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 AS//W DOB FOO-Vi
r\RLMG «_. CAMER
CAPOZZ/PARK
HBW/S 99 /CO WTTM
l_J
mwu
1
1
1
1
i
IW
th* MAP RECORDS SHOWCASE
Wl Pilgrims Of The Mind, Cooldown & Phil Western
FBI: KID KOALA & BULLFROG!    _
EariyShow. Cad club or New Music West for details
MAY     ___H
I'M
FEVER: Special Edition
& Luke Room 2: Dana D. $9, door only.
EZD____
Bman & Rizk present
GRANDE
1
|
y
$5, door only
cnBL
HK1
Foursquare A TSA present
CHERRY BOMBS
:
MAY^f
MAY^l
■•jfl
FEVER: Special Edition
JOSH MICHAELS aka OJIZ [San Fran, Tweekin]
Soulful funky house from mis risingWest Coast
Room 2: Dana D. $9, door only.
□
13 * EZ7_i
Call club for wee
M,        ^LAUNCH                      ^CIHjfSnbS
ca
events S83.S6S5
*a»
^GRANDE
R&B, Reggae, Hip h
*   wl Pascal                              __
3  twvsna                  EaFEVER
1   Drum'o'Bass                                    House wl T.Bone
"P           -s.   w/AndyB                                       Luke & Dana 0
COMINB SnON.Narman l»u Paul Van Duk
andm
66 WATER ST. Club: 6i
Sound system by:   1
ore...
3.6695 Office: 683.6527 Fax: 688.2552
Turbosound     Visual styling by: URBAN
1 www.sonar.bc.ca 1
elebrating 3 Wears in the Heart of Vancouvt
chameleon @
801 VV. Georgia St., Vancouver, BC Tel: 669.0806
FRIDAYS WEFKIV THURSDAY MAY {$) ll|Rg°_l_iE___I_
95 • May 99
Features
Capozzi Park
30 Helens
icu
99
Arling and Cameron
Asian Dub Foundation
editrix: miko hoffman
art director:
robert horsman
ad rep: maren hancock
production manager:
tristan winch
production saviour:
barbara andersen
graphic design/layout:
rob, mitchell parsons, ken
paul
production:  ann
goncalves, christa min, cat
moore, kirsten weisenberger
photography &
illustrations: jason da
silva, ted dave, jay douillard,
anthony kinik, laura jane
petelko, quentin wright
contributors: barbara a,
tania a, paul b, cody b,
brady c, chris c, val c, bryce
d, anna f, greg e, christine g,
patrick g, maren h, martin f,
John h, brian j, anthony k, bill
k, blaine k, John k, christa m,
janis m, Julian m, nardwuar,
anthony s, caleb s, scot,
stefan u, quentin w
programme guide:
anna friz
charts: julie colero
datebook: barbara/miko
distribution: matt steffich
us distribution:
tristan & aaron nakama
discorder on-line:
any takers?
publisher: linda scholten
Columns
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Cover
"The radio shall be a tinderbox or
it shall be nothing at all! Down with
the radio-as-pacifier!" (Anonymous slogan) Photomontage by A. Kinik, additional computer stuff by Rob H.
© "DiSCORDER" 1 999 by the Student Radio Society of
the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved.
Circulation 17, 500.
Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents
are $ 15 for one year, to residents of the USA are $ 15 US;
$24 CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to cover postage, of course). Please make cheques or money orders
payable to DiSCORDER Magazine.
DEADLINES: Copy deadline for the June issue is May 1 2th.
Ad space is available until May 19th and can be booked by
calling Maren at 604.822.3017 ext. 3. Our rates are available upon request. DiSCORDER is not responsible for loss,
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in type. As always, English is preferred.
From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can
be heard at 101.9 fM as well as through all major cable
systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock.
Call the CiTR DJ line at 822.2487, our office at 822.3017 ext. 0,
or our news and sports lines at 822.3017 ext. 2. Fax us at
822.9364, email us at: citrradio@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our
web site at http://www.ams.ubc.ca/media/citr or just pick up a
goddamn pen and write #233^138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC,
V6T 1Z1, CANADA.
Printed In Canada
pete
I.MIKE NESS-Cheating at So
itaire
2. DEAD MOON ~ Any and All
3. DROP KICK MURPHYS - The
Gangs All Here
4. MOTT THE HOOPLE ~ All the
oung Dudes
5. THE BODIES ~ S/T
UK BOX SET
staff picks
^ 4t    recent releases
«_■
3296 Main St./17th
876.9233
we carry garage, oi!, ska,
hip hop, hardcore, emo,
anarcho-punk LPs, 45s,
CDs ~ New & Used
TOP    $    PAID    FOR    PUNK    VINYL ErailfljOmilllll   kyTedvave
R.bS.
The. Pils&uru fWre*ic Bo^
Vancouver
Special
WB'I
MOLESTICS
Manufacturing Hokum
(King Hokum)
What to make of these corn hucksters with a social conscience?
The first time I saw them, I was
reminded of some well-to-do, earnest and elderly banjo-wielding
gentlemen in matching outfits I
once saw playing Dixieland in
a West Vancouver pub, although of course the youthful
and        Strathcona-formed
Molestics look darn different
and use some bad words too.
No, in spite ofthe pleasing and
rock-steady '20s jazz rhythms,
the Molestics have more in common with who-gives-a-shit folk
singers and politicized punk
bands, at least if you listen to the
lyrics, which are often pointed
and sometimes downright nasty.
Sam's guitar playing has evolved
to sheer loveliness over the years
and the band has become more
ambitious (although  it could
hardly   have   become   more
goofy); the Molestics steal from
an unlikely mix of sources, and
cover composers as varied as
Rossini and Bob (King of Western Swing)  Wills, often putting
BY JANIS McKENZIE
just enough of a twist on things
so that you'll know they could
play the songs straight if they
wanted to, but that they have bigger plans. So what is it all about?
According to the back of the CD:
"The anals [sic] of Jazz history
provide the modern Hokum artist
highbrow
without the
nobrow."
Well, that's a good argument,
but I'd be afraid of it falling into
the hands of a Bob Seger fan,
for instance! For upcoming
shows, an explanation of hokum,
and some self-deprecating humour, visit the band website at
www.molestics.com. (657 Prior
Street, Vancouver, BC, V6A 2G7,
<hokum@molesfics.com>)
BERTINE
Morbid Latonight Show
(Nettwerk)
No, she's not from Vancouver, but
Norwegian chanteuse Bertine
Zetlitz is sure cute! The host of
her own TV show and winner
of loads of accolades back
home, Bertine is sure to remind
Canadian listeners of The
Cardigans, with her waify
blonde good looks and wispy
high voice, although she
doesn't seem to share their
sense of humour (at least there
aren't any Black Sabbath
covers here). This debut CD is
covers a lot of Euro-pop ground,
with bits that sound like '60s
French girl singers, snippets of
lounge-lizard exotica, and even
Stereolab-ish flavours. While
Bertim
II that ir
I singing is
pressive and the m
thing we haven't heard before,
Morbid Latenight Show makes for
quite a charming little listen.
(www.nettwerk.com, Nettwerk,
1650 West 2nd Ave., Vancouver
V6J 1 H4)»
You're gonna love these brand new Epitaph releases
L
coming soon...
cz____s______
NEW CD LP CASS   IN STORES 6/8/99
HOPELESS
ROMANTIC
the new album by
THE
BOUNCING
SOULS
roaring in ya face out 5/4/99
East Coast punk at its finest"
-Toxic Flyer
also available: THE BOUNCING SOULS - S/T, TIE ONE ON
www.epitapli.com £
www.bouncingsouls.com    «__pt, Palinkas
Eats
BUKOWSKI'S  BAR AND
BISTRO
(1447 Commercial Drive)
A friend of mine once told me
his theory about eating out. He
said that everybody should be
able to go out and get a decent
meal for the price of an hour's
work at minimum wage. The
more I think about that, the more
sense it makes. Now, let's see if
we can apply that rule to
Bukowski's. The menu was extensive, with a variety of prices
ranging from around six to sixteen bucks. I was hungry and
needed something that would
give me fuel for the day while
still costing less than $7.15. I
ordered the grilled chicken on
focaccia with a Caesar salad
and a soda pop, total cost:
$9.05 plus tip. Not even close
to our target. On the up side,
the portion was more than generous and the food itself wasn't
too bad. The grilled chicken on
focaccia had lettuce, tomato and
a hint of dijon mustard. I've had
a similar dish elsewhere and it
is always pretty bland fare. The
not enough to ge
up. As for my <
salad is a Cae:
rhado
mber?
'uch here, but
too worked
salad. Have
that you can
-lad.
think about the
restaurant's name, the sadder it
makes me. The idea of opening
a literary theme restaurant called
"Bukowski's" has got to be the
most juvenile thing I've ever
heard of. To begin with, theme
restaurants are brutal, period.
That aside, I don't think Charles
Bukowski is ideal for a namesake. Sure, he could turn a
phrase at times, but he was also
pretty hateful, especially towards
women. He would probably
want to beat the shit out of everyone who was there and fuck
the "cunt" that served him (to put
it in his kind of terms).
When I first heard about
Bukowski's, I pictured a dank little cafe with strong coffee, poetry readings, and pretentious
writers. Instead, Bukowski's is
big, yellow, and feels more like
_&S*
BY BULK
hangout. They do host some
readings and musical events on
Saturday, Monday, and Tuesday
evenings, but since I was there
for lunch on Saturday, I missed
out on the action. Maybe I'm
totally reading the place wrong,
but it seems like the type of place
that yuppies and the like would
go to if they wanted to experience something "different" without ever having to leave the
luxury of their money behind.
Don't get me wrong, the food isn't
bad at all, I just don't like being
a prop in someone's holiday on
the East Side. One good thing,
though, was the choice of music:
Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young
(hey, I'm certainly not hip).
Looking back, if I was willing to spend more I probably
could have gotten something a
little
ting  t
Bukowski's. I wasn't willing to
spend any more than that for
lunch and I don't think anyone
should have to. The highlight of
the afternoon had to be hearing
"Helpless" on the way out. Neil
bonaduces
the democracy of sleep
$13 ppd
"...is it too late
to amend last years top ten list?"
GEORGIA STRAIGHT
bonaduas .
ninety nine
on tour    J
7. may. Vancouver
brickyard
radiosonic and exclaim! present
an evening with endearing
FEATURING
bossanova - plumtree - the salteens
7.may. Vancouver
vogue theatre
opening for the watchmen
8.may. Vancouver
dv8
afternoon show presented by
endeanng, bossanova and the good *acket
FEATURING
bossanova - may (w/arch of readymade)
8. may. victoria
community activity centre
755 pandora
FEATURING
run chico run
9.may.victoria
brickyard pizza
acoustic show
O.may.nanaimo
queens
Grumpy
Old Dog
I just moved, which meant having to locate, pack up, and
hump my CD collection (and
the odd cassette) from the old
place to the new one. As I slotted CDs into plastic cases,
cases into cardboard boxes, I
realized something. Not only
do I have too many CDs, but
there are simply too many CDs
in the marketplace.
It's no wonder that music retailers are lamenting the flat
curves on their revenue charts.
I thought back to that craziest
of crazy retail seasons, Christmas. Remember walking into
the record stores? Sensory overload. There were so many jewel
cases on the shelves, reflecting
the flashing coloured bulbs,
how could you possibly decide? I was either going to
spend hundreds of dollars or
spend nothing.
I spent nothing. It was simply too difficult to pick which CD
of the
should come home
Once upon a
needed the record
• ith n
sist with recording and copying
:   foi
riburii
Noi
anymore. Technology has enabled virtually anyone to compose, record, and make copies
of their music. And there are
more "do-it-yourselfers" in existence than ever before, using
computers and the acoustical
variations of bathrooms to
record, and taking advantage
of cheap CD copying facilities
(who will press CDs for about a
dollar a piece). And while computers have enabled artists to
deke around the labels, making
their own  music on their own
-is, there
wbacks:
>st DIY r
ober.
*0|or
orded,
let alone copied.
But the corporations that
now control the labels are also
at fault. They aren't making decisions on who to sign based on
talent or musical contribution.
They are in the music industry
for the money and, more often
than not, are choosing who to
back purely because of the
marketability of the product.
BY BLAINE K
How else do you think the Spice
Girls came to be? Of course, the
corporations — also taking advantage of cheaper CD production costs — are blitzing music
buyers, trying to provide something for everyone. Trying to
make an even bigger buck. This
also means that, for record
stores that have a finite amount
of shelf space, only certain artists and CDs will be available
to music buyers. What choice
is there in that?
I find it hard to blame the
sagging shelves in music stores
and the dearth of well-crafted
albums on the musicmakers
who are so dedicated that they
ergy,
and
money to something that will
probably only ever be heard by
their friends and family. Perhaps the record labels should
exercise greater resolve in signing artists. Traditionally, we
could expect a good label to
produce only music worth listening to. It's time for labels to
cut back. Emphasize quality
over quantity.•
UPTOWN
c___,-ra
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OS
4326 MAIN ST.
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@ 27th AVE.
C.-fj
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____
STREETSIDE
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VANCOUVER, BC
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V5V 3P9
604.708.9804
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DOWNTOWN
14-712 ROBSON ST.
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@ GRANVILLE ST.
UPSTAIRS
CD
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fr^§
VANCOUVER, BC
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604.684.PUFF KIM BROW
Who art thou (m
played)?
nthe
e the K
e, play it
me, age, instruments
the moon, I am the song,
Were you always Kym Brown as far as
your performing goes? In other words,
from whence have you come, Kym?
In grade four I won the role of first rat in our
adaptation of the Pied Piper, and in grade eight I
played star quarterback on the girls flag football
team. In a parallel universe that precedes ours, I
believe that aliens somehow extracted DNA
strands from Neil Diamond, Olivia Newton-John
and Jimi Hendrix, and crossbreed them with one
Homo sapien in our world to create Kym Brown.
What role have Futcher of Hellenkeller
and local journalist Denise Sheppard
played in your music endeavors?
Futcher is a wildly eccentric and inspirational
individual who provided a missing link and laid
the foundation during the early recording of my
debut CD pygmalion. What can I say about
Denise other than she too has inspired
songs.
We noticed that you use two vocal mics.
Why is this? Also, do you play with more
effects than anyone else in Vancouver?
Using one clean mic and placing an effect-like ,
distortion on another allows for a more dyne
range of sonic  transmission  without giv
myself vocal nodes. Plus, it sounds cool. I'm i
so sure that I play with  more effects than J
anyone else in Vancouver, but I may play more
with effects than anyone else in Vancouver.
The pre-release of your CD seems to
have a  million  over-dubs and  new |
sounds appear, even after 30 listens.
How many hours do you spend on one '
song? What takes longer, recording the '
song or mixing?
I spend anywhere from one hour (i
mixing) to too-many-to-count hours on one song,
depending on the vibe of the song and/or
voices in my head When I went to Futcher with
demos from The Hive, we ended up re-tracking a
lot while we were supposedly mixing. Then when
I went to do the final mixes with Saint Simko, we
ended up doing the same while setting up for the
new mixes, and then adding more still in the
middle of mixing. So mixing and tracking really
took on a symbiotic relationship of theii
during the making of this CD.
Did you ever get the disease of the
person you are singing to in the song
'Milk and Plenty?' Is this song about
obsession, the desire to be dominated, or
something else?
In this song I'm singing more to a collective of
persons, or on entity, perhaps.. What I really got
was an aerial view of Barbie's Mansion in Topsy-
Turvy land. All neon pink and shiny, it shimmered
while a glittery vial of The Incredible Shrinking
Woman's potion hovered by the front door handle
beside a dotted line and an X One
big Monte Hall reverberated,
pounding in my head,
perfumey tc
mouth, r
that
tof
triumph over those parasitic forces which will ■
attempt to mislead, manipulate, and exploit the I
artists who is having a tough time paying rent. *
Do you only perform solo now? Is it I
difficult to reproduce live what you hear ■
on the CD?
I never attempt to reproduce anything, as that m
would be an abolition of the moment and the ■
Muses would be forced to smite me. I do perform I
solo sometimes, with my microphones, effects, ■
acoustic guitar and my Hammond. Currently, I am |
also performing with Electro Woman (formerly of
Quave), who triggers sample
sequences, and submixes
beats and
on    her    MC505.
Who are you (names, ages, instruments
played)?
Jay Arner, 19, guitar, bass, drums, piano,
synthesizer, vocals, etc.; Jeremy Bidnall, 24,
guitar, bass, synthesizer; Kevin Cooper, 26, guitar,
bass, vocals; Adam Fink, 21, drums; Greg
Macdonald, 20, guitar, bass, drums, piano,
synthesizer, vocals, etc.
You are here tonight because of your 3rd
place finish in Shindigl Of the bands you
competed against, who do you feel
deserves a plug at this moment?
There were a lot of great bands this year, among
them: 42, Baked Alaska, Clover Honey, Feisty, The
Disgusteens, Peppersands, and of course,
Forecasts Farewell.
Tell us about the 'All About Pop' scene
here in Vancouver. Is pop in fact what it's
all about?
'It's All About Pop' is a series of shows held at the
Anza Club, organized by Scott Walker-Salteen-
Boy (though he stole the idea outright from Greg
and Jay) It happens every month or two, each
night featuring a number of local
up-and-coming pop acts.
Past   performers   of
Bossanova,
The  New
apparently
refuse to explore
the potential of
:al
Your   CD
nov/     finished
and   about   to   be
released     under
name       Pygmalion.       Why
Pygmalion?
I recorded 'Pygmalion' the song on my four-track,   ■
which is really where this all mostly began, so I   |
thought it apt to title the album as such. Also, I like   ■
Ovid's basic idea that remaining true to one's self   |
is the magic in actualizing one's ideals, but I also   _
like that oxygen is the perfect substance to breathe   |
and that it binds so wonderfully with hydrogen    _
and who would want to make an elm tree out of   I
an oak seed?
Discography:
Milk and Plenty (the Hive-grown cassette); Zoomfly
(the pre-release); and Pygmalion (the debut CD).    I
Contact:
604.667.2268.
Anything else to add?
Yeah, did you really listen to the pre-release 30   1
Pornographers,
ihem) Team
Strike Force. However,
's all about pop' is up for
dispute. A quick survey of the opinions
>f TSF members seems to indicate that it's about
anything but pop, responses ranging from 'it's all
about cash money,' to 'it's all about molten lava.'
What place do vocal harmonies play in
rock music as we approach the new
millennium?
Harmonies are an essential, yet puzzlingly
neglected element of rock as we approach the
year 2000. Many popular bands (who should be
setting the example for us lower 'indie' bands)
harrr
opting instead for
mere        parallel
thirds or fifths, or
no  harmony at all.
While these sometimes
sound great,  to limit a
song      to      such      stylistic
guidelines is narrow-minded. It is
our dream that, by the year 2000, we are hearing
more harmonies that make use of a variety of
intervals. To help realize this dream, we have
established the Team  Strike Force Millennium
Harmony Scholarship Foundation (TSFMHSF), a
non-profit organization that awards grants Jo
promising young bands on the basis of quality
vocal   harmonies.   Winners   are   selected   by
whomever is in Team Strike Force at the time and
receive one dollar per year for one thousand
Team Strike Force, the cast that you
assembled here for Thunderbird Radio
Hell is mighty impressive! Is this the
current line-up? Do you always have
members of the Peppersands, Salteens,
and Saturnhead on stage with you? Give
us a history lesson.
The short version of the TSF story is as follows: I
(still Jay) have been writing and recording as Team
Strike   Force   since   December   of    1997.    In
September of 1998, Greg (who also writes songs
in TSF), Jeremy, and Kevin joined so the songs
could be performed live. Since I was the only one
vho knew how to play all the drum parts, I
played drums live for the first few months, until
.erced drum virtuoso Adam of Pepper
Sands into joining. So, yes this is the current
, lineup, and yes, we are indeed a supergroup
Team Strike Force is the Batman of Vancouver
music: all of us are in old-mannered pop
bands by day (and night), but we rock in TSF
by night (and day) And we all live together in
eluded cave, making us even more like
Batman.
Ask    yourself    two    questions    and
ver them.
Name two recently-released albums everyone
should buy right now.
Kid Marine by Robert Pollard and Ponyoak by
Girl Wonder,  but that's not really a
question now, is it?
Oh, sorry. My mistake. How about this: is it true
that Jay and Greg first met in a grade 10 math
class?
Yes. Yes it is.
What's next for Team Strike Force?
We have a split 7" with Slanted Baby mixed and
soon to be pressed. Then, in an outrageous
display of originality, we plan to play shows and
more shows, hopefully many of them all-ages.
We II also be recording 20 to 30 songs in my
basement on the ol' four-track and Greg's fancy-
deluxe eight-track, for an album to be released
around the end of the summer. If we can afford it,
that is.
Discography
Four-Track Demos EP (1998), Owl City EP (1998).
Contact name and address
Team Strike Force c/o 4345 Barker Ave, Burnaby,
BC,    V5G     3C3,     604.970.2501     (Greg),
<teamstrikeforce@yahoo.com>,
http://members.tripod.com/teamstrikeforce/-
(,    f*\Y99
OR
A
K
n Lucky
tired of you
:WED
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Book Space May 19
Artwork: May Z5
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>www.ams.ubc.ca/media/citr/discord/cliscorcl.htm Capozzi Park is a hodgepodge of very
talented and interesting characters who
survive on the outskirts of musical sanity. For
Mark (voice, acoustic guitarj, Max (drums), Marcy
(voice), Steve (bass — he made il himself), Robin
(voice, organ, guitar), and Scolt (keyboards), music
as a way of life permeates all aspects of their
existence. Ah, career musicians, you think. Well,
they aren't exactly your average musical
opportunists and, even though they aren't
anticipating the big pay-off, they live in a mansion
of music. They drive a luxurious limo of lyrics
provided by up-and-comer Robin Fry and quite
possibly the greatest singer-songwriter to ever come
out of Canada, Mark Szabo. Their new CD,
Chocolate Covered Bad Things, released under
Mark's name, allows the listener to revel in their
regal ramblings of sound. Previous projects and
musical appearances for the members of Capozzi
Park include Good Horsey, Thee Crusaders,
Infernal Devices, Superconductor, Hot Fire, los
Disaslros, Insignificant Specks, Gunnar, The
Hollowheads, the Mary-Jones (now the Tonics), July
Fourth Toilet, The Molestics, and Paizuli.
Here's a peek into their musical minds ...
DiSCORDER: Who's Capozzi?
Max: The Spanish explorer who found Vancouver
originally
Mark: And then lost it again.
Max: He wasn't much of a braggart.
Steve: Capozzi Park is a basketball court in
Strathcona that Max plays basketball in.
Mark: There goes the mystique [loughs].
Steve: Sorry. I've also heard that the Capozzis are
a wealthy, somewhat eccentric, family in Kelowna
Max: Let's try to play up the eccentricity thing
here.
Steve: Boy, they're crazy. Oh my God!
Max: I think they had a foothill named after them.
Marcy: Capozzi Mound [laughs].
Why do you play music?
Mark: Because it's the only thing in life worth
doing.
Why's that?
Mark: Umm ...
Max: I do it 'cause my wrist hurts when I do it, to
show that I can survive through pain. Every since
watching the Bob Flannigan movie, it's the only
thing that keeps me going.
Steve: Max Lee, super-masochist.
Marcy: Did we establish why we play music?
Max: Mark plays music 'cause he's so fucking
sad, I think is what we've got so far.
Steve: It's pretty much the only thing that has
mattered in my life.
Mark: 'Cause you can't make money doing acid.
So you're saying you've actually made
money making music?
Steve   What most people call money ond what
Mark calls money ore two totally different things.
What was your motivation to record your
album?
Mark: Really, 'cause this guy, Rob Carmichael,
asked me to   He has a record label in New York.
Marcy   The album was supposed to be a lot of
things before it became what it really is.
Mark: It's going to be a play
Max: Well, originally it wos going to be a quilt,
bul ...
Steve: There was the four-track album.
Mark: CiTR has it
Max: They use it to rest their drinks on so they
won't mark up the table.
Marcy: No way!
So the second version of the album isn't
four-track?
Mark: It's a lot of stuff from that [the first version]
and some other eight-track stuff that the Vote Robot
guys came down and helped us record.
Why did you choose to re-record some of
the songs?
Mark: Because he asked me to agoin.
Max: So Mark never thought of any of these things
on his own  Someone just told him to follow orders
and he followed them [laughs], [to Mark] Are there
any instances of your own will coming to the plate?
Mark: No, I don't think so.
Max: You've been dressing yourself lately
Mark: Yeah, well, we'll see how that works out.
Your album is coming out and you've got
to promote it. How do you feel about
that?
Max: The extent of the ad campaign consists of
Mark calling his mom [laughs]. 'It's out! I don't have
enough money for postage, so come pick up your
copy.'
Marcy: Yeah, the commercial won't happen any
Max: Whal about the video? Good Horsey had a
real problem with making videos, 'cause we just
wanted to be somebody. Now we're sophisticated,
much older, mid-40's now ...
So is Capozzi Park a more sophisticated
effort?
Everyone: laugh, snicker, snort.
Mark: I don't know. If you want to sell records,
you have to make a video.
Do you feel pressure to sell the record
nov/ that you've pressed  a  bunch  of
them?
Mark: My mom can't afford to buy them all.
Max: That's one of your mother's few short
comings. She's a lovely lady.
Mark: At Christmas, I'd really like to go gold.
Max: Yeah, well, we'll spray paint you.
Marcy: I noticed one of our CDs that we actually
paid to get copied was for sale at one of our
shows. I looked at it and was like, 'Who did that?'
[to Mark] Was it you?
Mark: Yeah.
Max: It should've just been in a brown paper bag
and said 'mystery prize' 'cause it didn't have any
labeling on it.
Mark: See, I wish I had thought of that 'cause
that's the kind of promotion that appeals to me —
the random prank.
Can you describe the life of a Capozzi
Park song?
Mark: I say, 'This is how it goes,' and by the time
I learn how to play it, everyone else is done.
Max: That's good. That's great. Just try using
vowels — you're complicating it unnecessarily.
Let's direct this question more at Mark.
How do you go about writing a song?
Max: 'Because I'm so sad sometimes and I feel so
much better after I write them.'
Mark: I second that.
Max: OK, there you go.
Steve: There's Robin, too, who's not here to speak
for himself. Robin writes some pretty crazy stuff
Max: His songs have a jumpy, Captain Beefheart
feel to them.
Mark: He's not here ...
Steve: So let's make fun of him.
Marcy: Well, a little kid named Jordan who was
playing basketball with us called him Elvis.
Max: Robin doesn't spend a lot of time grooming.
His hair looks sort of like a quonset hut.
Mark: He has animal magnetism.
Max: He does, he's like a wild animal
Do you have any pre-recording or pre-
show rituals to help you prepare?
Marcy: Usually Max disappears somewhere and
doesn't come back until the very last moment.
We're kind of like, 'Uh oh.' The people in the clubs
are like, 'Can you go on now, maybe?'
Max: Even if I was there seven hours early, I would
still have to watch you guys fumbling around. It
would be frustrating, like trying to dress the elderly.
I don't need to tweak my knobs!
How do you approach playing live? Do
you have set lists?
Marcy: Here's what has happened. Mark has
decided that the set list would consist of freebie
postcards you get in club washrooms. Song titles
are written on the back of a card with Kate Moss
naked for Calvin Klein. Mark has them in his pocket
and he just pulls them out and says, 'We're playing
by Stefan Udell
this now,' which is a bit scary but is also really fun.
Max: When we usually involve a set list, we
hardly ever dump a song in desperation. We just
torture it to death.
Do you feel that you have to entertain the
audience?
Steve: At a show at the Anza Club, we put a bit of
an effort in the intro to put on a show. That's the
one where Mark dressed up as a woman.
Marcy:   People   said   he   looked   like   Sarah
McLachlan.
Steve: It was the barrettes.
Max: He was wearing some kind of dress with a
black velvet painting on the front of some woman in
a waterfall.
Steve: And [wearing] one sock.
Marcy: I like the foot-stomping thing we did. [For]
one of Robin's songs we just started to do this
fucked up Riverdance and that was completely
spontaneous.
Do   you   feel   that   spontaneous   stuff
cathartic?
Mark: It's not cathartic. The great thing about a
performance is to go and see something happen
that wasn't planned. To me, a really great show is
something that is also really terrible in parts.
Robin enters.
Marcy: Hey, it's Robin.
Scott: Ask all the questions again.
[to    Robin]    Can    you    describe    your
songwriting process?
Robin: I think it involves walking down a lot of
back alleys and coming up with ideas and getting
a melody and working it out in my room.
Marcy: After he takes off the bag lady costume.
Max: And a certain scratching ritual, [to Robin]
Do you find that any particular odours help you
think? Do you need any smells around you when
you make your music?
Robin: Yeah
Max: Maybe your mother's blueberry waffles?
Robin: Yeah
What are your inspirations? It doesn't
have to be a band. I could be a tree or
something.
Max: It could be a particular inert gas that you're
rather fond of.
Mark: Neon.
Marcy: The relationship that we have with each
other really inspires me. It's interesting, it's cool, it's
almost like a family.
Max: I'm mostly inspired by Mark.
Mark: And I by Max.*
CAPOZZI T
H
I
R
T
YH
E
L
E
n
s
by Anthony Schrag
photo by Laura Jane Petelko
It's probably not the best thing to say that I left a show with a splitting headache. And
it's probably not the greatest thing to say that I left with a stomach-ache, too. But
when you're talking to the 30 Helens, apparently this sort of thing happens all
the time — and their shows still sell out, over and over again.
"People keep coming up to us after the show complaining that they hurt something.
I guess we should do something about that," Morgan 'Helen' Brayton confided to me
a few days after their "30 Helens Greatest Hits" show (which played at the Firehall
Theatre).
It's not that their show is dangerous, it's just really, really funny. And it's the laughter
that has the audience hurting themselves.
During the first act of the Greatest Hits show, I was laughing so hard, it was all I
could do to hold my bladder back from bursting through my stomach and hitting
one of fhe Helens in the face. The two girls next to me told me after the show that
they wanted to help me, but they were too busy laughing themselves. Anyone
could have keeled over with heart problems and no one would have been able
to help them — the entire audience was in a fit of paralytic laughter.
The Helens' particular blend of irreverent sketch comedy makes them kind of
like a socially conscious, all-female Kids In The Hall — both political and/or
absurd. And it's a beautiful sight to see. You never know what's going to hit you
next: an eight-year-old girl screaming "Vaginal Discharge;" the ever graceful
Farrell 'Helen' Spence beautifully singing her theme song, "Fuck Off And Die,"
Sally Struthers asking you to donate to the "Vancouver Actors Fund," or Victoria
'Helen' Deschanel claiming, "Seals would look better with arms — arms to club
the hunters with." It all defies written explanation.
All of them are actors by trade and have been involved with the local acting
scene — both dramatic and comedic — for many years. They have their humble
beginnings in another all-women comedy group: the amazingly funny "Girl
Parts," formed by current Helen member Liisa Ingimundson. In April of 1998,
seven of the members decided it was time to move on and formed the 30
Helens. Along with Liisa, Farrell, Morgan and Victoria, 30 Helens consists of
Brianna Mason, Madeline Kipling, and their manager, Jennifer-Lee Koble.
Since their formation, they have enjoyed amazing success, gracing covers of
Xtra West, and have been reviewed by all of the major Vancouver rags. They've
performed at the ANZA Club, the W.I.S.E. Hall, The Urban Well, Celebrities
Nightclub, and loads of other places, and are planning to tour this summer as
far away as San Francisco.
They're fast becoming celebrities, and my advice is to see them as soon as
possible, before you have to pay through the nose.
They have a regular gig at The Jupiter every second Wednesday (beginning
again June 9th), but their next big thing is a CiTR presentation — Grrrlopalooza
on Saturday, May 15th at The Cultch, with Tribe 8, Veda Hille, Che: Chapter
127, Loud, and Sarah and Teegan (call 254.9578 for info).
Watch for a full-length interview with the Helens in an upcoming Discorder
issue. But be careful not to hurt yourself. You have been warned.*"
We're off to Halifax, NS for the
19   9   9
National Campus/
Community Radio
Association
.Conference
Why should you care?
If you are a local band, we can distribute your
Demos, CDs, 7"s,
or what have you
to the campus and community radio BIGWIGS
^pl DROP OFF UP TO 25 COPIES.
B4 JUNE 7 @ CiTR
OR CALL ANNA @ 822-1242
FOR MORE INFORMATION
101.9 fM Forewarn Farewell.  Mvi+erioi/f foi
Waihir>f*on'i freafcy electro~poppers icu
topped tv *he Starfish Root* for an
lex+ra special engagement with Gaze and
Myt-terio-jf forces tampered wf+n toy tofcropiSone** so
t^eir hilarious tales of fruit phones and frosty Tacotoa hipsters are,
unfor+onatefv*. hs*  forever.  Picl< up Choffo Matte A Motoent! (on K
Records) for the good word on experimental pop Mania. Ai toy _^	
dad would doubtless enthuse, IkitMashoo ...
/7\
DiSCORDER-. Who and what is icu?
Michiko: I play keyboards.
Aaron: I play upright bass.
Michiko:       and K.O. plays 'other stuff.'
What  exactly  do  you   mean   by
stuff?'
Michiko: I don't know if I should disclose
that information. He likes to be very cryptic
K.O. I play everything else.
'Everything else,' that's what they!
said too. Can you elaborate?
K.O. I play records, guitar, theremin, and
ittle gizmos. Switches, knobs, and faders.
icu's Olympian friend: Is there enough
■our tape for that man's ego?       ,
yi\
Why the unorthodox pronunciation?
K.O.: Itwas always [pronounced] ee-koo.
And we picked the spelling i-c-u instead of
i-k-u becouse [we thought], 'this is kind of
cool, people are going to start calling us
i.c.u.' and it's kind of confusing. We like
Aaron: We didn't mind being so vague.
K.O.: And if people called us i.c.u. we
said, 'Oh, that's cool too.' But, there
happened to be another band, called
I.C.U., in New York. Actually, they're
Intensive Care Unit, and they've been
giving us a hassle. So we might have to
change the spelling soon.
Aaron: It might be i-q-u instead of i-c-u or
something very similar.
JJ\
How  did   icu   get  a   hold   of   a1
theremin?
K.O.: I got one in '94, it's a little toy one
they make in Japan. My friend was
ing from there. The first time I saw one
was in the video of the Boredoms, MTV
with Boredoms. My friend was visiting me
from Japan, and I had him pick it up. And
then, I think it was in '96 I saw the movie
Theremin: A Sound Odyssey, the
documentary. From then I started
becoming more serious about it, and last
year, in a music store in Seattle, I saw this
one. Bob Moog started making one.
Is the toy theremin sort of like a
miniature version, or is it digital,
No,
it's still solid state. It's a little
Jy has one antenna instead of
Is it a difficult instrument to play?
K.O.: I think so.
Aaron: No, you just move your hand
[impersonates theremin noises]
K.O.: Well, the thing is, you program the
melody you want to play AHEAD and just
'lands and it'll play for you
How did icu get started with K1
Records?
Aaron: We all live in Olympia.
K.O.: I used to work at their warehouse,
box stuffing for K. Calvin started coming to
our parties, started to check us out, and
said, 'Let's record some songs.' So we
went into the studio   He was thinking of
an album, we were thinking of a few
Aaron: We recorded that first song for a
compilation [Selector Dub Narcotic] And
we recorded a few other basic tracks that
were just kind of us goofing around in the
studio. It came out pretty well, so after that
we got invited to record some more.
/5\
What does icu
Miranda July?
K.O.: We have a
with Miranda July,
recording that, now we're working on
remixing.
Are     you     going     to     be     the
background   to   Miranda   July's
spoken word, or is it a different
have to do with1
i CD-EP. We finished
Michiko: No, she didn't want it to be that
way because, I guess, that's the way it
usually is, things that accent her piece. We
did one song where she wrote a script,
and we wrote music to it, but it's a lot
more present than background stuff. It's
actually a song built around her script.
And then we wrote one song and she
Lwrote a script to that.
y*\
What's the unspeakably catchy
Japanese song in the background
of 'Yapparai?'
K.O.: It's a secret!
Michiko: It's not a secret! It's not a secret!
If people knew what it meant, it would
K.O.: It's an old [Japanese] folk song. A
'60s folk song, kind of a funny hippie
song.
Aaron: It's what the title suggests. It's
about a drunkard who falls from earth and
has to go back to heaven.
K.O.: A drunkard got hit by a car, goes to
heaven, keeps drinking in heaven —
there's beautiful women and lots of booze
in heaven — and he's telling you
'heaven's a great place with beautiful
women, lots of booze, and you should all
come up here some time!' And then he
gets kicked out by God.
y7\
What's the difference between c
stand-up bass and a conventional |
bass guitar — apart from the size? j
K.O.: You can make love to the stand-up 1
bass!
Michiko: Some people make love to the {
electric bass. You've seen them.
Aaron: I would say that the differe
would be the lack of tendons in my left j
arm. It's a different instrument. What on
would play on the electric bass to th
same,    exact    melody    would    be
completely different process, just because j
the sound is so different and because
physically so different to hold.  What |
would be a natural thing to do on
electric bass would be impossible for j
someone who's not a virtuoso on
upright. An octave is the entire span of my j
hand. ^^m
K.O.: And it's visually cooler.
Does your bass have a name?
Aaron: No.
Michiko: We have a name for our v(
K.O.: But does [the name of the bass] 1
change depending on the person you j
want it to be at the time? [laughs]
Aaron: It's not a surrogate person. Very j
f8\
Does  icu  pay attention  to  pop \
music?
K.O.: I love Third Eye Blind, [starts to j
sing]: 'I want something else, to get rr
through this ...'
Aaron: I work in a record store, so
know all the names, but it's amazing how j
little I really know. I know the titles of the j
hit songs, but I don't know what they I
sound like.
K.O.: We don't spend any money on it,
we just listen to the radio.
Michiko: I make it a point to avoid it.
Aaron: It's remarkably easy, when you
don't listen to the radio or have cable. If I
you're bent on being a snob about it — I
[to Michiko] no offence — then it's not too |
/^wJ
I     Michi
I     How
/T\
What's the name of icu's van?^V
Aichiko The van is "Frosty." |
low did it get that name?
Karon  'Cause we cool!* J mpety-BflJe
F
■ or -
OR THOSE OF yOO- WHO WERE SAD ABOUT THE RETIREMENT OF SOME GUy CALLED WAyNE
qRETZKy AND OF HIS NUMBER 99 IN HOCKEy, VOU NOW HAVE SOMETHING FUN TO
TKKE HIS PLACE. MELBOURNE BAND, ENDEARING RECORDS SUPERSTXRS. AND POP
SENSXTIONS 99 ARE COMING TO TOWN AND PLXyiNG A COUPLE OF SHOWS. TO
CELEBRATE,  I  INTERVIEWED FOUNDING MEMBER [AURA MACFkRLXNE.
BY SCOT
DiSCORDER: Would you like to tell me what the line up is
that is coming to Canada?
Laura: Myself, Cameron Potts, Tim Evans and Michelle Mansford.
And how about a quick history of 99?
99 was something that I did. It was a recording project which I just
played myself. Then, as time went on, I started thinking maybe I
should move it into a band as I decided to play live. That kind of
happened about three years ago.
What changes have taken place since then, with the style
of music and such? Has it evolved into more of a band
rather than a solo project with other people playing on it?
Well, it never really was a solo project which I got other people to
play on. I just recorded music and people played on it if they liked
to do so. I suppose, musically, you could say that now it is less guitar-
y and we are using more ond more different instruments. I mean, I
play vibraphone and xylophone and Michelle plays those too, so
there is sort of a focus on those at the moment. It just sort of boils
down to what instruments people want to play on each song, though,
I suppose.
The first CD was all yourself, wasn't it?
No there were other people playing on it and whatever they did, they
played — I never told anyone what to play,' they are contributing
whatever they contribute.
How did it come about that you ended up working with
Blair and Endearing?
I sent him a tape and he thought he might like to put out a single and
we decided it would be better to put out a CD rather than a single as
it wasn't going to be that much more expensive to do that. He had
done a lot of stuff with Australian bands previously, which is how I
knew about the label.
Could you give a run-down of what's happening over
here?
With dates and stuff? Well, as far as I know, we're going down the
west coast and then a tour of Western Canada. We're playing down
the coast with the Salteens and then Canada with the Bonaduces,
then we'll do the Midwest and East coast of the States. Once we leave
the US we are going to [do a five-month tour in] Europe.
As everyone plays in so many different bands, how much
of a priority is 99 for people?
I'd say it's more of a priority for me than anyone else and if people
can come along and play, then that's great. We try and accommodate
everyone so they can play in all their bands and do what they want
to do. I'm surprised how much effort all those people want to put in,
considering they have so much other stuff on. We realize that
everyone has other bands and that they have other things to do. At
the moment, Cameron is on tour in the States with Sandro so we'll just
meet him over there, and Tim has Sea Scouts who we will be touring
Europe with when we get over there. Michelle sometimes plays in
other bands but this is her main thing, too.
What happened to Rhonda?
Rhonda didn't want to tour anymore and she couldn't leave Australia,
so she's been pulling back for the last year. It was sad when she
wanted to leave, but we realized it had to happen and she's doing
her own thing now and that's probably better for her.
Do you really want to do a PhD. on Sonic Youth?
Um, no. Not really.
Did you play that song when you played with Sonic
Youth?
No. There are always a few songs on each CD we never play live
and that's one of them.
Yeah, the number of times I wanted to hear 'Popemobile'
and you never did play that.
Oh we never play it. Actually, Cameron likes that song so maybe we
can play it when we get over there.
You used to live in this part of the world, right?
No, I never lived there. But I toured and we were based in Olympia
for about six weeks.
Do you have anything coming out for the tour?
Not particularly. Just after we start touring, a single with a local
[Vancouver] band called Ersatz [will be released]. It's on a label
called Two Face. It is part of a series of about ten split 7"s from a label
in Melbourne. We've also been recording for the third 99 album.
What digits will the third 99 album consist of?
Oh, its called 180°.
Whafs with you changing the spelling of your first name?
Well, it's spelled Laura, but my brother gave me a nickname of Lora
and all his friends used to call me Lora the horror. I used it for a couple
of years, but then I went back to Laura.
What's happening with Choozy [label and distributor
Laura works for] at the moment?
We cut back to the core of what we were distributing as it was
becoming too much work to distribute other people's stuff and it was
becoming a logistical nightmare. So we cut back on everything to
concentrate on the material of the people who are working for
Choozy — stuff like Woozy and Pasty. We try and keep it more
workable that way and we also do the stuff that we swap from
overseas, things like Slab of Concrete and Slampt stuff. There are bits
of pieces here and there from other places, too. But Chapter Music,
which used to get distributed through us, now goes through Corduroy;
instead of Choozy ending, we just cut back to the basics. The point of
it always was to get people to do it themselves. So instead of us taking
it on for them, we'll give them information and say, 'Here's what you
need to know, now go out and get things done.'
What's happening with the label at the moment?
The 99 stuff, Sea Scouts albums, Fiona Beverage and a band called
Boo Hoo. Generally, I just put out my friends bands because I like
their music.
It was sad for me when Choozy cut back because they
had always been so good at getting stuff out and they
carried a lot of things you would never see in record
stores in Melbourne. I never really appreciated how good
it was until I came over here [to Vancouver] and realized
how bad postage really is, and how totally slack some
labels and distribution companies are, even some of the
smaller ones.
Oh, yeah, mailing over there is bad.
The postage system sucks and things just disappear
I was always impressed when we would get mail from people from
around the world who would just put cash in the envelope and mail
it to us. I thought if they can trust us to do that, then the least we can
do is get what they want out to them as quickly as possible.
How did the name 99 come about?
I thought it would be good to have numbers in the name as they
al. They are about the only thing that is the same all
■rid.
What else do you plan on doing while you are over here?
A lot of record shopping.
Good choice! The first two months I was here I just went
nuts finding stuff that you wouldn't ever see in Australia
and the saddest thing is that half of it was by Australian
bands. I mean, finding 7"s by your favourite local bands
that you won't see in the city they come from was really
odd.
Yeah, in North America there are lot of small and medium sized labels
which have really good distribution deals and, in Australia, it's quite
easy to make your music. But there is such a monopoly of distribution
with Shock and MDS that it is quite hard to get anything carried by
anyone else in stores so I guess that makes quite a big difference.
Anyway, I'm looking forward to that.
Finally, if you were a pirate what would your pirate
name be?
Roger the Parrot.*
Laura MacFarlane and her band 99 will be playing in Vancouver on
May 7 at the Vogue (with the Watchmen, show 9pm), May 7 at the
Brickyard (an Endearing Records showcase os part of New Music
West, with Bossanova, Plumtree, The Salteens, Bonaduces, and Klaus
Kinskis, show 9pm), and on May 8 at DV8 (with Bossanova,
Bonaduces, May, early show: noon-4pm).
11 m&Amm
:r the v* PAN
- OCEAN 3
DJDR JONES
' Mystery Machine
- The Dirtmitts
The Papillomas
1MACP0NTIAC
1 ROGUES GALLERY
M__ THE SADDLESORES
JET SET
SOLARBABY
E EVIL ROY SLADE
RETROGRADE
WELCOME TO GRADE 3
F# ALLSTATE CHAMPION
L_lJP5
PIGMENT VEHICLE
WITH GUESTS
28 THt MOUNDS OF
BUSKERVILLE
PLAID TONGUE DEVILS
FAST FREDDIE
[H"SU8 POP RECORDING ARTISTS
^ ZEN GUERRILLA
CHORE
WITH GUESTS
EfU.K.SUBS
DR. KNOW
DAYGLO ABORTIONS
Hey Kidz! Got dreadlocks?
[ver wanted "em?
Know someone who does?
.boy*
MAD
tfAX
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Monday to Thursday 10 am -11 pm | Friday 10 am - Midnight | Saturday 9 am - Midnight | Sunday 10 am -10 pm r\ y definition, Dutch notives Arling and \
f*^ Cameron could be classified as kitsch pop —
l^much like their Emperor Norton Records
labelmates, Fantastic Plastic Machine and Takako
Minekawa — but behind the exterior of happy and
whimsical music are two very serious artists. The
band Arling and Cameron is Gerry Arling and
Richard Cameron and if you caught their brilliant
DJ show at the Sugar Refinery March 27th, you
would know that Cameron has a DJ partner, Karin
Ras, who also helps run their Amsterdam-based
indie record label, Drive-In. Arling and Cameron's
latest offering, All In, does share a musical kinship
with many current Japanese pop bands, the
connection being so significant that in fact they did
write a song called "Arigato We Love You" for
Pizzicato Five's last album and a track called
"Bachelor Pad" on Fantastic Plastic Machine's full-
length debut. They also use Japanese vocals for
various songs on All In. Despite the creative link to
their Japanese friends, however, Arling and
Cameron maintain a distinctive and creative sound i
Arling & Cameron
•4- Amsterdam
Tokyo
by Christine Gfroerer
^
photos by Quentin
Wright
all on their own.
They are both musicians, particularly Gerry
Arling, who is professionally trained in playing jazz
on several different instruments and plays all the
instruments heard on All In. One gets the feeling,
however, that they are more of a collective because
of Karin's active involvement and their approach
to creating music more from a production
perspective. This is not uncommon in today's music,
with many DJs/producers/musicians utilizing
modern technology and sampling to construct
pastiche style pop music.
It all started for Arling and Cameron in their
hometown of Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1993.
When the Iwo first met, Richard was very much into
house and various types of dance music. He
recalls, "We were involved in an art project called
the Virtual Band, doing this project called Airbag.
We had one song that we had remixed by other
people 19 times over and released it as a double
debut CD." Working on that record provided some
good experience for them and from there it led to
more projects and experimentation with other types
of music.
In 1994, they originated their "Easy Tune"
DJparties, principally playing lounge music which
became increasingly popular. "It started out as
something we did for fun," says Karin, "in the
dressing room of a discotheque that could hold
about 30 people. Then it gradually became bigger
and bigger and eventually we DJed a party for
MTV Europe for 2500 people. That was a bit too
much for us ..."
"That was the end for us," adds Richard. "The
day after, on the front page of the national
newspaper was a picture of our party and the
caption read, 'After House Comes Easy Tune,' and
after that we knew it was over. For a couple of
months we were really hyped by the press and had
several sold out parties with thousands of people
and then we decided to call it a day. The MTV
party was in January and we officially declared
Easy Tune dead on the radio in April of '96."
In the two years in which the Easy Tune parties
existed, Gerry and Richard released a series of
singles under the
several different nc
They did this because they wanted to incorporate
new music with their lounge DJ sets, but at the time
there was no modern equivalent of what they were
playing. They released a compilation of these
singles called The Best of Easy Tune on their Drive-
in label (to be re-issued later this year on their
current label Emperor Norton). One song, "Aloha,"
became a Top 40 hit in the Netherlands for them. It
was the success of the first song and the failure of
a follow up single, "Aloha Again" that perhaps
aided them in the realization that it was time to
move on to something new.
Gerry comments, "We made four CDs of easy
type lounge music and we were kind of fed up with
it so we decided to make a change."
Richard contributes to this by saying, "Almost
every song that we make is a reaction to the song
we made before [and] every record we make is a
reaction to the record we made before. With The
Best of Easy Tune compilation, we already made
the contemporary lounge sort of statement so why
bother doing it again?"
Enter the "All In" DJ parties which followed the
demise of Easy Tune. With these new parties came
a change of format and music. This change
received an adverse reaction from the legions of
fans they had cultivated with their popular lounge
sound. Richard comments, "The first time we did
this we lost more than half our audience. We pretty
much lost most of our fans."
Karin justifies that decision: "We have to play
and do what we like and not what people expect
Richard agrees and further maintains, "It's hard
for us to understand why, if there's so much good
music around and there's so many possibilities,
someone would willingly discard whole sections of
the spectrum just because it doesn't fit in with a
certain style or something. As DJs, Karin and I go
into record shops and listen to so much music and
I can't imagine that I would see a great record and
not buy it just because I can't play it in my set. It
seems silly to me. That's what most of the djs and
-4t
^musicians seem to do — they box themselves in." '"■
I From the "All In" parties and with their fresher
1 i perspective, the All In record evolves as does the
i use of Gerry and Richard's own surnames, Arling
\ and Cameron. Richard claims, "In the beginning,
i our projects were very conceptual in a way, and I
\ didn't even regard myself as being a musician
\ anymore. We were also doing video clips and
\ djing these parties. At first, the CDs were more like
I projects rather than a band, but as Arling and
j Cameron, we want to establish ourselves as artists
I again rather than anonymous producers behind the
scenes. So we are more like a band now with our
I new record. All In is a bit less conceptual in the
\ sense that we allow some of the songs to be more
| serious, mood-wise. It's still made in a more free
\ style, in that we don't think too rr
f about it very intuitively; therefore, i
\ fun."
All In is definitely a fun record by some
> interesting and hardworking individuals making
\ sure everyone's having a good time, whether
\ they're Djing a party, interpreting art through iheir
I music, writing soundtracks for fashion shows, or
\ just creating excellent music for your own listening
>e- '• ,
13 S^sSJMEffi
jch and just go
it sounds quite interview and photos by
Quentin Wright
Six years ago, five young Asian men formed
a band through a community music project
in Farringdon, London. Naming themselves
the Asian Dub Foundation, their objective was to
blend every genre of funky music onto a dub
framework, while continuing the educational and
nurturing elements of their workshop origins.
Nowadays, the band with the most self-descriptive
name since the Holly Cole Trio define their music as
"Asian Punk Jungle" — go fig. The NME described
them as "the most important band in Britain" — a
dubious accolade, considering that publication's
love of hyperbole. However, their explosive sell-out
show at the Starfish Room (which their press release,
in a classic example of self-effacing modesty,
describes as "rousing") confirmed the credibility of
the tribute
The star of the show was undoubtedly 20-year-
old MC Deeder Zaman (aka Master D). Although
he appears amazingly young, his raw and
aggressive performance is also beautifully smooth
and confident — hardly surprising since he has been
rapping since age nine with groups such as Joi and
The State of Bengal The first thing you'll need to
know about this band is their battle against racism
has both defined their music and shaped their
career Deeder described how they struggled for
years to get any exposure: "ADF came about when
the British National Party [the extreme right wing
and racist political party] won a seat in the Isle of
Dogs and a young Asian kid got jumped by a gang
of about 20 fascists and put in a coma. ADF had to
come about because no one else was making a
stand. We were just fed up and not scared to speak
up. We met in a workshop which was filmed for a
television documentary — the organization was
about getting young Asian people into higher
education in music. We had all these major record
companies coming to our shows sniffing around,
but no action. The fact that we are five Asian people
in England saying what we are saying . . of course
everyone's going to shut the door in our face. There
[are] a lot of scared A&R men. We were censored
because of our race, the kind of music we were
playing, and because we were documenting secret
histories that have never been told and things you
won't find in your history books — like when the
British army went to India in 1990 and shot down
300 women and children. You're not going to hear
anything about that."
After a couple of years during which ADF
evolved from a dub sound system to a fully fledged
band, they still failed to excite any interest in the
UK music scene. A break came after finding an
audience in France, followed by a very public
campaign by Primal Scream's Bobby Gillespie (who
Deeder describes as a "scholar of music") to get
them noticed: "Bobby said that if we were five white
guys with guitars, we would have been signed.
Instead we had to go to France to make money to
put food on the plate because it was all going
downhill. It was only when Bobby started pointing
at us that we got any attention. The first time we
played out of London was to 9,000 people at
Glasgow Green with Primal Scream. That was really
good — we were blown away. You have to have
ie music industry to point down on
id tell the media what direction to take next
the Beatles We want to hear some future, forward
music — let's look forward for a change."
Guitarist Chandasonic (also known as Steve)
agrees, while echoing the feelings of frustrated music
fans all over the world: "We weren't getting the
coverage in Britain because it was the height of
Britpop. The music industry and press is so tightly
controlled that rather than encourage the unexpected
and the unpredictable, it can only deal with what it
knows — white boys with guitars I think people
should get their priorities right about music — people
look for the references, for something that's gone
before that they can hang onto. I wish some people
se that's the mentality of the place [En
all forms in all different degrees. Yo
leone a Paki to be racist — you can <
! Asian bands on one page/'
— that's the sad thing about England."
Of course, claiming that the British music industry
is politically conservative and racist is nof really
much of a platform. Only the most right wing
reactionary would attempt to deny it. The situation
is aggravated by the constant need for the British
press to be promoting new "scenes." Unfortunately,
if you don't resemble the current crop of high profile
bands, you can wave bye-bye to any kind of press
coverage or record company interest. While ADF
and the Britpop scene are not exactly as different
would befieve in music, in innovation, in new
hybrids, new approaches and encourage
participation. Get rid of the superstar system and
the ego shit. Forget talking about drugs and
smashing up hotel rooms. It's just so boring. We
don't get any of that shit and we don't attract that
shit."
Amen, Brother! Would someone please get the
above statement printed on a couple of thousand
postcards and delivered to the offices of every major
record label in the world? The irony is that the
against brick walls with graffiti on it, looking ha
They put us in really horrible, industrial sett in
time they put us all in a [garbage] bin. We
:ing, 'Why don't you just put us in shit
hina?' But we
as chalk and cheese (hey, it's all pop music, right?),
our lads' cheddar was definitely of a stronger
vintage. The result was that nobody wanted to know:
"We came about when all the Britpop came about
and we got kicked over to one side. Now we just
kicked all that aside ourselves. Britpop was just
nostalgic — looking backwards and looking at the
past. We have a new track called 'Real Great
Britain,' which says it's time to reject the '60s
charade and get rid of Oasis, Pulp and remakes of
pendulum swings both ways. While the press had
no interest in dub bass, jungle rhythms, ragga
rapping and race politics in 1995, by 1998 these
elements were jumped on as it became clear that
Britpop had turned to shit and techno was marketing
itself into mainstream blandness.
With Roni Size's New Forms winning the
Mercury prize for the best album of 1997,
Cornershop selling truckloads of albums around the
globe, and Goldie becoming a genuine showbiz
celebrity, it was obvious that the mood had changed.
True to form, a new term was coined which
combined the new drum'n'bass friendly Zeitgeist
with the Asia-centric nature of a handful of bands:
"The Asian Underground".
"It is insulting," says Deeder. "The Asian scene
is just a media hype, but we can't get away from
that because that's the mentality of the place
[England] Racism exists in all forms in all different
degrees. You don't have to call someone a Paki to
be racist — you can do it by grouping all the Asian
bands on one page."
Nevertheless, the prejudiced nature of the music
business which hindered their progress was now
helping to hype them into the charts. Bands like
Fundamental, Cornershop, and the State of Bengal
— who had been putting out music for years with
minimal support — were suddenly finding themselves
name-checked by music mags, journalists and djs
as being the latest incarnation of the bees knees.
Despite the praise, Chandrasonic laughs about the
way they have been presented by the press: "For
photographs we are usually asked to stand against
brick walls with graffiti on it, looking hard. They
put us in really horrible, industrial settings. One time
they put us all in a [garbage] bin. We're thinking,
'Why don't you just put us in shit or something?' But
we took the piss. You see it's not about doing the
depression, it's not about desolation, and it's not
about no hope." He also dismisses the whole Asian
scene thing as a media creation. "We're not part
of a scene — maybe with Cornershop, but there
are not really any similar bands in Britain and few
elsewhere. Maybe just Audioactive from Tokyo
[currently touring with ADF in North America] and
Zebdar from France. We're not competing with
anybody, we're just trying to inspire people to get
involved — to make good positive music and say
something that's going to change something — and
to not just reproduce but to come up with something
That word: "original." Anyone talking to a
member of ADF may notice how frequently it occurs
in their conversation. It is clear that the quest for
originality is what has brought the Asian Dub
Foundation to their unique musical formula. These
guys want to hear something they have never heard
before and they want you to hear it too. Their desire
to embrace every musical genre from bhangra to
thrash metal and play it over a punishing jungle
beat is what makes this band so special. Perhaps
the strangest element to their music is Chandrasonic's
guitar work. Combining reggae rhythms, power
chords, weird melodies, and occasional flashes of
surf and country picking he is in a field of his own.
1* MAV 99 After all, jungle, techno, hip hop and dub are not
known for their axe heroes. Where did he develop
his style?
"I have always been really interested in
electronic music. I used to be an ambient dj (as a
member of ambient techno act Higher Intelligence
Agency), but guitars are still good things to play on
stage and to watch as a performance thing. It's just
that most of the time they are used to play such shit
music. The reason why the guitar is peripheral all
the time is that people ain't got a clue how to make
it work. I like the sound of bass and drums and I
like to keep it rolling with the guitar, but I think that
you have to throw away everything to do with pre-
electronic music: nice melodies and chords. I play
what works. Sometimes I don't play at all or I just
play sounds. There are certain things I do which
are not very guitar-y. Bo Diddley was interesting.
He said, 'I don't play the guitar like a guitar, I play
it like a drum,' and I'm kind of that way. I'm more of
o programmer and a sampler and I play the guitar
like that. We all program, all five of us — it's very
important."
Their live set featured most of the songs from
their new release Rafi's Revenge. Lyrically, ADF hove
dispensed with adolescent alienation, the protocol
of modern relationships and metaphors about the
environment. "Our song 'Buzzin' is our anti-slacker
anthem," says Chandrasonic. "It's all this stuff like,
you're in a band so you don't have to get up in the
mornings and you don't have to think about
anything. That was done in the '60s and '70s —
people chill out too fucking much, you know. No
one wants to hear them bands — they think they're
big and when they get to France they have to open
for us. 'Buzzin' has a bit too radical a sound [to be
a worldwide hit]. Although 'Free Satpal Ram' is the
one that got us a lot of attention and it is heavy."
Their track "Free Satpal Ram" deals with the
controversial imprisonment of an Asian man,
convicted of murder in 1986 after defending himself
against a violent racist attack. The single is part of
a major campaign instigated by the ADF to bring
public attention to his plight. They have recently
visited him in prison. "The campaign is still going
on," Deeder says. "We handed a letter to [British
Home Secretary] Jack Straw through [Creation label
boss] Alan McGee [and] things are moving." The
UK has always had its fair share of musicians with
a mission, but such overt activism makes the
pretensions of many of those high profile bands seem
laughably low-key and self-serving. Chandrasonic:
"The Manic Street Preachers are not at all political
and I hate that guy's voice. In Britain they are
overstated and overrated. When they get abroad
no one wants to know."
The album showcases a comprehensive spectrum
of beats, from the softest ping-pong ball bounce to
the CN Tower landing on BC Place during a Promise
Keepers meeting. A hip selection of collaborators
have helped keep their ideas new and diverse.
"We've worked with loads of people," says Deeder.
"Audioactive, Adrian Sherwood, Les Fabulous
Troubadors, Primal Scream [their next single,
'Unchanelled Frequency'/'No Civil Disobedience']
and we did a few remixes with Junior Delgano [on
his latest album Fearless]. [Also,] The Sugarhill Gang
came to our rehearsal space when they were doing
a show in London and they might be using one of
our tracks on their new album."
Talking about other people's music, Deeder
praises dub/ragga merchants Sizzla, Linton Kwesi
Johnson and Zebdar. However, Chandrasonic
throws out a few surprising recommendations:
"Lauren Hill is good and I love the new TLC. You
see, the production on all these new R'n'B tracks is
getting really junglist, especially the vocals. There's
a lot of looseness
mentation with the
programming that
before and I think
that jungle has
had that influence.
Ti m ba I a n d
[superstar
producer of SWV,
Jay-Z, and Missy
Elliot] is taking all
the credit, though.
they have a product fhey can put out. We're thinking
of puffing out a compilation CD. We have brought
stuff out already, but it's mainly being used as a
piece of our portfolio to get funding."
As an example of the empowering nature of
musical education and encouragement, Deeder is
a shining example. "I went straight out of college
into an environment where people are much older
than me. People don't believe I'm only 20. I'm not
a supernatural person or anything — if any kid was
put in that environment they would end up thinking
differently. I'd rather be where I am than at college
in England where they're not going to teach me
much and not going to give me any confidence. It's
scary going to school in England. When I see my
friends in my home town now, they've got nothing
to talk about, nothing to say, and nothing that will
inspire them. It's all about being cocooned and
locking yourself away from everybody, of being in
your own car, not traveling on public transport. I'm
here to fuck you over or you're here to fuck me
over. A lot of kids out there might switch on the telly
boring old guy in
^ul^I^^^^^^Ur a suit 9°'n9 on
and  on   about
politics and they
switch off.  It's
boring and they
•  he   has
beats. He's never
j'ingle but he must
have [been
influenced]."
beginnings, the members of Asian Dub Foundation
have continued to be active in encouraging music
projects, workshops and education programmes.
Deeder explains their operations: "We have two
workshops in London. We employ our own tutors
who mainly do outreach work and we have our
own equipment. We are really dedicated towards
music technology. We'll get five kids and do a 10
week block with them, working on music, depending
on how much they know. Hopefully, at the end of it
ow, they've got nothing to
, nothing to say, and notl
rill inspire them. It's all al
cocooned and locking youi
from everybody, of bein
iwn car, not traveling on pi
>ort. I'm here to fuck you <
I're here to fuck me over, j
s out there might switch or
ind see some boring old gi
going on and on about po
politics is
mentioned, they
don't want to
know what the
hell you're
talking about. If
them understand
LIFE they might
see that it affects
way and they
will really want to get into it. In our song 'Dub
Mentality,' we say that Dub is a place we come
together to argue and debate. Politics affects
everybody."
Sound familiar? Most musicians with any
pretensions of cred. have tried to make their point
by personalizing political issues. Of course, it helps
if it has a good tune and you can dance to it.
Thousands have tried, including Sly Stone, Joe
Strummer, Chuck D, James Brown, Ani diFranco,
Bob Marley, Ian Mackaye, John Lennon and hell,
conservative, segregated, and trivial as ever. Deeder
thinks things are changing and cites his old pals
Primal Scream as an example Having spent about
10 years working with such dub and funk luminaries
as Adrian Sherwood and George Clinton [as well
as the ADF], the Scream still play to a white, male
indie crowd: "They will start to reach a black
audience," he says. "They are on a journey and
they've gone all the way from rock and heavy metal
to playing dub to a mainly white audience, but they
are educating their crowd. It's going to take time
for them to bring all the communities together, but
it's happening slowly."
Similarly, Deeder explains that the music of ADF
is also evolving: "We are junglists but the new stuff
is like futuristic ragga. That's what direction we're
going in. We're not getting away from the jungle
sound but we're moving on. We want to try different
things. It might be a lot more beautiful this time
around because we want to give the louder side a
break — although it might be a bit more aggressive
[the] next time." He denies, however, that this new
direction is a reaction to the continuing reports of
the demise of jungle and it's mellow little brother,
drum'n'bass. In fact, ADF have been one of the
loudest voices calling for the humane destruction of
d'n'b. Chandrasonic says that "a lot of drum'n'bass
is just prog rock" while their bass player Dr Das
called it [in the NME] "introspective, indulgent
psychobollocks." Deeder: "Where did jungle come
from? It came from putting heavy basslines under
ragga You can hear tracks by Nina Simone which
have a heavy, groovy, swinging breakbeat — it's
the dub of the '90s. Like everything else, when they
techno-ise it, it sojnds horrible, like someone puking
up in a washing machine. You have to check the
whole history of the music and see what was original
and what was horrible. Jungle was a racist term
and when people started using the word jungle it
was an attempt to turn that around Jungle becoming
drum'n'bass was like rhythm and blues becoming
heavy metal. But I don't feel bad about Roni Size
winning the Mercury. That was a turning point — it
put jungle up there and got it into people's minds at
last. You can always tell which music has had. all
the originality sieved out. It's always been the case
and the worst thing is that because the United States
is quite behind, it always gets the sieved out crap."
If you want to hear something that doesn't sound
like puking up in a washing machine, Rafi's Revenge
is out on ffrr/London. For more information about
the Satpal Ram campaign, check out http://
www.asiandubfoundation.com/satpal/.•  A
15E#?c£a®3® 	
comin' up next issue
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tarn-10pm | Video Philter
It's 1977. My little eight-year-
old heart can barely stand the
excitement. After a Saturday
morning at the roller rink honing
my shoot-the-duck and avoiding
being kissed on the hand during
the "couples' skate," I was being escorted by the big kids (my
1 2-year-old baby-sitter and her
friends) to the biggest movie to
hit town in ages No one around
me could stop talking about how
greot it was going to be When
we got to the theatre, the line-up
was around the block. An hour
later, popcorn in hand, we settled down into our seats for the
cinematic joyride of a lifetime.
My life has never been the same
since I saw The Shaggy DA.
Yes, it's blockbuster season
again. Thank The Godfather,
Francis Ford Coppola and
the wizards at Paramount for initiating this innovative/bankrupting marketing ploy wherein one
movie is advertised in every
possible way in every possible
moment — it's only a matter of
time before you can pick up
your free roll of Jedi Toilet Paper at McDonald's and your
$9.99 pre-lubed light saber at
the Loveshop — before the film
opens simultaneously on three
to four thousand screens across
America Memorial Day (known
in Canada as the last weekend
in May) is the official Go date
for the season and this year
there are already three contenders for the Hollywood Queen of
Summer title. By popular estimation, Star Wars I: The Phantom Menace is going to be seen
by every pair of working eyes in
the world Mike Myers' spy
spoof sequel Austin Powers:
The Spy Who Shagged Me
and Will Smith's third foray into
the summertime green, Wild
Wild West, are looking to mop
up Star Wars' rear. There are
three kinds of people in this
world: those who LOVE blockbusters and live for the cinematic summer; those who abhor them and wait out the sunnier climes in the air-conditioned
confines of the Fifth Avenue Cinemas; and those who talk a lot
about hating the crass Hollywood marketing machine, then
rush out to catch each of its offerings as soon as it hits the
theatres.   For   all   of   these
cinephiles, I have rental advice
for the upcoming season: a postcoital dose of more and/or a
video antidote. Though all my
suggestions this month are blatant Hollywood product, each
undercuts the Tinsel Town monolith with hilarity, though not always wittingly.
George Lucas is eagerly
awaiting his move up the chain
from milli- to billionaire and he
needs your help. After adding
your bucks to his big bag of green,
if you're still not sci-fi satisfied and
need a little more of that space
teamwork thing, Paul
Verhoeven s STARSHIP
TROOPERS is just the rental. Beyond the gratuitous violence you'll
be craving after the computer-generated family muppetry of Star
Wars I, Troopers provides a
whopping helping of the irony
so lacking in the myth-making
Lucas series. The hilariously fascist overtones, the riotously
unflappable smile of Denise
Richards, the guffaw-inducing
hyper-seriousness of Michael
Ironsides, and the blatant silli-
elements were in Verhoeven's
Showgirls, for anything but the
director stabbing at the heart of
the Hollywood blockbuster and
bleeding all the pretension out
of it. To take Starship Troopers
seriously is to miss a really great
comedy.
Up front, I thought AUSTIN
POWERS: INTERNATIONAL
MAN OF MYSTERY was      a
really great comedy. Proving
once again that weird is funny
and Canadians have the mo
hilariously fucked  up mind;
Mike Myers wrote and starred
in a film that thankfully NO
ONE could ever take seriously
The bad one-liners reminisc
of the best of Mel Brooks c
the swingin' '60s fashions c
music providing a joyous pul
Austin Powers' only fault in my
its mod<
of the whole
cannot be a
-iterpri:
Columbia
O  X
May 1 - Thrill Seekers • Shag 57 • Saul Duck
May 3 - Go-Go 1 3 • Sturno
May 4 - Bauqthral • MK Ultra • Swerve
May 5 -Moral Panic • The Hill
May 6 - Vibrator • Templar
• Plan Orange • Fell • PURRr
May 7- Dogtooth Violet   • My Tragic Sister
• Koark • Strong Like Tractor • Sideshow
May 8 - Saturnhead • MK Ultra • 5 Minute Miracle • Seven • Bliss
May 10 - Cereal Porn • Split Lip Ashtray • Indirekt
May 1 1 - Pious • Residue
May 12 - Eternal
May 13 - Micheal Chase • Joey Shileleigh & The Dirty Little Jerks • Larry
May 14 - By-Product • Autumnex • Tractor
May 15 - The Livids • Francophobes • With Guests
May 17 - Polo Convoy • Faithless Wonder • Willis
May 18 - Furios • Chapter 3 • The Humans
May 19 - Dragline with Guests
May 20 - Pound • Doug Smith - Kevin Armstrong • With Guests
May 21- Fiction Entertainment Presents... Carbon 6 • Himsa (From Seattle)
• Dialate • Sileophage
May 22 - Thurston 5 • Liars
May 25 - Censure • With Guests
May 26 - Zuckuss • Myopia • With Guests
May 27 - Them Damn Coyotes • Mach Turtle
May 28 - Soldiers of Misfortune • Brain Dead • Side 67
May 29 - 60 Cycle Buzz • With Guests
May 31 - Skin Flick • The Sky Fishermen • With Guests
303 COLUMBIA STREET VANCOUVER
FOR B00KNG INFO CALL THOMAS (ALL TYPES OF MUSIO
Thi
l  ha
Dpening sequenc
energy and fun thi
other film beginning that I c
think of. My personal anticif
tion is huge for the not-qui
prequel-but-set-in-the-past-sc
can't-wait Austin Powers: The
Spy Who Shagged Me. If, like
*, you c
t for s
for your  spy  spoof fi
James Bond isn't doing it for you
anymore, get to your neare
OUR MAN FLYNT Created
1966 to try to cash in on, ar
send up, the genre of the new
profitable Mr. Bond, Derek Flynt
(played by Oscar winner and
slot machine shill James Coburn)
is a not just a super spy who
picks up babes while solving international mysteries and stopping international syndicates.
He's an extra-super-hyper spy
who speaks a gaziliion languages (including dolphin) and
keeps a bevy of babes (one in
every colour) at his house.
Watching the ultra-'60s look
and deadpan antics of Our
Man Flynt, and it's slightly inferior sequel, In Like Flynt you
can clearly see where Mike
Meyers got much of his Powers
inspiration.
WILD WILD WEST is the
somewhat dark horse of the
summer dash to the box office
finish; so far it hasn't generated
fhe i
of e
*   the
•tin Powers sequel. With the
multi-talented charm of Will
Smith in the lead, however, its
moneybags can be assured that
it will at least show. A remake
of a 1 960's Robert Conrad TV
show that I'd never heard of
until I caught it in Asia on Rupert
Murdoch's StarTV, the film version will hopefully retain the sci-
character charm of the original.
charming, but not quite intentionally so, is TOMBSTONE
One of two dueling Wyatt Earp
stories to be released in 1993
(the other being the absolutely
no fun Kevin Costner opus,
Wyatt Earp), Tombstone is a
spoof masquerading as a western,  and the only one who
>  the
oke is Val
er's Doc Holiday. The B-tier
actors assembled for this touching story of a frontier marshal,
his brood of over-mustachioed
brothers, his hop-head wife,
and the actress who loves him,
including Kurt Russell, Bill
Paxton, Michael Biehn, Jason
Priestley (I), Billy Zone, Sam
Elliot, Dana Delany, Charlton
Heston and Frank Stallone (!!),
read like a who's who of actors
not to hire when you're making
a serious movie. And, thus, this
movie full of unintentional double entendres and ecstatically
bad acting — in other words, a
Hollywood classic that can't be
missed.
Whether any of the summer
of 1999's blockbusters will, like
Tombstone, earn the title of
"Hollywood Classic" will be discovered in a few months' time.
Meanwhile, for those of you
who would like to put your talents at separating the cinematic
winners from the bargain basement losers, get right on over to
the Mr. Showbiz website
(www.mrshowbiz.com) and
sign up to play their annual
Summer Blockbuster Challenge.
An addictive way to forget it's
sunny outside, the game gives
you a chunk of play money with
which to buy and sell movies.
Based on the fir:
weekends box c.....
your "studio" makes a profit or
sinks a wad. Fabulous prizes are
proffered to the winner. Artistic
merit has no value. We are, .after all, talking about Hollywood.•
o opening
LOCAtEd IK tHE stUdENt UNION BUl^dlNG At
6138 sUB BOU^EVARd
PIT PUB
MOKdAY tO sAtUEdAY    11:00^
sUNdAY 1__-00:pm - 11:001*1
683-3757
•ffiitfeSSESLTl 7
mm
BY THE INVISIBLE CLAIRE
/Av
ihinq\
Warning: over-the-counter flu medication, haunted speed-shitting
turntables, and obscure I 980s-vintage experimental records do not
mix! Those decelerating 303s can do some serious damage to vulnerable nervous systems. Herr Schrapnel was right.
^e
J
I he Sonorous Envelope, by
I surround-sound guitar pop
I masters MERIDIAN
1520, tells ofthe return to the
womb Lulled into a medicinal
slumber by Neo Citran vapours
and flu-begotten stupor, I can relate Meridian 1520's single is
gorgeous and glimmery, with a
bit of a 4AD sound to it. The B-
side, "Hypercube," features a
vast wall of guitar ond psychedelic bleeps Here is happy
sparkling pop that is nostalgic for
all the right reasons (Brentwood,
PO Box 2062, Providence, Rl,
02905)
THE GOLDING INSTITUTE
is back on the ethnographic
death march, bent on revealing
the social history of washroom
facilities in an era of global political economy   Sounds of the
International Airport Restrooms is
about as funny as pseudo-academic documentation can get:
CECIL
SEASKULL
£>._
secretively recorded snippets of
life in airport bathrooms in Hawaii, Seoul, Bali, Singapore,
LA., Auckland and Brisbane; a
little socially/historically con-
i; Esperanto trans
lation insert, complimentary paper toilet seat cover As a student
of anthropology, I find this 7" —
which is knees and shoulders above the Institute's
last effort, Sounds of the
San Francisco Adult Book
Stores — particularly
amusing, but the real
joke is neither cryptic nor
academic. (Planet Pimp,
PO Box 411193, San
Francisco, CA, 94141-
1 193)
If you've ever felt the
twin emotions of girl love
and heartache, then
CECIL SEASKULL has got your
number. East Coast ex-patriate
and former Nerdy Girl
frontwoman Cecil sings the lovely
and touching "Friends Again" in
her trademark high-pitched, na
sal voice, reminding us all just
how painful lost (and reclaimed)
friendship can be The feedback
which underlies Cecil's simple
guitar playing is an excellent
touch Ms. Seaskull also covers
a Sloan tune, "Bells On," turning it into a romantic duet lhat
could beat any hackneyed AM
radio love dyad hands down.
This 7" is far too short. (Daydream, PO Box 34082, Scotia
Square RPO, Halifax, NS, B3J
3S1)
Our Maritime provinces are
truly blessed with PIGGY Those
cold and rocky shores could do
with a little brightening up and
Piggy is a band uniquely suited
to the task. Describing themselves
as "the Calypso Orchestra of the
Maritimes," the ten people who
comprise Piggy's regular line-up
make glorious, catchy calypso
that is as sunny as a Caribbean
afternoon. Just listen: flute, Hawaiian guitar, drums, bass, violin, guiro, trumpet, tenor sax, alto
sax, and an ass-kicking sense of
fun. Calypsos to Please You —
following up previous Piggy releases with titles such as Calypso
Avalanche, Apocalypso, and
Crazy for Calypso — features
four smashing songs on cheery
pink vinyl. Will this be the next
dumb record industry retro trend?
Let us all earnestly, sincerely, fervently hope not. (Cinnamon
Toast, PO Box 2665, Halifax
Central, Halifax, NS, B3J 3P7)
I made a few jaws drop in
horror when I revealed to some
CiTR lounge-*surfers that I had
heard "By The Way,"
BUILT TO SPILL s cover
of an older Heavenly
tune, playing on CFOX
not too long ago. The dismay and disbelief which
greeted my announce-
gible. But dude, there's
no doubt about it. It's a
nice tune, too MARINE
RESEARCH, the band
formerly known as Heavenly, cover a Built To Spill
track, "Sick & Wrong,"
on the other side of this
Great bouncing bass,
great keyboard lines,
wonderful silky-smooth vocals
from Amelia. The only faux pas,
in my mind, is the (thankfully brief)
foray into near-rap towards the
middle of this otherwise seamless
song. (K, PO Box 7154, Olympia, WA, 98507)
THE FATAL FLYIN'
GUILLOTEENS make fast, furious, insane rockabilly punk
dressed up in thick Texan accents
and very smart outfits. The five
songs on Danger West! are not
recorded very well, but it works.
(Peek-A-Boo, PO Box 49542,
Austin, TX, 78765)
Another hard and staticky
rock band is the RC*5 from
Seattle In The Bottle features four
high-octane songs of varying levels of distinctiveness. My pick is
"American Ruse," which has excellent heavy basslines and some
strong singing. (My Fat Ass, PO
Box 45133, Seattle, WA,
98145-0133)
"Gone Away," by TREN
BROTHERS Mick Turner and Jim
White, is a slowly meandering
soundscape built from an expert
combination of traditional rock/
melodica and tape loops. This
song is superbly produced, full-
sounding and rich. The only
break in an otherwise mellow experience comes towards the end
of this long song, where the Brothers take a few seconds out to
kickstart the pace. "Kit's Choice"
is essentially the same: instrumental, leisurely, exquisite. (Secretly
Canadian, 1703 N. Maple,
Bloomington, IN, 47404)*
Printed
Matters
FRED CHARLEUX
Costaz perd le mort
(Vent d'Ooest)
DANIEL PENNAC
ta Fee carabine
(Gallimard)
IAN RANKIN
Knots & Crosses, Hide &
Seek, Tooth & Nail, A Good
Hanging and Other Stories,
Strip Jack, Mortal Causes,
Black &  Blue,  and   The
Hanging Garden
(Orion)
This is probably the last of these
mindless treatises, as pressures in
my life — chiefly, TV, school, and
TV — hove become too much. So
I'll try to get bluntly to the point
rather than hold up any potential
successor any longer. This month:
murder and mayhem.
It has been years since I have
written, read, or conversed in
French with any degree of frequency. Though resumes present
me as somewhat bilingual and
despite having knowledge of finding accented characters without
using "Insert Symbol," nine-tenths
of the language are now a mys-
18 WKY 99
tery to me: hence an effort to
read two books in French by
French authors. Both follow a
similar genre, the comedic detective story. Equipping myself with
two dictionaries, the challenge
Pennac's to Fee carabine
{The Fairy Godmother, available
in English through Harvill) was
— at least his English publisher
As the French purportedly find
Jerry Lewis sans Dean Martin
funny, as did the Americans; and
as "bestseller" could equally be
applied to the latest John
Grisham book as it could to the
latest by Umberto Eco, such a
statement needs to be viewed
under an electron microscope.
With this consideration quashed,
we enter Pennac's scenario. The
Parisian suburb of Belleville, rapidly becoming an immigrant's
quarter through President
Pompidou's gentrification of the
city centre and typical human
xenophobia, has of late been fhe
venue of a throat-slashing madman daring to rival Robespierre's
descriptions generally providing
ample conception of his characters' environments. Still, this is a
rather small work causing some
characters to be somewhat ill-developed It is, however, enticing
with a few interesting plot twists.
BY GREG ELLIOTT
guillotines Our murderer's victims
are old ladies; his weapon, a
straight razor. This atmosphere of
terrorized seniors serves as a
backdrop to the first murder of the
book Noticing an old woman
about to cross the street as well
as the presence of two large
"Arab" men coming down the
street, Inspector Vanini, supporter
of the Front National, rushes to
her aid. Instead, the old lady pivots and puts a bullet through his
skull before resuming her progress
through the shocked onlookers.
Racist Vanini, however, was the
prize pupil of Chief Superintendent Cercaire — cercaire being a
bug of some type — who hastily
proceeds to the scene determined
that an immigrant, preferably an
Arab, murdered the young inspector. However, as this is a review
and not a book report, there is
nothing else to say.
On the whole, the language
is fairly simple with some slang
and words I could not find in either my French-English or French
dictionaries (small as they are).
Pennac's prose is fast paced, his
Charleux's Cosfoz perd le
mort (loosely translated: "Costaz
Loses the Body") is his first novel.
His protagonist, Roger Costaz,
the Police Superintendent of
Annecy, resembles an aging student protester from 1968. His
compatriots, Inspector Lorenzo
Viale and Chief Inspector Juillard,
have their own foibles. Viale continually makes obscenely poor
puns and pulls pranks. His immediate superior, Juillard, presses
for the use of proper French, acting as the voice of culture and
reason, while spouting peculiar
comments. Between these two exasperating fellows and Costaz's
own oddities, it is surprising the
three rose to their current ranks.
Yet their interrelations become
more strained in their latest case.
A body is found in a hotel room,
purportedly having been
drowned. Unfortunately, the victim was almost completely dry.
However, once the corpse is
placed in the morgue, it goes
walkabout, eventually to be rediscovered on a ski hill in full regalia, its face damaged by an
encounter with a rock. That a
body should so easily escape
from a heavily guarded facility is
worrisome enough, but suddenly
bodies begin appearing in other
cities under similarly bizarre circumstances. Adding to the eccentricity of the case, the murders are
alphabetical according to victims'
family names and towns; for instance, Jacques Asselin in
Annecy. Puzzled by this twisted
congruency, Costaz seeks the
assistance of an ex-con, Julien,
Mercadieux. What follows are
gun fights, punch-ups, conspiracies, car chases, and anything
else that would do well on television. Even so, or likely because
of it, this book is enjoyable.
The language is full of slang,
conveniently footnoted for the
ignorant (like myself), and the
pace is fairly rapid. For a light
comedy, the characters are well-
developed and frequently amusing, and, as a first novel, it is fairly
well-written. It might be a little
more violent than required, but
Back to the English language
and north to Scotland (except for
Tooth & Nail, previously released
as Wolfman] we have Ian
Rankin's Inspector Rebus series.
Detective Inspector John Rebus
(Detective Sergeant in Knots &
Crosses] is an alcoholic, chainsmoking ex-Para divorce with a
daughter he scarcely understands
and a strange charm to women.
Like the detectives of old, Rebus
works as a loner, almost purely
on instinct, which inevitably leads
to him receiving a damn good
pounding in each novel. Like
Columbo, the novels often begin
with the crime in the process of
being committed through the eyes
of the murderer; Rebus' car is
similarly dilapidated to further the
comparison. Even so, the series
is surprisingly not formulaic.
Though one knows that Rebus will
solve the case in the end — these
are detective series, after all — one
does not know what is next in store
for Rebus, save that it will inevitably add to his self-loathing. Rankin's
pace has slowed over time, permitting the greater expansion of
Rebus and subordinate characters.
Thenc
fhe
able, and have improved
series progresses. He even won
an award for Black & Blue, certainly one of the best of the series so far.
Well, wading through the
bodies of this month's nonsense,
I am reminded of a Simpsons
episode: "Mrs. Pummelhorse! I'd
like to get down now ..."• H
PIN       ESS
by Miyu
I think you know me. Maybe you are me. I am normal. So normal that
I can't describe myself. I'm not fat or blonde or ugly. I have one
earring in each ear. You've met me before. We've been introduced
four times, but you can't remember my name. Or else I look
exactly like Trisha or Chrissy or your mother's accountant. On
the bus, you don't look at me, you watch the cross-eyed
guy floss his teeth with the corner of a business card and
spit carrot bits onto my leg. You listen to the crazy guy
sing, "All you need is God, he'll listen to you ... Why
don't you kill me ..." But you don't say Bless You
when I sneeze because you never hear it.
So this is my revenge. I will write this
phrase on your desk, your bathroom wall,
your steering wheel, and it will scare you
because it might be true. You Are All
Alone. If that made you laugh, keep
reading this and I'll make you feel
good about yourself because
you are so much better than
me. If that made you cry,
keep reading this because I will show you
what happiness is.«
bve *?v-anK
I we cws\c, ^nner, espressc
open Urte...
1115 Qv-<xcw;l\e st «>83-?poM
May Featured Artist
Tara MacLean
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Tara MacLean t-shirts on sale for $15
New Releases
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SATURDAY, MAY 29
ALLEY CAT SCRAMBLE
19®m&£smm Under
Review
Not that they don't resort to
cliches, they're just well placed
They clearly have skills and 1999
is quite good  But I'm a picky lis-
3 done
APHEX TWIN
Windowlicker EP
(Warp)
New! Improved! What you've all
been waiting fori
It slices! It dicesl It's easy to
clean and it comes with b detachable node!
Can be used on any surface,
without staining! It's Aphex
Twin-LITE.
Same Yummy Aphex Twin
Goodness.
Same Great Flavour.
Same Fucked-up Sounds ond
Now with only HALF THE LISTENING TIME
All new. Be the first on your
block to own this great new product.
(Some exceptions apply Null and
void in Quebec See your local
record store for details)
Anthony Schrag
CRAIG ARMSTRONG
The Space Between Us
(Melankolic/Virgin)
While Craig Armstrong's
name may not be familiar to you,
undoubtedly his music has entered your ears at some point
without you knowing it. Having
worked with Madonna, U2,
and Massive Attack, Craig
Armstrong's achievements are
impressive. However, the relative
obscurity of his own music has
been a result of the numerous
soundtracks he's worked on, foregoing the attention-drawing
arena of popular music With The
Space Between Us, Armstrong
blends the two worlds in a seamless fashion Epic string phrases
are both haunting and memorable. While IripJiop breaks almost
like a heartbeat are essential to
the feel of the album, the 12
songs seem more classically oriented, giving the album a soundtrack-like mood. The inclusion of
"Balcony Scene," a track from the
Romeo & Juliet soundtrack, enforces that sensation. The album
somehow maintains a duplicity of
dark introversion overcome by
majestic, uplifting layers of
strings. On "This Love,"
Armstrong enlists the help of
Cocteau Twin Liz Fraser for a
vocal effect that is both a return
to Massive Attack's Mezzanine
and a step away from any previously covered ground The Space
Between Us is a solid statement
that Armstrong should be taken
seriously for his own music and
not for his support of other acts.
A beautiful album.
Patrick Gross
BETA BAND
The Three EPs
(Astralwerks)
The comparison is made every
time this band is mentioned, but
on first listening to The Beta
ALBUMS • ZINES • RECORDED MEDIA
ing a huge motherfucker of an
album    We might have to wait
for another year, though, because
this definitely isn't it.
Quentin Wright
Band it is hard to not think of
Beck in one of his country/blues
moods Most of the elements are
present: a loosely programmed
strummed acoustic guitar A sprinkling of antique instruments
wheeze through their last number
before being junked forever while
a gravelly voice drones on about
junkyard dogs and hubcaps.
However, The Beta Band have
taken Mr. Hanson's formula and
added a degree of experimentation and spacey technical effects,
with variable results. On tracks
like "B+A," when it all comes together in a crazy mess of laid-
back funk-pop, you could (almost)
believe that you are listening to
the album of the year "Monolith,"
on the other hand, is one of many
tune-free snooze-fests which suggests that this proudly self-indulgent band would benefit from a
humour transplant Any collection
of singles and B-sides is bound
to suffer from patchy quality, and
in this case the good songs are
swamped by several pointlessly
long dub workouts, ultimately
making for a disappointing and
unsatisfying album
Quentin Wright
THE BLACK HALOS
The Black Halos
(Live Fast Die Young)
It's always been difficult to pin this
band down It's all very well rolling around on stage in a pair of
ripped PVC pants on Friday
night, but the rock V roll outlaw
image fades when they are commonly seen around town holding
down respectable jobs, being
nice to their girlfriends and drinking moderately in the company
of a designated driver. Similarly,
this album has the song titles,
photography, record label (a subsidiary of Sub Pop) and producer
Pack Endino) to promise a trashy
punk 'n' roll classic, but the actual content is ... well ... kinda
disappointing, actually. The
smooth production job sounds
like Endino (producer of Nirvana and Tad) is auditioning for
the next Def Leppard album,
ond is totally unsuited to the
three-chord thrash-alongs for
which the Halos are known. The
drums sound awful and the
wimpy guitar suggests that the
boys need to ditch the fuzz
boxes and learn to crank up the
The Black Halos have the
potential to be lauded along with
The Make-Up and The
Hellacopters, but this album
can only be compared to post-
punk underachieves like The
Lurkers or The Members Of
course, that still makes them head
and shoulders above most other
bands in their class and we all
know they are capable of mak-
BIG RUDE JAKE
Big Rude Jake
(Attic)
Ever since I discovered Big
Rude Jake's 8/ue Pariah a couple years ago, I've been waiting
for another album of burlesque
swing to come our way. Sad to
say, Big Rude Jake polished up
his wingtips, left the band behind,
moved to America, signed to a
major label, decorated the new
CD with stars, stripes and eagles
no less, and then produced a
It's not exactly bad, it's just
not good; it's pretty much indistinguishable from any other contemporary swing album, and
we've been led to expect so much
more. Gone is the rock-bottom
blues influence in favour of a
heavy horn section, though thankfully the Hammond organ stayed
with him. There are a few worthwhile tunes like the sultry "Mercy
for the Monkey Man" and "East
Side Dive." Jake's still big, rude,
wears a signature white suit, and
it's still a good album to strip by,
but oh the curse of the overproduced, over-determined sound.
Maybe if he went back to recording after last call ...
Anna Friz
BLUETIP
Join Us
(Dischord)
This is a pretty terrible record, if
you ask me. It's DC-core kind of
stuff, but without any sincerity or
originality to it. This is cheesy
hard rock with some okay discordant guitar parts, lots of predictable dynamics, and awful
vocals. I think this band tries way
too hard to look, sound, and
seem "cool" within the "emo"
scene and doesn't work nearly
hard enough on being creative
with their songwriting This record
is even worse than their first one.
Chris Corday
CASSIUS
1999
(Virgin)
French ex-Motorbass and La
Funk Mob producers Boom
Bass and Zadr serve up an economical big beat house record.
Not as savvy as compatriots Daft
Punk and maybe closer in style
to The Chemical Brothers
except without the bombast,
Cassius's songs have the minimum of substance necessary to
do the right thing. That Cassius
has successfully discovered and
exploited this minimum without
resorting to too many cheap tricks
or gimmicks is commendable.
music For my taste, most house
is often too obvious and corny.
Definitely part of what makes me
enjoy this album is its lack of
"disco diva" vocals.
All that said, while I expect
that this record is not destined to
become a long term resident in
anybody's collection, I don't quite
understand Virgin records aggressive advertising campaign.
Such overdone effort seems
wasted on an album that can
, get by on its c
What
gratuitousness might make even
the typically overactive and easy
"dance market" consumers pale
and shy away. Give it a rest. But
I guess the geniuses at Virgin are
after a bigger prize: usurping Fat
Boy Slim's lucrative mainstream
popularity, particularly here and
in the US. Good luck, but here's
some advice for you chumps anyway: get a good video. Don't
believe the hype. / 999 is worth
Brady
COLDCUT
Let's Replay
(Ninja Tune)
First of all, I know next to nothing
about any music that's "electronic," or whatever the catch
phrase of the day happens to be
for that genre of music. Secondly,
I know for a fact that often remix
albums are overpriced and not
worthwhile. That said, this is a
really fun record. There are lots
of funky beats, pace changes and
nice record scratching going on,
the samples aren't cheesy, and
the actual bass/guitar bits that
form the "songs" fit together really well. Every song is quite different-sounding and they're all
worth a listen, with the exception of the terrible second track
on which Jello Biafra does
some really stupid spoken word
blabbering.
I enjoyed listening to this and
if you're not too into Coldcut or
any of the other Ninja Tune stuff
yet and want something to get
you started, then this is probably
your ticket.
Chris Corday
EMINEM
The Slim Shady
(Interscope)
I feel like Tipper Gore.
And I am not squeamish — I
go around calling myself
Hancunt, for fuck's sake — but I
want to defecate down
Eminem's throat after listening
to his awful debut album. I
grabbed his CD to review after
MuchMusic's Combat des Clips
(he beat out "The First Night" by
Monica), as I remembered it
slagging Marilyn Manson
and being surprisingly funny. On
the way home from UBC, my
companion and I listened to it in
the car. Right before the Burrard
Bridge, my companion lost the
ability to tolerate the shit blaring
from the car speakers and angrily
switched the band channel to
CiTR. This happened during song
#3 of Eminshit's olbum, "Guilty
Conscience," wherein Eminem
and his producer Dr. Dre rap
back and forth, with the latter
playing the former's conscience
Any situation wherein Dr. Dre (infamous for beating up female
rapper and MTV Pump It Up host
Dee Barnes while his bodyguards kept the crowd at bay —
the two make light of it in the
song) portrays somebody's conscience has got to be pretty
fucking scary.
And it is Millions of hormone-charged, white suburban
boys are going to buy this album, and at age 12, they can
hear Eminem rap about how
cool it is to drug teenage girls
ond rape them. Wicked. "Guilty
Conscience" makes me yearn for
the chivalry of "Girls" by the
Beasties:
Eminshit: "Now listen to me,
while you're kissing her cheek,
smearing her lipstick, slip this in
her drink, now all you've got to
do is nibble on this little bitch's
earlobe.
Dr. Dre: "Yo, this girl's only
15 years old. You shouldn't take
advantage of her, it's not fair!"
Eminshit: "Yo, look at her
bush, does it got hair?"
Dr. Dre: "Uh-huh ..."
Eminshit: "Fuck this bitch right
here in the spot there, 'til she
passes out and she forgot how
she got there."
Mmm ... I'm getting a wet little clam from that one. On another track, Eminem raps about
how he shouldn't be a role model
for anyone. Therefore he doesn't
object to his shit being all over
commercial radio and TV?! My
sincere wish after listening to this
album is that one day I will get
to hold Eminem's hands behind
his back while Mike Tyson rapes
him up the ass with a Garden
Weasel.
And if you say, "That's out of
hand," then I'll say, "it's only
tongue-in-cheek."
Hancunt
FENNESZ
Plays EP
(Moikai)
This is smart solo work by the
Austrian Christian Fennesz.
Originally on the Mego label
and re-released by Jim
O'Rourke, this two-song EP is
going to be on my year's end
top ten list for sure. Ostensibly
covers of The Rolling Stones'
"Paint it Black" and The Beach
Boys' "Don't Talk (Put Your
Head On My Shoulder)," these
very deconstructed and enigmatic versions are a remarkable
mixture of acoustic guitar and
digital recording, editing and
processing technology.
Fennesz gets an amazing,
inventive assortment of sounds
out of his equipment: buzzes,
clicks, odd warbles, drones, you
name it. Everything is stated, reworked, broken and reassembled at once. The outcome is nof
cacophonous or irrational, but
totally melodic, subdued and
quite beautiful.
Brady
NEIL HAMBURGER
Left for Dead in Malaysia
(Drag City)
When you hear the introduction
("It's Neeeill Hammburrrgerrr!")
followed by dead silence from the
audience, you know you're in for
a treat.
The third full-length from the
king of humourless comedy is
even more painful to listen to than
the last. You have to be a special
kind of person to be able to sit
and listen to the entire 40-minute
routine on this record; however,
that does not mean this is not a
Neil Hamburger, aka
Gregg Turkington (who is allegedly the brilliant mind behind the
World's Greatest Phone Calls
album — by far, one of the greatest comedic records I have ever
heard), now travels to Malaysia
to perform to an audience of 20
people who don't understand
English. On this record, he
touches on the topics of The
Spice Girls, necrophilia, religious humour, and the cremation
of his parents, among many others. For fans of Mr. Turkington's
work, this is a must.
Fartin Martin
SIMON JOYNER
The Christine EP
(Secretly Canadian)
The cover of this record looks like
a bunch of scraggly lines, but
look closer and it's a man and a
woman sitting on opposite sides
of a bed. The image is sad,
wrecked, exactly like the songs
on this EP. The Christine EP was
recorded from '94-'98. Simon
Joyner sings mostly only accompanied by an acoustic guitar, his voice cracking, almost as
if he were in Nashville, but really, it's quite beautiful. The lyrics kill me inside, ripping my
stomach, but I feel satisfied. I will
let Joyner explain: "I watched a
bottle tango with a girl made out
of paper/ It all happened so fast
and in the pitched black, that I
didn't see him rape her/ But I
found her ripped and soaking,
and the bottle staggered off confused/ And shattered himself
against a post after whistling
John Train's Blues ..."
Christa Min
KITTY CRAFT
Beats and Breaks from the
Flower Patch
(Kindercore)
This LP, from a one-woman music
machine who calls herself Kitty
Craft, stays true to its title. Drum
machines back pretty guitar
strumming with wistful, shoe-gazing vocals floating along the top.
Laid-back and sweet with a subtle funk, listening to this album is
comparable to drinking a tall,
cold glass of lemonade that you
bought from the neighbourhood
kiddies, you know? It's refreshing,
good in a way. What else would
you expect from a label named
Kindercore? This one's a keeper.
Hancunt
XO MAY 99 LEGION OF GREEN MEN
Floating in Shallow Water
(Post Contemporary Music)
People should get this CD for the
opening song alone. "For Maria,
Where I May Find Her" is an
electronica, with overtones of
Herb Albert. It's like a cyber
Latino lament, at once traditionally poetic and thoroughly tech-
The Legion... are smart musicians in that they know how to
blend different styles of music together and still make it work.
Every song on their second album
obviously has different influences
— some just plain ambient, others a little more experimental, but
all in the excellent tradition The
Legion... has created.
With this album, the musicians have delved into the jazzier
aspects of music and incorporated them into the electronic
genre They have moved away
from the harder, more insane aspects of their past album into the
more ambient and experimental.
It's a nice break from the seemingly endless electronic artists
who all sound and look the same.
But the album does have its
faults. The electronic music movement is/has progressed so rapidly
over the last years that this album
seems like nothing special in comparison — even though it is.
Anthony Schrag
JIM O'ROURKE
Eureka
(Drag City)
Without sarcasm, I would comfortably describe this album as
"advanced pop music" or maybe
even "adult indie rock". Some
scary words, or maybe not. In a
way this album is best summed
up by its choice of cover songs.
Both Ivor Cutler's "Women of
the World" and Burt
Bacharach's "Something Big"
easily slip in amongst Jim
O'Rourke's originals. But Eureka is neither kitsch nor ironic,
and reflective work. Although
O'Rourke's approach seems quite
clinical and intentional, it is not
lifeless, self congratulatory, or
heady. Instead, Eureka is almost
a playful, celebratory culmination
of all the formal elements found
in O'Rourke's past releases.
To my ear, instead of David
Grubbs, O'Rourke is furthering
the direction of the last Gastr
Del Sol album, Camofleur, towards an eclectic, refined fusion
of experimentation and high pop
As with last year's Sad Timing,
the credo of taking from the past
as much as from the present, but
always leading to something else,
remains central to O'Rourke's
methodology. Of course, this
record is not easy to approach.
Not because it's bafflingly abstract, but because it's so apparent. The result is that the sensitive
indie rock listener may feel uncomfortable at times. I suspect this
album is sure to have its galvanized detractors and enthusiastic followers alike, but such opinions could probably be formed
in a vacuum, without reference
to any real music listening. With
that said, I couldn't blame anyone for not liking this record, it
took me a while to get into it too
(not that I'm the high watermark
of good taste) However, after
some thought, I think it's great.
O'Rourke obviously knows what
he's doing and is in control of
some very complicated, large arrangements with varied instrumentation and singing, not to
mention probably Sours of post-
production studio work. As with
Bacharach at his best, this laborious side of the music is polished
and well ordered, not quite hidden as made tidy. In the end,
there is neither puffed up intellec-
tualism to turn people off nor
dumbed down pandering to a
false, generalized audience —
it's all just beautiful listening.
Brady
PLASTIKMAN
artifakts (be)
(Minus)
In '95, Windsor, Ontario kid
Richie Hawtin (Plastikman)
was thrown out of the US for performing illegally. Up to that point,
Hawtin's creative development
had centred around the Detroit
scene where he had a great deal
of success organizing and performing at countless parties. His
banishment from the States was
a radical event in his musical and
personal life and it spawned three
Plastikman albums, all meditations on exile: sheet one, musik,
and finally artifakts (be).
As far as I'm concerned, this
is the best of the lot. My friend
summed it up pretty well when
he said that it was one of those
albums that if you leave on while
you're asleep you wake up
stoned. Although in parts it is
VERY ambient, it contains
enough electronic weirdness to
satisfy a relatively jaded listener
(just take a listen to
"skitzofrenik"). As David St.
Hubbins once said, "There's a
fine line between stupid and
clever." At times, artifakts (be)
verges on ambient cheese, but
Hawtin is smart enough to never
quite cross that line.
J.M.
ANOUSHKA SHANKAR
Anoushka
(Angel)
I really wasn't sure what to expect from this record, but I figured it's got Ravi Shankar all
over it so it can't be bad. The album features five tracks, four of
which were either written by, or
adapted from, traditional ragas
by Ravi Shankar. This is not to
say that this is essentially a Ravi
album. Far from it! While the
mark of the elder Shankar is certainly present, his supremely talented and very adept daughter,
Anoushka, demonstrates her
own subtlety of style. Accompanied by Bikram Ghosh and
Arup Chattopadhyay on
tablas, Anoushka weaves her
own distinctive magic on the si-
tar, molding her father's music to
her own ends, especially on my
personal favourite, "Kirwani."
J.M.
SIX BY SEVEN
The Things We Make
(Mantra/Beggar's Banquet)
This album will be embraced
much easier by the fans of British
rock-pop music than, perhaps, by
those who prefer their bands from
Stateside. Six By Seven sounds
like they have culled their influences from a variety of the favourite British bands of the '90s of
whom we all know the names.
But The Things We Make isn't
laden with as many of the catchy
pop hooks nor does it strive to
explore new vocabularies for the
electric guitar. This album is
listenable and the band is promising, but this time out you won't
find yourself with any of the songs
stuck in your head.
Cody Beales
SONGS-OHIA
Axxess and Ace
(Secretly Canadian)
People that I know sometimes ask
me, "Chris, why do you listen to
such depressing music? Doesn't
it bring you down?" So I tell them
frankly, "Yes, it most definitely
does." The way I see it, sometimes you need to be down. If you
were never blue, how would you
be able to distinguish your sad
times from your happy moments?
This new Songs'Ohia record is
my own little way of "gettin'
down," so to speak. Jason Molina
(singer/songwriter) plays absolutely heartbreaking campfire
songs about personal failures, lost
loves, and other such painful topics. His distinctively high-pitched,
almost out of tune voice soars
over the simple, catchy guitar
melodies, quiet drums, and even
a bit of mournful-sounding violin.
It's all so simple, yet it's so perfect. Their best effort yet, me-
thinks. I love it.
Chris Corday
TOBIN SPROUT
Let's Welcome the Circus
People
(Luna)
I'm waiting for the new Guided
By Voices album. This will have
to keep me occupied, I suppose.
Tobin Sprout is soft, but not
quite mushy. Every song on this
album is played at about 72,
according to the metronome. I
can say that Tobin writes a good
song. Unfortunately, he can't
write a good album. Buy this on
CD — that way, you can listen to
one or two songs when you feel
like it. If you buy this on vinyl,
you might fall asleep trying to lis-
> the whole record.
Don Was (who also co-produces) and the steady studio work
of Jim Keltner flavour the playing. This is probably nore suit
able a
e albun
Chrh
i Min
PAUL WESTERBERG
Suicaine Gratification
(Capitol/Universal)
Paul Westerberg's latest effort
is another solid collection of
catchy pop rock songs. Sound
surprised? Not really. This is an
album that long time fans will no
doubt enjoy, but for those looking for something new and different, look elsewhere. Paul
brings in some help for most of
the songs on this album. Guest
appearance by Dave Pirner of
Soul Asylum, Shawn Colvin,
something you can appreciate,
but isn't the focus of your evening.
Cody Beales
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Drinking From Puddles
(Kill Rock Stars)
This is Brandon Lieberman's
dream come true Lieberman,
host of Drinking From Puddles on
KBOO in Seattle, has collected
22 recorded performances by
various artists from his show. This
compilation is an impressive accomplishment, containing many
inspiring, historical live efforts.
Popular and unknown artists are
placed side by side; quiet acoustic performances (Obituaries,
Elliott Smith, Kristen Hersh)
match up to faster, noisy rock
(Murder City Devils, Prolapse) creating a nice dynamic
flow to the whole record Worst
inclusion: Nicole Panter's spoken word piece, "Fuck." My personal favourite: Cat Power's
almost unrecognisable cover of
Pavement's 'We Dance.' Well
done, Brandon.
Chocolate baby
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Mali to Memphis
(Putumayo)
I was so excited to see the advance copy of this album — not
just because the artists are all
outstanding but because it's
about time someone other than
Ry Cooder made the obvious
connections between contemporary West African pop and modern delta blues. Most Africans
forced into slavery were from
West Africa, of Manding, Fulani,
and Bambara heritage. Though
Mali lies further inland, the African musicians on this recording
are Bambara, Fulani and
Songhai, and use a similar scale
to that of American blues. Many
of the African artists grew up listening to western blues, so though
the roots of blues lie in Africa,
the blues have circled back to
inspire African musicians.
Mali is home to some star African artists like Amadou and
Mariam, Boubacar Traore,
and Rokia Traore, all of whom
do a turn on this compilation in
the company of three generations
of blues musicians from John Lee
Hooker to Taj Mahal to Guy
Davis; and the ever-elusive Jesse
Mae Hemphill makes a rare appearance with a 1979 recording
of the haunting drone "Standing
In My Doorway Crying."
Boubacar Traore's "Kar Kar Madison" is reminiscent of Ali Farka
Toure at his best, followed by
Eric Bibb, who eases into a blues
tune with strong African instrumentation. My favourite track is Lobi
Traore with French harmonica
genius Vincent Bucher.
If you are a serious roots and
blues fan, you can't live without
this recording. All that slide guitar's gotta be good for the soul.
Trust me.
Anna Friz
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Old School vs. New School
(BMG)
Holy Shitl! This is just what the
doctor ordered in this day and
age of watered down, second
rate, Z95 type hip hop This album is a perfect gift for those
friends of yours who think MC
Hammer is Old Skool, The
Sugarhill Gang has something
to do with Spanky and Alfalfa,
and that EPMD is some sort of
hemorrhoid remedy. Check this
out: three Whodini remixes, four
Tribe Called Quest remixes,
Kool Moe Dee, BDP — damn!
Some of the premiere djs around,
including Doc Martin, Fatboy
Slim (Norman Cook) and
Grooverider give these Old
Skool masterpieces their own
personal spin. A great tribute to
some hip hop and dance classics:
Rabbit in the Moon's nine-
minute remix of "Fool's Gold" is
probably the best version of that
ubiquitous track I've ever heard,
and Bad Boy Bill's remix of
Kool Moe Dee's "I Go to Work"
wins for best song.
J.M.
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Material
(Source)
The featured artists on Material,
the newest compilation by French
label Source, are all twins of other
favourite French stars from an
alternate universe (although the
credits listed on the liner notes of
the album give no indication that
they actually are some of the
biggies using noms de guerre).
They are indeed real unrelated
artistes. This, contrary to popular belief, is still a fabulous thing.
Big fans of the new wave of
Frenchies like Air, Daft Punk,
DJ Dimitri, etc. can't get
enough of it and this record, my
friends, will satiate your lust for
a little while (at least until the next
Cassius single is released).
This is the perfect album for
you if you're ready to go on another Moon Safari. There is not
one dud on this to spoil your day.
Starting with the first track,
"Moogie" by Ernest Saint
Laurent with it's moog lunar
space theme and then on to the
dance-floor of the Parisian disco
covered in "Stardust" with the
song "Heatwave" by Phoenix.
Then there's "L'Ultime Atome" by
Oomiaq which leaves one feeling like they're floating through
the "Air" with Perrey and
Kingsley (Jean-Michel
Jarre, eat your coeur out!)
Scenario Rock's theme
tune with the same title is the
Beastie Boys at a tender moment. Another preferred track is
"Musique Pour un Enfant Jouet"
by the simply named Rob (oui!)
who utilizes a certain sample
also used in the big hit "Praise
You" by that Fatboy guy. Bril-
If this compilation gets the
press it deserves, it will be quite
a hot thing, but if all goes well,
it may stay relatively obscure
and remain the secret delectation for us Francophiles!
Christine Gfroerer
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Virgin Voices: A Tribute to
Madonna
(Cleopatra)
As a fag that never liked Madonna, why would I listen to a
tribute to her? Because it's not her!
No one wants to admit it, but she
actually wrote (sang?) some damn
catchy tunes. And the secret of this
album's success is that people on
this album take the catchiness of
both her earlier and newer pop
and are completely irreverent with
it. Catchy, fun and great music —
who wouldn't like it?
Perhaps the best thing about
this album is the people on it. It's
KMFDM singing "Material Girl,"
Dead or Alive doing "Why it's
So Hard," Information Society doing "Express Yourself."
And that's not all: Boy George,
Spahn Ranch, Heaven 17,
Bow Wow Wow and more
And not a Blonde Ambition Tour
groupie in sight.
It's all the yummy goodness
of the '80s minus the annoyance
of Madonna. And this is Volume
One. Can't wait for Vol. 2.
Yippee Skippy!
Anthony Schrag
SOUNDTRACK
Reach the Rock
(Hefty)
Primarily a collection of solo music by John McEntire, this
soundtrack to William Ryan's
Reach the Rock also features
good tracks by Tortoise, Sea
and Cake, Bundy K. Brown,
Polvo and Dianogah The music is all very complementary and
evocative but a little sparse (intentionally because of the requirement of being a soundtrack I
would assume). Nevertheless the
music does stand alone quite
well. Still, despite the overall high
quality, there are no big surprises.
Not that this is really a problem,
as past fans wouldn't necessarily
be looking for any, and new listeners would still enjoy what's
available: spacious, mellow,
fairly ambient but occasionally
groovy stuff.
McEntire's work is more often
particularly spare, leaving the
other bands to pick up the tempo.
Apparently McEntire also chose
all the other soundtrack's participants and helped oversee it as a
whole. He made some good
choices: Polvo's brief piano piece
made me hope that they've given
up on prog rock for good and
Dianogah's two basses and
drums workout is snappy and
memorable. Bundy K. Brown,
Tortoise, and Sea and Cake also
all provide solid songs, not
throwaway or B-side material.
How McEntire became involved
with '80s teen movie mogul John
Hughes — who wrote Reach the
Rock — is likely a good story.
Probably John Hughes's son, John
Hughes III, ex of Bill Ding, now
otherwise known as Slicker, and
I think the main guy behind Hefty
records, acted as mediator and
impresario. Well, who cares, I
can't wait for the film. Let's just
hope the strike is over by then.
Brady Real Live
Action
JUNGLE
DESTROYER
THE BEANS
I AM SPOONBENDER
Friday, March 26
Starfish Room
I wandered into the Starfish not
seeing straight after I 3 hours of
work Being an anniversary party
for CBC's firove New Waves and
Exclaim Magazine, I was bubbly
in anticipation of meeting 8NWs
Patti Schmidt. Alas, of the three
whopping pages of guest list, she
was not present  Willing lettuce
and bowls of dip lay on the tables, remnants of the pre-porty I
didn't make  The crowd seemed
lively, loud, and even, dare I say,
excited
I Am Spoonbender, con
taining ex-members of Pansy
Division and Cub, hit the stage
first Clad in black and leather,
they burst into sputtering,
assaultive, electro-fusion goth-
pop Keyboards and aggressive
drumming, repetitive, minor-
chording bass, mixed with very
little movement comprised the
show's opener   They seemed
When The Beans were setting up, people began to sit
themselves on the floor in front
of the stage and the feel turned
intimate and warm. Uninitiated
to The Beans' live show, I spent
the set in quiet awe of their organic, patient, musical musings.
Primarily instrumental, they
played around with dynamics,
a voice-only performance piece,
found sounds, and storming cre-
scendos. They swept me up in
;alad a
iad« rr
their
a believer
After a small rant from
Nardwuar, Destroyer started in
on their bent pop. I was struck
by their instrumental skills and
their ability to keep such catchy
songs off-kilter at all times. It was
almost unsettling, although it
could have been my bent frame
of mind. I want to hear more of
Destroyer
Now, even though I had stuck
considerable wads of toilet paper in my ears, this show was still
instensely loud. Blistering and uncomfortable, I'd even go so far
as to say What will become of
our hearing, dear scenesters? ...
Jungle: flashing, towering
sign Flashy clothes and real rawk
posturing. Divine! These guys
wield mature song-craft like a rapier, severing heads and stealing
feet — a Cheap Trick for our
time So your papa was a rollin'
Well, Patti, you silky voiced
eluder, you picked some damn
fine local talent. I left the Starfish
spent and grinning, with only a
slight case of deafness. Turn that
shit down!!
Caleb Stull
11 NV\Y 99
VANCOUVER BACH CHOIR
Krystof Penderecki's Polish
Requiem
Saturday, March 27
Orpheum Theatre
The concert's program featured
the work's title in a red, drippy
font, similar to a heavy metal logo.
Like most metal, the music was a
river of hackneyed, unfocussed
solemnity The notes proclaimed
manifold sources of inspiration:
anti-fascism, mourning for Poland's suffering, and love of Catholicism. The result was overloaded, following too many
threads at once
The Bach Choir sounded
haggard and under-rehearsed
Yet the sheer size of the choir —
204 voices, bigger than any baroque chorus Bach would have
known — often overshadowed
the orchestra The symphonic ensemble may or may not have had
a name. They played well
enough, but the choir seemed to
defuse any electricity the orchestra threatened to create. The vocal soloists, who sang great,
sailed easily over all these problems as the conductor failed to
draw the chorus out of its doldrums
The real problem was
Penderecki's 1993 score. The
strings and percussion maintained
a musical dialogue that would
have been current around 1909.
For example, the violins would
perform a descending sequence
down through the violas to the
cellos and basses, until solo tym-
pani hammered out the motif's
rhythm to punctuate the gesture.
Chimes were constantly going off,
imitating church bells and ominous holy seriousness. There was
also no attempt to blend the orchestra's sections in any but the
most blunt manner.
Even the most cliche techniques could come together to
something uplifting if they eventually fused into a convincing transformation, such as heard in
William Walton's "Belshazzar's
Feast" However, the ambitions of
the instrumental music were apparently limited to providing a
backdrop for the singers, and repeating figures that would connect one sung moment to another.
All the movements sounded more
Penderecki's "Requiem Mass"
did succeed at what was probably its real intent; it gathered together heads of state (in this case,
the Consuls General of Poland
and Germany) to show their solidarity with the proclaimed intentions of the composer, while appearing at a venue of cultural relevance. Penderecki has understood the political angle of musical success ever since he re-titled
a nameless orchestral exercise
"Threnody: for the Victims of Hi-
LIVE REVIEWS
roshima," instantly transforming
his career. Overnight, Penderecki
was recognized as a "politically
aware" artist. Whether this was a
calculated manoeuvre or not is perhaps impossible to say However,
a large listening body was immediately attracted to the sympathetic
inference of Threnody's title. If political suggestion created an audience for his music, then political
suggestion could be tailored for a
musical event, creating money and
influence. Benneton ads have
shown how passionate issues distract, presenting effective veneers
for ordinary, even tawdry, product. Penderecki simply upped the
heights in sensational banality
John Keillor
ASIAN DUB FOUNDATION
DJ HIVE
AUDIO ACTIVE
Saturday, March 27
Starfish Room
OK, I admit I'm kinda dumb sometimes: I got to the Starfish at 10:30
(when my tickets said the show
started) and two minutes later a
band started. "Great," I thought,
"I'm just in time." Wrong! Turns
out it was Audio Active and I
missed DJ Hive. Damn! Anyway,
there were a few people there already, but to the 150 or so people who didn't make it to see Audio Active, all I can say is, "Sucks
The Japanese quintet put on a
show of such intensity and overwhelming energy that many people weren't sure how to deal with
it. Though I couldn't hear any of
the heavily distorted, murky lyrics,
the message was clear: (to quote
IX Cool J): "Now watch me bash
this beat like a skull, that you know
I had beef with!" Yeah! They
kicked such harsh ass with their
brand of industrial funk that I felt
like I'd been hit with the
"Chewbacca defence."
After a short break (to get our
heads back together) Asian Dub
Foundation dropped the bomb
on us. Right from the opening
number, "Black White," the combination of Deeder's driving vocals, intense jungle breakbeats,
and Dr. Das' slow, droning, dub
basslines was more than enough
to drive a dancer insane. On the
downside, while the show was
INTENSE, the crowd kinda sucked
ass. Even the band noticed how
lame, uptight and apathetic much
of the crowd was with comments
like: "There's a little too much individualism in this room; not
enough collectivism, not enough
activism!" The conscious jam obviously went over many people's
heads, as evidenced by the pathetic lack of reaction to political
statements such as the song "Free
Satpal Ram" and their connected
plea to free Mumia Abu Jamal
(very few seemed to know what
they were talking about, or even
care) They finally got some worthy crowd response but they had
to work WAY too hard for it. We'll
be lucky if they come back.
JM
VANCOUVER PRO MUSICA
Sonic Boom 99
Fri., April 2-Sun., April 4
Western Front
There were many fine things about
this event: good playing, pleasant
venue, alert bar staff, etc. However, the music performed ran the
gambit from serious art music to
light, garden party backdrop If
this sounds inclusive, democratic,
or fair, imagine sitting still through
many pieces that do not interest holf
an audience, including yourself.
sic to express music yet unwritten,
while others wanted to reproduce
existing music in their own image.
The first sort, avant-garde, required concert conduct because
it only made sense after close listening. This serious stuff usually
makes terrible background music.
The latter, lighter music did not
require close listening and would
have made just as much sense to
an audience in mid-conversation.
When the lighter pieces played,
the room felt stuffy and uncomfortable, because its listeners were
over attending the music.
Light classical music doesn't
have the place of importance it
had in the 19th century It is difficult to write art-like music of modest integrity these days, because
pop culture produces such inspired fluff. Perhaps a new appreciation for the garden party will
create a new venue for light classical music. However, pop music
is a multi-billion dollar industry
intent on clobbering anyone trying to enter the pleasant veneer
music market. Mixing light chamber music with avant-garde music
resulted in a cloying pastiche.
When their respective audiences
attempted to sit civilly shoulder to
shoulder, it seemed like everyone
was bored half the time. What use
could a light music lover have for
raw talent, such as Victoria's
Cassandra Miller and her
"through night and day and in
and out of weeks and almost over
a year?" To salon loungers, Miller
was a crazy punk, while the avant-
garde crowd found her invigorating, putting the final touches on
her compelling new voice. There
was little that could compare to
this tough, primordial material for
cello, two recorders, and three
double basses. With the cello acting as a repetitive thread between
low (basses) and high (recorders)
polyphony, the strengths of the
Victoria music scene were well
represented. Clips were attached
to the stringed instruments, producing a rattle that forced listeners to
dig in to hear the independent
voices. Only great bass playing -
- thanks to Chris Nelson, Megan
Bradfield, and Anne Duranceau
— could articulate the idea in such
a low register. Then there was
Rodney Sharman, with his
"Cordes Vides" for solo harp. An
accomplished        composer,
was constantly concealing a new
syntax, negating the passive effect
a moment of light music has to the
next moment. The more closely
one listened, the better his music
sounded Melanie Beales playing was simply stunning. These
bursts of content and originality
were breathtaking to some and a
chore for others.
Conversely, Mark
Armanina's "Heartland" was
the last word in uncomplicated
prettiness. Performed by the Orchid Ensemble, Asian instruments
were mixed with western percussion to create effective surfaces
that would have been ideal for
landscape film scores (this is one
of the most popular Thai freshwater inlets...). The music wandered
amicably from one pleasant texture to the next, without any previous material ever impacting on
Other light pieces, such as Del
Miles' "Sonatina #1," sounded
like classical chamber music, but
rather than being current, its idiom
was about a hundred years old,
recreating Paris' "Group of
Seven" and its music's airy motions. This act of recreating was
not the same as creating, but it
was pretty While the lovers of
the light were enthralled, the more
serious listeners, the avant-garde,
found themselves less than satisfied.
Clearly, this format is not working out. What is required of Vancouver Pro Musica is to clearly
define where it stands. Just as the
programmers of Lilith Fair craftily
avoided Judas Priest in their
line-up, Vancouver Pro Musica
must know their position and their
audience. Until then, the avant-
garde crowd might do better to
huddle around Vancouver
New Music and Standing
Wave
John Keillor
SEBADOH
LOWERCASE
Tuesday, April 6
Vogue Theatre
They came, they rocked ... I came,
I rocked ... I must say that seeing
Sebadoh in a movie theatre
venue isn't as much fun as sloshing your beer and banging your
head in the Starfish, but oh well.
Sebadoh was great. This is the
third time I've seen Sebadoh live
and they kicked ass as usual. But
I'm easy to please, being a big
fan. They stuck pretty close to their
last three releases, Bakesale,
Harmacy, and this year's The
Sebadoh, but they did regale me
with an appropriately heart-
wrenching version of "Soul and
Fire" off of 1993's Bubble and
Scrape. Because the Vogue isn't
really a drinking venue, I stayed
relatively sober and for the first
time noticed how pronouncedly
different in style Jason Lowenstein
and Lou Barlow are. When Jason
is front man, things are fast and
furious and his vocals have a
wonderful early-Pixies Frank
Black raw power sound which
really makes me simper like
Britney Spears, whereas Lou
loves to mellow out. The two sort
of took turns speeding things up
and slowing things down, creating a wonderful ying-yang of ga
rage rawk.
And of course, Sebadoh's new
CFOX status meant that there were
a bunch of squids who thought
they were going to see the New
Radicals and therefore couldn't
get down once confronted with so
much feedback, so they just stood
around looking uncomfortable —
but who gives a shit? Barlow had
a charmingly self-conscious reaction to "The Flame"'s Top 40 radio airplay — when the sample
kicked in to begin the song,
Barlow broke into a devilish smile
and started clapping his hands
over his head, adopting a stadium
Ah, Sebadoh, until we meet
again next year ... I love you.
Hancunt
VEDA HILLE
TIME WAITS
Friday, April 9
Starfish Room
Vancouver's own musical treasure
and quirky diva Ms. Veda Hille
provided a most snazzy evening
of musical delight with her
Skilled and Devoted Band
Back from a mostly-triumphant tour
of the US (with the possible exception of Philly), she kicked into
a groove early and stayed there
late.
Opening act Time Waits
delivered an interesting but uneven set of jazzy-folky grooves.
Lead singer Koralee Tonack has
a whole lotta Natalie Merchant
goin', on, but definitely not in a
bad way. The rhythm section left
room for improvement and if I
could have heard James Ong's
cello, I would've been much hop-
pier. Multi-instrumentalist Jane
Gowan proved to be the glue
holding this outfit together, with
her relaxed stage presence and
proficiency on accordion, keyboards, and trumpet. This is a
band which would be worth seeing in a more intimate setting.
"Hello, hometown crowd!"
was Veda' s boisterous greeting
to the SRO crowd at the Starfish.
But "SRO" in this case meant sitting room only and neither this
cheer nor the kick-ass show that
followed got the assembled asses
off what should have been the
dance floor — kids, if this is a trend,
let's nip it in the butt — except for
the now-mandatory swirling hippie
types who politely danced off to
the sides of the stage.
One Veda Hille show is never
the same as another, but it does
seem as though she's progressing
down the jozz-funk road in a
breakneck fashion. Her Skilled
and Devoted Band is just that:
Barry Mirochnik and the inimitable Ford Pier switched off on
guitars and drums a few times to
keep it lively. Barry's saw solo was
the height of slick and fit the
groove so well that heck, you
wouldn't know it was a carpenter's tool if you weren't looking.
Visually, Veda has still got that
librarian-cum-goddess thing happening — perhaps musically as
well. Sweet and chunky melodies
threaten to explode into thrashing
discord at any moment. Ah, Veda,
we love you so! Don't leave us for
so long next time.
Val Cormier CiTR
charts
WHAT'S BEING PLAYED ON 101.9 FM
HOW THE CHARTS WORK ,
The monthly charts are compiled based on the number of times a CD/LP ("long vinyl"),
7" ("short vinyl"), or demo tape ("indie home jobs") on CiTR's playlist was played by
our djs during the previous month (ie, "May" charts reflect airplay over April). Weekly
charts can be received via e-mail. Send mail to "majordomo@unixg.ubc.ca" with the
command: "subscribe citr-charts"#
may 99 long v
nyl
may 99
short vinyl
1     various artists
syrup & gasoline
grenadine
1
hellacopters
down right blue                         sub pop
2      oh susanna
Johnstown
Stella
2
built to spill/marine research split                                                        k
3      legion of green men
floating in shallow wa
er         post cont.
3
disgusteens
nothing personal                     longshot
4     gaze
shake the pounce
k
4
longstocking
will you stay                                          k
5       april march
chrominance decoder
idea!
5
ghosts and vodka
memento mori                                 hefty
6      low
secret name
kranky
6
donnas/toilet boys
split                                              lookout
7      plastikman
artifakts (be)
minus
7
marine research
s/t                                                          k
8       sleater-kinney
the hot rock
kill rock stars
8
various artists
self portrait                               permafrost
9      various artists
yoyo a go go
yoyo
9
n. case/whiskeytawn
split                                         bloodshot
10     the kingpins
let's go to work
stomp
10
harry dean stanton
you don't miss ...                   rx remedy
1 1     coldcut
let us replay!
ninja tune
11
magnetic fields
i don't believe you                       merge
1 2     the roots
things fall apart
mca
12
lucksmiths
untidy towns                               drive-in
13     the surfdusters
surf after dark
fireball
13
archer prewift
s/t                                           motorcoat
14    satsuma
satsuma
independent
14
pennsy's eleclric ...
s/t                                 suicide squeeze
15   .hissy fit
uglier than you
bridge burner
15
the parcels
s/t                             brentwood estates
16    sebadoh
the sebadoh
sub pop
16
low
venus                                          sub pop
17    makeup
i want some
k
17
les savy fav
our coastal hymn                        deSoto
18    lonesome organist
calvalcade
thrill jockey
18
roads to space travel
meatballs for lunch                     deSoto
19    silver scooter
Orleans parish
peek-a-boo
19
rizzo
shymaster                                 cher doll
20    coyote men
vs. el mundo
estrus
20
junior varsity
juvenile                                     remedial
21 petty booka
22 aphex twin
windowlicker ep
warp
23 godspeed you ...
24 built to spill
slow riot for new zero ...
keep it like a secret
ep          kranky
A«aA«a___ Uorp. ie~
&\AA*~iAJ*jiJ>L~a. Ao*<~<»ttAA_Jc_
25    ladybug transistor
albemarle sound
merge
(j&>4>J&e^J«*&
«Jd-yy\^o^JoLj\ llayyvcla^yt^.)
26    metalunas
x-minusone
american pop
1
au pairs
equal but different: bbc sessions
27    varios artists
drinking from puddles
kill rock stars
2
refused
the shape of punk to come
28     olivia tremor control
black foliage
flydaddy
3
sex gang children
live at the lyceum, 1983
29    von zippers
bad generation
estrus
4
various artists
wanna buy a bridge?
30    takako minekawa
cloudy cloud calculator
emperor norton
5
neotropic
mr. brubaker's strawberry alarm clock
31     looper
up a tree
sub pop
6
the need
32    mogwai
come on die young
matador
7
prime time indian m
jsic programming on CiTR 101.9 fM
33    arling & cameron
allin
emperor norton
8
gavin friday
each man kills the thing he loves
34    pan sonic
a
blast first
9
god is my co-pilot
"i hate my friends"
35    electric frankenstein
i was a teenage shutdown              estrus
10
black light district
1000 lights in a darkened room
may 99 indie
home jobs
1        salteens
nice day
2       radio berlin
distance
3       forecasts farewell
behind the red sun
4       clover honey
talk about me
5       skavengers
i won't forget you
6      full sketch
soundtrack
7       belle bete
love stains
8       team strike force
lager ♦ lime
9      we cooshla
i am not a swan
10    bishop of battle
coldward and stormward
11     nagasaki fondue .
nobody
12     destroyer
karen is in rome
13    benedictions
oh no
14     dreamy angel
laundromatte queen
15     tickertape parade
audience with the pope
16    light of green
silver bird flew away
17    portal b
freak show
18    fridge art tiara
?
19    the kirby grips
mod boy
20    full sketch
sketchersize
what we
listened to ...
1     david bowie
singles collection
2    the crabs
sand + sea
3    mark
chocolate covered bad things
4    rose tattoo
scarred for life
5    marine research
from the gulf stream
6    99
767
7    prodigy
dirtchamber sessions
8    the lonesome organist
cavalcade
9    cassandra wilson
10 bangs
tiger beat
iwrTiirrfTfi^
<jdasilva@eciad.bc.ca>
b(vj Jason (Da,s£Lvci
15 E^SSSiaB On The Dia
YOUR ON-AIR GUIDE TO CiTR 101.9 FM
SUNDAYS
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSK 8:30AM-
12:00PM All of time is measured by
its art. This show presents the most
recent new music from around the
world Ears open.
THEROCKERSSHOW 12:003:00PM
Reggae inno all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON IHE SADDU alt. 3:00-
5:00PM Reakowshit-caughl-in-yer-
boots country.
WIRELESS alt. 3:OC-5:OOPM
LIPGLOSS & CIGARETnS alt 5:00-
6:00PM British pop music from all
decodes
SAINT TROPEZ alt 5:00-6:00PM
International pop (Japanese, French,
Swedish, British, US, etc.), '60s
soundtracks and lounge. Book your
jet set holiday now!
QUEER FM 6*00-8:00PM Dedicated
to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, ond
transsexual communities of
Vancouver and listened to by
everyone, lots of human interest
features, background on current
issues and great music from musicians
of all sexual preferences ond gender
HELiO INDIA 8:00-9:OOPM
GEETANJAU      9:00- 10:00PM
Geelanjali features o wide range of
music from India, including classical
music, both Hindustani and Carnatic,
popular music from Indian movies
from Ihe 1930's to thei 990's, semi-
classical music such as Ghazals and
Bhajans, ond also Quawwalis, etc.
THESHOW 10H)0PM-1K)0AM Stnctly
Hip Hop — Strictly Underground —
Strictly Vinyl With your hosts
Checkmate, Flip Out & J Swing on
Ihe 1 & 2's.
THE CHILL-OUT ROOM 1:00-
4.-00AM DJ Clutch spinship4iop...DJ
Decter spins techno. So chill out with
MONDAYS
BLUEGRASS FOR BREAKFAST 6:00-
8:00AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8:15-11:00AM Your lavountebrown-
sters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of ihe familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights! Tune in and
enjoy eoch weekly brown plate special.
Instrumental, trance, lounge and
ambience.
BLUE MONDAY alt.  11:00AM-
1:00PM Vancouver's only industrial-
electronic-retragolh progrom. Music
to schlomp to, hosted by Coreen.
THE ETHER TABLE alt. 11:00AM-
1:00PM
SOUPE DU JOUR 1:00-3:00PM
Feeling a little French-impaired?
Francophone music from around the
globe, sons Celine Dion.
THE MEAT-EATING VEGAN 3:00-
4:00PM I endeavour to feature deod
air, verbal flatulence, a work of music
by a 20-century composer — can you
say minimalist? — ond whatever else
appeals to me. Fog and dyke positive.
EVB. VS. GOOD 4.-00-5KXJPM Who
will triumph? Hardcore/punk Irom
beyond ihe grave.
BIRDWATCHERS 5rO0-.*O0PM Join
the Sports deportment for their eye
on Ihe T-birds.
POLYFILLER alt. 6:00-7:30PM
LADY DEATHSTRIKE alt. 6:00-
7:30PM
PIRATE RADIO 7:30-9:00PM
Formerly "love Sucks", now at a new
THE JAZZ SHOW 9*»PM-12:00AM
Vancouver's longest running prime time
jazz program. Hosted by the ever-suave
Gavin Walker Features at 11
May 3: "The Coltrane of the organ, "Larry
Young and his olbum Unity.
May 10: Ston Getz with the Kenny Clarke
Francy Boland Big Band.
May 17: On his birthday-alto saxophonist
Jackie McLean with trumpeter Kenny
Dorham ond "The World's Hippest
Rhythm Section."
May 24: Circles by guitarist Jim Hall with
pianist Don Thompson ond drummer
Terry Clarke.
May 31: Tenor saxophonist Tina Brooks
with Irumpeleer Johnny Coles.
VENGEANCE IS MINE    12:00-
4:00AM Hosted by Trevor. It's punk
rock, baby! Gone from ihe charts but not
from our hearts — lhank fucking Christ.
TUESDAYS
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW 6:00-
8:00AM
THE CLASSICAL SHOW 8:00-
9:30AM Listen carefully as Johnny
B. brings you the classical music
show featuring Canadian composers,
amateur hour and more. Radio con
fuoco for the masses
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM 9:30-
11:30AM   Torrid trash-rock, sleazy
surf ond pulsatin' punk provide ihe perfect
scissor kick to your head every Tuesday
mom. There's no second chance when
Kungfu is used for evil wilh drunken fist
Bryce. tt-yool!
TRAGIC ANIMAL STORIES
11:30AM-1:00PM Tabs of puppy
love gone awry, and of baby ducks
crossing ihe street, oil backed up by a
sod soundtrack of various indierod
bands for your own enjoyment and
education. Cry in your beer, pleose.
ECHOES FROM THE SUGAR CUBE
FACTORY lrfXWrOOPM
BELT OUT THE BLUES 2:00- 3:00PM
Music for families and little people.
THE SLIPPERY SLOT alt 3:30-
5:00PM
SKINTIGHT BUFFOONERY alt
3:30-5:00PM
BBC WORLDNEWS SERVICE 5:00-
5:30PM
RADIO ACTIVE 5:30-6:00PM
Activism, issues and fucking up the
corporate powers that be.
FLEX YOUR HEAD 6:00-8:OOPM
Hardcore and punk rock since 1989.
http://flexyourhead.
vancouverhardcore.com/
SAREGAMA        8:00-9:00PM
I	
1¥ MAV 99 Featuring traditional (classical, light
and folk) and contemporary South-
Indian music.
WITCHDOCTOR HIGHBALL alt.
10:00PM-12:00AM Noise,
ambient, electronic, hip hop, free
jazz, Christian better living LPs, the
occasional amateur radio play,
whatever.
VENUS FLYTRAP'S LOVE DEN alt.
10:00PM-12:00AM Join Greg in
the love den for a cocktail. We'll
hear retro stuff, groovy jazz, and
thicker stuff too. See you here... and
bring some ice.
AURAL TENTACLES 12*O0AM-VERY
LATE Warning: This show is moody
and unpredictable. It encourages
insomnia and may prove to be hazardous to your health. Ambient, ethnic,
funk, pop, dance, punk, electronic,
synth, blues, and unusual rock.
WEDNESDAYS
SUBURBAN JUNGLE 7:00-9*OOAM
A perfect blend of the sublime and
absurd, with your refined and exotic
hosts Jack Velvet and Carmen Ghia.
SPIKE'S MUSICAL PINS AND
NEEDLES 9:00AM-10:00AM
Spike  spins  Canadian   tunes
accompanied by spotlights on local
artists. Weekly "Vintage Vancouver"
segment takes a look back at this
city's musical past.
RADIO    DRAMA    10:00 AM-
BABYLON AFTERNOON  12:00-
DJ IN A COMA 2:00-3:00PM
MOTORDADOY 3*O0-5*O0PM 'eat,
sleep, ride, listen to Motordaddy,
repeat.'
BBC WORLDSERVICE 5:00-5:10PM
RACHEL'S SONG 5:lO-6:00PM Info
on health and the environment. From
recycling and conservation projects to
diet, health, and consumption and
sustainability in the urban context.
SOLID STATE 6:00-7:30PM
Featuring the latest in techno, trance,
acid and progressive house.
Spotlights on local artists, ticket
giveaways, & live performances.
Hosted by M-Path.
AND SOMETIMES WHYalt.7:30-
9:00PM slealer-kinney, low, sushi...
Ihese are a few of our faveotvwrit things.
BY THE WAY alt. 7:30-9:00PM
Let's give alternative media a chance
- VIVA VINYLI 7*1 new and old,
local cassettes and demos.
FOIKOASIS 9-00-10-.30PM Featuring
the latest local and international
releases in folk/roots/world music,
phone interviews, in-studioguestsand
more. Requests always welcomedl
STRAIGHT OUTTA JALLUNDHAR
10:30PM-12:00AM LetDJsJindwa
and Bindwa immerse you in radioactive Bhungra! "Chakkh de phutay."
Listen to all our favourite Punjabi tunes
— remixes and originals.
HANSKLOSS'MISERYHOUR 12:00-
4:00AM Mix of most depressing,
unheard and unlistenable melodies,
tunes and voices.
THURSDAYS
FIRST FLOOR 3:00-6:00AM
DON'T SAY THAT ABOUT MY
MAMA 6:30-8:30AM
REEL   MUSIC   8:30-10:00AM
Soundtracks and classical.
alt. Ifc00-1 1:30AM
Part accordion-tinged musicol
meanderings, part experiemental
weirdness, with a little bad hill blood
thrown in for good measure.
STAND AND BE CUNTED alt. 10:00-
11:30AM DJ Hancunt urges women
to get down with their cunts while
listening to women in jazz, funk, rap,
soul, worldbeot, disco ond beyond.
CANADIAN LUNCH 11:30AM-
1:00PM From Tofino to Gander, Baffin
Island to Portage lo Prairie. The all-
Canadian soundtrack for your midday
snack!
SIEVE & MKE l*00-2aOPM Crashing
the boys' club in the pit. Hard and fast,
heavy and slow. Listen to it, baby,
(hardcore).
ONOMATOPOEIA 2:00-3:OOPM
Comix comix comix oh yeah and some
music. With Robin and Jules.
BOMBSHELL alt. 3:00-5:OOPM
RHYMES AND REASONS alt. 3:00-
5:00PM
CULTURE CRAP 5*00-5:30PM
SHAPE UP alt 5:30-6:00PM
REELS TO REEL ah. 5:30-6:00PM
Movie reviews and criticism.
OUT FOR KICKS 6*00-7:30PM No
Birkenstocks, nothing politically correct. We don't get paid so you're
damn rightwe have fun wifh it. Hosted
by Chris B.
ON AIR WITH GREASED HAIR 7:30-
«W)0PM Roots of rod & roll.
UVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL 9:00-11:00PM Local muzak
from 9. Live bandz from 10-11.
COCKED AND READY art. 11:00PM-
1:00AM
NOCTURNAL TRANSMISSIONS alt.
11KJOPM- 1:00AM You adjust the
lighting, DJ Satyricon mixes the
sounds. Radio that could only happen
after the sun's gone down. Songs and
soundscapes for the naked city.
PLUTONIAN NIGHTS 1:00-
4:00AM Late nightvinyl. Occasional
skips. Cheers.
FRIDAYS
CAUGHT IN THE RED 6:30-8:30AM
Trawling the trash heap of over 50
years worth of real rock Y roll debris.
Stick out yo' can.
ONE LOVE 8:3O-10:O0AM Anything
and everything from the wonderful
world of music, as long as harmonies
con be sung, and the melodies be
heard.
SKA-TS SCENE-IK DRIVE! 10:00AM-
12.O0PM Ska, baby.
THESE ARE THE BREAKS 12:00-
2:00PM DJ Splice brings you a
flipped up, freaked out, full-on,
funktified, sample heavy beat-lain trip,
focusing on anything with breakbeats.
Versatile at any style.
LITTLE TWIN STARS 2*00-3:30PM
Underground, experimental, indie and
women. Jacuzzi space rock at its finest.
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS... 3:30-4:00PM
NOIZ 4.-00-5KJOPM self-titled.
BBC WORLDSERVICE 5:OO-5:30PM
FAR EAST SIDE SOUNDS alt. 6:00-
9:00PM
AFRICAN RHYTHMS alt. 6:00-
9:00PM David "Love" Jones brings
you the best new and old jazz, soul,
Latin, sambo, bossa & African music
from around the world.
HOMEBASS    9:00PM-12:00AM
Hosted by DJ Noah: techno, but also
some trance, acid, tribal, etc. Guest
DJ's, interviews, retrospectives,
giveaways, and more.
LIMP SINK   alt.  12:00-6:00AM
Rant, phone-in and kiss your mother
with the guests.
DEAD AIR alt. 12:00AM-VER Y LATE
Exceptionally interesting girl talk.
8ATURDAYS
GH TO THE CHORUS alt. 6*00-
8:00AM
THE SATURDAY EDGE 8:00AM-
12:00PM Studio guests, new
releases, British comedy sketches, folk
music calendar, and ticket giveaways.
8-9AM: African/World roots. 9AM
12PM: Celtic music ond performances.
ALAM MAZEKA 12:00-1:00PM
POWERCHORD  1:00-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show;
local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities. Gerald Raltlehead ond Metal
Ron do the damage.
LUCKY SCRATCH 3:00-5:00PM
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, crooners
and tunesters in the blue degree.
Blues and blues roots with your hosts
Anna and Andy.
RADIO FREE AMERICA 6:00-
8:00PM Extraordinary political re
search guaranteed to make you think.
Originally broadcast on KFJC (Los Altos, Cal.|.
LIVEI AT THE HI-HATH alt.
10:00PM-1:00AM 'Sho' 'nuff
bumpin'I'-Popular Music. Phone,
write or call for reservations. Dance.
Admission $6.00.
PIPEDREAMS alt. 10:00- 1:00AM
SOUL TREE alt. 1:00-4:30AM From
doo-wop to hip hop, from the electric
to the eclectic, host Michael Ingram
goes beyond the call of gospel and
takes soul music to the nth degree.
EARWAX alt. 1:00- 4:30AM Noiz
terrorism cut thru raw rhythms/as
punk rock dissects Detroit
minimalism/Da truth will be found
bound in sounds/locked in my ears
like Earwax. Word. -Guy Smiley
REGGAE LINKUP 4:30-8:30AM
Hardcore dancehall reggae that will
make your mitochondria quake.
Hosted by Sister B.
WHOM
HOW
Arts
Board Chair     Harry Hertscheg
President       Tobias Vat
Production   Shot
— Coordin
I Station Manager Ao	
| Vice President    Anthony Schrag
^<T-Ti^inRVir^Tir tet _-
New Time, New Name,
but... Same Show!
Love Sucks now called Pirate Radio,
moved to Mon. nights 7:30-9:00
-audio art and mixology with Industry and
Agriculture
Same Show, Same Time,
but... New Name!:
Audio Sprockets is now cared DJ in a coma
/^Ck
Shows on Hiatus for
THE  jUMMER (but back in Sept.):
Bluegrass for Breakfast Mon. 6:30-8:00 am
JD Avalon Presents Tues. 2:00-3:30 pm
Sound That Pitch Tues. ait 3:30-5:00 pm
La Bomba Tues. 9:00-10:00 pm
Summer Fill-ins:
Belt out The Blues Tues 2:00-3:30 pm
Skintight Buffoonery Tues alt 3:30-5:00 pm
New Shows:	
First Floor Thurs 3:00-6:00 am
Don't Say That About My Mama Thurs
6:30-8:30 am
2.5®tKg£®E3S Dateb
oo
WHAT'S HAPPENINC
FRI 30    CiTR PRESENTS OLIVIA TREMOR CONTROL, THE
MUSIC TAPES@Starfish, Spirit of the West, Lunassa, Scruj MacDuhk,
SFU Pipe BandOVogue, Time Waits@South Hill Candy Shop
SAT MAY 1   CiTR PRESENTS GOMEZ, MOJAVE 3@Starfish
Paperboys, Gaelic Storm, Mary Jane Lamond, Ad Vielle Que
Pourra@Vogue; Los Mocosos@Chameleon; Phoenix Chamber Choir
with Carol Welsmon@Chan Centre, DJ DutchboyOWaldorf Hotel;
Molhertrucker, Drugslore@Pic Pub
SUN 2 Indie rock off: Joel, Johnny Sizzle@Sugar Refinery; Alanis
Morissette, Sloan, Veda Hille@GM Place; Eve 6, LitORichard's, Vancouver Guitar Quartet CD release party@Firehall Theatre; Ambienl
Brunch Tour (feat. Perfume Tree, Dogone, DJ Jhuno, Spool)@Starfish;
MON 3 CBC Vancouver Orchestra@Chan Shun Concert Hall;
Bodner@Sugar Refinery; Rocksteady Ska Dance Night w/Ska-T@Gate
TUE 4 Big Miss Moviola's Chainletter Tapes@Blinding Light Cinema
WED 5 Big Miss Moviola's Chainletter Tapes@Blinding Light Cinema; Incantation, Solus, Zuckuss@Starfish, Ryan Bigge@Sugar Refinery, Eye of Newt Collective@Havana Gallery; Pilgrims of the Mind,
Phil Western@Sonar
THU 6 Motorhead, Dropkick Murphys, Hatebreed@Rage, Nickelback,
Jar, Special Guests, New Big Shoes@Starfish; PURRr@Columbia
FRI 7 Kid Koala, BullfrogOSonar; Jungle, Jack Tripper, Veal, Brundle
Fly@Starfish;   Endearing  Records  showcase@Brickyard;  The
Molestics@Sugar Refinery;  £"/sew/)ere/ess@Vancouver Playhouse;
Watchmen, 99@Vogue; Run DMC, Maestro@Enterprise Hall (Plaza
of Nations); Acme Swing Co ©The Legion (2205 Commercial Dr.)
SAT 8 Pure Science@Sonar, Millenium Project@Chameleon; Fryer
Tuck     and     Broken     Record     Chamber@Sugar     Refinery;
Elsewhereless@Vancouver Playhouse; Bloomsday, Kristy Thirsk, Glimmer, Grace, Damn the Diva@Gate; Mike Ness, Richard Buckner, P.W.
Long@Vogue; Cadillac Tramps, Alley Boys, Midge, l-900@Starfish;
Granville Island Bluegrass Festival free show@Market Stage
SUN 9    Dance installment by Sherri Eurechka@Sugar Refinery;
Granville Island Bluegrass Festival free show@Market Stage
MON 10 Bodner@Sugar Refinery; Rocksteady Ska Dance Night w/
Ska-T@Gate
TUE   1 1     Not So Fast Freddie@Sugar Refinery;  DJ Graham
Smith@Chameleon
WED 12 SFU Film School PartyOStarfish; Eminem, the Beatnuts@Rage;
SUBMISSIONS TO DATEBOOK ARE FREE!
TO HAVE YOUR EVENT LISTED, FAX ALL THE
RELEVANT INFO (WHO, WHERE, WHEN) TO
822 9364, ATTENTION "DATEBOOK." DEADLINE FOR THE JUNE ISSUE IS MAY 17TH!
THU 27 Asian Heritage Month Films out of Left Field@Blinding Light
Cinema; Shazzam@Chameleon, Weakerthans, Greater Than Less
ThanOStarfish
FRI 28   Hellacopters, Quadrojets@Starfish
SAT  29     Dave Sikula Quartet@Sugar Refinery;  Alley Cat
Scromble@Starfish; DJ Josh Michaels@Chameleon
SUN 30   Final dance piece by Sherri Eurechka@Sugar Refinery
MON   31   Rocksteady  Ska   Dance   Night w/Ska-T@Gate;
Bodner@Sugar Refinery
Smak@Chameleon; Coal, Lily Frost@Pic Pub
THU 13 Hell Caminos, 440 Six-Pack, Ten Days Late,
Catheters@Starfish, BY08: Home Movies@Blinding Light Cinema;
Wave Wave@Sugar Refinery; £/sewhere/ess@Vancouver Playhouse
FRI 14 Star Wars Pre-prequel Party@Starfish; Broken Record
Chamber@Sugor Refinery; Snakefarm, PJ Olsson@Sonar; Bad
Religion@UBC Student Rec. Ctr.; £/sewhere/ess@Vancouver Playhouse
SAT 15 Grrrlapolooza (feat Tribe 8, Che: Chapter 1 27, Veda Hille,
Loud, Ersatz, Sarah & Teegan)@VECC; The Colorifix@The Gate; Lik
the Pole, Flash Bastard, Maneaters@Starfish, Talking Pictures with Jorrit
Dykskra@Western Front; Fat Beats@Chameleon,
F/sewhere/ess@Vancouver Playhouse; Granville Island Bluegrass Festival free show@Market Stage; Gob@Pic Pub
SUN 16 Vancouver Chinese Music Ensemble@Western Front; Dance
with Sherri Eurechka@Sugar Refinery (7-9); Granville Island Bluegrass
Festival free show@Market Stage; Benefit concert for Kosovar Refugees with Dee Daniels@Ryerson United Church (W. 45th at Yew St.)
MON 17 Rocksteady Ska Dance Night w/Ska-T@Gate;
Bodner@Sugar Refinery
TUE 18 Buckcherry, Black Halos@Starfish, Critter@Sugar Refinery;
Ambient Brunch Tour (feat. Perfume Tree, Dogone, DJ Jhuno,
Spool)@Chameleon
WED 19 ISO   feat  Otomo Yoshihide, Paul Plimley Trio@Starfish;       I S22___5_1_II?8
Hugh Masekela@Richard's on Richards
THU 20 Local Rabbits, Star Collector, Mt. Pleasant@Starfish; DJ
Dan@Chameleon
FRI 21   Radiogram@Sugar Refinery; Kinnie Starr@Starfish
SAT 22   Nomeansno@Starfish; Kyrestan@Sugar Refinery; Granville
Island Bluegrass Festival free show@Market Stage
SUN 23    Dance with Sherri Eurechka@Sugar Refinery; Granville
Island Bluegrass Festival@Performance Works
MON 24 Pharcyde@Richard's on Richards; Rocksteady Ska Dance
Night w/Ska-T@Gate; Elvis Costello@Queen Elizabeth Theatre,
Bodner@Sugar Refinery, Granville Island Bluegrass
Festival@Performance Works
TUE 25 Local & Lady-Mode Movies@Blinding Light Cinema; Not So
Fast Freddie@Sugar Refinery
WED 26 Local & Lady-Made Movies@Blinding Light Cinema; Heather
Cox@Sugar Refinery
VENUES • BARS • THEATERS • RESTAURANTS • RECORD STORES
The Abyss 315 E. Broadway  (side entrance)
Anderson's Restaurant (Jazz on the Creek)
Anza Club 3 W. 8th  (Mount Pleasant)
Arts Hotline
Bassix 217 W. Hastings (at Cambie)
Backstage Lounge   1585 Johnston  (Granville Island)
Black Sheep Books 2742 W. 4th (at MacDonald)
Blinding Light     36 Powell St.
The Brickyard 315 Carrall St.
Cafe Deux Soleils 2096 Commercial  (the Drive)
Cafe Vieux Montreal 317 E. Broadway (Mount Pleo
Caprice Theatre 965 Granville (Granville Mall)
Celebrities   1022 Davie  (at Burrard)
Cellar Jazz Cafe 3611 W. Broadway (downstairs)
Chameleon Urban Lounge 801 W. Georgia (Downtown)
Chan Centre 6265 Crescent Rd (UBC)
Club Mardi Gras 398 Richards St.
CN Imax Theatre 999 Canada Place
Columbia Hotel  303 Columbia  (at Cordova)
Commodore Lanes 838 Granville  (Granville Mall)
Cordova Cafe 307 Cordova  (Gastown)
Denman Place Cinema   1030 Denman  (Wsst End)
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden Main Hall 578 Carrall St.
DV8 515 Davie (downtown)
Firehall Arts Centre 80 E. Cordova  (at Main)
Food Not Bombs Vancouver
Frederic Wood Theatre (UBC)
Garage Pub 2889 E. Hastings  (downtown)
Gastown Theatre 36 Powell (Gastown)
The Gate  1176 Granville (downtown)
The Good Jacket 225 E. Broadway (at Main)
The Grind Gallery 4124 Main (Mt. Pleasant)
16 MAr 99
488 6219 Hollywood Theatre 3123 W. Broadway (Kitsilano)
684 3777 Hot Jazz Society 2120 Main  (Mt. Pleasant)
876 7128 It's A Secret 1221 Granville St. (downtown)
684 2787 Jericho Arts Centre  1600 Discovery (Pt. Grey)
689 7734 Jupiter Cafe & Billiards  1216 Bute (near Denman St)
687 1354 La Quena   1111 Commercial (the Drive)
732 5087 The Lotus Club 455 Abbott (Gastown)
878 3366 Lucky's 3972 Main
685 3978 Luv-A-Fair  1275 Seymour (downtown)
254 1195 Wert Bar 1320 Richards (downtown)
tt)    873 1331 Maximum Blues Pub  1176 Granville (downtown)
683 6099 Medialuna   1926 W. Broadway
689 3180 Minoru Pavillion 7191 Granville (Richmond)
738 1959 Moon Base Gallery 231 Carrall St. (gastown)
669 0806 Naam Restaurant 2724 W 4th Ave (kitsilano)
Old American Pub 928 Main (downtown)
687 5007 Orpheum Theatre Smithe & Seymour (downtown)
682 4629 Pacific Cinematheque  1131 Howe (downtown)
683 3757 Palladium  1250 Richards (downtown)
681 1531 Paradise 27 Church  (New West)
683 5637 Paradise Cinema 919 Granville (Granville Mall)
683 2201 Park Theatre 3440 Cambie (South Vancouver)
662 3207 Picadilly Pub 630 W. Pender (at Seymour)
682 4388 Pitt Gallery 317 W. Hastings (downtown)
689 0926 Plaza Theatre 881 Granville (Granville Mall)
872 6719 Purple Onion   15 Water St. (gastown)
822 2678 Queen Elizabeth Theatre Hamilton & Georgia
822 9364 Raffels Lounge  1221 Granville  (downtown)
684 MASK The Rage 750 Pacific Blvd. South (Plaza of Nations)
688 8701 Railway Club 579 Dunsmuir (at Seymour)
872 5665 Richard's On Richards  1036 Richards (downtown)
322 6057 Ridge Cinema 3131 Arbutus (at 16th Ave.)
738 3211
873 4131
688 7755
224 8007
606 6665
251 6626
685 7777
875 9858
685 3288
230 6278
688 8701
608 0913
738 7151
682 3291
665 3050
688 3456
688 2648
525 0371
681 1732
876 2747
682 3221
681 6740
685 7050
602 9442
665 3050
473 1593
685 5585
681 1625
687 6794
738 6311
Russian Hall 600 Campbell (Chinatown)
Scratch Records  109 W. Cordova (Gastown)
Seylynn Hall   605 Mountain Hwy (North Van)
Shadbolt Centre for the Arts 6450 Deer Lake Ave. (Bby)
Singles Going Steady 3296 Main (at 17th)
Sonar 66 Water (Gastown)
Southhill Candy Shop 4198 Main (at 26th)
Squish'd Knish 4470 Main (at 29th)
The Space 316 Hastings (downtown)
Starfish Room   1055 Homer (downtown)
Starlight Cinema 935 Denman (West End)
Station Street Arts Centre 930 Station  (off Main)
St. Regis Hotel 602 Dunsmiur (downtown)
Stone Temple Cabaret  1082 Granville St. (downtown)
Sugar Refinery  1115 Granville (downtown)
Theatre E  254 E. Hastings (Chinatown)
Thunderbird Ent. Centre 120 W. 16th St. (N. Van)
Vancouver E. Cultural Centre  1895 Venables (at Victoria)
Vancouver Little Theatre 3102 Main  (Mt. Pleasant)
Vancouver Press Club 2215 Granville (S.Granville)
Varsity Theatre 4375 W. 10th (Point Grey)
Vert/Washout   1020 Granville  (dowtown)
Video In Studios  1965 Main (Mt. Pleasant)
Virgin Mega Store 788 Burrard (at Robson)
Vogue Theatre 918 Granville  (Granville Mall)
Waterfront Theatre   1405 Anderson  (Granville Is.)
Western Front 303 E. 8th Ave (near Main)
Whip Gallery 209 E. 6th Ave (at Main)
W.I.S.E. Hall   1882Adanac (the Drive)
Women In Print 3566 W. 4th (Kitsilano)
Yale Blues Pub   1300 Granville (downtown)
Zulu Records 1869 W. 4th (Kitsilano)
874 6200
687 6355
291 6864
876 9233
683 6695
876 7463
879 9017
682 4171
689 0096
688 3312
488 1333
683 2004
681 8915
988 2473
254 9578
876 4165
738 7015
222 2235
872 2999
872 8337
669 2289
331 7909
685 6217
876 9343
874 4687
254 5858
732 4128
681 9253
738 3232 I MAY 12
_____! M^_-___i ^^^^ ^»T»C DACF I
BAD RELIGION J
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FRIDAY MAY Hi
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UNIVERSAL IMPORTANT NE* SOUNDS FOR YOUR URBAN EARSCAPES
PIZZICATO FIVE
Playgirl & Playboy
CIV LP
It's become stylish to get marrie
in Las Vegas "Tell me you love
me". "I do". Take your vows with
Shibuya-kei's most exulted 'club-
pop-meets-easy beat' duo, as they get the horns to groove, the
hips to move, and spell out L-E-T'S M-A-K-E L-O-V-E oh so
smooth! Wedding equal parts Eartha Kitt. Serge Gainsbourg
and Saint Etienne. Playgirl & Playboy is a detour from their
recent drum 'n bass influenced stylings, orchestrating lush
arrangements ot soft-rock sounds with very hip effect. "I Hear A
Symphony" stands to become the sultry anthem of choice for all
cooing Lovebirds!
16.98 CD 14.98 LP
TOM WATTS
Mule Variations CD/Cass/LP
He has captured the hearts and imagination ol millions of listeners the world over, creating dense albums full of character, emotion and old-fashioned chutzpah! He has fished the
deep blue with Lounge Lizard John Lurie and stolen through
the bayou with Academy Award Winner Roberto Beninni. He
has drank from the cup of many different lives, and always graciously left a little memory for us, the casual observer. Pull up
to Uncle TOM's cabin one more time and reserve your spot on
that shaggy rug before the fire. Because tonight's the night, and
because nighttime is the right time, and because that emptiness that has so solemnly consumed your deep search tor personal meaning finally has a name — Mule Variations' TOM s
most diverse record to date, The Mule, as we call it around
here, is truth, beauty and soul extracted one ounce at a time
through song with help from friends Marc Ribot. Les Claypool
16.98 CD 12.98 Cass 14.98 LP
MURDER CITY
DEVILS
Broken Bottles,
Empty Hearts
CDAP
Hold ofl on that postmortem,
put your knives away, this baby isn't dead yet. No way
man. this dirty body still jumps and lurches with spirit.
Consider yourself warned. But this isn't any Frankenstein
either, this is no zombie, this is blood and meat and youth
and energy. Of course we're talking about sweet rock and
roll music here, that's right, of course we're talking about
the MURDER CITY DEVILS. These guys do the business —
hard and fast and true. There's no faking, no scam, no
bullshit and no one else this close to the vein. Now thanks
to the disciples at Scratch, who brought this good word
home tor us to share, the floor is clear. Get up and dance.
14.98 CD 12.98 LP
FANTASTIC PLASTIC MACHINE
Luxury CQ/LP
Sitting comfortably rn a rattan foldout. the bubbles in the tumbler
next to me race to the top of the glass, attaching themselves willingly to the lemon, which floats there carelessly under the afternoon
sun. "Now that's a Gin and Tonic!" I scream. Creating the perfect
soundtrack my own private Fantasy Island episode, FANTASTIC
PLASTIC MACHINE magically co-exist in a realm between '60s lounge
vibes and '90s electro-bliss, where melodies seduce the ear- "Is this
fruity? I know that taste Wait yes of course, its...". Deliriously we
float along and along...
16.98 CD 14.98 LP
MAN OR ASTROMAN
E.E.V.I.A.C.CD
The distress signal shines in the nig!
The very real possibility of nuclear;
filiation makes the air go stale like a rat
used to mop the brow's nervous beads
sweat. Will our rockin' engineers develi
the new software technology required to strike a choid, nut unlike a
wild mix ot meltdown surf instrumental and manic synthesizer
noodling, against their evil enemies. Will E.E.V.I.A.C interface with the
nation's stereos causing us to dance? Tune in next week triends...
Same MAN OR ASTROMAN time! Same MAN OR ASTROMAN channel'
A noil
Mseb
jUI
16.98 CD
GENTLE WAVES
The Green Fields of
Foreverland
k nother voice in the Belle and
Sebaslian choir stands from up from
the pews. Multi-instrumentalist Isobel
Campbell makes clear that there is more
than one talent in "that' little corner of Scotland. Fans knew this album
was on way long before it was even recorded. It's come time to settle
down! The GENTLE WAVES have brought this folk-pop treat ashore for
■us all to enjoy. Ready your heart and home tor this quiet altarpiece.
Yes, other Belle and Sebastian players dip into this water too.
18.98 CD
THE BLACK HALOS
s/t CD/LP
Its clear teenagers are becoming increasingly disenfranchised with the
state of modern music. Communicated through modems and television screens, modern music has become a spectator's sport-without
any real promise or tangible moving emotion. Here's where THE BLACK
HALOS come in. Your adequate is their insufficient; your 'drawing the
line' is their start point of oblivious abandon. Simply put, they're
equipped and we're not. Combining the sound and spirit of the most
dangerous era of rock — the sick 70s — and fuelled on the primal
power of the Stooges, Dead Boys and New York Dolls, tltese Halos are
hereto bring closure to the dire state of rock, only to deliver it newborn back into the hands of the people. Yes!
16.98 CD 12.98 LP
THE CRABS
Sand and Sea CD
New on the K Records label, THE
CRABS are old favorites here along
trie Zulu shoreline, as wed as that of
their native Seattle. 10 songs that recall
the innocence of Beat Happening, the
groovy coolness ol The Velvet Underground, and a tinkling pop
sensibility a la Low, that's got them graduating head of the class.
Previously known as a duo, Sarah Dougher of Cadallaca adds a little pinch to their claws courtesy of her wild farfisa organ!1 Stop by
for listen!
16.98 CD
EUPHONE
Calendar of Unlucky
Days CD
This aptly named band certainly is
pleasing to the ear! Heroic Doses
members Ryan Rapsys and Nick Maori
use all kinds of studio smarts to fill out
this cool, good natured, instrumental pop record. But they're not
hiding behind bands of electronic devices. Nope, they've got their
chops in order too: Rapsys is definitely one of the better drummers
around. If you're thinking this sounds like it might come out of
Chicago, you're right! Look out Tortoise, these swift young guns
may take your (Sea and) Cake. Bad jokes aside, this really is a great.
. record. Recommended.
16.98 CD
THE HERBALISER
Very Mercenary CD
Topping the terrific Blow your
Headphones OH, these adventurous
English hip-hop technicians again prove
that they know how to put shit together.
Everything is in order: the funk, a little
jazz and down tempo, some kitsch, the funk again. Even Canadian
hip-hop veterans The Dream Warriors make an appearance, as well
as What Whal, Blade, Bahamadia and Roots Manuva. Working an
inventive sound of their own, Oltie Teeba and Jake Wherry continue
to do Ninja Tune right. Fresh beats for new players.
CD $16.98
NIGHTMARES ON WAX
CartootSoul CD
Get way down with this long overdi
release from George Evelyn's
smooth operation. NIGHTMARES ON
WAX. Now with a larger more versatili
band, everyone should become pleasantly groggy off this second hand smoke: This trunk of soul will
easily please old fans of Smoker's Delight and new fans will also
dig Its cool laid-back demeanor. Mellow trippy beats for the next
time you want to get high at Safeway (figuratively speaking, not an
endorsement).
16.98 CD
1869 W 4th Ave.
Vancouver. BC
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tel 738.3232
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ill 12:00-6:00
THE FALL - The Marshall
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BOUNCING SOULS -
Hopeless Romantic CD/LP
GOLDEN - Super Goldon
Original Movement CD
FANTOMAS - s/t CD
FUGAZI - Instrument'
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GOOD RIDDANCE -
Operation Phoenix CD/LP
JOHN ZORN/MASADA -
Live in Jerusalem
1994 2CD
FLESHTONES - Return to
Hitsburg CD
NEGATIVLAND/
CHUMBAWAMBA -
The ABC's of Anarchy CD
SMALLS -
My Dear Little Angle CD
OLD'97S - Fight Songs CD
Soundtrack • SB1 CD
LAMB -B Line CD-EP/12"
LUNA - Super Freaky
Memories CD-EP
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