaustion of possi-
JLX ^  bilities, they took a route open to all artists but travelled only by the most honest
or courageous. In the aftermath, the various members of TG re-emerged as Chris & Cosey
(Chris Carter and Cosey Fanni Tutti) on the one hand, and Psychic TV with all its permutations (Genesis P. Orridge, Sleazy, et al.) on the other. On October 9, Chris & Cosey will
appear at the Luv-A-Fair as the last stop on their first Canadian tour. On August 31, I phoned
them in England (and charged the call to Mark Mushet's number, hee hee). The edited transcription of the conversation and the accompanying discography might serve as a preview for
those wondering what to expect on October 9.
DISC: / understand your new album is being released in
North America.
COSEY: Yes, it's going out on Warner Bros, as we do the
tour.
D: Will that mean you'll be featuring the album fairly heavily
in Vancouver?
C: Not particularly, no...we thought we'd do quite a mixture of
material—some old—some new.
D: What's the album like in terms of what you've done
before?
C: The production's changed yet again; but it's a cross
between (Songs of) Love and Lust, "October (Love Song)"
and Hammerhouse (Conspiracy International Vol. 1). It's a
real cross-section actually—it's got a lot more lyrics on it
and more songs as such.
D: How about some of the older material?
C: We were thinking of doing a version of "October (Love
Song)" which is more the original version—much slower.
D: / don't imagine any of this has filtered through to England,
but when Tom Ellard (of Severed Heads) was here in June,
Vancouver had the phenomenon where word of the concert
snowballed and it became THE place to be that night. A lot
of people ended up there with absolutely no idea of what to
expect. I'd like to give our readers a clear picture of what
will happen on October 9 as possible. What about the use of
tapes?
C: Our tapes? Chris is right here. Perhaps you can talk to
him about that.
CHRIS: This time we're taking a small porta-studio with
us—a Fostex. It has basic rhythms on it and a few sequencers. And that will possibly have a sync code on it that will
be triggering a Roland drum machine as well. This is the
first tour we've ever done where we're actually taking a fully-
fledged drum machine with us—so we can play on top of
that as well.
D: What sort of visuals can we expect?
C: The visuals at the moment are based around a video
tape which will be presented on a video screen; but we're
also bringing some 35 mm slides with us in case we get the
opportunity to use any slide projectors—and then John
Lacey will juxtapose them as well as the video tape.
D: Your new solo album, Mondobeat, had been released
here. Did Cosey have any involvement in that?
C: She participated in the production. DISCORDER
October 1985
Tamahnous Theatre
presents
CHEAP
.12 Mon-Sat 8:30 pm
THE VFMF & VECC present
v immense power
and passion!
Absolutely breathtaking!
OCTOBER 22 - 26 • 8 PM
Fred Curchack
^Stuff as Dreams
are Made On
j Oct 31 - Nov 9
y(f 8 PM
Two-for-One
Preview Oct 30
COMING A
UPI
TRIAL by Sally Clark
Masterpiece Music
BIM
IN THE GALLERY
JERRY RIVARD
Sept 29 - Oct 31
I
Realistic Watercolours
and
Pencil Drawings
254-9578
D: Does she plan any solo work in the future?
C: I'm not sure—Maybe you should ask her.
COSEY: No plans at the moment—I've been doing some
performance work here, mainly. That's about the only thing I
would think of releasing on video and then I would do music
to go with it. But we're not going to film any of our performances as such.
D: I'd like to talk a bit about collaborations. The liner notes to
Mondobeat mention a planned release of material done with
the Eurythmics. Has that materialized?
C: Yes. It was originally started in 1982, and then things
crescendoed for them, and then we went on tour, and then
they went on tour—but we finally got the okay to release it
from RCA. It will be released by Rough Trade on September
18.
"Throbbing Gristle won't work together
again. We just exhausted all the
possibilities."
D: It was hinted in a few articles I read that you were working with other groups such as Lustmord or Konstruktivits. Is
that so?
C: Yes. We did the one 12" with Lustmord (Conspiracy International, Vol. 2). We were wanting to put out his album on
Conspiracy, but we just don't have the money to do it. We
told him (Brian Lustmord) to keep it and mix it when he can
and give it to someone who could get it out as soon as
possible—because we didn't have the funds to do it
immediately.
D: How about Konstruktivits?
C: The same thing applies—because we're not a label as
such. We just brought Conspiracy in to cater to the more
unusual things that we do—collaboration-wise or on our
own. But Geln (Wallis) came to our studio and recorded his
new album here—and we'd really like to put it on our own
label; but we couldn't do him the credit that he deserves.
He's hoping to get it out on his own label—but via the
Cartel.
D: Some electronically-oriented groups seem to be hindered
by the new technology in that they become too clean and
homogenized and all start to sound the same. Why do you
think that is?
C: I don't know, really. I guess it's just a lack if imagination.
D: I'm a bit curious about your own feelings for your
releases. Heartbeat for example. Was that very difficult to do
without the rest of TG as your first independent effort?
C: No, it was very easy, actually. We recorded it very quickly
and it went really well. The only strange thing that happened
after TG split was when we did our first live show and we
went to a rehearsal before we went out to the gig and
started improvising. About 15 minutes in, we looked at each
other and we both realized that we were waiting for Genesis
to start. That was the only strange thing—but I'm glad we
did it in rehearsal because we got it out of our system and
after that it was great.
D: How about Trance? For me this was a return to the old
TG sound. Would you agree?
C: I don't know, because some people wonder whether it
sounds like TG or not and were 50% of TG—so bits and
pieces of TG are still there.
D: European Rendezvous—/ was very impressed with the
sound of this album. This was all live?
C: Yes—from the tour we did.
D: Is that a fair representation of what you sound like now in
a live gig?
C: I've no idea, because we haven't played live since then.
D: Psychic TV et al. seem to have gone in such a drastically CITR fm 102 cable 100
different direction from you—do you keep in touch with what
they are doing and vice versa?
C: I know Genesis played some of our records when he did
some DJ-ing in some of the clubs in London. That's quite
nice to hear—and his wife likes our music. I've asked Sleazy
for a copy of (Coil's) Scatology; but I haven't got one yet.
We're all still talking and everything.
D: What strikes me is that both you and Chris on the one
side, and Genesis and Sleazy on the other side seem to do
an awful lot of interesting collaborative work with other
people but there doesn't seem to be much between
yourselves anymore.
C: We won't work together again. We just exhausted all the
possibilities for each other and everything we had to offer
each other is no more.
D: What do you think of the directions music is heading
these days? Is there anything or anyone that excites you?
C: A really difficult one, that, because some days I'll listen
to something and I'll think "that's great" and then as soon
as someone asks me I forget. I can't think of anything that
just sort of jumps out at me at the moment. It's all a little bit
apathetic—especially in England.
D: That brings up an interesting point. Most of the
experimental groups in England and Europe seem to gain an
awful lot more acceptance in North America than they do at
home. Would you agree?
C: Yeah, I would.
D: Why?
C: In England people are so used to having things put on a
plate and put in front of them. And even sort of pigeonholed, and they're told what to think about it. It influences
people's attitudes. Mind you, there's a hell of a lot of decent
people in England as well—but what you end up with is the
fashionable crowd that zoom in on a gig.
D: Unfortunately that happens here too.
C: The popularity of music in England is very transient. You
make it onto the charts and you're there for about 2 or 3
years and then you're cabaret.
—Larry Thiessen
DISCOGRAPHY
Cassettes
Sinn & Form Cassette & Magazine (West Germany)
Sudden Surge of Power (Cause for Concern - U.K.)
Rising from the Red Sands Cassettes Vol. 1 & Vol. 4 (Third
Mind - U.K.)
Time to Tell Cassette & Magazine (Ian Dobson - U.K.)
CTI "Chris & Cosey" Live in Berlin 1983
CTI "Chris & Cosey" Live in Zurich 1983
The Space Between (Chris Carter) Third Mind - UK.)
Records
Heartbeat (Rough Trade - U.K.) November 1981
Trance (Rough Trade - U.K.) May 1982
Flowmotion LP (Ian Dobson - U.K.)
'Nicki" single (Japan) 1983
"October (Love Song)" single (Rough Trade - U.K.) 1983
Songs of Love & Lust (Rough Trade - U.K.) January 1984
Elemental 7 (Doublevision - U.K.) 1984
Hammerhouse - Conspiracy International Vol. 1 (CTI - U.K.)
1984
European Rendezvous Live (Doublevision - U.K.) 1984
Thy Gift of Tongues - Conspiracy International Vol. 2 (CTR -
U.K.) 1985
"Untitled" single (with the Eurythmics) (Rough Trade - U.K.)
September 1985
Archive LP - Scheduled for release in 1985
Mondobeat Conspiracy International Vol. 3 - Chris Carter
(CTI - U.K.) 1985
Techno-primitive - due for release by Warner Bros, Fall 1985 DISCORDER
October 1985
TOUCHE
an accent on
diversity
THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC is a unique place, an island
of 16th century French language and customs that is struggling to maintain its identity in the midst of an English-
speaking nation that is doing the same, vis-a-vis the United
States. Montreal, physically situated on an island, finds itself in
an equally unique position, musically and culturally, with a mix
of French and English found nowhere else on the continent, or
in the world, for that matter. So it stands to reason that they
would have a unique and interesting bilingual music scene,
right? Wrong, according to Touche.
any period of time. Disco and Top 40, along
with heavy metal, are very strong, but people go for that because they have nothing
to identify with, no music to reflect their
state of being in Montreal."
But what about Touche's inclusion in the
scene? Anonyme replies, "We've played at
Les Foufounes Electriques five times and
people, the media, are really reaching out.
Hopefully, in a couple of months, they will
classify Touche as...Touche! After all, we've
only been together six months, although in
those six months lots of things have happened to us."
It's really quite amazing that a six-month-
old band can embark on a cross-Canada
tour without so much as a packaged demo
tape, but these folks were received warmly
in every city they played. This speaks volumes for their ability to cross the language
barrier of their lyrics through an intense application of the universal language, music.
I asked Anonyme whether he thought that
the barrier might be too much to overcome
in the long run. "For the moment I'm not
expecting people to understand what I'm
saying. I don't think it matters so much what
I give out, it's how I give it out."
Without a doubt, this singer manages to
express himself more than adequately on
stage. One characteristic common to speakers of the Romance languages is the ability (some would call it an art) to speak with
their hands. With one of said appendages
grasping a microphone, Anonyme is left
with a single conduit for his non-verbal
TOUCHE, in case you've forgotten,
were here in late August for a series of
concerts at the Arts Club Lounge and
the Savoy, with a benefit at CRAB Beach
thrown in for good measure. They're a six-
piece—singer, bassist, guitarist, drummer,
alto and tenor saxophones—with no easy
musical definition. The most conspicuous
feature is their lyrics, provided by poet/
singer Anonyme Sansreget (literally, Anonymous Noregrets), which are 100% en fran-
cais. That's right folks, another language,
foreign to most of us. The year I spent in
Quebec taught me enough French to
understand what these people were singing about, or so I thought.
In fact, most of Anonyme's songs are
filled with colloquialisms and double-
entendres, making it tough even for some
Francophones to get a handle on his entire
message. The whole band speaks English,
so I wasn't forced to test my rusty French
during the interview. Stephen Nikleva, Red
Herring's guitar player, contributed his
technical musical knowledge to the interview, asking most of the questions pertaining to, well, musician-stuff.
The Roving Ear in last month's Discorder
covered the Montreal scene from the perspective of Deja Voodoo's guitar player (and
Anglophone) Gerard Van Herk. Touche's
guitarist, Stefan Delaney, provides a different viewpoint: "It's a state of confusion,
really, there is no underground establishment and only a handful of bands last for
communication. This proves to be enough.
In their show on CRAB Beach he had the
crowd in the palm of his hand, expressing
more emotion through body language than
many singers can with their voices. But
does this make Anonyme the band's
"leader?" Not as far as he's concerned.
"Sometimes we need an 'eteincelle'
(spark), but everybody is a leader with his
or her instrument. Often I will arrive with an
idea, but when the band accepts it, I no
longer think of it as 'my' idea. I like it this
way."
ANONYME is not a singer by trade,
though, and his poetry has always
been more important to him than his
music. Today, things have changed. "I want
to put a border between the band and my
solo poetry. I don't want to be known as a
poet with backup musicians, I want to be
a part of the band. Maybe one day, if I work
hard, I will be a good singer and remove
the idea of 'poet' when I get in front of the
microphone." The poetry integrates very
well with the music, as do all of the diverse
elements provided by the two-woman horn
and rock 'n roll rhythm sections. "The horn
section arranges its own lines," says Stefan.
"I generally do the basic arranging, the
structure of the song, but I never write for
anybody else's instrument. The fact that the
horns blend so well is a credit to their great
musicianship."
Stefan's jazz influences show up in the
complex guitar lines he writes, but the
amazing thing about Touche's music is the
manner in which different styles mesh to
create harmony. Jeff StTLouis, the drummer,
has played mostly in heavy metal and hardcore bands, while the bass player is a Rolling Stones fan. This become evident only
after close examination of the music,
because the overall sound is not even close
to either of these genres. In fact, Touche's
vibrant, but unclassifiable sound is only
part of the reason that they feel their success in Quebec is imminent. I was extremely surprised to find out that they are one of
a precious few Quebec bands, in an alter- native vein, who sing in their native tongue.
Anonyme explains it this way: "Well, we
should start before the Parti Quebecois
became the government in 1976. We had
lots of French bands then but the message
was always the same. Songs were about
this country called Quebec, that they
wanted to be separate from Canada. When
the PQ came to power, the people thought
that they'd won the fight, that they didn't
have to sing in French to affirm their culture
anymore. For five or six years, I've been telling people everywhere I go that the first
good band to come along with French lyrics
will find the door very large. This made our
decision to sing in French extremely difficult."
To this Stefan adds: "We're walking on
land that hasn't been walked on for so
long...the grass is high, the trees hav(
grown, and there's nobody there.""
THEY DON'T FEEL like maintaining*
this pioneer spirit for very long, however, that's the kind of thing that could
break a band's artistic back. They would
like to use their successful tour as an example for fellow French musicians to follow.
Anonyme sums up their feelings this way:
"Perhaps, when people ask us how our tour
went, our answers can help change things.
'Oh yeah? They do that in Regina?', they'll
say. Before we left, people told us that we
were committing a kind of suicide. All the
songs are in French, they won't like you,
they won't understand you, they won't come
to see you!'. I was uncertain then, I hoped
for a warm reception but what we received
has been incredible!"
We went on to discuss the precarious
state of Quebec politics, with the return of
Robert Bourassato the provincial Liberals,
the power vacuum created by Rene Leves-
que's departure, and the possible effects on
the artistic community. Anonyme confided
that "...maybe I'm more separatist than I
think, but we in Quebec need a stronger
mental border between us and the Americanism around us. When you are surrounded by the English and American mentality,
you feel that...that maybe it's better that you
not elect Robert Bourassa." So much for
politics.
Quebec is home to some of my happiest
memories and Touche's positive attitude,
their Gallic confidence and sincerity,
brought back the feelings I got from most
of the Quebecois I encountered. Pierre
Vallieres' "white niggers of America" are no
more, it seems, and in their place we find
a people who have come a long way in
search of an identity and who have gained
enough security to continue that search.
Touche, through the musical celebration of
the French language, and through their efforts to expose this to their fellow Quebecois, are an integral part of the cultural and
artistic aspects of the furthering of the
French-Canadian's lot. Moi, j'ai fini, mais
Touche va continuer.
—Jason Grant
°*
mnMEMMmmm
*
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BrilliantOrahge
Keel hauls theRecord Biz
THERE IS A GAME played by adolescent boys. One boy
says to another, "Excuse me, there's a spot on your shirt,"
and then points to the area where the spot is supposed
to be. Being naturally concerned with his physical appearance,
the second boy looks down at the front of his shirt to see the
spot and...WHACK!!...finds himself being tapped under the
chin.
The whole activity is basically good clean fun if you're 15,
broke and stupid...it's not the sort of thing the singer of a
good but relatively unknown band would, or should, do to the
president of a major record company. Except that Graham
Brown, the singer of the good but relatively unknown Brilliant
Orange, did just that to the president of Sire Records.
"I wanted this guy to remember me," says Brown of his
actions on that warm summer evening aboard the Hollybum,
as K.D. Lange and Brilliant Orange went Boating with Bud,
along with a bunch of water-born music lovers.
BROWN PEERS OUT from behind
the omnipresent glasses as he gleefully relates this tweeking of the nose
of the record biz. We're sitting in the Pender
Street loft that Brilliant Orange calls a practice space, and as drummer Rick Vee
comes in he voices his concern for a
grounded seabird of some variety in the
lane outside. Brown, guitarist Mark Findler,
and I follow Vee outside to investigate.
"What kind is it?"
"I dunno...a Cormorant maybe?"
A decision is made to phone the SPCA
and we return to the loft to continue the
interview. "Mark and I started Brilliant
Orange about 10 months ago," explains
Brown. "A mutual friend introduced us one
night at the Railway Club, knowing we were
both looking for projects." Previously the
athletic Brown had lived in Edmonton and
played there in a moderately successful
band, Junior Gone Wild. Findler will admit
only to having lived in North Van for many
years and to having skiied a lot while there.
When prodded, Findler adds that his biggest musical influence is Kiss—'No, no, just
kidding." He later added that he thought of
AC/DC as a good, honest, live act and that
he liked "intelligent bands...that's why I
I ike... AC/DC" (I dunno, he seemed like a
reasonably intelligent guy for the rest of the
interview.) For the first five months Brilliant
Orange was Findler and Brown practicing,
writing, getting ready to record a demo.
"The name Brilliant Orange came about
because, well...we think of ourselves as fairly brilliant fellows," says Brown modestly.
"We do?" inquires Findler.
"Sure we do," replies Brown, "and
orange is everywhere."
"Yes...I see...AAARRRGGGHHH..." I
replied as their orange kitten clawed at the
orange pen in my hand.
So much for the name.
THE DEMO WAS recorded and sent
off to CITR where two tracks, the irre-
pressibly upbeat Happy Man and the
country-tinged sagebrush saga Shotguns,
Cacti and Vengeance went to #1. With the
songs receiving airplay, Findler and Brown
recruited Vee and bassist Dave Glenn.
Beyond his credentials as the saviour of our fine feathered friends, Vee will only reveal
that he grew up in Calgary playing the
drums and listening to CFCN, the local Top
40 station.
Mr. Glenn was, sadly, absent from the interview so we'll have to take the word of the
others that Dave is (a) "weird", (b) "a funny
guy", (c) "kind of psychotic.no, that not
fair", (d) "no, actually Dave's very intelligent", and (e) that "he plays bass very
well". We are further informed that if he had
been present Glenn would have said things
like "I want everything, but I don't know
where to put'it," and "this isn't a band (or
an interview), this is a festival."
WITH THE LINEUP complete, Brilliant Orange debuted at the Town
Pump, opening for Bob's Your
Uncle. Since then they've played a variety
of clubs as well as making an appearance
at the Commodore, supporting Poisoned at
a Food Bank benefit.
"We just want to play some honest songs
and avoid just going through the moves,"
says Brown of the live show. "I believe I'm
up there to entertain people, but I think that
if we have a good time, it'll rub off on the
audience."
More likely to move the audience is the
band's vibrant ringing sound, vaguely reminiscent of REM meeting XTC in an alphabet soup of musical experience. There is
a definite rootsy feeling in the band's music,
with the chiming of Findler's Rickenbacker
bouncing off Brown's acoustic work and
Glenn adding his voice to the other two to
further brighten the sound.
Front and center in the band is Brown,
described by the others as the anarchist of
the band. He is, to say the least, a curious
character. He claims to sleep only four
hours every two days, and when asked
about the ubiquitous Lennon glasses replies, half in jest, "I'm scared of the
crowd...I'm afraid they might see my eyes
...see something I don't want them to see."
An unusual confession from someone who
seems as concerned with honesty in music
as he does.
Yet the honesty does come across on
stage. And we shall soon see if Brilliant
Orange can bring it across on vinyl. An EP
featuring recorded versions of Happy Man
and Shotguns... along with two other songs
should be released this month. After that
it'll be off on the road, visiting Brown and
Vee's hometowns as well as points further
east. The familiar slog. You'd think there
would be an easier way.
"Excuse me sir, but there's a spot on your
shirt."
WHACK! —Pat Carroll
CITR MOBILE SOUND
What You Want, Where You Want It!
From Neanderthal cave stomps
cha-cha, CITR can deliver
It right to your next party
with Its Mobile Sound System.
And the rates are great!
CITR MOBILE SOUND  228-3017 DISCORDER
October 1985
PROGRAM
I
HIGH PROFILES
8:00 pm:
five nfehts a week
01 Tues.
XTC
03 Thur.
Top of the Bops
04 fri.
Don Bulls California
7:15 pm Football: UBC vs.
Alberta
07 Mon.
T-Bone Bumette
OB Tues.
Young Fresh Fellows
10 Thur.
Top of the Bops
11 Fri.
David johansen
12 Sat
Sex and Bestiality Pt. I
A four-cassette compilation
(issued by Bain Total, 1984) of
experimental, industrial elec
tronic music featuring a
multitude of European bands
(Recluse Organisation, Smersh,
Smegma, Sleep Chamber, Die
Musik) on fndepftndant labels.
"Dedicated to Genesis R Or
ridge."
14 Mon.
Flaming Croovies Pt. 1
15 Tues.
Grapes of Wrath
17 Thur.
Top of the Bops
18 fri.
7:15 pm Football: UBC vs.
Manitoba
19 Sat
Sex and Bestiality Pt. II
21 Mon.
Flaming Croovies Pt. H
22 Tues.
Mitch Easter-The Man The
Myth
24 Thur.
Top of the Bops
25 fri.
Floyd's Favourites
26 Sat.
Sex and Bestiality Pt. Ill
28 Mon.
The 3 O'Clock
29 Tues,
6:30 p.m The Cramps-a
3-hour special
31 Thur.
Top of the Bops
WEEKDAY REGULARS    1
7:30 am   Sign-On
8:00 am   WAKE-UP REPORT
News, sports and weather.
10:00 am BREAKFAST REPORT
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEW and INSIGHT.
imprn   LUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
AFTERNOON SPORTS8REAK
DINNER MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEWS, INSIGHT
and a DAILY FEATURE.
Sign-Off
4:30 pm
6:0V pm
4:00 am
WEEKDAY HIGHLIGHTS
MONDAYS
MONDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
7:15-10:00 am
7:15-8:00 MusicMusicMusic and lift off.
8:00-9:00 News/Music/News/Music/News
9:00-10:00Theatre of the Mind...is about fill
ing one hour with one idea. Produced by E.S.I. Special production
by Patrice Leslie.!
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00 pm-1.00 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time Jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview, and local music news.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
07 Oct.  Gary Bartz and the NTU Troop. Taifa
and Harlem Bush Music: two albums
that combine vocals, chants, Afro-
American socio-politics and excellent
Jazz led by one of the leading post-
Coltrane saxophonists. Gary Bartz
(alto and soprano saxophones) with
his NTU Troop and vocalist Andy
Bey.
14 Oct.  Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers.
Art Blakey's dynamic young band as
they sounded with both Marsalis
brothers...Wynton (trumpet) and
Branford (alto saxophone). Recorded
in 1982 at San Francisco's Keystone
Korner.
21 Oct.  Something different, an album by
the great Julian "Cannonball" Ad-
derley in a speaking role. Cannon-
ball presents (with musical examples)
a History of Jazz; from its beginning
to 1960, when the album was
recorded. One of the best and most
entertaining histories of this music.
Musical academics should check this
out.
28 Oct. The Art of The Ballad. Great perfor-
mances by various Jazz artists playing ballads. Slow, sad, sweet, sensual
playing by many of "the greats". Hear
Lester Young, Miles Davis, Thelon-
ious Monk, John Coltrne, Sonny
Rollins, etc...
TUESDAYS
DOG'S BREAKFAST
7:30-11:00 am
A goulash of aural surprises and "Over the
Fence" radio drivel some time around 9:00.
Special orders will be taken. Your waiter: Paul
Funk.
PLAY LOUD
Late night 1:00 4:00 am
Difficult for the sake of being difficult. The
diverse noise of repressed creation. Your
worst fears realized. Aural surgery performed
by CITR's resident misanthrope, Larry
Thiessen. October low-life high-lights:
01 Oct.  TBA (Maybe a lot of Whitehouse if
he's feeling mean.)
08 Oct. The Case for Brevity-Music especially composed or performed for one
minute (or less). Jarring. A show for
confirmed caffeine freaks. Make
arrangements now to be out of
town for this one.
15 Oct.  Adrian Sherwood—a tribute to the
mastermind behind the sound of
ON-U Records—who brought us
Mark Stewart and Maffia, Annie
Anxiety etc. etc.
22 Oct. Local—an examination of some well-
known and not so well known local
artists. Several debut airings.
29 Oct.  Hallowe'en. A repeat of the Psychic
TV special with many new and
added demons.
WEDNESDAYS
PARTY WITH ME, PUNKER!
4:00-6:00 pm
This popular show specializes in music
described, for lack of better words, as "hardcore punk." But we also like and play garage
bands, guitar-oriented bands, and occasionally Swahili-electro-salsa-funk. With the irrepressible Mike Dennis and co-hosts Andrea
Gamier and Kamel Gill.
02 Oct.  Tea and Crumpets with the Spores.
09 Oct. Andrea picks the hits.
16 Oct.  Husker Du Day.
23 Oct.  Andrea rocks out.
30 Oct. SHAM 69 Live.
JUST LIKE WOMEN
6:20-7:30 pm
Woman, heal thyself with Ann and Lil's
remedy for the Old Boys' Network: an hour
of news, interviews, and music. A shot in the
arm for all women, and for any man who
likes them.
THE KNIGHT AfTER
Midnight to 4:00 am
Music to clobber Yuppies by-featuring radio
shows traded with alternative stations in
Europe and the U.S. This show will really
mess up your BMW!
02 Oct.  La Voix du Lezard from Paris
09 Oct.  Radio SORDIDE form Normandy
15 Oct.  Made in Australia from Sydney
23 Oct.  Radio LAOLIN from the Loire Valley
30 Oct.  Radio KOLN from Germany
THURSDAYS
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00-9:00 pm
Top of the Bops approaches rock'n'roll from
the broader perspective of its roots in country country swing and rockabilly as well as
R&B, jump blues and doo wop.
MEL BREWER PRESENTS
11:00 pm-Midnight
We're never quite sure who Mel Brewer will
send our way each week, but he inevitably
comes through with somebody. In past
months we've featured the Enigmas, Lost
Durangos, Bolero Lava, Ripchords, 54/40,
Animal Slaves, Go Four 3, Chris Houston, Bill
of Rights,   and, of course, the Rock Critics.
FRIDAYS
FRIDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
7:30-10:30 am
Stirrings—A radio program that focuses on current
revolutions of the heart and mind. Issues covered
will include Native issues (Stein Valley), Women's
issues (Dub Poets), Anthropological explorations u
CITR fm 102 cable 100
D
(discovering the Secrets of the Shaman), and interviews with cultural types. This month: Malopoets,
Steel Pulse, Mark Isham and, of course, the unexpected. Get it inside you. Host and Researcher:
Kirby Hill.
POWER CHORD
5:00-6:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring
the underground alternative to mainstream
metal: local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities, plus album give-aways.
THE BIG SHOW
9:00 pm-midnight
Why pay money to get into a nightclub on a
Friday night? If Big InternationAl can't get you
dancing, no-one can.
THE VISITING PENGUIN SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Interviews with local musicians and artists,
the newest sounds at CITR, your personal requests and even golden oldies. What more
could you want? Hosted by Andreas Kitz-
mann and Sheri Walton.
WEEKEND REGULARS
7:30 am   Sign-On (Saturdays)
8:00 am   Sign-On (Sundays)
Noon        BRUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
8:00 pm   SAT/SUN. MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather, plus
GENERIC REVIEW, analysis of
current affairs and special features.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
WEEKEND HIGHLIGHTS
SATURDAYS
THE FOLK SHOW
10:30 am-Noon
Host Steve Edge presents a wide range of
folk music, extending from the latest U.K.
Rogue-Folk through to all kinds of traditional
music from Canada, U.S.A., the British Isles
and just about anywhere else. Plus the latest
U.K. soccer results at 11 a.m.
NEOFILE
Noon-4:00 pm
Join CITR's music directors as they take you
through the station's new and exciting Spin
List. Turn to page 21 for your own copy.
PROPAGANDA!
6:30-9:30 pm
An eclectic mix of interviews, reviews, music,
humour, High Profiles, and other features
with Mike Johal. Operator Don Miller; Production Stacey Fruin.
Hi Profiles
26 Oct.  Prince Far I
Interviews
05 Oct. Joolz — poet and actress from northern England (who is also performing tonight at Gangland Studio, 1715
Cook St.)
12 Oct. Michael Harding — a chat with this
local performance artist whose rigue
public performances have   •
sometimes had him arrested!
19 Oct.  Trisha Roche — a worker with
Development and Peace who has
recently returned from Nicaragua.
Features
05 Oct.  AEIOU - political satire with the Artists Educational Iconoclastic
Organization (Un-)limited.
12 Oct.  citizen Kane — Propaganda!^ Brent
Kane interviews Kevin Zed.
Umkonto We Sizwe! — (Spear of the
Nation!) Propaganda! delves into the
reality of oppression in South Africa.
This month, profiles of Nelson
Mandela and the late Steve Biko.
19 Oct.  AEIOU
26 Oct.  Umkonto We Sizwe!
PYJAMA PARTY
9:00 pm-1.00 am
Your hosts Mike Mines and Robin Razzell
present everything from ambient music for
snoozing to upbeat tunes for popcorn and
pillow fights.
TUNES 'R' US
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Music, Music, Music, Handyman Bob, Music,
Music, My Favorite Album, Music, Music,
Experimental To Classical, Teddy Kelowna
presents, and yes more music. R.I.P to Music
From The Tarpits.
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
8:00 am-Noon
20th Century music in the classical tradition-
Mahler to Medernal, Scriabin to Xenakis, all
styles, media, and nationalities. Hosts: Lynn
Price and Paul Smith.
ROCKERS SHOW
Noon-3:00 pm
The best in reggae with host George Family
Man Barrett, Jerry the Special Selector, the
Major Operator, and Collin the Prentice.
06 Oct.  Sunsplash review
13 Oct.  Ras Michael and the Sons of Negus
20 Oct.  Reggae Dub Poets
27 Oct.  Messenjah
SOUL GALORE
3:00-4:30 pm
Focusing on Black-American popular music of
this century, this program takes you from the
birth of the blues through doo-wop, soul and
funk, from Massachusetts to California and
everywhere in between.
THE AFRICAN SHOW
4:30-6:00 pm
A program featuring African music and
culture with hosts Todd Langmuir, Patrick
Onukwulu and Dido. Tune in for the latest
news from Africa, plus special features at
5:00 pm.
NEITHER HERE NOR THERE
6:30-8:00 pm
Relevance? What relevance? Music, interviews,
comedy and readings of prose and poetry
with hosts Chris Dafoe and Paris Simons.
SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE
8:00-9:00 pm
FAST FORWARD
9:00 pm-1.00 am
Probably Vancouver alternative radio's most
alternative show. Mark Mushet searches the
world over for experimental, minimalist,
avant-garde, electronic, and other non-
mainstream sounds.
06 Oct.  One show a month set aside for
surprises?
13 Oct.  After the fact with Chris and Cosey
(CTI with John Lacey). Interview and
music with this most pleasant pair of
individuals.
20 Oct. Mr. Marital Aid reads selected original
works of prose and poetry. Improvised
prose, Furious Boys, and more.
27 Oct.  Given the success of Augusts live mix
of contributed tapes, a Radio Performance Collective called "Various Artists" has been formed. Founding
members: Mark Mushet, Larry
Thiessen, Greg Nixon, Clemens Rettich.
Others are welcome to join.
THE EARLY MUSIC SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Join host Ken Jackson for music from the
Renaissance and Baroque periods, presented
at an appropriately early hour. This month's
highlights:
07 Oct.  Hanacpachap Cussicuinin by Juan
Perez, Bocanegra (Lima, Peru)
14 Oct.  Francois Couperin
21 Oct.   11th to 13th Century Troubadours
28 Oct.  W.A. Mozart-Symphony No. 40 per
formed by the Acadmey of Ancient
Music
LIVE THUNDERBIRD SPORTS BROADCASTS
FOOTBALL
Sat 05 Oct, 7:15 pm
UBC T-Birds vs. Alberta Golden Bears
Fri. 18 Oct., 7:15 pm
UBC T-Birds vs. Manitoba Bisons
Fri. 25 Oct., 4:45 pm
UBC T-Birds vs. Calgary Dinosaurs
BASKETBALL
The Buchanan Classic
UBC TBirds vs. SFU Clansmen
Fri. 08 Nov., 8:15 pm (game 1)
Sat. 09 Nov., 7:45 $>m (game 2)
Tues. 12 Nov., 8:15 pm (game 3-
if necessary) DISCORDER
October 1985
Vinyl    Verdict
Skinny Puppy
Bites
Nettwerk
LET'S SAY A FEW NICE THINGS ABOUT
Nettwerk shall we? Under the direction of
Terry McBride, Nettwerk has quickly established
a reputation of being one of the most highly
organized and image-conscious record labels in
North America. The packaging is first rate, the
pressings are outstanding, and the live presentation of Nettwerk are imaculately produced.
There is certainly a great deal of creative opportunism at werk here. Well done.
Now, let's say a few nasty things about Skinny
Puppy, the juggernaut of Nettwerk's latest promotional thrust. Contrived. Horribly plagiarized.
Pretentious. Dreary. Silly. Embarrassing. Infantile. And all this to be found in Vancouver's most
unlikely teenybop fave rave. But then, maybe they
hope to superceded Wham! Some people really need the wind taken out of their sales (sic).
Skinny Puppy top my list if only because they
promise to put Vancouver on the map as "the
little town that couldn't produce anything of origin
or substance."
Skinny Puppy were first brought to my attention in the spring of 1984. Kevin Crompton gave
me number 12 in an "extremely" limited edition
run of cassettes. The tape was called Back and
Forth and the insert gave open credit to the influence of Britian's Nocturnal Emissions, Portion
Control, and the Legendary Pink Dots. The credit
was crucial to the integrity of the tape because
all of the music was solely derived from those
three groups.
At the time, I was just happy to see that there
was a healthy interest in the independent, mail
music nettwerk. Since that time, the pups have
had visions of stars (themselves) and 6 by 2%-
inch pieces of paper with portraits of various
prime ministers and the odd monarch on them.
They've also seen fit to don the musical blinkers and pursue the wholesale theft of every
hackneyed sound and image produced by Britain's failing "industrial" softcore dancebeat
scene. Plagiarism is often difficult to avoid in the
world of pop music, but here we are dealing with
out and out robbery right down to the graphic
images that accompany the disc.
What I suspect is that Skinny Puppy hope to
repackage and sell the oh-so-demonic-and-
threatening "industrial" dancebeat sound to a
North American market that is, at best, only
peripherally aware of the originals. The "originals" in this case refers to Potion Control,
Cabaret Voltaire, Nocturnal Emissions, Legendary Pink Dots, Severed Heads, and, to a minor
degree, Chris and Cosey. What many of these
groups once had to offer was a musical look at
such pertinent subjects as the power of suggestion, abuse of popular mediums through disinformation, violence, deviant forms of sexuality,
etc. etc. Now, the lure of the might disco thudbeat
has supplanted all of this and many of this school
of music are quite justly accused of being excessively pretentious pop bands (Cabaret Voltaire
being the most revolting). And to think that Skinny Puppy arrived on the scene after all this.
"Social Deception" indeed!
To give you an idea of just how creatively
bankrupt (read corrupt) Skinny Puppy actually
are; the opening track, "Assimilate," was "produced and mixed" by the Severed Heads' Tom
Ellard when he was in town this past June. What
this actually means is that the pups came up with
a very simple synth riff in the studio then promptly arrived at an impasse. Mr. Ellard then comes
in, by invitation, and proceeds to work out the
rest of the idea. The resulting track comes up
Severed Heads all over. One listen to Tom's previous tape work will easily suffice.
What is even more amazing is that the opening track on side 2 begins with a tape of a man
talking about his head being cut off, this being
awfully reminiscent of "Dead Eyes Opened" from
the Severed Heads' Since the Accident LP. The
audible references to other groups don't end
there. I don't want to mention all of those groups
again, but given the striking lack of originality
in the Puppy sound and the fact that Puppy can't
even muster enough technique to blur the glaring audio piracy, I may have no choice.
This brings us to the overall sound and hence,
lack of technique and originality. Skinny Puppy
are working with an analog mentality in a digital
environment. The aforementioned groups that so
entranced the pups into blind worship used every
basic analog tape technique to produce much
of their best work. These guys, on the other hand,
are working and recording in a state-of-the-art
studio with the latest digital synths and sampling capability.
And what do they do in this luxurious position
you ask? Well, besides the incessant and annoying disco thudbeat, they choose to use this wonderful, untapped resource to produce sounds
that are so cliched it is pitiful. D-d-d-d-d-digital
delay galore! Other sounds, such as some variable speed tape work, have needlessly tied up
some incredibly potent technology while they
could have, or should have, been produced with
analog facilities. Then again, if Loverboy can use
a Fairlight...
Then there's the question of the vocals and
lyrical content of the Puppy sound. Does anyone
remember those Bugs Bunny episodes that
featured the Tazmanian devil? Growly vocals!
Oooooh, SCARY! There has never been a voice
of so many limitations in this city's history. Death
death death. Please Kevin, sorry, Nivek, experience it first-hand before ranting about it here on
the horrifying and depressing West Coast.
Now, on to the cover graphics. What we have
here is the careful gleaning of the latest trend
in European cover designs. It is far too similar
to the Neville Brody/Crammed Discs school of
ambiguous, beautifully obscured images. The
two obvious reference points there would be
Brody's cover for 23 Skidoo's Seven Songs LP
or, despite the difference in release timing, the
cover of the new Steven Brown/Benjamin Lew LP
on Belgium's Crammed Discs label. Once again,
no shortage of originality here. One problem is
the recurring skeletal remains theme (suitably
obscured, of course) that little boys find so fascinating. This is symptomatic of Skinny Puppy's
blatantly contrived obsession with death that
culminates in the strained attempt at perversity
in the "thank you" column. And just what did
Roman Polanski have to do with the production
of Bites? Thirteen-year-old girls? You wish, guys.
But then again, how is the Joi-gel and Juicy Fruit
set to know about all this?
Many people have told me, "Ah, they're just
a bunch of opportunists. Leave them alone." Well, CITR fm 102 cable 100
I'm sorry, but it goes a little deeper than that.
Skinny Puppy pretend to have an independent,
"new music" integrity and credibility that can
only be said to be diametrically opposed to what
they are actually doing; i.e. ripping off the other
parties I've oft mentioned in order to become
"underground" rock stars and sell this "new"
sound to North American ears. If you are going
to enter the commercial arena then go all the
way, and play by their rules.
In the long run, Skinny Puppy will be the downfall of Nettwerk's credibility. Nettwerk does have
the potential to be one truly brilliant organization,
provided the likes of these clowns don't ruin it
for them. Part and parcel? Let's hope not. There,
chew on that one, Tindy.
—Mark Mushet
Hugh Masekela
Waiting For The Rain
Jive Afrika
Various Artists
An Afflicted Man's
Musica Box
United Dairies (UK)
THESE RECORDS WERE MEANT FOR
decidedly different ends. One starts from
what is, to many of us, unfamiliar terrain, at least
geographically. Its basis is from outside our musical culture, but its purpose is to achieve proximity. This happens through a sort of structural
mutation, into something which is recognizably
digestable. The other has its origins from within
our culture, but yearns to be outside of it. It
achieves its distance by stretching itself—to an
extent where recognizable support and structure,
being found useless, are shed. So, with the listener (and, in particular, the reviewer) caught in
the middle, these two discs sort of point in the
same direction. Let's get to the point.
The first record is by Hugh Masekela, who
plays flugelhorn and trumpet, sings, and produces. Waiting For The Rain is a stylish blend of
African flavour, but there are obvious Western
jazz, pop, and structural collisions. Feel is not
lost in the process, but the album works best
when it leans blacker than whiter. Choice cuts
are "Lady," "Politician," and "Run No More," although the others have their moments and virtues. The first features a soaring vocal line firmly footed by some solid bass and torso-twisting
percussion. "Lady" was written by Fela Aniku-
lapo Kuti, who is currently imprisoned in Nigeria.
fcf-   10? 33s
S
-T     X     T      L-   et LAvBC
GRAPES OF WRATH
TALKING HEADS
CABARET VOLTAIRE
THE DAMNED
NEW MODEL ARMY
THE MEKONS
VARIOUS
A.K.O.B.
VARIOUS
MALOPOETS
A WESTERN FRONT
PLAN 9
MANU DIBANGO
SHRIEKBACK
BENJAMIN LEW/
STEVEN BROWN
GENE LOVES JEZEBEL
September Bowl of Green
Little Creatures
Drinking Gasoline
Phantasmagoria
No Rest For The Wicked
Fear & Whiskey
This Is Hot!
Explosion Blues
Shindig!
Malopoets
Off to the Angels
I've Killed a Man..
Electric Africa
Oil and Gold
A Propos D'Un Paysage
Immigrant
NETTWERK
WEA
VIR/POLYGRAM
MCA (UK)
CAPITOL
REDRHINO (UK)
HOT (AUSTRALIA)
UNDERGROWTH
ZULUBIRD
CAPITOL
ORANGE (US)
MIDNIGHT (US)
CELLULOID (US)
ISLAND/MCA
CRAMBOY (NETH)
SITU2 (UK)
cSpiA/USf   fo?4?:
A   R.   T    OT    3
THE WOODENTOPS
BRILLIANT ORANGE
OMNISQUID
LOST DURANGOS
HANDSOME NEDS
THE CURE
ROCKING FOOLS
THE CULT
DILETTANTES
TOUCHE
DAF
SLY & ROBBIE
THE ADULT NET
THE FALL
BUSTIN
^   i_ e      tAeet
Well Well Well/Get It On
Shotguns, Cacti, & Vengenace
Spontaneous Human
Combustion
Visions/I've Seen the Rain
In Spite of the Danger
In Between Days
Steady Job
She Sells Sanctuary
Theme/Dunkel Augen
Animal/..dune Autre Planet
Absolute Body Control
Bass & Trouble/Black Satin
Incense & Peppermints
Rollin' Danny/Couldn't.
Think About It
ROUGHTRADE (UK)
"DEMO"
"DEMO**
"DEMO**
"DEMO"
FICTION (UK)
EAST SIDE
BGRSBQUT (UK)
"DEMO"
"DEMO"
ILLUMINAT (UK)
ISLAND/MCA
BGRSBQT (UK)
BGRSBQT (UK)
STREETHEART(BRD)
T FORWARD NEW RELE
ARTIST
PAUL DOLDEN
NURSE WITH WOUND
VARIOUS
CHRIS AND COSEY
VARIOUS
SHOCK HEADED PETERS
VARIOUS
VARIOUS
KEVIN GODSOE
GREG NIXON
VARIOUS
TITLE
Veils (15 ips reel)
The Sylvie and Babs High
Thigh Companion (L.P.)
Music with Memory - Tellus
#9 (cassette compilaton)
Techno Primitives (L.P.)
Continuous Live Mix of
Tapes Submitted by a Variety
of Vancouver Based Artists*
The Kissing of Gods (E.P.)
The Security Show
(cassette compilation)
The Fight Is On (LP.)
Picture Postcards (cassette)
Flexible Packaging Plant
(cassette)
Various (Various)
LABEL
SPERMBANK(VAN)
LAYLAH (HOLL)
TELLUS/PASS(US)
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
FASTFUCK(VAN)
BENELUX (UK)
REALSOON(VAN)
LAYLAH (BELG)
GODSOE (VAN)
UNDERGROWTH (VAN)
VARIOUS (VARIOUS)
*lf you wish to submit tapes to be used as part of a series of scheduled and spontaneous live mixes,
contact Mark Mushet at 669-0398. All submissions will be given due credit. Voice and sound beds
of an abstract nature will be much appreciated, though tapes of found sound and indiscreet
conversation will be needed as well. Thank you. October 1985
WflMKURlllttftHtE
IW/ftJRtt
RKURMttKMt
a
s
tMWicqtawTH'ee.
1 Over the years, Fela has had home-burnings,
I beatings, and other unpleasantries in return for
I saying things that the Nigerian government, it
J seems, would rather have unsaid. The next track
j is Masekela's aptly angry "Politician." "Tonight"
I is slightly embarassing, either because of an
I absence of pretense, or because it's completely
I contrived. The side is rounded off by an instru-
| mental, "The Joke of Life", which is all right in
j itself, but rather uncomfortably reminds me of
1 Chuck Mangione. It's cuts like these two that
| sound suspicious in their slickness, Masekela
I seeming a bit too eager to please. The album
j was recorded in Botswana, but most of the in-
I struments are Western, albeit well-played. All in
I all, a fairly satisfying affair; not for everyone, but
| probably intended to be. It's worth checking out,
f though, particularly in light of its price.
1
Ad
www* m
ft.*   1     ?.5HLCOROoYfl
VCTUMft
More expensive, and perhaps expansive, is An
Afflicted Man's Musica Box. This compilation consists of Foetus In Your Bed, Nurse With Wound,
Operating Theatre, Jacques Berrocal, Anima,
and Amm. The names of the artists are indicative
of the disc's contents although, surprisingly, the
tamer tracks are provided by those with nastier
names. The first track is Berrocal's. I was well
into the song before I realized that I was still
waiting for it to start. Instead, it built, mercilessly, harmonically, in tension, the percussion finally
splashing and smashing non-metrically until the
halt. Next up was Anima, whose songs are titled
simply with the instruments used in them. "Violin
Fuchshorn" started with some very annoying
violin, coupled with a couple of coughs. A trumpet, or, I guess, fuchshorn, joined in, providing
a maniacal counterpoint. The Foetus in Your Bed
material is highlighted by some out-of-time percussion which can make you lose your balance.
The other side starts with AMM's "Commonwealth institute 20-4-67" which is a real seat-
shifter. Basically, it sits there and makes you uncomfortable. Eventually, you feel a forceful urge
to take the record off; it's kind of like holding your
breath.
Probably the most predictable thing about this
album is the speed it spins at. It's a record to
put on when you want to be alone, because
everyone else will probably leave the room.
"While Waiting For The Rain" tends to draw the
listener groove, An Afflicted Man's Musica Box
is a toe- and face-clenching experience. Still, I
found it enjoyable, worthwhile, and challenging
listening. Others will finds its atonal adventurous-
ness vile and pointless. It's a relief to know,
though, that these artists are able to vent their
anxieties in a non-violent manner; although, !
wonder if the person pictured on the cover listens
to this music because he's afflicted, or if it's the
other way around. I'm gonna find out, I guess.
—Don Chow OCTOBER 1, 2 & 3, 1985
THE RETURN OF
TUPELO CHAIN SEX
FEATURING DON "SUGARCANE" HARRIS
Sp~
[:'
W*.
I
'*      %         .        X .,
with guests
OCTOBER 1 & 2    THE DILLETANTE8
OCTOBER 3    TARTAN HAGGIS
ADVANCE TICKETS $5. 6 BUCKS AT THE DOOR.
SAVOY CABARET • GASTOWN
October
4/5 THE DILETTANTES with THE PSYCHOBUNNIES
11/12 Surprise Guests
18/19 FRANKFRM5
25/26 CHRIS HOUSTON from Toronto
I LIVE MUSIC IN THE LOUNGE I
|   FRIDAYS FROM 10:50-SATURDAYS FROM 11:30 P.M.
ARTS CLUB THEATRE 1181 SEYMOUR 683-0151
MARTIAN PASSION
No.3 IN THE SERIES
AVAILABLE OCTOBER 1985
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620 E. Broadway (rear)      875-1869 or Pager 645-0126 DISCORDER
October 1985
THIS MONTH, DEMO DERBY GOES
international with two, non-public releases
from the U.K. Don't ask me how we got a
hold of them; I just write this stuff. Also, there
are a number of demos from local bands who
have yet to play live. This in itself is an exciting
phemonenon because the experience that these
groups gain in the studio should make any future
recordings all the more enjoyable. Eventually,
though, they will have to prove themselves in a
more public arena. But enough yammering! On
to the reviews...
THE ROOM
"A Shirt Of Fire"
Some demo. This sounds like it was recorded
in a 48-track digital studio in L.A. (compared to
the other demos), and has college radio hit written all over it. The Room, an English group,
records on Red Flame/10 Records, and this is
an obvious attempt by them to achieve some financial success (not with the demo, but the inevitable single). The song is a clean, full-sounding
pop tune with enough high-end guitar solos (a
la psychedelia) to keep commercial radio programmers at a safe distance. The Room is following the same path as Echo, The Cure and Siouxsie; not so much in the sound, but rather in the
feeling surrounding this song. These three bands
share very little musically with The Room, but
their road to mass acceptance began, like The
Room, with critical acclaim and relative musical
inaccessibility. There is one band that this song
compares with favorably, and some CITR listeners might remember them, another English
group named Jasmine Minks, who have one
mini-LP to their credit. If the Minks follow The
Room, they just may end up with a bit of money.
THE CHAMELEONS
"Nathan's Phrase"
This English band would probably be quite
upset if they knew that we were playing this. The
Chameleons have established themselves as
quality recording artists and a rough, tinny mix
like Nathan's Phrase does nothing for their reputation, except to show what they might have
sounded like in the garage four or five yers ago,
or at a pub gig without a soundcheck. Bands like
The Chameleons need the wizardry of good production facilities to bring out their best, especially
since their sound has progressed from scratchy,
strident guitar-based pop to a smoother, more
accessible version of the same. This song carries elements of both styles, with a repetitive
guitar line that forms a base for a rawer (but
equally as repetitive) riff in a lower key. It's not
very catchy, but I'm sure that production comparable to previous Chameleons efforts could
make this a viable, listenable tune.
EXCITED FIRST DAUGHTER
"Man Cuts Off His Head With
Chainsaw And Lives" and
"Excited First Daughter"
Finally, a local band. This studio outfit is headed, or is it beheaded?, by CITR's own Paul Funk.
Now, Paul's a pretty pushy kind of guy, a trait
evidenced by the place offered his guitar on
these two instrumentals. You guessed it; front
and centre. This would be another example of
the unfettered ego were it not for the quality of
our man Funk's picking. I could make a lot of
statements about the bombastic nature of this
TRACK
RECORDS
76WCORDOV\.'
685-8970 CITR fm 102 cable 100
music, but telling you the category it fits in says
it all—it's prog-rock. Ecch. Visions of long-haired
guys perched on stools wanking interminably on
some space-age riff. I don't generally enjoy this
stuff, it seems to me to be music created for
musicians only, but these two tracks, especially
the title song, have a vitality that is rare in this
genre. The tempo changes, where the guitar is
usually left on it's own for a few bars, remind me
of King Crimson from Disipline or Beat. Funk is
no Fripp, but he's certainly competent enough
to pull these two off. There are errors, but they
only serve to add an air of humanity to what can
be an almost mechanical style.
HOUSE OF COMMONS
"Here Today"
Here's one that won't be vacillating in their
musical orientation. Andrew Challinor has reorganized one of Vancouver's top names in the
hardcore scene, and has come up with a demo
that incorporates some flashes of metal without
losing touch with its hardcore roots. This one
rumbles along like a bull in a china shop, there
is no really clear sense of purpose, but a reproduced, re-mixed version would probably gain
the cohesiveness that makes a good hardcore'
song a great one. H.O.C. will continue to improve,
and this song will probably only represent a transition period for the band.
THE HIP TYPE
"Illuminated" and
"Blue-Bottle Flies"
The first time I heard these, I could find no easy
comparisons or influences for The Hip Type.
Then I though real hard and managed to come
up with the New York-based band 10,000 Maniacs, albeit before their singer took voice lessons.
These two songs are infectious little ditties that
exude musical and lyrical maturity but have one
big drawback, a poor vocal track. It's a shame
that the most prominent part of the song is so
inconsistent. The singer's voice has an endearing, homey quality, but she hits too many flat
notes to create any real atmosphere. 60's influences are evident and the form of the songs is
quite basic, but overall, the music has a genuine
rich feel to it that is complemented by some inventive lyrics. Some improvement in the vocals
and The Hip Type will start to prove themselves
in the local scene.
PEOPLES REPUBLIC OF DAVE
"Sad, Sad World"
Another song that suffers from a lacklustre
vocal performance. This Toronto band, like The
Hip Type, has put together an infectious 60's-in-
fluenced top-tapper without a lot of frills. Vocally,
the track is slightly stronger than either of The
Hip Type's, but it's much less lyrically provocative
or original. Sad, Sad World moves along at a
good clip, with some timely tamborine flourishes
and clean harmonies, and follows the lead of
bands like The Fleshtones, The Plimsouls and,
to some extent, The Smiths. The song is a renovation of old ideas rather than a rehashing of
them, but the vocals don't mesh with the music
as well as any of the bands mentioned above.
The geographic location of this band will probably help them record more songs, more that
is, than any similar group from Vancouver could.
That could be a boon for CITR listeners if, and
only if, the People's Republic of Dave finds a better singer.
—Jason Grant
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OCTOBER LINE-UP
Round One Semi-Finals
Monday, Oct. 7th
Winners of the
past three Shindigs!
No Contest Night!
Monday, Oct. 14th
BILL OF RIGHTS
THE SPORES
Round Two Prelims
Monday, Oct. 21st
TROUBLE BOYS
LINE DRIVER
SOREHEADS
Monday, Oct. 28th
DEAD CATS
BAD ATTITUDE
BAYOU DIACHMA
savov
PRIZES
24 Hours of Recording Time Each
First Prize supplied by UNIVERSAL RECORDING
Second Prize supplied by BULLFROG RECORDING
HAPPY HOUR 7--30 -9O0
SAVOY NIGHTCLUB   6 Powell St., Gastown, Vancouver, 687-0418 DISCORDER
October 1985
ARMCH
EYE
OKAY, OKAY, SO THIS MONTH I SUC-
cumb to editorial pressure and concern     women and interrupting each other as they read
myself specifically with "music" videos    from prepared texts and otherwise wax rhetorical
(notice I didn't say "rock"). Discorder is, after all,     on such pertinent late sixties issues as the
a music rag. The problem is, when you start talk-     necessity of violent revolution nd the compati-::
ing music videos, you may as well say wasteland:     bility of Mafxist theory and Black Power: There*!
deep, dark, smelly and pretty much#empty.     lot of r-
Almost by definition it's a purely promotional     argua
medium. Mine videos in 10 exist purely as a    essjf"
means to sell product. 1o review them?wou|d::::D'e
to review '""
end, \ dor
drool afthi
rajpS, ydV
nothing
There is
vidt
flolfv
t>eur?), wl
a deadly
', if you
nDoo-
,%:
Si:.'
somi
they
forthe^buddie:
connois- Allei
intrigued    -i&ckorpl
Fantasia   (F<
ion. elabora^dui
r Jean Luc
Studio footage of the band is intercut with black
American revolutionaries hanging around in a
nothing B do with
ither, it's a low budget Italian
stasia   being   Adolph   Disney's
ittlmafef/ gutless animated interpretation of certain classical; music favorites).
Allegro come r. weirder and
ultimate!, *y. A not-
hu o  in   which
'dy's k <: lacks an in-
ion, everything starts
in the pri; e of a discarded coke bottle,
and spreads out from there. This is what anima-
id be. Freed from the limitations of flesh
reality, the Imagination takes off with
iderful abandon. Even your parents
o/flfV
►n't like Cabaret Vbltaire'sJ
for that r
people-<you kr
taire before tr
are raw and nasty. ■■
and maximum distc
fun). Visually, it's pretf
agine every experir
you've seen in the last 10 years (sti
looping, quick cutting, natives dancing to a rock
beat/extensive repetition, static effects, looping,
quick cutting, natives dancing, etc.), and it goes
on and one for vvell over an hour and you just
sit there at four AM and melt into your chair, and
you eventually go insane, run next door with an
axe and murder the Goodhouses but you get off
with a suspended sentence because your dad's
lawyer succelsfully argues that you were temporarily possessed by certain malevolent subliminal messages hidden in the video (fortunately
I fell asleep before any of this actually happened—I think). Recommended for the brave
and the devastatingly bored. Almost as good for
late night viewing as The Waltons with a trapped
vertical hold.
—Bill Mullan
Simply
Divine-
in Polyester
kust in the Dust
Pink Flamingos
Female Trouble
All 300 lbs. of fun
NOW ON VIDEO
QflDEOflftTKfl
Bk
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1829 WEST 4TH AVE. AT BURRARD 734-0411 I
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Tust last week boy killed himself
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about thcri?^
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DOWNTOWN
WEST END
GASTOWN
EAST SIDE
POINT GREY
KITSILANO
A&A Records & Tapes
Bayshore Bicycles
Afterimage Photo Service
Bikes On Broadway
Agora Food Co-op
Arts Club Lounge
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Changes Consignment
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Clothing
Cafe Madeleine
Broadway Records & Tapes
The Block
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Rufus' Guitar Shop
The Comicshop
Doll & Penny's
Deluxe Junk Clothing
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UBC Bookstore
Deluxe Junk Clothing
Firehall Theatre
(Oakridge)
English Bay Book Co.
Golden Era Clothing
Minerva's
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Hamburger Mary's
John Barley's Cabaret
Neptoon Collectors'
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Crystal Club
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Minus Zero Leather Works
Records
Video Stop
Hollywood Theatre
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Re-Runs Recycled Apparel
Music Shop
RICHMOND
Lifestream Natural Foods
The Gandydancer
Melissa's Records & Tapes
Ripley's
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A&A Records & Tapes
Long & McQuade
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Heaven
Pizzarico's
The Savoy Nightclub
P.Ks Hot Shop
(Lansdowne)
Kelly's Electronic World
Robson Super Market
Sissy Boy Clothing
People's Co-op Bookstore
Glass Onion Records
Lui's Ville Cafe & Pies
Second Suit Clothing
Smilin' Buddha Cabaret
Store No. 1
Kelly's Electronic World
Luv-A-Fair
West End Community Centr
e    Systems
Vancouver East Cinema
(Lansdowne)
Records
West End Video
Town Pump
Vancouver East Cultural
Paul's Music Sales &
Track Records
Centre
Video Inn
Vancouver Folk Music
Ridge Theatre
NORTH SHORE
The Waterfront Corrall
Festival
Side Door
Outlaws
A&A Records & Tapes
Zeet Records & Tapes
Western Front Lodge
NEW
Twizzle Hair Studio
Videomatica
Railway Club
(Park Royal)
Kelly's Electronic World
WESTMINSTER
Sloppy Joe's
(Park Royal)
Courthouse Studios
Zulu Records
Streets
Sam the Record Man
Studio Cinema
Vancouver Ticket Centre
(Capilano)
Whispers
Including
UBC, other campuses, and all Vancouver public libraries.
The Web Clothing
Ze-Bop Record Rentals October 1985
The Roving Ear    K K
This Month from Hawaii...
AS I WAITED IMPATIENTLY IN THE LUG-
i gage lineup at the airport I could hear
k Vancouver International's version of
music for airports—Bryan Adams—between the
usual, barely decipherable announcements. I
sighed and began to dream of the tropics.
But it was not to be all beaches and sunshine.
The plane arrived in the middle of the night and
customs was tedious. As I stepped out into the
lobby I could feel the warm breeze, and I could
hear—Bryan Adams. I fled the terminal and laid
my sleeping bag out on a concrete bench
outside.
Jet lag allowed me a fitful sleep until I suddenly
awoke to the sound of much swearing and banging. It was a bag lady making her way through
the airport garbage cans. Every now and then
she would yell and swear and then beat the
nearest can with a stick. It took several nervous
minutes before I realized that the object of her
disaffection was Barbara Streisand. The bag
lady's ranting and thrashing was directed entirely
at some tiresome Hollywood type. I wondered if
the bag lady was a victim of too much muzak.
But then, in my state of aural confusion, it all
made some kind of sense.
Morning came and me and my bicycle flew to
Maui. I soon made my way to the percussion of
surf and sand at the beach. I found a campsite
on the sunny side and settled down to watch the
incredible starscape just a few feet from the
crashing water.
The next day featured a torrential rainstorm,
so I sought shelter in a whaling town turned
tourist trap, Lahaina. I stashed my bike at the bike
store, courtesy of manager Mel. As the skies
began to clear late in the day, Mel drove me to
the other side of the island to find a cheap hotel.
On the way we flipped through the dial on the
radio and Mel told me about popular Hawaiian
music.
Sixties music dominates to the point where,
in comparison, CFUN would seem like a progressive music station. Light rock, lotsa schlock.
There were a couple of stations featuring
Hawaiian music, but that was about it. A kind of
slack-key version of reggae is very bland and extremely popular. I preferred the strange harmonies and falsetto vocals in the more traditional
folk ballads.
My bicycle had no radio so I sought my sound-
scape wherever I could find it. The sound of the
"Big O" threw out a lot of decibels and had a
catchy if somewhat irregular beat. One night,
camped 7000 feet up Haleakala crater, I was
treated to a wall of sound as storm winds roared
and whistled at speeds up to 160 kmh.
But experiences like this aside, Maui was too
crowded for my tastes. I rode south to Hana as
big waves crashed at the bottom of steep cliffs.
There was a shoebox airport just outside this
remote town, and mercifully there was no muzak.
I took off for the big island of Hawaii on an
eight-seater Beachcraft, my bicycle stuffed
behind the back seat. It was a short hop to Hawaii
and I was in awe as we approached the airport
there. Lava flows dominated the landscape, huge
fields of black and grey. It all seemed much too
raw for my concept of the tropics.
I spent a day in tourist haven Kona-Kailua
before beginning my trek around the island.
Muzak everywhere, but here one modern rocker
was included with the Beatles and Simon & Gar-
funkel, namely Bryan Adams.
I escaped to the wilderness again. I spent a
few days with a Haole community on a remote
beach. The sea was high and the hardcore pounding of ocean on lava almost overbearing. More
than one conversation was interrupted as all eyes
and ears tuned in to a particularly powerful wave.
I continued around the island, sometimes camping in places where there was no one for miles
and other times at regular type campgrounds.
There were plenty of people and plenty of ghetto
blasters. I talked and partied with several young
Hawaiians. They were highly suspicious of punks
and punk music. Only a few who had done military service on the mainland seemed to have any
idea that musically the eighties had arrived.
Those few could boast of seeing the Clash and
other big-name alternative bands stateside, but
most of their friends just didn't care.
Finally I needed a break from the incessant
surf so I headed for the volcano. To my delight
I found that I could take my bike right into the
Kilauea caldera. It was here, with steam vents
and new lava all around me, that I rediscovered
that rarest music of all, deep silence. I spent
hours marvelling at the beautiful emptiness.
I was soon to fall prey to a different kind of sensory overload. On one ride in Volcano National
Park I made my way through the Kai desert, a
couple of craters, a lava tube and rainforest
before returning to camp. Happy but unsettled
I returned to the ocean.
I stayed a night on a homesite in an ancient
village called Kamomoa. The cliffs were riddled
with sea arches and there was a kind of fizzle
of backwash mixed in with the rhythm of the
waves.
My route around Hawaii took me next through
the island's population center, Hilo. Here the roar
of the surf was drowned out by military cargo
planes practicing take-off and landing at Hilo
Naval Airport.
I hurried to the lush Waipio Valley. This narrow, deep valley was bordered by steep, 1200 foot
cliffs on either side with a beach fronting the
ocean. The road down to the valley had grades
of 18% to 28% so not many people managed to
get in. There is a small community of Hawaiians
living there. They grow Taro and otherwise try to
revive a more traditional lifestyle.
At an impromptu party on the beach, I met Eric
and John, a couple of valley residents. The party
featured fresh water prawns, steak, beer and
other delicacies as well as some beautiful music.
The Hawaiians love to have a guitar in their
hands and they love to write songs. Simple songs
about the land, the ocean and their incredible
family loyalties. Songs that rang true off the verdant hills, rising above the inherent clash of
cultures.
The party ended with the threat of an incoming
storm and I found myself spending that night and
the next couple of days with John and Eric at
their house deep in the valley.
They are Taro farmers and spend some of their
plentiful leisure time making things out of
coconuts and palm trees. They made toys and
games and one morning, before breakfast, Eric
wove a huge basket from a single frond for a
friend.
We lived off the land, catching and picking our
food from the rivers and riverbanks, and all was
washed down with copious amounts of Bud-
weiser.
Music was a part of all activity, a guitar was
always close at hand. Lyrics were created to fit
every situation. At night as I fell asleep I could
hear the sound of two guitars playing soft and
sweet as 1200 foot waterfalls thundered outside.
Waipio Valley was a hard place to leave.
Before I left Hawaii I had one more chance
musical interlude. I was sleeping under the stars
at a popular campsite on the north Kona coast.
A couple of Hawaiian families were camped nearby. One of them was probably a professional
hotel entertainer. He sang and played long into
the night, mixing country and western with traditional Hawaiian songs. He had a smooth, caressing voice and would break effortlessly into falsetto, all the while the surf pounded in the background.
My time was up. As I passed through Kona Airport on my way to Honolulu the canned music
again cut like a knife. As did the grey skies and
rain upon my return to Vancouver.
—Kawika £
f-
0
, HOWWM'
jk~*^llLi
'tfl6.*
^ai     B^ ^ JH
En           ,* -        tf*t
Hftl
1       * *^b 7
1
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special events
SAVoy
HAPPV HOUR 7:30 -900
SAVOY NIGHTCLUB   6 Powell St., Gastown, Vancouver, 687-0418
TUPELO CHAINSEX
OCT with Guests
1-3       Advanca Tickets: S5.00
$6.00 at the door
CELTIC    MADNESS
OCT FROM THE U.K.
15     The Battle Field Band
with special guests
Advance Tickets: 58.00
HALLOWEEN
OCT      COSTUME PARTY
31 BOLERO LAVA
with guests
Prizes for best costumes!
^

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