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 November 1984
Vol. 2 No 10
luide to CITR fm 102 cable 100 DISCORDER November, 1984 DISCORDER November, 1984
DISCORDER is a monthly paper published by the Student Radio
Society of the University of British Columbia. DISCORDER provides
a guide to CITR Radio, which broadcasts throughout the Vancouver
area at FM 101.9.
CITR transmits its 49-watt signal from Gage Towers on the UBC Campus. For best reception be sure and have an antenna attached to your
receiver. For those of you with persistent reception problems, CITR is
also available on FM cable at 100.1 in Vancouver, West Vancouver, North
Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Marple
Ridge and Mission.
DISCORDER is distributed throughout the Vancouver area. Enquiries
about advertising in DISCORDER or distributing free copies of
DISCORDER at a new location can be made by calling 228-3017.
General CITR business enquiries or information about renting the CITR
Mobile Sound System is also available at 228-3017. The request line
is 228-2487 or 228-CITR.
Editor: Chris Dafoe   Program Editor: Val Goodfellow
Advertising: Harry Hertscheg
Layout: Ball in a China Shop Layout Inc.
Photography: Dave Jacklin, Ian Warren, Bill Jans, Robert Van Acker
Contributors: Dean Pelkey, Mark Mushet, Mike Dennis, Julia Steele,
Kandace Kerr, Jeff Kearney, Theresa Henry, X. Fildebrandt, Bill Mullan,
Krista Hanni, Steve Robertson, Ammo Fuzztone, Linda Scholten,
Pat Carrol, Rob Simms, Larry Theissen, CD, Dave Ball
AVAILABLE FREE
AT OVER 100 LOCATIONS
DOWNTOWN
H & A Records & Tapes
Arts Club on Seymour
Black Market
Bronx Clothing
Camouflage Clothing
Check-It-Out Clothing
Collector's R.P.M. Records
Concert Box Offices
Duthie Books
The Edge
F°451 Books
Faces
The Gandydancer
Kelly's Electronic World
Luv-A-Fair Cabaret
MacLeod's Books
Montgomery Cafe
Odyssey Imports
Railway Club
Studio Cinema
Vancouver Ticket Centre
The Web Clothing
Whittaker's On Seymour
GASTOWN
Afterimage Photo Service
Basin Street
BeBop Beatwear
Cabbages & Kinx Clothing
Deluxe Junk Clothing
Firehall Theatre
Golden Era Clothing
Minus Zero Leather Works
Pow-Wow Clothing
Reptile Leather
Re-Runs Recycled Apparel
The Savoy Nightclub
Sissy Boy Clothing
Smilin' Buddha Cabaret
Video Inn
The Waterfront Corrall
Zeet Records & Tapes
ZZ...on Water
ZZ..West
WEST END
The Bay Theatre
Bayshore Bicycles
Breeze Record Rentals
Camfari Restaurant
Denman Market
Downtown Disc Distributors
English Bay Book Co.
Little Sister's Book & Art Emporium
Manhattan Books & Magazines
Melissa's Records & Tapes
Pizzarico's
POINT GREY
A Piece of Cake
Cafe Madeleine
Dunbar Theatre
'  Duthie Books
Frank's Records & Books
University Pharmacy
Varsity Theatre
Video Stop
The Video Store
West Point Cycles
KITSILANO
Bill Lewis Music
Black Swan Records
Broadway Records & Tapes
The Comicshop
Deluxe Junk Clothing
Hollywood Theatre
Lifestream Natural Foods
Long & McQuade
Neptoon Collectors' Records
Octopus Books
Ridge Theatre
Scorpio Records
The Side Door Pub
Videomatica
X-Settera Select Used Clothes
Yesterdays Collectables
Zulu Records
EAST SIDE
A & B Sound - Car Stereo
Bikes On Broadway
Changes Consignment Clothing
Collector's R.P.M. Records
Highlife Records & Music
iggy's
Kelly's Electronic World (Oakridge)
Memory Lane Records
Neptoon Collectors' Records
New York Theatre
Octupus Books East
Roxy Theatre
Vancouver East Cinema
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
Western Front Lodge
NORTH SHORE
A&A Records & Tapes
(Park Royal)
Kelly's Electronic World
(Park Royal)
Sam the Record Man
(Capilano)
Deep Cove Bike Shop
RICHMOND
A&A Records & Tapes
Cubbyhole Books
Paul's Music Sales & Rentals
Sam the Record Man
November 1984 Vol. 2 No. 10
The Agony and the Ecstasy of
watching Shindig
...//V THIS ISSUE
FEATURES
SHINDIG 11
CITR's musical extravaganza rounds out its second month,
with the Observer in tow.
CRASS ...., 12
Bits of Black Tape plumbs the depths of the UK's most
controversial band.
DEJA VOODOO   15
CD steals a moment with Montreal's musical madmen.
THE CURE 18
Dean Pelkey gets his claws into those enigmatic Lovecats.
REGULARS
AIRHEAD    4
THNCK    6
BUNKER BEAT    8
LIVE H
Julia swallows the bitterest P.I.L.
CITR PROGRAM GUIDE 20
DEMO DERBY     24
More music from the basement. Big Dummy investigates.
VINYL VERDICT 25
New music from Talking Heads, U2, Soul Asylum, Bowie, and more...
SHINGLES 28
THE ROVING EAR 30
Grant Burns reports from Calgary.
Cover: Robert Smith of the Cure: Photo Bill Jans DISCORDER November, 1984
Rh6a|>
SSSSSS5SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS5
c/o CITR Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 2A5
Dear CITR,
What the fuck has happened!?
Over the last month or so your DJs have undergone a completely
disgusting transformation. They seem to have become second rate DOC
HARRIS types. It seems as though every time I turn on my radio I hear
some jerk sayihg, "Less Talk More Rock," or "...On The R...," or "You're
with the Doctor," or some other idiotic phrase. Don't get me wrong, I'm
the first one to laugh at a joke, but jokes have lifetimes and once they're
dead they're no longer funny; just plain irritating.
Here are some of the names I hear over and over again, "Reg the
Veg," "Captain Ned," "The Doc," "Uncle Rick Thompson," "The Kid,"
"The Girl," "The Bird," and "Rockin' Dale." There are more which temporarily slip my mind. I have also noticed that the afforementioned hyp-
sters are on the radio much more than say, once a week. For example,
the one called "The Kid" has been on several times per day and over
the weekend seems to have been on every single day since Friday. He
is a particularly annoying cretin as he somehow combines CFOX jerkness
with CKLG slimeyness.
Why has this happened all of a sudden? Has the DJ director recently
been recruited from CFUN? Has your program manager become lazy
and decided to stop screening DJs? Or, is this a forced move towards
a commercial radio licence? If it is, which is my best bet, it is disgusting!
In the past CITR has always stood for a pure idealistic approach to radio.
Selling out has to be the worst thing you could possibly do. I must,
however, give you the benefit of the doubt but all indications are not in
your favor.
Yours, a (soon to be ex-) fan
Richard Lee
RS. I'm not the only one who thinks this, many of my friends have voiced similar dissatisfaction with your new jocko homo policy.
You wouldn't believe how it happened. The doorbell rang here at
the station, and when we opened the door, in poured hordes of corpulent, middle-aged potatoeheads with moustaches and shag haircuts. The fact that they were all wearing identical powder blue jackets
seemed to indicate that they belonged to the same counter-terrorist
radio station. Their leader kept shouting something about ratings
being way down. The rest of them were talking so fast that we
couldn't understand a word except for "countdown" (which happened to be about every third word). Anyway, they herded us into a little
room and locked the door. That was almost a month ago and we're
still in here. When we get hungry they slip a few gourmet burger
coupons under the door which, of course, taste terrible and get stuck
between our teeth. I hope we get sprung soon because the air is
getting awful stale and my fellow inmates seem to have this strange
gleam in their eyes whenever they look my way.
Dear Airhead,
As an avid local music enthusiast and human of respectable intelligence, I was embarrassed and dismayed to read the SHINDIG commentary (October issue).
In this article of approximately 56 written lines there were 19 direct
references to alcohol intake. According to my calculator, that's less than
every three lines that this so-called "Observer" felt it necessary to stress
that he or she has attained drinking age.
Now I know that any Battle of the Bands should not be taken too
seriously, but I think this sort of juvenile journalism makes a mockery
of any inherent artistic merit.
Why pollute the pages of Vanocuver's only DISCORDER with boorish
pap?
A Reader
P.S. Why weren't all three contending bands pictured?
Dear Chris,
Picked up a DISCORDER today. I must compliment you on "Marv
Newland the Animated Man." You stuck to the facts and still made the
article interesting. Your prose style is clean, to the point, and paced well.
I only had to stop reading twice to wipe the drool from my chin and shirt
front.
Please advise your photo department that they ran, instead of a photo
of me, a very bad picture of Ed "Kookie" Byrnes.
Keep the Gabby Pahinui interviews coming on CITR.
Please do not resist the inevitable lawsuit that my legal department
has advised me to carry out against: DISCORDER, CITR, you, Ed
"Kookie" Byrnes, and anyone who reads your interview mentioned above.
Yours truly
Marv Newland
Sorry Marv. Hope we can make some ammends by running this picture of you from your cameo in "Sing Beast Sing."
"Food for Thought"
I am just one of surely many who believe CITR to be one of the best
things to ever happen to Vancouver music. My one beef, however, is with
the way many of the DISCORDER contributors are allowed to "HIDE"
behind cute little aliases (i.e. The Observer, etc.) when signing off their
pieces. I believe this to be an open invitation to irresponsible journalism.
If someone has something to say, they should at least be willing to stand
up to it!!!
Otherwise, keep up the great work!
Gerry Nishi
Hey, whore you calling irresponsible, eh? Take it back or we'll beat
the shit out of yousc.or maybe we'll just sue you(se). By the way,
do you want any gourmet burger coupons...or maybe some free
Bryan Adams tix?
Theresa Henry
<? taxrffc yostkmj puufc -rn^fet exmirrter DISCORDER November, 1984
SAvoy
t 7:30 to 9 PM {
J HAPPY HOUR t
JNO COVER CHARGE?
*****•***••**••**
November Hilites
Nov. 1-3     Big Red Truck
cinnR
presents
EVERY MONDAY
BANDS YOUIL SEE IN NOVEMBER
THE SEMI'S
5   Eighth Day
My Three Sons
Out Of Proportion
Nov. 6-8
Bolero Lava
and Friends
ROUND3
. 12   Immoral Minority
Second Language
Rhythm Mission
19   Figures of Speech
Jump
Various Artists
26   Ministry of Ambiguity
Soldiers of Sport
Jet-Sonz
ORIGINAL BANDS
BATTLING FOR
GREAT PRIZES
Supplied by:
INSIDE TRAK PERRYSCOPE
MUSIC MAN'S ANNEX   COMMERCIAL ELECTRONICS
PROFILE SOUND        IMPERIAL RECORDING
Nov. 13-14 Work Party
Nov. 15-17 Beverly Sisters
Nov. 22-25 JaneSiberry
(from Toronto)
Nov. 27-30 Roots Raskidus
(from S.R)
The Savoy, #6 Powell Street, Gastown    687-0418 DISCORDER November, 1984
FRIDAY - NOVEMBER 30th - 8 pm
GRANDVIEW LEGION HALL - 2205 Commercial (+ E. 6th)
I,  BRAINEATER   JAZZMANIAN DEVILS
BEVERLY SISTERS       MACBOOTY BROTHERS
ANDREW JAMES PATTERSON      HANDSOME NED + THENSOME
The UNDERTAKERS SHEA MAN DISCO
PRESENTATIONS
INSTALLATIONS
DRESS - FLUORESCENT!
The Evening of ART, MUSIC,  PERFORMANCE, + DANCE
TICKETS - $7.00
available at:
The WAREHOUSE SHOW
PITT INTERNATIONAL GALLERIES
HIGHLIFE RECORDS
ZULU RECORDS
CENTRE CULTURAL COLUMBIEN
October 11-November 15
Pamela Hollhunt
Paintings
November 22-December 20
Jasna Gilardino/Louise Ruxo
Paintings
WESTERN FRONT
October 31-November 24
Carole Itter
Sculpture
November 9 8pm
r Fllmaker Projjj
MacLeod, BuitenhuisL
Rimmer, Coorru
Paintings
PRESENTATION HOUSE
je N. Van. 9M-1361
E ^«^p'
IATIONAL GALLERIES
■6 8pm
Tupperware Party
"November 5 8pm
Grand Public Opening
NoyaJtk 5-December 1
ijfmany Drawings": A Group Exhibition
•ffiwember 5-December 1
■       Oral
"Just Pretty Pictures"
Photographs
FIREHALL THEATRE
November 5-30
Lyse Lemieux
Installation
Until November 4 ■   /;•*
Margaret Randall
"Photos From Nicaragua"
UntH November 4
Deliberations: Arranged/mage* in
Photography^
November 8-D
"Photo Perspectives '84"
Mc2
SOHonwttfMIIM-att
Toben, Latremouille, Follows, Rhine,
Goldberg, Wade, Varney, Moiseiwitsch,
Leszczynski, Plewman
November 23-Oecember 12
Joe Average
Pa in tings/Dra wings
November 16, 17, 18
"A Different Face"
Films and Videos by Women
Robson Square Media Centre
800 Hornby Street
11pm
Workshops:
Quebec Women Filmakers
Media and Native Culture a
Black Women Filmakeq
872-2250 for into f£
VIDEO INN
o tapes since October '83
VANCOUVER NEW MUSIC SOCIETY
669-0909 for Info
November 18 8pm
Kronos Quartet: Avant-Garde Strings
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
December 2 8pm
Salvador Ferreras and Paul Dresher
Two solo performances
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
MALASPINA PRINTMAKERS
20-December 1
Malaspina Printmakers Society Annual
Members Show
Alicia Priest
Collin Browne
Reading
November 25
Don Druick, Flute
Diana Kemble, Piano
All Performances at 8pm
OPEN STUDIOS
November 12-24, Tues-Sat. 12-5 pm
Opening November 12 8pm
"Pantheon Series"
839 Beatty Street
November 5-16 Wed-Sun 1-7 pm
Opening November 5 8pm
Lorna Mulligan, Liz Scully, Jill Weavi
Sharyn Yuen
"4 Corners"
36 Powell Street 2nd Fir 687-3296
November 9-10-11, 16-17-18, 23-24-25
Friday 8-10 pm Saturday/Sunday 1-4pm
Georginna Chappell
689 East 46th Avenue 321-5312
November 22 and 29 3-6 pm
November 24-December 1 1-4 pm
Nomi Kaplan
1756 West 14th Avenue 733-4098
COBURG GALLERY
314 West Cordova Street 2nd Fir 688-0866
November 7-24
"Sex text"
Photographs: Brooks, Birnbaum, Barry, Ess,
Beckman, Gordon
November 28-December 15
Henri Robideau
Photographs
November 4
Bill Schermbrucker
Gladys Hindmarch
Reading
November 11
Robert Holliston, Piano
David Fabey, Violin
Misha Bodner-Horton, Cello
November 30 8pm
BLOWOUT '84
November 30 9pm
Jazzmanian Devils, I. Braineater, The
MacBooty Bros, Handsome Ned &
Thensome, Beverly Sisters, Andrew James
Patterson
N(ON) COMMERCIAL GALLERY
November 6-17th
Todd Davis
Opening November 6 8pm
November 20-December 1
Group Show: Women Artists For Battered
Women Support Services
Opening N
CONVERTIBLE
November 20-24, 12-9 pi DISCORDER November, 1984
TtlNCK
...after THE CURE we were feeling a brand new clean, that tingling sensation sometimes known as contact high, when the band seeps off the
stage and the mob commences to unglue its constituent parts...those
diehard consumers who found themselves on The Mall after the gig quickly separated into the John Barley's camp and the Luv-A-Fair camp. The
former must have been disappointed that only half of L.A.'s 45 GRAVE
showed up; the latter camp may have been pissed off to be turned away
due to a new anti-leather door policy...as ROBERT SMITH might have
said himself, "c'est la meme chose"...those of us without the power of
pecuniary expression had a more limited choice—Billy Barker's pad or
a tete-a-tete at the Plaza (where Jill was counting tetes and Paul Digs
and Chris Crud were recounting their adventures at the Commodore),
slam dancing and boosting each other above the pogoing mob's heads,
nearly getting their pants torn off in the process...much to the amusement of THE CURE'S guitarists, which raises the specter of Jock Rock
in a new way...a couple of nights earlier, JELLO BIAFRA had a few caustic
words to say on this subject, when the DEAD KENNEDYS played the
New York Theatre...my favourite songs of theirs included 'Jockarama"
and "MTV Get Off the Air"...the styles of two lead singers and the lyrical
content of their songs could not have been more different—Smith barely even looked at the audience, while Jello was always taunting, confronting and jumping into the crowd. In "Charlotte Sometimes" Smith
intones in his very sexy and private way, "sometimes I'm dreaming while
all the other people dance," while Jello delivers a diatribe about the dead
football hero whose coach praises him for "giving his all," then he scolds
one teeny punk for "using your fists—big deal!" The DK's sound and
the all-ages policy at the York gig prompted a frenzy of stage-jumping
quite invigorating to us faded rockers; voyeuristic vicarious thrills. Jello
must have the patience of a saint, or the concentration of a kamikaze
pilot, not even twitching when the sportspunks jostle him in the middle
of a song—and he's so cute with a stocking pulled over his head! Dumb
question -342—what caused that sulphurous reek in the balcony? Gag
me with a fire-cracker!...despite a sloppy performance from drummer
DARREN, the DK's set rocked out and hundreds of partymakers stumbled
down tp BILLY BARKER'S pad, where a few thrash bands wanked out,
including the annual reunion of TART'N'HAGGIS, a unique case of overkill
burlesque that's so stupid it's funny; JOEY SHITHEAD grabbed a mike
of the night
forawhileand traded insults with Barker and bassist PAUL MACKENZIE,
along the lines of "you're so tight, etc..." which put those of us who were
too drunk to find the stairs in an excellent mood for slam-type square
dancing to canned Scotabilly till five a.m....and CONGRATULATIONS
to LEN PESTER for surviving a messy operation by local scalpellers to
remove a bloated ego or some other internal organ that nearly exploded. After a short convalescence, Len is back on his seat again, right next
to the effigy of Guy Hawkes, who, rumour has it, people are paying five
bucks a shot for tickets to watch HIS internal organs go kerblooie on
the night of Nov. 5th. The location's a secret...and speaking of locations,
Walt Disney productions has been giving local layabouts a shot in the
arm, I mean wallet, to portray layabouts from Chicago fifty years ago.
I finally got my chance to slit former Waterfront Club Manager AL
HYLAND's ears from chin to chin with my bowie knife down on the
NATTY GANN set under the Patullo Bridge—and missed! The guy swings
a mean straight razor, so don't go trying to rip off his bread...also in the
background at the HoBo camp were veteran Van. rockers ROBERT
HARVEY and RANDY PANDORA...and I'm here to tell you the MIKE
CLUB is NOT getting back together, despite their having a snappy little
number in seven, count 'em.seven eighths time called SLIPPING OUT
treading the CITR charts with the most obnoxious little guitar solo I've
ever wanked in.lt—it's kinda cute, so call the Request Line at 228-CITR
right NOW and stand up for your rights...VIDEO INN really screwed up
their telethon on Cable 10 TV by pulling STOKELY SEIP's hour-long compilation of VI. library tapes off the air. Of course the INN is really sensitive to the censorship question since PAUL WONG's collaboration CONFUSED: SEXUAL VIEWS got yanked by ex-VAG director LUKE RUM-
BOUT A statement delivered by a contingent of flustered feminists to
the showing of the promo video Sept. 20 at the HELEN PITT GALLERY
claims "some of the images and the promotional style would be considered offensive" which makes one wonder if, 1984 style, they are intending
to edit the offensive material out of the Video Inn library. It's true, Stoke-
ly and Samantha Hamernes looked pretty kinky and intimate in the promo
clips and maybe it was this that the feminists who now run Video Inn
"found an unacceptable representation of the centre...that
stimulates...women"...I dunno, fifteen bucks is a bit steep, not that I wanna
"promote divisiveness" but I like to be stimulated too, only I got one problem, and I was born with it.
PHOTO QUIZ: what nearly-famous Va. rocker
posed for THNCK photog TIM TRYLINSKI in this get-up? Send your
answers with a five-dollar bill and you'll receive postpaid a FREE copy
of the band's latest record! Bi for now...your pal,
—Ammo Fuzztone DISCORDER November, 1984
NOVEMBER
1 Texas Swing with
CLARENCE GATEMOUTH BROWN
2-3 DAVID RAVEN BAND
5 POWDER BLUES
6 SUNNY OKOSUN
TOWN PUMP
66 Water
BAfiEfeYS
23 w cordova st
IN GASTOWN      669-1771
Mon., Nov. 5     WORK PARTY
Wed., Nov. 7     FLYING UNDERCUPS
with special guest
EUGENE SHADBOURNE
Wed., Nov. 14   MY THREE SONS
with THE FLUNKIES
Wed., Nov. 21   FORM BY FIVE
Wed., Nov. 28  RED HERRING
with guests
No Cover 8:00-9:30 p.m.
13UNKKII
Dear Mutants for Nuclear Re-Development:
1. Peter Gabriel - Peter Gabirel (1980)
The perfect album for the post-bomb world. Dark, depressing, paranoid,
and best of all, the cover looks like Gabriel has seen the Earth circa 2000
A.D.
2. King Crimson - Starless and Bible Black
Crimson may be one of the most pretentious rock bands in the history
of music but some pretensions are earned (thanks Robert Christgau).
Robert Fripp is a truly monumental guitar player and his band is right
in tune with his ideas on this disc.
3. Brian Eno - Another Green World
With all respects to Enola Gay, this Eno one is his true classic. Eno
has a loopy sense of humour that leads to the bizarre but he is also a
Romantic in touch with beauty.
4. XTC - Black Sea
Every tune on this album is a minor classic, from Respectable Street
through to Travels in Niholon. I'm sure one day XTC will be the band
to write the perfect pop song (Living Through Another Cuba comes close).
5. Gang of Four - Entertainment
Maybe in the year 2000 people will listen to "5:45" and wish guerrilla
war struggles were only entertainment seen on the 6:00 news, where
they are nice and removed from reality. This is a great record to blitz
to. Blamo!
6. Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring
This one caused a riot in 1913 and it still seems radical today. Loud,
brutal and primeval—if it wasn't for this disc the world of music might
have been a lot tamer in the past fifty years.
7. The Beatles - Abbey Road
Any list of ten greats that leaves off the Beatles is very incomplete.
I particularly love Side 2 on which all the songs kind of melt together
in beautiful nonsense.
8. The Residents - Duck Stab/Buster and Dan
"Avant-pop terrorists" says Rolling Stone, and I believe them. These
loonies play a very demented brand of pop (sort of mutant rock) and I
could not live in the bunker without listening to "Bach is Dead" or "Lizard
Lady."
9. Popul Vuh - Hossana Mantra
This German band plays a very quiet and ethereal style of music that
is very restful without becoming Muzak. This would remind me of the
beauty that once existed on Earth.
10. Pindrichi - The Passion of Jesus Christ According to Saint Luke
This is my personal favorite sacred music piece. A bleak yet passionate
outcry of despair with a ray of hope. Very apt for the post-bomb world.
Rocket Ronny
(a.k.a. Steve Gibson)
finwr
tmud
HPT DISCORDER November, 1984
BKAT
**********
1. Led Zeppelin - Houses of the Holy
I don't give a damn what anyone says—this album is a classic. Period.
2. Wire - 154
A truly awesome collection of well-produced British punk. The lyrics
are guaranteed to double your vocabulary overnight.
3. Pink Floyd - Ummagumma
Here is something from the Woodstock era that is truly stranger than
being cooped up in a bunker for 15 years with 10 of your favorite albums.
The theme song: "Several Species of Small Furry Animals Gathered
Together in a Cave" (=Bunker) and "Grooving with a Pict."
4. The Lords of the New Church
A beautifully recorded British punk album that will make you jump up
and down and scream and yell and stuff.
5. Queen II
This is some of the finest music ever recorded on vinyl. Even if you
hate Queen, this album is really worth a listen—LOUD. They still had
long hair then.
6. Iron Maiden
Nobody knows this album exists! It's truly a heavy-metal gem—much
better than the commercial stuff they're playing now, and good ol' "Eddie" on the front cover was never more lovable. Bang your Head!
7. Mott the Hoople - Mott
Ian Hunter's powerful Mott really show off on this old classic. It's only
available in import shops, but well worth the price.
8. Yes - Going For The One
One of the most intricate pieces of work this band has ever done. Even
the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra would be impressed.
9. Riot - Fire Down Under
Super-duper heavy-metal that doesn't make you sick after three plays.
10. The Dead Kennedys - Fresh Fruit For Rotting Vegetables
I'll have to agree with Gord Badanic, President of CITR. This is fun
tunes.
Thanks for reading this, It was fun to do.
Martin Zander
NOT JUST ANOTHER MUSIC SHOP
LTD.
PRESENT   THE   SECOND - ANNUAL
featuring A BAKER'S DOZEN!
Rocrusa
The Acousticats   „
Fun With Numbers
The Dilettantes
White Lies
*   My Three Sons
Second Language
Missing Link
False Creek
Bruno Gerussi's Medallion
The Doctors
And Two Special Guest Bands
Sales Service Lessons
Repairs Graphics
HOT JUST MOTHER.
music SftDP
393S Main St.. Vancouver. B.C VSV 3P2
^•977'1866
►  FRI. NOV. 9   4
8PM-2AM$4ATTr£D00R
► SAT. NOV. 10 4
1 PM - 6 PM
$5ATTr£D00R
(INCLUDE S BUff ET)
6 PM - 8 PM
MUSIC SEMINAR
8 PM- 2 AM
$4 AT THE DOOR
PACKAGE TICKETS $10 FOR BOTH DATES. AVAILABLE AT THE WATERFRONT, 686 POWELL ST., OR MOT
JUST ANOTHER MUSJC STORE, 3938 MAIN ST PHONE 877-1866
* TOTAL ECLIPSE PRODUCTIONS • 255-8924 *    x**™***^
DR. HELEN CALDICOTT
"STOP THE NUCLEAR MADNESS"
MONDAY NOV. 26th 8:00 pm
UBC WAR MEMORIAL GYM,
Available from AMS Box Office,
all Vancouver Ticket Centre and
Concert Box Office outlets
Childcare provided
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
LAST CHANCE
for 1984/85 Play
Season Tickets
NOVEMBER 7-17
TWELFTH NIGHT
Directed by Pamela Hawthorn
JANUARY 16-26
THE IMAGINARY
INVALID
Directed by Mavor Moore
MARCH 6-16
HAPPY END
a musical directed by
Arne Zalsove
Information & Reservations
228-2678
Arbutus
& 16th
PHONE
738-6311
BEST FILM
1984 festival of festivals
with
Keith Carradine
Genevieve Bujold
Lesley Ann Warren
Rae Dawn Chong
7:15 & 9:30
(MATURE) Some coarse language
Occasional suggestive scenes DISCORDER November, 1984
EVIRrfWWMffiNIIWr
ADMISSION $4.99
IN CASE YOU HAVENT
HEARD ... IT'S ABOUT THIS
STRAIGHT COUPLE (JANET
& BRAD) WHO STUMBLE
ACROSS THIS
TRANSYLVANIAN CASTLE. IT
WAS THEIR LUCKY NIGHT.
DR. FRANK-N-FURTER
(TRANSVESTITE SCIENTIST)
WAS THROWING A PARTY.
ALONG THE WAY THEY
MET RIFF RAFF
(HANDYMAN), MAGENTA
(A DOMESTIC), COLUMBIA
(A GROUPIE), AN OLD
FRIEND DRIVES IN DR.
EVERETT V. SCOTT (A RIVAL
STRAIGHT SCIENTIST}.
ROCKY-HORROR (MUCH
MUSCLE, HOWEVER A FEW
BRICKS SHORT OF A FULL
LOAD: FRANK-N-FURTER
CREATION) & EDDIE (EX-
DELIVERY BOY & LEATHER
BIKER WHO RIDES THE
REAL HARLEY.
THERE IS ALSO THE CRIMINOLOGIST IAN EXPERT) WHO IS NOT HEARD ALL
THAT OFTEN. SORT OF YOUR TYPICAL GATHERING AT A VICTORIAN
HOUSE PARTY. A CLASS ACT TO START OFF OUR FALL MIDNITE SERIES.
EVERY FRIDAY
MIDNITE
CMATUHQ
DRESS UP, BRING YOUR
R»CE. TOAST, CARDS,
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A FRIEND.
All ages admitted.
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DISCORDER November, 1984
guess I shouldn't have been overjoyed during Happy Hour at the Savoy.
They saw fit to cut me off at the bar...Perrier, hold the rocks. The Observer
shouldn't be blind-drunk (or so Denny Boyd told me).
The October 1st SHINDIG at the Savoy was the best SHINDIG so far.
Procedures for Approval were hot, lotsa people danced, Beau Monde
kept the beat going, but Red Herring had the hottest set of all as they
won themselves a trip to the finals on December 10th.
October 8th saw the annual no-contest night when Go 4 Three played
with Pete Moss and The Special Sauce and Bill of Rights. Another
full house...is it true "the sauce" drowned the other bands? Nahh!
By the way...who sez Billy Barker spends a good chunk of his life
drunk and the other part apologizing for it?
The contest resumed with 5th of November on October 15th. Their
pop laid-back sound contrasted only slightly with the three-piece
Ominous Cinema sound—high energy, average performance, but
weaker songwriting. The highlight of the night was Eighth Day, the winners of the night, a sort of T-Rex sound rock band.
Not A Love Song
D.O.A. opened and they were hot. The set was tight and they played
a lot of their best songs. One song that struck me as really great was
"Frontier." But, who am I to spoil Ken Lester's glowing admiration of my
D.O.A. reviews. What bothered me about this gig whas when D.O.A.
announced that one third of the world's population was starving (you
could never tell by looking at them), while the rest of us were partying—'So
let's wreck the party." Gee guys, who got the chrome dipped chordless
guitar for Christmas and who is selling T-shirts bought in bulk with D.O.A.
slapped on them for THIRTEEN DOLLARS a crack?
Johnny Lydon was certainly larger than life. He picked his nose, spat,
contorted his pyjama clad body in all sorts of strange, almost "Breakin' "
positions, bugged his eyes out and held a large portion of the audience
in the palm of his hand. He did all of this "and much, much more..."
on a neat-o, glow in the dark, new wavo stage. He was equipped with
a fog machine and an electric halo. Someone should buy one for Pope
John. I'm sure he'd want one, in fact I want one. Anyway, the man's
(Rotten's, not the Pope's) stage presence was incredible.
He was particularly great when he picked up his hate and sang
"Religion." Johnny seems to have created his own religion—himself. The
brutal, thick-necked Mining Engineers alias bouncers, looked out in awe
at a crushing mass of people shaking their fists and singing along to
a song that calls "Sin an eternal Hymm."
I felt sorry for all the people's hands he touched. I noticed he touched
them with the same hand which he picked his nose with. But it was all
part of his personal charm. He became even more charming when after
about six songs he told the audience "I'll be drinking beer in the dressing room. If I hear you I might come back." And off he strutted. I thought
he wouldn't come back, especially when the crowd chanted "D.O.A."
instead of "P.I.L." But return, he did, not for very long though.
My Three Sons
Robert Van Acker
October 22nd was another good night at the Savoy. My Three Sons
opened...a seven-piece ensemble with two girls doing back-up vocals—
but their set consisted of old, reliable covers filling in the gaps between
so-so originals. False Creek, the most different band in the competition, played second. Their urban-folk sound didn't impress the judges
enough, nor did the hard-core thrash sound of The Spores. My Three
Sons went on to win round two, set two of SHINDIG II.
The third night of round two saw Out of Proportion beat One Fell
Swoop and giZmo. One Fell Swoop probably had the best songwriting
and talent, but lacked energy. The Eric Clapton Clones giZmo cleared
the bar.
All three round two semifinalists will have fan clubs out...no blood
folks...this really is a friendly competition.
cartoonists
writers
artists
WANTS
YOU!
It was apparent that Johnny was having a good laugh at all of us. Ther
I looked at the crowd (myself included) dancing and getting all exciteo
to the tune of "This is not a Love Song" and realized just how funny
it must have appeared to Lydon. We were a bunch of thick Canadians
jiving to a rubbishy fourth-rate song. When P.I.L. played "Bodies" (not
"Anarchy in the U.K." or "The Greatest Rockin' Roll Swindle;" contrary
to popular belief) Johnny must have had an even bigger guffaw at a bunch
of people going wild over a song that was at least seven years old. But
it was great anyway and it was the closest thing to the Sex Pistols
Vancouverites will ever see.
RI.L.'s music with the departure of Keith Levene, leaves something
to be desired. Johnny has only himself and his fans left, and he is exploiting them for all they are worth.
Lydon could have sat on stage and sung nursery rhymes and still have
had the audience in his pocket. He seems to be having the time of his
life, charging people money to seem him be himself on stage. It is the
swindle of a lifetime and he's getting away with it—for the moment.
Special Thanx to Ian and Andrea.
—Julia (The Griper)
11 DISCORDER November, 1984
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\nnet DISCORDER November, 1984
CRASS is more than just a British band that often finds themselves
described as the "lords of anarchic punk." CRASS is also a record label
and a way of life. Members of the band and friends live on a farm just
outside London. They are strict vegetarians, practising anarchists, don't
drink alcohol, and are deeply involved in political discussion and, more
importantly, political action.
The band has five albums and a multitude of singles. Their albums
don't often hit the Top Ten in England for a very good reason: they are
usually banned the minute they hit the streets. Last month, for example,
a London record shop keeper was fined for selling not only CRASS
records, but also those by such bands as the Dead Kennedys. In Canada
their music is probably known only to a small knot of hardcore fans and
political activists, and it is almost as hard to find here as it is on the other
side of the Atlantic. It takes a lot of dedication on the part of most people
to sit down and listen to a single or an album by CRASS.
CRASS claims to have been around since before the Sex Pistols raised
their snarling little brushcuts in the late 1970s. The members of the band
were involved in folkie political bands before coming together as CRASS
in 1978. The group had been synonomous with direct political action
since coming together in the 1960s. They have done benefit gigs for
squats, women's transition houses and safe shelters, anarchist centres
and causes, anti-racist and anti-sexist organizations, and other political
events. Their albums carry the economic warning that the record should
cost no more than L2.50, even though you find the price jacked up to
the normally extortionate North American import price in local record
shops. CRASS have their own recording studio, and a huge distribution
warehouse in London, as well as a printing press that cranks out newsletters, broadsheets and posters. All of this activity speaks not only a
certain amount of financial security in the ability to own all of these functions collectively, but also a dedication to political theory in action. The
only way to escape from music money domination is to own the means
of production and distribution yourselves. For bands like CRASS, and
those on the CRASS label, this means retaining artistic and political control, being able to choose the bands they want to record, playing where
and what and when they want to play—and for whom. And, conversely,
being banned in most record shops and on the radio. All of which makes
CRASS somewhat outlawish.
"...if was the first time in
years that young people
seemed to be glamming onto
something that was basically
anti-authoritarian..."
With all of this one might expect CRASS to be your stereotyped slam-
dancing punks, living in a run-down warehouse squat in London's East
End. That's the picture Vancouver filmmaker Ian had when he visited
CRASS last year.
Ian: "I was expecting a big old house with five or six punks living in it
and stuff...I wasn't expecting anything different in the way they spoke
and what their ideas were. I was just expecting that image, because you
grow up on images and form images about everything. It was really
neat—we got off this bus right out in the English countryside, with the
picture postcard kinds of pubs and shit, and I see her (Eve Libertine)
come pedalling towards us, this woman on a bike with a semi-outrageous
haircut. So we looked at each other and knew this was obviously the
person who'd been sent to meet us. We would have been surprised if
it wasn't because this wasn't the kind of village that was crawling with
punks.
"Anyway, she meets us, real friendly, and takes us about two miles
along this winding road to their house, which is right in the middle of
these fields, beautiful little cottage with rose gardens, beautiful gardens
growing vegetables, and buildings and shit. They're right on the edge
of this farm, they've had it for years. Fairly typical sort of back-to-the-
land types, a little more manicured than it would be here. And so we
went out to the back yard and spent about eight hours talking.
"They look real normal. I said to one guy 'You look pretty normal to
be in a punk band,' and he said, 'Yeah, I had a moderate spike job at
one point, but ah, fuck, I got sick of walking down the street and getting
stopped by the police...I walk down King's Road and no one knows who
I am. I'm in one of the most famous punk bands in the British Isles, probably the most famous punk band, certainly in Europe, and no one knows
who I am.' And he says, 'I like it like that, you know, because I don't want
people running around taking my picture and asking me how we got that
guitar sound on the last record and shit like that.'
"But they publish little booklets of their lyrics and shit because they
know a lot of people can't understand the words and they know a lot
of people don't like the music that much. I guess they're more of a political
entity than a band.
"They've been trying to do political things for years and years, and
"I got the sense CRASS were
intelligent, coherent people who'd
been living their politics for the
past 20 years."	
"They've been trying to do political things for years and years, and
they were into music, I guess, and saw punk come along and it was the
first time in years that a lot of young people seemed to be glamming
onto something that was basically anti-authoritarian and had overtones
of a radical nature, so they decided it was a way to reach people instead
of just going the way they were going. So they just formed a band.
"They told me they got this tape sent to them by a Boston radio station, a university station, like a half hour compilation of their stuff, and
they were really surprised that they were played in North America. They
don't even deal with North America. They were distributed by some guy
in Toronto and have a handshake agreement to be distributed by Rough
Trade. When I told them that their albums were available in Canada they
kind of laughed. 'Oh yea? Well, jeez.'
"That's why they don't play in North America either. Because it's a
big rock star trip. They said they'd go to a town in Europe and the next
day their albums would be double priced, because they'd played the night
before. It would be a big rock star trip, you know, people'd be coming
out to see the band instead of coming out to be part of the political things
that would be happening.
"They're not interested in that, there's no point. It's not their obligation to appear as a band, and play along to that kind of bullshit that you
read in magazines like Rolling Stone on how it's a band's obligation to
play for their fans. They're there to make people think in England, which
is their place, where they're trying to change things. If you can't change
things in your own little village you aren't going to change things anywhere
else. And that's where they're trying to change things, to get discussion
going and that kind of shit."
But what if we don't want to play their stupid games? The
authorities have plans for that too—the awkward ones get shot as
subversives...
Subversives are what the whole thing is about. Subversives are
people who want to change things. Having this record makes you
a subversive. Women living outside men's rules are subversives.
13 DISCORDER November, 1984
more Crass
Anyone who's not supporting the generals and the government, the
general and the government are against...State control is the name
of the game...They also fear a rebellion to take their evil war-toys
away. They're getting one..."
from the cover, Nagasaki Nightmare single
CRASS
With lyrics like that, it is little wonder that the British ruling elite isn't
fond of CRASS and their musical accomplishments. Ian was told how
the police often arrive at the CRASS door to deliver warrants, summonses
and the like, usually for charges of obsenity against the latest CRASS
release. He described how the first time the cops arrived they were in
full riot mode, expecting a good drag^em-out street battle. Instead, they
were met at the door by a smiling middle aged woman, asking them if
they'd like tea. Somewhat disarming...
Ian asked them what they knew of North American bands.
"They said they like Millions of Dead Cops (MDC) and after they met
them they liked them even more. They talked about a Dutch band called
Ex, a really good band, that they knew. The also mentioned a couple
of Belgian bands. I asked them about the Dead Kennedys, and they didn't
really know anything about them, just sort of said 'Yea. That's who MDC
was here with, the'Dead Kennedys. MDC sort of camped in our fields
while the Dead Kennedys stayed in one of the big hotels in London.' Funnily enough I went down to Brixton two days later and went to this
bookstore. Railton Road Books, and the woman who ran this bookstore,
she thought MDC was just great, they stayed in her apartment and stuff,
but the Dead Kennedys stayed in hotels, getting drunk and shit, kind
of typical rock band kind of stuff while MDC were checking out squats
and talking with people. I kind of got the impression that CRASS was
saying okay—these guys are young and they're going to grow into their
politics.
"CRASS always book their own halls, and they try to play small halls
that will be accessible. They absolutely insist on controlling ticket prices,
which is impossible as soon as you leave England because they have
to go through managers. They've got a guy in Amsterdam and one in
Northern Ireland—but you need guys like that in every city, and there
just isn't a political net large enough to support that kind of organization.
"When they tour they take 2 or 3 other bands with them, and this filmmaker who shows neat films before and between the bands. While I was
there I went to a Poison Girls' gig, and they were touring with something
called the Cabaret of Fools, which was the band; a Rasta guy doing rap
poetry; a gay comedian; a skinhead kind of guy who was the MC but
who was really into doing political rap; and a white guy and a black woman
who were kind of a music group that would do more folk type music,
but with an edge to it. And that's the kind of thing that CRASS is into,
to create more thinking. It's all political but it's all different kinds of stuff
so all kinds of people will go there, right? Like when we were there, there
were the punks up front, dancing and shit, but in the back there were
all kinds of other people to see the other acts. So like a whole bunch
of people came together and met together in a situation that they wouldn't
do otherwise."
"Big A, little a, bouncing b
The system might have got you but it won't get me"
"Big A, little a"
CRASS
CRASS records and singles are available at extortionate prices in
local import record shops.
And you can always call the station and request more CRASS...
RETURN VLIGHT
A FLOCK OF SEAGULLS
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14
	 DISCORDER November, 1984
DEJA VOODOO
On the road...
By CD
Gerard Van Herk and Tony Dewald, the two who are Deja Voodoo,
have come west from Montreal in a pink and white '59 Edsel with
a cracked manifold. They are on a mission and they have brought
along the tools of their trade—Van Herk's battered guitars, Deward's cym-
balless drum kit, and bits and pieces of song and style from the scrap-
heap of American popular culture. They are here to spread the word of
Slugdeabilly.
Sludgeabilly?
What the hell is Sludgeabilly?
"More than anything else, I guess, it's a bad attitude," laughs Van Herk.
Dressed in a thrift store black suit and wearing a large black plastic tarantula as a tie, Gerard looks like the unholy offspring of Buddy Holly and
Lilli Munster. "The music itself involves stealing from blues, punk, country,
R&B, garage rock, stuff, things, whatever we can pick up. It's not even
a collage; it's a gumbo sort of thing where you just throw in everything,
cook it up, and hope it tastes better than it did separately."
Van Herk isn't kidding or exaggerating when he says "stealing." Deja
Voodoo are barefaced, unashamed musical larcenists. Not content to
swipe a phrase here, a hook there, they lift huge chunks out of other
people's songs and insert them in their own twisted compositions. Three
lines from the Sonics 1964 hit "The Witch" end up in the middle of a
song called "Voodoo Barbeque;" Lieber and Stoller contribute to
"Monsters in My Garage" with a few lines from "Jailhouse Rock."
It had to, happen: plagiarism as an art form.
"It's not plagiarism," insists Dewald, before being interrupted by his
partner. "All rock 'n' roll is plagiarism," Gerard says. "It's true, we steal
from all kinds of places, and we freely admit it. I think more people should
admit it and do it better. At least we only take the good bits."
To be fair, Deja Voodoo are more than the cat-burglars of rock. They
are also amusing company, nice to their parents, bilingual, and to top
it all off, founders and big cheeses (les grand fromages) of OG records,
home of some of Montreal's best undergound bands. They are also the
purveyors of a sound that may have to wait until the bomb drops to
...and into the gumbo.
become stuff of the top 40. It is the perfect music for the post-nuclear
age. Supported by Dewald's insistent modern primitive drumming, Van
Herk grinds out crude guitar riffs and...sings. Only you can't really call
what Gerard does singing. He sounds like Johnny Cash on steriods. He
"...we steal from all kinds
of places, and we
freely admit it."
sounds like his vocal chords melted together in the initial blast. We're
talking deep voice here, kids. There is no high end in the Sludgeabilly
sound. No ring of cymbals, no twang of guitar, and definitely no falsetto.
In fact, you get the feeling that Gerard's head would explode if he even
thought about singing in falsetto. The sound is all down at the bottom
with the creepy, crawly mutant things—in the sludge.
Sludgeabilly got its start back in 1981 when the duo's previous band,
the Halftones, broke up. "Our singer quit because we didn't have a synthesizer in the band," says Dewald. Undaunted, they decided to continue as a two-piece.
Montreal has never been known as a stronghold of local underground
music. Most Montrealers seem content to hit the dance clubs and catch
the occasional touring band. Faced with this indifference, Deja Voodoo
decided to play as often as possible. "A lot of local bands in Montreal
play every six months or so, hoping to make each gig a big deal. They
figure if they do that they'll qet a bia audience, because people would
go 'cause everybody's going'," explains Dewald. "We decided we'd rather
play for fifty people every three weeks."
The band's tenacity paid off, and by 1982 they had their first record,
a 7" single featuring the aforementioned "Monsters in My Garage." The
15 DISCORDER November, 1984
J'-rkSwdcfor"
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More Deja Voodoo
record was recorded in an empty club and, despite the genuine lo-fi
sound, was a local success.
Encouraged by their initial success, Dewald and Van Herk formed their
own label, OG Records. Initially intended as a vehicle for releasing their
Gumbo cassette, OG has since blossomed, releasing Deja Voodoo's LP
Cemetery as well as music by fellow Montrealers, Condition, Terminal
Sunglasses, American Devices and the Asexuals. The Montreal
underground music scene, at one time almost non-existent, has grown
Ian Warren
with the success of OG records.
"Deja Voodoo records are still the only things that make any money,"
says Dewald, "but on the whole, the label" breaks just about even."
"The whole point of OG isn't to make money anyways," insists Van
Herk. "We just want to make the Montreal underground a bigger
underground."
They have succeeded in doing that. OG has spawned imitators and
at long last we are hearing some local, original music from Canada's
second largest city. Deja Voodoo have also been instrumental in getting
that music to the rest of the country. While this is their first visit to Vancouver they have crossed the country to Calgary twice before.
Their mission to Vancouver can be judged a great success. They played
to enthusiastic audiences for three nights at the Savoy. "We were kinda
suprised," Van Herk admits, "because Vancouver is the one place in
Canada we've had trouble getting records to. We ran into the problem
that nobody would give us dates until the record was available here, and
nobody would book us if the record wasn't being distributed here. I guess
this trip solves that problem."
So, their mission accomplished, the two who are Deja Voodoo have
returned to their home town, with stops along the way. The '59 pink and
white Edsel wheezes through it's cracked manifold under the burden
of more stolen songs and styles. Maybe they've taken something from
Vancouver, maybe not.
In any case, Deja Voodoo are gone. But they'll be back, with more
Sludgeabilly.
Lock up your songs.
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669-4238 DISCORDER November, 1984
Dean Pelkey sharpens his daws on...
THE
CURE
ON THE TRAIL OF THE LOVECATS Part I
£ '*m ne Cure are doing an autograph session at Odyssey Records
I at 4:00, you can talk to them when they finish," I was told. That
I sounded easy enough. There'll probably be about 20 to 50
people there for autographs and I should be able to have a long chat
with Smith, Tolhurst and co. afterwards. That was my first wrong assumption of the day. I arrive at Odyssey and am greeted by a line of over 200
people, mostly young girls, all waiting for a glimpse of The Cure. Do they
know something I don't? Is this the beginning of Curemania?
Inside the store everyone is tense. The Cure aren't here. A reliable
source informs me that their plane is two hours late. Seems that they
were flying into Vancouver from Japan via Los Angeles. Oh well, nothing
to do but wait and watch the crowd grow surly.
By 5:30 what was an orderly line has now become an impatient mass
halfway into the store. I feel likeleaving but I decide to stay, wondering
if I might get a story when this unruly mob of Cure groupies have had
enough and decide to trash the store. All is saved however, by the eventual appearance of Robert Smith and Laurence Tolhurst at 5:53. They
are instantly mobbed, beseiged for autographs, presented with banners,
stuffed toys, and smothered in kisses. Serious journalism and common
sense dictate that I stay far away. After watching the spectacle for several
minutes I decide that a wiser idea would be to retreat and attempt an
interview after the show. Slipping out the back way I find more fans
waiting, they've cased the joint well, and it makes me wonder if the boys
in Duran Duran had not better start worrying a bit.
ON THE TRAIL OF THE LOVECATS Part II
A sweaty Commodore crowd has just departed, burly men are wheeling equipment around, and after much begging and patient waiting
I'm ushered into the presence of Laurence Tolhurst. Looking a bit
tired, he nevertheless is prepared to play genial host with a cigarette
in one hand and a glass of scotch in the other (the English gentleman
as rock star?).
Right away it's obvious that Tolhurst wants to talk, barely giving me
18
time to get my tape rolling. Apologies are made for the shortness and
raggedness of the set. Apparently the original drummer on the tour had
been called back to England under mysterious circumstances and the
replacement, Vince Ely, formerly with the Psychedelic Furs, had only
about 6 hours of practice with the band. Although the present show the
band is doing usually works better in a theatre type of setting, the clublike setting of the Commodore helped cover up the rough edges of the
band, who in turn treated Vancouver to some "rockier" versions of certain songs.
Tolhurst comes across as a very earnest fellow who really has no pretensions about what he's doing. Having grown up just south of London
in a middle class family, he left college after three years because "I'd
rather do something I can do," and formed The Cure with long time school
friend, Robert Smith.
Although Smith is usually seen as being The Cure by himself, Tolhurst
plays an equal part in the band.
"The thing about it is, The Cure's myself and Robert, but the nature
of most people's idea of a group is one central figure of three. But when
we first started we said that to each other, one person's got to go for that.
We won't sort of worry about different roles and things, like you're the
guitarist and I'm the drummer and you can't do anything else. We'll
swap them around so it's interesting. We're very similar people, it's like
a sort of jigsaw. When we're in the studio we have similar ideas but some
things he can do I can't and some things he can't do I can, so it's like
a perfect kind of duet. There's an equal contribution but I leave the final
decision to him. Say I write some lyrics and we put them all together-
he has to be happy to sing them because you can't sing something you
don't believe in. Also, you can't sing certain words."
Tolhurst gives one the impression that neither Smith nor himself are
really concerned with who does what on a song. They work towards a
guitar line or a title (as in "A Forest") and draw from "loads of words in
patches and for one song often have about ten different sheets of words,
some of mine, some of his, and take little bits out." The emphasis is on
the atmosphere, idea, and execution of things. In his case it appears
that a Cure song is more than merely the sum of all its parts.
The band itself has gone through a series of strange musical and DISCORDER November, 1984
stylistic permutations. Tolhurst describes their early attitude as "pretentious" with the name The Cure being chosen to evoke images of a
musical cure to what they perceived to be musical rubbish. Starting off
as a pop band with Boys Don't Cry; by the time Pornography (their fourth
album) was issued they were working in a musical vein described alternately as somber and dense or dirge-like funeral songs.
This, it seems, was the result of a number of factors coming into play
over time, both personal and personnel-wise. During the recording of
Faith Smith and Tolhurst each experienced personal losses what with
Smith's grandmother and Tolhurst's mother both dying. As a result, what
had been intended as more of an "up" album subsequently became
more subdued. This feeling carried over and spilled out again in the making of Pornography.
"That was because at the time with the people involved, it was a very,
very intense personal relationship between the three of us that made
an album like that. That it had to be that hard, because it was very much
a fire and water thing with the band. It was very intense at that time.
The album had to reflect what we where like." Tolhurst sighs and drags
on his cigarette, reflecting on those days. "The music came from the
feeling between us and it was quite hard. We stopped then considering
ourselves as a band for a while because it became so mentally crazy,
a lot of it. I mean, like all our records are always like a diary almost of
what's happening to us at the time."
During the tour in support of Pornography the band became fed up
with being on the road and to a certain extent, with each other. At the
end of the tour it was agreed that a holiday of sorts was needed.
"I think a lot of bands are very stupid to be quite honest, because
how otherwise can you tolerate something which becomes like, a complete manual grind kind of existance? You know, you play for months
on end, the same songs, the same people, the same thing, and then
when you stop that you've got to make a record of the same thing and
do it all again."
Diversification became the order of the day. Tolhurst decided to step
behind the controls of a studio, producing the band Also the Trees and
Baroque Bordello from France. Robert Smith on the other hand, remained
more in the light, working on The Glove with Steve Severin and filling
in on guitar with Siouxsie and the Banshees. He appears on their live
album and Hyaena.
Through all this Tolhurst and Smith remained in contact and began
to release a series of Cure singles starting with "Let's Go To Bed," which
"I suppose we like to
confuse people..."
began a virtual rennaissance for the band. The fact that they had worked on other projects kept their interest going and when they were ready
to resume the identity of The Cure it was with an excitement and feeling
of newness that Tolhurst describes as being similar to when they first
started.
And though at the present Smith has left the Banshees to devote his
energy to The Cure, this, cautions Tolhurst, doesn't mean they won't continue to pursue outside interests. He adds that he recently had a phone
call from Baroque Bordello and will be producing a new single for them
shortly. As well, he's of the opinion that The Glove may have a new project in the works. These outside projects he insists, are half the reason
why The Cure are still around after six years. "For us, we're in the group
to enjoy ourselves but we do other things outside the group and that
keeps it all interesting."
One of the more obvious products of the new found excitement of Smith
and Tolhurst for The Cure was "Lovecats." It was the first single recorded by the band outside of London, in Paris to be exact, and found the
band quite cheerful and toying with what appeared to be jazz influences.
Tolhurst agrees and smiles at the reference to jazz but calls it "fake jazz."
The song was done in a studio with a lot of people amidst a party atmosphere and the revelation that it, and the accompanying video, were
partially inspired by the Disney movie The Aristocats draws a delighted
response form the crowd gathered in the room. Following up on the idea
that the band's records are a diary of what is happening to them it must
be safe to say that they enjoyed their stay in Paris. Tolhurst sips his scotch
and nods knowingly.
This brings us to The Top, an album recorded after a two-year layoff.
It has some of the openness of "Lovecats" yet also contains darker,
brooding songs such as "Shake Dog Shake." Although Tolhurst claims
that the band has been a lot happier in the last year, "with The Top it
was like, 50-50, you know, there were some days when we did things
where they felt very sad and very sort of claustrophobic, and then some
days it was like happy and up. So that accounts for the variation. Purely
that reason, really, because we had that period for two years since Pornography where we'd only put out singles. We'd put them out expressly
for that reason, just to sort of experiment and try and see if people would
believe it was us. I suppose we like to confuse people really, we're a bit
mischievous."
"I find it a bit fruitless for a band to preach politically when a band
is never going to change the world basically, ever. An old actor might
change things a bit but I can't see the day, I may be talking rubbish,
but generally music doesn't change the political attitudes of the world.
It might change young people's ideas about things a little bit and make
people think about things more, but in general it doesn't. I think the way
to change things for us, is more a sort of personal politics you know,
like your relationship with everybody." This attitude is best summed up
with the expression "each man is an island," and Tolhurst sees The Cure
as attempting to build bridges between the islands. Although they have
touched on subjects such as the obscenity of war in songs such as "100
Years" on Pornography, The Cure generally try to stay away from blatant sloganeering. Jello Biafra may disagree with this approach but
Tolhurst says, "We can only express what we feel ourselves. I find it bad
that people talk about something they aren't really involved in."
Tolhurst goes on to tell about working in Crass' studio where he was
basically the antithesis of all that Crass stands for. And while he does
admire a lot of things they've done, he finds "a lot of it too naive and
too simple. This is black and this is white and there's nothing in-between.
Maybe we work in that area that's in-between—which is where most
people are I suppose." Aha, here perhaps lay some of the basic roots
of the Curemania observed outside the record store; appeal to the middle classes, the people in-between. When this is put to Tolhurst he dismisses it and attributes their new-found popularity to more people having simply heard "Let's Go To Bed" and "Lovecats." Famous people now,
I guess.
So what does the future hold for The Cure? Well, to start off with they
have another month in North American before heading back to England
for a two month vacation. Remember, this tour started in Europe back
in April and has literally taken them around the world. After that it's off
to Germany to start work on a new album, and the name Conny Plank
gets thrown about. Does this mean more experimentation? Attempts to
confuse the audience further? A go at stirring things up? Visions of a
teutonic sounding Cure buried in synthesizers come to mind. Tolhurst
shrugs, finishes his scotch, and flashes one of those mischievous smiles.
Lovecats or Cheshire cats? Can these guys be trusted? Who knows—
perhaps the answer will be in their next vinyl diary.
—Dean Pelkey
19 DISCORDER November, 1984
ROGRAM GUID
-A guide to CITR fm 102
REGULAR   PROGRAMS
CABLE 100
African Show   (Wednesday 9:30 pm-12 am)
A program featuring African music and culture. Every week,
with news, current events and local African music events.
Fast Forward (Sunday 9:30 pm-1 am)
The latest in the exciting and vibrant world of experimental, independent, minimalist, electronic, avante garde stuff.
Actually, this program is yet another alternative to CITR's
general "alternative" sound. Keep abreast of independent
cassette releases around the world, as well as listening for
rare live recordings or more well known non-mainstream
artists.
The Mid-show (Wednesday Midnight-1 am)
The Mid-Show presents a diverse and sound fluid mesh,
from candy to explicit, engineering a release ghetto.
Directed by the magnetic loneliness of audio art, video art,
poetry, prose and indigenous music, the movie soundtracks, young and old pop and rock, foreign lingo hits and
country jostle about looking for conversation. Listen in and
get a piece of the action. Hosted by Jon Anderson.
Music Of Our Time   (Sunday 8 am-12 pm)
Music of the 20th century in the classical tradition. Hosted
by Ken Jackson, Jay Leslie and Sandra Thacker.
Folk International (Saturday 10 am-12 noon)
Folk music from around the world. Tune in on the first and
last Saturday of each month for traditional Canadian folk
music, and on the Saturdays in between for Indian music.
News and Sports   (Weekdays)
Local, national, and international news and sports. News
and sports reports at 8 am, 10 am, 1 pm, and 6 pm.
Newsbreak and Sportsbreak at 3:30 pm and 4:30 pm. On
Saturday and Sunday, regular newscasts air at 12:00 noon
Final Vinyl   (Nightly at 11 pm)
Albums played in their entirety. Refer to the final vinyl listing
in this section for a more detailed explanation.
Playlist Show   (Saturday 3 pm-6 pm)
The countdown of CITR's weekly top 40 singies and
albums, featuring new additions to the Playlist. Listen for
Michael Shea.
Generic Review
(Weekdays at 8:35 am and 5:35 pm. Also on Saturday and
Sunday Magazine)
A critique of local entertainment, theatrical events, movies,
and exhibits.
Proper Gander
(Saturday 6:30 pm-9:3Q pm)
Everything but a well-dressed goose.
High Profile
(Monday through Saturday at 8 pm)
Spotlighting one artist's music and career. Refer to High
Profile listing for artists.
Public Affairs   (Weekdays 9 am)
Current events and issues around Vancouver, as well as
in depth coverage of social problems, political events and
public figures.
Insight (Weekdays 9:43 am and 6:13 pm)
An editorial comment on current issues open to the community. If you have something to say, call 228-3017, ask for
Doug Richards.
Jazz Show (Monday 9:30 pm-1 am)
An evening of varied traditional and avant garde Jazz on
one of Vancouver's longest running all-jazz programs. Now
that C-JAZ has become "FM97" this is one of the only
places you can hear jazz on the radio before midnight.
Hosted each week by Gavin Walker or Bob Kerr.
Rockers   (Sunday 1 pm-3 pm)
The latest and best in toasting, rockers, dub and straight
forward reggae. Hosted by George Barrett.
Saturday and Sunday Magazine
(Saturday & Sunday at 6 pm)
Weekend magazine shows presenting special news, sports
and entertainment features.
Sunday Night Live   (Sunday 8 pm)
Rare live recordings of noted local and international artists.
Mel Brewer Presents   (Thursday 11 pm)
A program featuring exclusively the newest and best in local
talent with new demo tapes, live interviews with groups and
local music figures, debuts of new released and lotsa hot
juicy gossip.
20
Voice of Freedom   (Sunday 6:30 pm-7:30 pm)
Satirical broadcast from a mythical radio station on a
secluded American military base (Diego Garcia) where all
the records are twelve years out of date. DISCORDER November, 1984
PROGRAM GUIDE
fA guide to CITR fm 102
CASLC100
fCITR
102 FM
I 100 cable.
SUN
MON
TUES
WED
THUR
FRI
SAT]
Q:0O
0:35
MUSIC
OF OUR
TIME
WAKE            U
P       REPORT         WITH           NEWS,          SPORTS        AND
WEATHER
II                                      I                                    I
GENERIC REVIEW
GENERIC REVIEW
9:
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
I
CITR INSIGHT EDITORI/
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
ho00
MORNING
REPORT            WITH           NEWS,          SPORTS         AND
WEATHER
FOLK
INTERNATIONAL
|   am
NOON
NEWS
NEWS
SUNDAY
BRUNCH
m   -.00
1   pm
THE
ROCKERS
SHOW
LUNCH
REPORT          WITH          NEWS,            SPORTS        AND
WEATHER
o °°
1 o °°
O 30
THE
SUNDAY
AFTER
NOON
SHOW
THE
PLAYLIST
SHOW
NEWS
NEWS                            NEWS                           NEWS
NEWS
4 .30
SPORTS
SPORTS                       SPORTS                        SPORTS
SPORTS
1       d :0°
1      ^ .35
GENERIC REVIEW
[ GENERIC REVIEW
y    :00
a13
1      V/   30
SUNDAY
MAGAZINE
DINNER
REPORT          WITH          NEWS,            SPORTS        AND
WEATHER
SATURDAY
MAGAZINE
I                .    .„ ^,^n,A.
VOICE OF
FREEDOM
CITR INSIlim cunun
PROPER
GANDER
7   °°
/    :30
8M
SUNDAY
NIGHT LIVE
HIGH
PROFILE
HIGH
PROFILE
HIGH
PROFILE
HIGH
PROFILE
HIGH
PROFILE
HIGH
PROFILE
Q oo
FAST
FORWARD
JAZZ
SHOW
AFRICAN
SHOW
1000
11"
FINAL
VINYL
FINAL
VINYL
FINAL
VINYL
FINAL
VINYL
MELBREWER
PRESENTS
FINAL
VINYL
FINAL
VINYL
MID
NIGHT
FAST
FORWARD
JAZZ
SHOW
*
THE MID
SHOW
T    :00
1      Q    00
1    Q  °°
1      O am
CITR broadcasts daily at 102 FM and 100 cable FM from 7:30 AM to 4:00 AM
21 DISCORDER November, 1984
yw
CITR TOP 20 SINGLES
ARTIST
TITLE
LABEL
1 MALCOLM McLAREN
Madame Butterfly
VIRGIN/POLYGRAM
2 HUNTERS &
^^f
COLLECTORS
Follow Me No More
EPIC (UK)
^
3 JERRYJERRY
Baby's On Fire/
Gospel Surfer
"DEMO**
4 THE SMITHS
5 POISONED
How Soon Is Now/William..
Yellow Pages/Grey Area
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
POISONED
^   Request Line     A
6 ASSOCIATES
Schampout
WEA (UK)
■     HL
aU  h
7 BILL OF RIGHTS
Blind Society/The Core
BORE
H    v
m
8ATTILATHE
STOCKBROKER
Radio Rap
CHERRY RED (UK)
r     228-CITR
m
9 IGGY POP
Repo Man
MCA (US)
^M
10 NOMENASNO
Self-Pity
**DEMO**
11 JAH WOBBLE
Voodoo
LAGO(FR)
J
12 WORK PARTY
Work Song/Come On Over
MODAMU
13 JOHN CALE
OohLaLa
ZE(UK)
14 TUXEDOMOON
Soma
JOEBOY(BLG)
15JOHNATHAN
w
RICHMAN
The Tag Game
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
¥
16 MIKE CLUB
Slippin' Out
-DEMO**
w
17 TIM RAY A/V
Mondo Caine
-DEMO**
18 RED SHIFT
Underflesh
All You Pretty Girls
PSYCHE INDUSTRY
VIRGIN/POLYGRAM
19 XTC
on /~>n i  pr>ATT
ALSO RECEIVING AIRPLAY
20 GILL SCOTT-
HERON
Re-Ron
ARISTA/POLYGRAM
THE GO-BETWEENS
FLIPPER
Spring Hill Fair
LP
LP
SALEM 66
Gone Fishin' .
LP
RICHARD THOMPSON
Small Town Romance
LP
LONG RYDERS
Native Sons
LP
RED ROCKERS
Schizophrenia Circus
LP
HOODOO GURUS
Stoneage Romeos
LP
MOBILE SOUND
AZTEC CAMERA
DEVO
Knife
Shout
LP
LP
THIS MORTAL COIL
It'll End In Tears
RUNDMC
LP
228-3017
BEVERLY SISTERS
BEAT PAGODAS
EP
EP
FRONT 242
EP
BLOW MONKEYS
Atomic Lullaby
12"
CONSPIRACY
INTERNATIONAL
Hammer House
12"
CHAKK
Out Of The Flesh
12"
MICHEL LEMIEUX
ASIYAH
nr-Tcn An/-*um
Romantic Complications
How Could I Forget
7"
CITR TOP 20 ALBUMS
"CASSETTE**
**/^AOPrTTr**
PETER ARCHER
TV Child
CASSETTE
1 TOM VERLAINE
Cover
VIRGIN/WB
illillill
2 FORGOTTEN
REBELS
This Ain't Hollywood
STAR
3 PALAIS
SCHAUMBURG
Parlez-Vous Schaumburg?
PHONOGRAM (BRD)
4 M.I.A.
Murder In A Foreign Place
ALT TENT. (US)
5DELFUEGOS
The Longest Day
SLASH (US)
™p *n.  ^^m
6 RED HOT CHILI
PEPPERS
Red Hot Chili Peppers
EMI/ENIGMA (US)
KorJ
7 SKATALITES
Return Of The Big Guns
ISLAND (UK)
8 MINUTEMEN
Double Nickels-
SST (US)
9 SUMMERS/FRIPP
Bewitched
A&M
10 SACRED COWBOYS
Sacred Cowboys
FRINGE PRODUCT
11 ROBYN HITCHCOCK
I Often Dream Of Trains
MIDNIGHT MUSIC (UK)
12 LET'S ACTIVE
Cypress
IRS (US)
uSiflfc-
13 K.D. LANG
A Truly Western Experience
BUMSTEAD
14 CRAZY 8'S
Law & Order
REDRUM
C"**s3!P llo
15 THE CULT
Dreamtime
VERTIGO/POLYGRAM
16 VARIOUS ARTISTS
Repo Man Soundtrack
MCA (US)
17BUNNYDRUMS
On The Surface
RED (US)
18 400 BLOWS
"..If I Kissed Her.."
ILLUMINATED (UK)
19 TOM ROBINSON
Hope & Glory
CASTAWAY/RCA (UK)
20CARMEL
The Drum Is Everything
LONDON/POLYGRAM
22 \november hiprofiles^
High Profiles are 45 minute documentary style music specials,
encompassing
individual bands, musical movements and
styles and scenes around the world. High Profiles include
biographical material, histories, discographies and a good
sampling of music. High Profile can be heard Monday through
Saturday evenings at 8:00.
Thur
1   The Collectors
Fri
2  The Wide World of Chrissie
Hyndes Bed Mates
Sat
3  Tom Waits
Mon
5 Chairmen of the Board
Tues
6  Fastbacks
Wed
7  "Arts Underground"
Thur
8  No High Profile
Fri
9  No High Profile
Sat
10   Eyeless in Gaza
Mon
12  No High Profile
Tues
13  Charged G.B.H.
Wed
14  Guilty Pleasures II
Thur
15  Sparks
Fri
16  Men Who Gargle Drano
Sat
17  Mark Perry and TV Personalities
Mon
19   Professor Longhair
Tues
20  The Boston Music Scene
Wed
21   Bob Calvert
Thur
22  ADX (a.k.a. The Addicts)
Fri
23   No High Profile
Sat
24   Echo and the Bunnymen
Rarities
Mon
26  Confederate Pop
Tues
27  3V2 Hour Special on the Velvet
Underground (begins 6 p.m.)
Wed
28  Coitus Musicus
Thurs
29  Twin Tone Records
Fri
30  No High Profile
DISCORDER November, 1984
THUNDERBIRD SPORTS
Schedule for Live Sports Coverage
Nov.
Nov. 3
Time
Sport
1:00 pm
Football
(Montana Tech.)
8:00 pm
Basketball
(S.F.U.)
8:30 pm
Basketball
(S.F.U.)
8:00 pm
Basketball
(S.F.U.)
7:15 pm
Hockey
(Alberta)
7:15 pm
Hockey
(Lethbridge)
Nov. 8
Nov. 9
Nov. 12
Nov. 23
Nov. 30
From Thunderbird Stadium, Monte Stewart has play by play
and Mike Perley brings colour and insight. Catch our final 1984
broadcast of the football T-Birds. First basketball broadcast of the
season, Doug Richards provides play by play and Monte Stewart
has colour. Catch our action from atop S.F.U. Again, this one is
against our most hated rival, those bums from the hill. This time,
from our turf here at U.B.C.
In case they haven't had enough we will broadcast yet another
slaughter of those cagers from S.F.U.
IF YOU WANT TO WORK FOR CITR SPORTS, CONTACT
MIKE PERLEY OR MONTE STEWART, 228-3017
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
SUNDAYS
8 AM till NOON
NOVEMBER SHOWS
November 4       George Rochberg: String Quartet No. 3
Bela Bartok: Concerto for Orchestra
PACIFIC CONTEMPORARY MUSIC
FESTIVAL RECORDINGS (Steve
Chatman)
November 11      Rochberg: String Quartet No. 4
Benjamin Britten: War Requiem
Gerald Finzi: Lo, the Full Final Sacrifice
John Paynter: The Rose
Leonard Bernstein: Halil
November 18     Rochberg: String Quartet No. 5
John Cage: 30 Pieces for String Quartet
Penderecki: De Natura Sonoris
KRONOS QUARTET PREVIEW:
Ruth Crawford Seeger: String Quartet
Benson: Dream Net
Rudhiar: Advent; Crisis and Overcoming
November 25     Rochberg: String Quartet No. 6
CANCO.N SPECIAL with guest Colin
Miles of the Canadian Music Centre,
featuring recordings on the Centredisc
label.
Hosted by: Jay Leslie, Ken Jackson And Sandra Thacker
cinnR
Membership
Application
NAME:
AGE:
ADDRESS:
POSTAL CODE:
PHONE: 	
ARE YOU A UBC STUDENT? Y N
UBC STUDENT NO. 	
INTERESTED IN PROGRAMMING?
6138 SUB BOULEVARD    VANCOUVER, B.C.    V6T 2A5    228-3017
23 DISCORDER November, 1984
Demo Derby
First off, this month in Demo Derby, another apology: this time to
Corsage. "Season of the Witch," a song reviewed in this column
last month, is not an original, it is a live recording of the old Donavan
classic.
Second, a bit of news: Unovis, another band reviewed last month
has just changed their name to the Jet-sonz. Those two things out
of the way, on to the world of the good, the bad, and the truly awful.
•••••**•*••*••*••••*•••••*•••••
This is not a pop song: 4 tapes reached us this month that sound kind
of like one of those demonstration tapes made by Yamaha or Korg synthesizers, showing the "broad range of sounds available on the palette
of today's aural sculptor." Lots of know twiddling, with a number of interesting sounds coming out, but no real music (or aural sculptures). "Too
Bad" by Peter Hurst, along with '"No Escape" and "River at Doom,"
both by Christopher Ross fall into this category. "Under Flesh," by Montreal's Red Shift is pretty much the same, except there is an electro-
dance beat added. "Amazon Grace," an instrumental by Michael
Barabas, on the other hand, has a catchy rhythmic feel and a great Belew-
like guitar part.
••••••*••••••••••••••••••••••*•
Trevor Jones has a new demo tape, under the name the White
Orpheus Project. For those of you familiar with the guy's music, this
is pretty much the same as his other solo material, with a heavier emphasis on rhythm. Can blue men sing the whites?
••••••••••••••••••••••••*••••••
Live, Michael Lemieux is supposed to be a great multi-media performer. Not having seen him live, I have no extra experiences to help fill
in the gaps found in his song "Romantic Complications." The song alternates between a neat T-Rex like chorus, and one of those French-
Canadian disco-beat songs that everyone used ot hate so much.
••••*••••••••••••••••••••••••*•
CAMOSUN AOUARIA
We are  knowledgeable in
A few months back, Peter Archer had a really cool demo tape, consisting of a rhythm track with spoken word exerpts from the film "Blade
Runner" dubbed onto it. His new song, "TV. Child" is very different:
very laid back with a kind of blues riff in the background, and lyrics about
the new generation brought up on Hill Street Blues. I'd rather have a
TV. Party anytime.
• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••-A-*
If you didn't grow up in the prairies during the "golden age of Rock
'n' Roll," Herald Nix is the next best thing. This band has the most
authentic (whatever that means) rockabilly sounds Vancouver has ever
known. Offered to us this month is a new ballad "The Fugitive Kind,"
a beautiful countryish number that will stick in your mind if you're at all
mushy.
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Montreal's Disappointed New People must be getting sick of this comparison, but gosh, do they ever sound like Joy Division. If Ian Curtis hadn't
been so depressed, he would have written "Fuck With Christ." ("WHEN
you fuck with Christ, whoa whoa, you're on your own.") This is a fantastic song!!
• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••■A-*
Also from Montreal comes the Asexuals, with "Stand Up." This band
must be great live. The song writing itself is a bit standard, but there's
lots of energy, guitar and drums much like the Alarm with electric guitar.
"Stand Up" also sounds very much like Stiff Little Fingers' last decent
single, "Talk Back." The Asexuals compare weakly with Stiff Little Fingers
or the Alarm, but still okay guitar pop.
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Monuments Galore, from Winnipeg, suffer from the same problem
as do the Asexuals: lots of energy, but still weak songwriting and derivative
style. "Young Girl Generation" builds into a mod pop tune, with harmonies
and guitar riff sounding a lot like early Jam.
—Big Dummy
the selection
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24 DISCORDER November, 1984
VINYL VERDICT
Talking Heads
Stop Making Sense
Why Stop Making Sense? Why a Tour? Why
a Movie? Why do the musicians come out
gradually? What will the band do next? Where
do the Movements come from? Are live concerts
better or worse than records? Why no special effects in the movie? Why a booklet? Why a big
suit? Why was a digital system used for the
sound? The Talking Heads' new album Stop
Making Sense asks all these questions and, if
one listens closely, answers them all—very
positively.
This album is neither here nor there. It is not
truly from the studio nor is it truly live. But taken
as a whole there is no ambiguity. This is a good
album which, for the first time, reveals the talents
of the band as both musicians AND performers.
The LP is a document of their last tour which included a wonderful show here in Vancouver. It
is also the soundtrack to a film of that tour. Attendees will recall that this show finally revealed a
side of David Byrne which had remained hidden
—that of actor and showman. Byrne's stage person had, to some, seemed "weird" and to me
had an air of fake spontenaity about it. Byrne,
I thought, programmed his stage movements and
vocal inflections yet, he was barely touching his
full potential. He has now extended his choreography to the extend that we all know it's a show
rather than Byrne being Weird. He has craftd a
stage show which compliments the Talking
Heads new music and line-up to very good effect. It has re jjulted in their most visually and
musically exciting shows since they were the
naive group of 1976.
Stop Making Sense is a reprise of Speaking
In Tongues plus some old stand-bys. And it is
generally good, firstly because the songs have
more punch due to their live recording and
secondly due to the sound—the LP was recorded digitally on 24 tracks with extensive studio
overdubs. We get the energy live with the polish
of the studio. Musically this has seen the large
band of nine members gel and develop some
guts. The songs on Stop Making Sense are infused with a spark and buoyancy missing from
their last set of LPs and live shows.
The cassette version is even more buoyant. It
features extended versions of most songs and
a very rich mix of "Slippery People'—the bass
makes your tummy rumble. It is also mastered
very well on a good quality tape. Well done!! Both
come with a nifty booklet explaining how Byrne
put the show together and showing clips from
the film.
Stop Making Sense—sure you have heard it
all before—but here it is much much better. It's
more lively, better recorded and just generally
provides a better picture of the creativity and
humour that the Talking Heads represent. Watch
for the film in your neighbourhood.
—No. 1
M2 TbUtUuHdiefm
U2
The Unforgettable Fire
The first time I really paid attention to U2 was
the first time I saw them play live. It was early
1981. Their debut album Boy had just made it
to North America, and raves were beginning to
abound. The show was a "Cheap Thrills" presentation at the Commodore—less than the price
of a movie—so I took a small chance and picked up a ticket. What ensued was a blazing fifty
minutes of rock 'n roll so earnest, passionate and
fun that, to this day, I still have to just scratch my
head and admit unreserved awe. U2 were hot.
They turned the old dancehall on its side; and
what's more, they were young. Younger than me
even. It was scarey to think of what they might
be up to five or so years down the line.
Well,nowit's late 1984, three and a half years
later, and unlike most of the other new bands that
were worth getting excited about in 1981, U2 are
still with us. They have a new album out, too, their
fourth studio effort. It's called The Unforgettable
Fire, and though it does represent a significant
change, it's not a disappointment.
Gone is Steve Lillywhite (producer of the first
three albums) and gone with him is the brash,
high-end (can you say "youthful") edge that
characterized the sound of those albums. In his
place, U2 have enlisted Brian Eno and Daniel
Lanois, arguable the world's foremost purveyors
of ambiant music. At first this strikes as an odd,
even dangerous choice: Take the bluster and the
flash out of U2 and what's left but a gutless,
empty-headed quartet far too concerned with their
onw hippy dippy spirituality to be worth listening
to.
No so, thank God (?). From the first strains of
"A Sort of Homecoming" it's apparent that whatever changes there may be, they serve an agreeable end. No, this isn't the sound that left everyone windburned three and a half years ago in
the Commodore. That would be redundant. It's
more subtle than that, more mature. The fire's
burning as hot as it ever was. Now it's just covering more ground, and showing a few new
colours.
To recommend stand-out cuts would be misleading, for The Unforgettable Fire functions best
as a complete album. Every cut has its place,
whether it be the ambiant moodiness of "4th of
July," the folk-inflected emotion of "Bad" or the
triumphant pop of "Pride (in the name of Love)."
U2 had to change. Another album of Steve
Lillywhite produced rockers along the lines of War
would have sold lots of copies, but it wouldn't
have allowed the band to grow. The Unforgettable
Fire then is a positive move forward, and a very
good album. U2's best since Boy. Maybe it's even
better. Give me a few years to mull it over.
—Bill Mullan
25 DISCORDER November, 1984
Soul Asylum
Say What You Will...
Everything Can Happen
(Twin Tone US)
Question. What do Soul Asylum and Prince
have in common? No Soul Asylum have not
made a hit movie, but they do hail from Minneapolis, the city that Prince calls home. Big deal,
right? Admittedly, such comparisons are hopelessly superficial, and ultimately meaningless,
especially since Prince and Soul Asylum share
little else. The key here is Minneapolis, a city
whose biggest claims to fame, before Prince,
were Mary Richards and Rhoda Morgenstern.
These days Minneapolis has more to be smug
about than just Prince. The city boasts a burgeoning underground music scene, the driving force
of which is Twin Tone records, possibly the Mid-
West's most exciting independent label.
It's entirely possible that future audiophiles will
speak in glowing terms of "the Twin Tone sound,"
a brash and unpretentious melding of various
popular styles. Blues, rockabilly, soul, folk and
hardcore all find an outlet in the music of such
Twin Tone artists as The Suburbs, The Replacements, and of course, Soul Asylum. I don't want
to give the impression that these records are
strictly peas from the same pod, because each
exhibits a different approach to the basic styles
they explore.
On Say What You Will... Soul Asylum do exhibit some strong influences indicative of the
musical atmosphere from which the band emerged. We get much of the frenzied energy and
power of their labelmates, the Replacements, but
little of the humour and fun that make listening
to the Replacements such an uplifiting experience. This isn't really a happy record and it gets
downright dark in some places, probably due,
in no small part, to the input of Husker Du
guitarist Bob Mould,the producer of the album.
And yet, for all their obvious influences and
stylistic divergence, Soul Asylum succeed in forging a unique sound, characterized by the raspy,
sore throat vocals of Dave Priner, a man who
sings remarkably like Roy Tyner of the legendary
MC5.
Undoubtedly, the success of the Soul Asylum
sound lies in it's members' willingness and ability
to stray from the path of hardcore, hyperthrash
dogma. They can play it fast, they can play it slow
and they don't mind mixing it up by digging into
some of the roots of American music. They used
to call themselves Loud Fast Rules, a name
which left little room for manoeuvring in terms
of music and attitude so it's no wonder that this
quartet decided to change their name.
So what is Soul Asylum? Is it a place of refuge
for lost soul or forgotten soul music? More likely, it's a state of mind where anger, unrest and
2S , .
frustration can be exorcised through sheer force.
Soul Asylum makes willful music and Say What
You Will...Everything Can Happen is an intense,
overpowering record. Hell, we need more power.
—Mikey Inmate
Lydia Lunch
In Limbo
Rough Trade (UK)
This dreary six-song 45 rpm record seems to
be completely composed of a single sombre
rhythm track encompassing minor variations
from song to song, along with Lydia's vocals;
•which vary from moaning to screaming to moaning. Add some effects from The Thrilling Chilling
Sounds of the Haunted House and you have your
record. The playing is competent but uninspired.
Needless to say, this is boring. In Limbo has
none of the obnoxiousness that have made past
Lunch releases (especially Teenage Jesus and
the Jerks and 73.73) something to threaten
naughty children with, and none of the salacious-
ness that appeals to sleazebags (perhaps Lydia
was into her Grand Dame phase when this was
put together). This record seems unduly influenced by Lydia's pal Nick Cave in his less manic
moments, and includes ex-Birthday Party member Rowland Howard contributing a song.
That this record was held up for almost two
years before getting itself mixed and released
implies some sort of contractual obligation, which
usually means the artist will hand over any old
crap on the shelf to the record company for
release, and the record company (in this case,
Hough Trade) will package it nicely and push
it on an unsuspecting public. In this case, the
best thing about In Limbo is the packaging. The
record is neither fish nor truly foul (if it was really awful it would be good for a laugh) but merely
inconsequential flatulent piffle.
—Rob Simms
Tom Robinson
Hope and Glory
Dear Tom,
I picked up your new album, Hope and Glory,
the other day. I almost missed it 'cause it looked
a little too glossy. But when I saw the soldier on
the front, I knew it was yours. The folding cover
is a nice idea, and having the words written out
adds something, but did you need to list every
minute detail about every song?
Well, enough said about appearances. I have
to admit I was disappinted to see "Atmospherics" and "Looking for a Bonfire" on this album.    ,
I already have them on your North By Northwest f
album and the old versions are better. Sounds
like you're slowing down with age, buddy. And
what happened to the sharp edge of your voice?
You seem to be losing your accent. Not that it's
bad or anything, but you had my attention more
when your accent was stronger. Also, why did you
record "Rikki Don't Lose That Number?" You
didn't change it in any way, you copied it exactly, f
Are you trying to show your respect and admiration for the two guys that wrote it (Becker &
Fagen), or were you just filling space?
wnere were you when you wrote the music for
these songs? In.a lounge in Las Vegas? Sure
sounds like it. And what about the words? I usually find some kind of message or idea in your
songs. What's the meaning of "Blond and Blue?" <
Is there a meaning in "Blond and Blue?" And
how about "Cabin Boy?" We all knew you were
gay when you put out the hit "Glad to be Gay"
in '77. If you're trying to reinforce that message
with "Cabin Boy," it won't work. The song is too
weak, and who cares anyway!
I'll have to admit, I like "War Babies" but it
doesn't hold the album together. Personally, Tom, (
I don't thing there's much Hope and Glory for this
album. Better luck next time.
—Linda Scholten
Portion Control
gidllllilslHI^ <
FORWARD
Step Forward 4
For even the dedicated listener, "industrial"
music presents certain problems—the biggest
of which can be a reluctance to pass judgement
hastily. Because the technology is constantly
changing, bands who perform this type of music
are always able to discover new and different
sounds with which to assail their listeners. This 4
tendency also enables certain bands to gain a
following due only to this "difference" and not
because of any particular talent. They are, in
short, pulling a fast one.
Portion Control,  regrettably, falls into this
category. A series of early cassettes, singles and
one or two cuts on various compilation albums
led us to believe that this group ventured into 4
some extremely innovative areas of electronic DISCORDER November, 1984
music. Admittedly, the sound quality wasn't always good and this may have served to entice
rather than scare off the interested listener. The
arrival of their Simulate Sensual LP in 1983
presented a noisy, very rhythmical experimental
analysis of Portion Control over a period of about
3 years. Even the live cuts on this record have
a presence to them which is individual. One
could not help feeling that despite the occasionally poor recording quality, Portion Control was
definitely doing something worthwhile. I should
say that this album remains one of my favourites
for its raw, exciting flavour. If Simulate Sensual
is Portion Control at their best, however, Step
Forward, their newest release, is undeniably
Portion Control at their worst.
Maybe the early noise and rhythm allowed
them to get away with a lot of things which a
clean, well-produced recording would not, or
possibly the group has simply run out of ideas
and refuses to die in much the same manner as
New Order or similar bands subsist. In any event,
Step Forward is simply a very boring, homogenized, disappointing, harmless and limp effort. If
you like good industrial noise and are prepared
to pay for it, buy Simulate Sensual; but don't
waste your time or money on this one.
—Larry Thiessen
Plan 9
Dealing With the Dead
Once upon a time, a long time ago, before Bill
the Cat or even the Ramones, there was something called psychedelia. It was a way of life, a
way of dressing, thinking, and even (gasp) a way
of making music. Everybody dug it, even the
Beatles and the Stones weren't untouched by this
strange musical form. However, after a while, it,
like love beads and Timothy Leary, faded from
the universal consciousness and was forgotten
by everyone.
Well...almost everyone. From somewhere deep
in the heartland of the U.S. of A. comes Plan 9
and their album Dealing With the Dead. This
eight member band (drums, bass, keyboards,
and lots of guitars) recreates that keen sixties
psychedelic sound, complete with cheezy electric organ, jangelling guitars and weird lyrics.
Plan 9 doesn't stop there though, they've also
made their music relevant to the eighties. For example the title track deals with the nuclear, fried
to a crisp, evaporated, kind of dead that we've
all come to know, love, respect, and blame on
Reagan. Other noteable songs on the album include "Step Out of Time," with its feeling of
depth, and "Can't Have You" which has an
authentic sixties sound to it.
The album also comes with one of the least
likely "freebees" in the history of recorded music,
a sixteen page comic book. This worthy episle
by one R.K. Sloane, who also did the album's
cover, is at such a level as to be beyond criticism
...so I won't try.
Taken as a whole, complete with the comic
book and the dayglow album cover, Dealing With
the Dead is an effective updating of the
psychedelic sound which could appeal not only
to those who've worn the grooves off their Strawberry Alarm Clock albums, but also to those
who're looking for something different to listen to.
—Pat Carroll
David Bowie
kAtW
>»   Afe
Tonight
Just over a year after the release of Let's
Dance, David Bowie has seen fit to grace us with
his presence again. Tonight, however, fails to live
up to past or present expectations. Slick production does not hide the lack of energy and effort
on this album, composed largely of poorly done
covers. Bowie's taken a fine bunch of songs, set
them to a lame reggae-like backbeat, crooned
a little and expected the world to do back flips.
It's not going to happen.
Tonight's two most interesting tracks are its two
new originals: "Blue Jean" and "Loving the
Aliens." They are very different songs in both
their lyrical and musical approach. "Blue Jean"
seems clearly targetted for the commercial market, taking up the big beat sound of Let's Dance,
albeit with a more languid pace. "Loving the
Alien" takes sweet harmonies and symphonic
strains to a point just short of Perry Como.
Bowie's lyrics, dealing With extra-terrestrial
redemption, raise the track above the maudlin.
The rest of the album is made up of covers of
what we must assume are some of Davie's personal faves. With Brian Wilson's "God Only
Knows" and Leiber/Stoller's "I Keep Forgetting"
Bowie faithfully captures the sixites big production sound. Neither song, however, managed to
capture my attention. As on Let's Dance Bowie
has pillaged the back catalogue of Iggy Pop,
rounded off the rough edges, and eliminated all
the rawness that made the songs great in the
hands of the lg.
The album is rounded out by a pair of new
Pop/Bowie collaborations. Sadly, both "Tumble
and Twirl" and "Dancing with the Big Boys"
sound like the dabbling of a rich and talented
man.
And that's the problem. Tonight sounds like
dabbling. Bowie seems to have left most of the
album to the divices of producers Derek Bramble and High Padgham, resulting in a record
devoid of innovation or imagination, covered up
by pompous and overblown production.
One can only hope that Bowie's acceptance
of his demi-god rock star status—as reflected by
his pose on the cover of Tonight—is not permanent. I would like to think that Bowie is only dancing with the big boys, and has not yet joined
their ranks.
—K. Hanni
Pete Moss and the Special Sauce
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This month's hack: CD
Yes, yes, yes, I know, it's about time that this rag came up with a way
to deal with all those pesky pieces of vinyl that don't qualify as ALBUMS.
Yes, I know that the single is the basis of all pop music. Yes, I know that
the EP is once again part of the merchandising bag of tricks of major
and independent record companies. Yes, I know it's presumptuous, even
ridiculous to write a 2000 word essay on life, the universe, and the state
of the hairdressing about a record that only
has five, or worse, two songs on it. We're sorry we didn't do this sooner.
No, we're not. No apologies. No quarter asked; none given, and all that
crap. Out with the poison pen and on with the job at hand. Crank up
the Ride of the Valkaries. I love the smell of vinyl in the morning. Death
from Above AAAAARRRGGGHHH...
THE REPLACEMENTS - I Will Dare (Twin-Tone US 12")
After the eclecticism of last year's Hootnanney, who knew what to
expect from the Replacements. Delta blues? Hawaiian nose-harp instrumental? More Metal Machine Music?
The answer seems to be: none of the above. Mind you I haven't heard
the rest of the album (entitled Let It Be [now that takes nerve]) so I could
be wrong. This first offering, however, is no less a surprise. Minneapolis'
favorite musical archivists go the pop route with I Will Dare, a compulsive,
bouncy pop song. I'm not saying they've turned into the Bluebells or
anything, but for a song called "I Will Dare' it sounds positively innocuous.
Paul Westerburg's cracking vocals saves the whole thing from vapidity
just in the knick of time.
The b-side is more characteristic of earlier work: a raw workout of T-
Rex's "20th Century Boy" and a cracked version of that old chestnut
"Hey Good Lookin'."
THE WORK PARTY - The Work Song/Come On Over (MoDaMu)
These guys used to be Junco Run? This is a MoDaMu release? Yes,
on both counts. It seems the sun shines at MDM these days and all those
folks who used to make serious, introspective records have learned to
smile just a little bit.
Someone commented that, on first listen, this record sounds like Fleetwood Mac had defected and signed with MDM. I wouldn't go that far.
Both songs have a funky-folky sort of feel. And both songs deal with
love (that's L-O-V-E, kids) and we all know that L-O-V-E songs walk a thin
line between brilliance and banality. The Work Party's debut manages
to walk that line half the time. "The Work Song" nicely plays off that
old cliche of working for someone's affection against the conventional
notion of tote that barge, lift that bale.
"Come on Over," on the other hand, falls flat.
All in all, not a bad start.
CAPTAIN BEEFHEART & HIS MAGIC BAND
The legendary A&M sessions (A&M)
The initial recorded output from the Captain, re-released for your
pleasure. It's a more conventionally bluesy Beefheart than the one that
has been twisting people's perceptions of music since. But while the
five tracks included (four Beefheart originals, and a cover of "Diddy Wah
Diddy") may lack the fractured brilliance of Trout Mask Replica, or the
mutant orchestration of some of his other work, they still have that soul,
and that great, gruff voice. The original singles have been trading hands
for around $35 so this looks like a bargain, especially when it includes
"Here I Am, I Always Am," a previously unreleased track that, more than
the singles, is a harbinger of things to come.
JOHN CALE - Ooh La La   Ze (UK)
Cale seems to be having a rough time lately. His last LP, Caribbean
Sunset, was a letdown after the stark, often chilling, brilliance of Music
for a New Society.
I could understand the man wanting to lighten up a little, but this
senseless waste of vinyl is hardly the way to do it. Cale sounds more
like Tim Curry (remember "Do the Rock"?) than Curry does. It's all there:
the name dropping, the aging-lecher vocals, the pathetic attempts at reviving the burlesque as Cale ogles the tits on the girls at St. Tropez.
Some people shouldn't take holidays.
Ofl 1111
MALCOLM McCLAREN - Madame Butterfly (Virgin)
Malcolm merrily debases the world's music by adding the same old
rhythm-machine tracks, Puccini's dead, he can roll over in his grave if
he wants to; at least he doesn't have to listen to this. Never mind if it's
in poor taste; it's just dull.
File next to 7007 Strings Do Themes from the Classics.
VARIOUS ARTISTS - Hollow Weiners
Who says all the fun has disappeared from the Vancouver "underground"
music scene? "Hollow Weiners" is living evidence (are records alive?)
that the silliness has not vanished. What is "Hollow Weiners" you ask?
It is a 5-band, 5-song, seven-inch compilation record, featuring some
of Vancouver's finest "real" and hard-partying fuck bands. It includes
Tartan Haggis's "Loch Ness Monster" and The Scissors' terrifying tune,
"The Underwear Wolf." This disc is going to chill your spine, curl your
toes, and straighten your body hair, all at the same time. Bags of Dirt
and Stab 'Em In The Abdomen contribute to the fun and screams and
as an added bonus, this record contains the Enigma's "Monsters In The
Basement," from their soon-to-be-released second record. Buy "Hollow
Weiners" or be a bore!! Besides, how can you go wrong with the production from Baron von Obvious and the Underwear Wolf himself? The
cover looks like a bad nightmare, the kind you get after eating all your
Halloween goodies in one night. Really scary stuff, kids.
GIL SCOT-HERON - No Re-Ron (Arista)
Four years on, and GSH still hasn't learned to love the great communicator. This is a sequel to 1980's "B-Movie" and as much as I hate
sequels, this one's worth looking into. "No Re-Ron" forsakes the cool,
threatening jazz of "B-Movie" for the crunching sound of hip-hop as provided by, among others, Bill Laswell, Anton Fier, and Bernie Worrel.
Similarly the analysis of the earlier work is replaced by some timely mud-
slinging. This one should be on your turntable until November 6.
"Would we take Fritz with our grits?
Hell, we'd take Fritz the Cat
Would we take Jesse Jackson?
Hell, we'd take Michael Jackson."
ATTILA THE STOCKBROKER - Radio Rap (Cherry Red UK)
ATS seems to have taken a liking to ranting with music. He originally
performed alone, but now, after the minimum instrumentation of his album
Sawdust and Empire, he's gone the full disco route; pumping bassline,
keyboard florishes, even back-up singers. And it works.
Radio Rap rants on about the pathetic state of Radio 1 in the UK. "What
does this have to do with my life?" you ask. Absolutely nothing. As a
matter of fact, if Attila thinks he's got it bad, someone should ship him
over here for one of the fossils Led Zeppelin A to Z weekends.
Ungrateful bastard. Still, a good record.
STAPLE SINGERS - Slippery People (Profile US)
The Talking Heads have done a number of covers in the past—I never
thought I'd see someone cover one of their songs. But the Staple Singers
have gone ahead and done it. The result is alright, but nothing special.
It's a fairly faithful rendition, which is the reason it doesn't succeed. Part
of the charm of the original lay in the marked contrast between the
quirkiness of David Byrne's voice and the soulfulness of the voices of
the backup singers. That contrast is gone here (all of the Staple Singers
can actually sing) and, sadly, so is the charm.
I'm looking forward to hearing Sister Sledge's version of "Burning Down
the House."
STYLE COUNCIL - Shout It to the Top (Respond UK)
A vast improvement over the last single, if only because of the disappearance of the Cappuccino Kid, that nauseating, self-important little
snot who wrote the liner notes to previous Style Council singles.
Seriously though, this record adds some punch to the Style Council
sound, with some solar-plexus horns, Weller dropping the weak falsetto
that made "You're the Best Thing" so irritating, and a lyric that seems
to have do with something other than Paulie's Phillie soul fantasies.
Nothing to write home about, but a step in the right direction.
DISCORDER November, 1984
GOING HOME
FOR CHRISTMAS???
WE'RE
Going Your Way!
TRAVEL CUTS
Christmas Charters
Vancouver-Toronto
Leaving Dec. 19,20,22,23
Returning Dec. 29, Jar
Vancouver-Ottawa
Leaving Dec. 22
Returning Jan. 6
Vancouver-Montreal
Leaving Dec. 23
Returning Jan. 6
Vancouver-Edmonton
Leaving Dec. 21
Returning Jan. 6
Vancouver-Saskatoon
Leaving Dec. 19
Returning Jan. 3
Vancouver-Winnipeg
Leaving Dec. 20
Returning Jan. 2
VANCOUVER (Return to:)
Toronto $369     Winnipeg
Edmonton      $139     Ottawa
Saskatoon      $159     Montreal
$219
$399
$419
Going   ** TRAVEL
YourMray.'iV^   CUTS
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC, Student Union Building
604 224-2344
Going   r^ TRAVEL
Your¥£y!t^   CUTS
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
Granville Island
1516 Duranleau St
604 687-6033
29 DISCORDER November, 1984
The Roving Ear
...this month from Calgary
Talking with many of Calgary's original music bands, this fall seems
to be a time of rest, recording and re-evaluation. The city's present
oldest underground band—the RipchOrds are taking a 2-? month break
to sit back and assess the sound. In the meantime they are putting the
finishing touches on their joint recording project with Big Dog. The record
should be released sometime this December.
The Nex'd feel that they've played their welcome "to the brim" for '84
and won't be making any live appearances until we're through this year.
They have recently recorded another demo tape, this time with the help
of the Slip, on their 8-track facilities at the Music Connection. The Slip
themselves have been hard at work on new material and have had some
good feedback on their latest demo including a visit from a TO. record
company rep (more than just a form letter response—eh?). Ex-Will
guitarist Brent Cooper has formed a new psychedelic band—the Crying Helicopters—and is also involved with Nex'd bass player Kevin
Kingston in a studio band entitled Green Means Go.
The Golden Calgarians have come out with yet another fun-filled, full
album of music on the Rubber Records label. Our music director has
dubbed Savage Love as the Spike Jones of heavy metal. I really hope
they keep the drive alive to '88—our golden year. For your very own copy
send 8 bones to Rubber Records, P.O. Box 4554, Edmonton, Alta.,
T6E 5G4. Exhibit A have lost their keyboardist but are still writing 'n
rehearsing and will start live performances in December.
The Now Feeling have picked up ex-Decitefull Concubine bassist
Shawn Scott, bought a practice PA. (serious-like), and are gigging
regularly including recent stints at the National and Ten Foot Henry's.
Ex-Riverbank Action (yes, they broke up after their whirlwind West
Coast tour) guitarist Bruce Callow has started up a new band, the
Patrons, and they will have a single out this December.
Another new band made up of some University media types is Notes
From The Underground. After finishing a 16-track recording they just
have to figure out how to do it live.
Recent outta towners 45 Grave, Verbal Abuse, and the Dead Kennedys brought Calgary's hard and fast out for warm ups. Eye On You
have picked up Personality Crisis' drummer John Card and are holding
out as our only playing punk band. White Noise, who are said to be
Calgary's hardest core act, are riding on their reputation as their lead
vocalist recovers from a double hernia (way to belt out those lyrics)—
they should be back in time for the Christmas rush. Keeping tabs on
this scene is a new photocopy rag—Rip 'N Tear. Speaking of mags, Last
Issues' second buy for a buck edition is out and selling well. The new
32-page format is a good look and read at the Calgary Arts—pick up
Montreal based primative-urban-swingests Condition out
back of Ten Foot Henry's in Calgary. Photo: G. Burns.
a copy in Vancouver at NEO-ART-ISM, MACLEOD BOOKS, or OCTOPUS
BOOKS.
Venue-ways the National Hotel is still hiring local and out of town New
Music acts and the university Student's Union has been extremely
helpful this year in using local alternative acts for support and bringing
in such bands as the Beverly Sisters, Bolero Lava, and Rank & File.
Ten Foot Henry's is surviving despite the drought of local performing
bands. Since the demise of H.C.'s, 10's remains as the only venue for
new local bands and import acts such as Deja Voodoo, Condition,
Animal Slaves, Verbal Abuse, and De Dub Poets. The club's manager,
Richard McDowell, was pleased to announce recently that over half the
monies collected in the past year were put back in the hands of the performers. (Not much of a profit margin for holidaze in Cambodia, Dick!)
On a final note I would like to report that with 6" of snow on the ground
and temperatures of -15° the Ripchords final step at Henry's last night
was a vibrant heated success. CJSW is scheduled for city-wide broadcast this December and we hope that with the return of a few resting
bands and the beginnings of some new ones we can continue to warm-
up the otherwise frozen wasteland.
—Grant Burns
Station Manager, CJSW
Calgary
Advertise in
vw.'.
228-3017
\
in DISCORDER November, 1984
On or Off Road
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'\r\\   i\(
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RECORDS     •     POSTERS     •     T-SHIRTS     •     BOOKS     •     MEMORABILIA

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