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 Z>-
Negativland     Sufjan   Stevens      Top   Spot      La-Ti-Da   Records       Daniel   Lanois
Hair Police  Experimental   Travel     Electric  Frankenstein What The Heck Fest
iPod   Experiments   Innocence Mission    The Makers     Stephen   MalfcttlUS
Sage Francis GeofF Berner SS Cardiac Eminem Billy Corgan
Comics Go To Hell Vancouver's Buskers
A Y    ^ sy~.V^_ SHINE NIGHT CLUB
7 NIGHTS A WEEK OF/
RAP/RAWK/GRIME/ELECTRO/80S/DANCEHALL/AND MORE
WE PARTY LIKE ROCK STARS AND YOU SHOULD TOO
alife   #
/JtajcSkn.
2 DiSCORDER - August 2005 o> n
O'
Kat Siddle's
That magazine from CiTR 101.9fm. August 2005.
FEATURES
Eminem: Anatomy of Success
. CFUV vs. Stephen Malkmus
Get Off llllhternetl The Great IPod
Experiment of Ought-Five
An Interview with Negativland
You'll Meet Them In The Street:
Vancouver's Buskers
REGULARS
■■N
p.10
p. 16-17
p. 18
EDITRIX
Kat Siddle
AD MANAGER
Jason Bennet
PRODUCTION AAANAGER
Dory Kornfeld
ART DIRECTOR
Graeme Worthy
TA EDITOR
Vampyra Draculea
RLA EDITOR
Kimberley Day
AUGUST CALENDAR
Dory Cornfeld
LAYOUT & DESIGN
Graeme Worthy
Dory Kornfeld
Jason Bennet
Joceline Andersen
PRODUCTION
Dory Kornfeld
Graeme Worthy
Jason Bennet
Joceline Andersen
Vampyra Draculea
ON THE DIAL
Bryce Dunn
CHARTS
Luke Meat
DATEBOOK EDITOR
Graeme & Joceline
& Robb Breckenridge
DISTRIBUTION
Torben Wilson
US DISTRO
Frankie Rumbletone
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society
of UBC
Thanks to Ruby Dog's Art House for donating some art and collage supplies.
You can go there yourself and get aH sorts of nifty things for your own art projects. The store is at 4738
Main Street and is open 11-6 Tuesday through Sunday.
Perpetu)^plrwminent Disaster
Riff Raff
p.3
p.5
Strut Fret and Flicker
p.5
Textually Active
p.6
Mix Tape
p.7
Calendar
p. 12-13
Under Review
p. 19
Real Live Action
p. 20
Finding Joy
p.21
Charts
p.22
Program Guide
p. 23-24
Notes to this issue:
This month is pretty straighforward, I got rid of that goddamned Adobe Jenson Pro. It was
dragging me down. I left it on the cover, just for continuity's sake. It was the star-shaped
periods that got to me, even though I wasn't using them. I like it when I have the choice
of punctuating something without feeling embarassed. The drawing on the cover is. of
a beach where I saw a really cute seal pup last weekend. The airship was necessary to .
make it not look like a postcard. I switched the headlines to Baskerville Bold, but I'm not
entirely satisfied with it. It's got character, that's for sure, but it's capital S's are a little
weak. Everything else is nice though. I put some dropcaps in, I was gonna make them all
lowercase, and maybe in Sabon, just for those stabbing lowercase j's but I remembered
my oath. This, friends, is Baskerville Bold. Check out that "S," does it look wrong to you?
DSOPGZT
Perpetually Imminent
Disaster
YOU + MUSIC + OTHER PEOPLE * RINl
Welcome to the "Public" issue of DiSCORDER.
—This theme fell into- place mostly on it's own: music
is inherervlly~pub1icrr~^^ expression and
communication that anticipates aTTaudienceTTSOt"---
there are some kinds of music that are heard in public
more often than others, and it's this discrepancy that
has made me aware of the public and private divide
in my whole music-nerd life. I have always been drawn
to music that is different or difficult. While I choose my
radio carefully and try to go to clubs that play music
I actually want to dance to, most of my real music
listening is done semi-privately, via my own stereo or
headphones.
If you're with me on this one, you know the small
thrill of hearing a song you like played in public. When
I walk into a coffee shop that's playing an album I
know well, or even something I recognize but didn't
expect, I like to scan the employees and try and figure
out which one chose it. It's a old habit, a reflex from a
time when I was the only person I knew who liked Dar
Williams, and it's one that won't go away now matter
how old I get or how many music geeks I know. As
much as I like sitting in my room alone listening to The
Concretes, I seem to insfinctually know that music is
meant to be social.
The bulk of this issue centres around how lesser-
known music is received in public, as Mitch Chua
thrusts her MP3 player into the faces of 39 people
and Negativland's Don Joyce discusses copyright
and burning toast. The public reaction to more
exposed music is scrutinized in Zach Goelman's
"Eminem: Anatomy of Success," while Rob Brownridge
investigates buskers, those local fixtures and public-by-
deflnition musicians. One of my favourite anecdotes
about indie music ii
as a story though, s
public didn't make
> I thought I'd end wifrh:
There's More Than One Way To Be A Music Nerd
by Dory ^
I've spePtaToTofitme-1^ summers worth—in
surreal alternate universe known as Summer Camp. So
much of working at camp is fhe opportunity you have
to mess with other people's kids. And by "mess with" I
mean that when you've got someone else's offspring
isolated on some remote island hideaway for three
weeks, you can teach them all sorts of things: that
being naked no big deal, socialists have some pretty
great songs, gender is just a social construction, etc.
One of the ways that we work on instilling this
alternate set of values is through informal Saturday
morning workshops with topics like Middle East politics.
Science vs. Religion, or the role of women in hip hop.
One Saturday morning, a co-counsellor and I ran a
little workshop entitled "Improve Your Vocabulary With
The Decemberists!" In an act of astounding brilliance
we were able to combine our loves of Colin Meloy and
large mouthfuls of words. We listened to "Here I Dreamt
I was an Architect" and learned words like "indolent"
and -"balustrade," we brooded along with "Los
Angeles I'm Yours" and defined "dolor," "calamity"
and "lagour on divans," and then, with "The Soldiering
Life," we learned about "dungarees."
The point of all this is that Kat wanted me to write
about this little activity to prove to y'all that there's
more than one way to act like a music nerd in public.
You can pare music down into minutely defined
categories and memorize guitar riffs or you can make
small children listen to the things you like and defend
its brilliance to the death,  /"^jr*
Ked Cat Records
4307 J\jTain Sfc-
New & Used CD's & Yinyl
© DiSCORDER 2005 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All
rights reserved. Circulation 17,500. Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents
are $15 for one year, to residents of the USA are $15 US; $24 CDN elsewhere. Single copies
are $2 (to cover postage). Please make cheques or money orders payable to DiSCORDER
Magazine. DEADLINES: Copy deadline for the Sepember issue is August 20th, 2005, not that any
of you will care. Ad space is available until August 25th and can be booked by calling Jason
at 604.822.3017 ext. 3. Our rates are available upon request. DiSCORDER is not responsible for
loss, damage, or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork (including but
not limited to drawings, photographs, and transparencies), or any other unsolicited material.
Material can be submitted on disc or in type or via email. As always, English is preferred, but we
will accept French. Actually, we won't. Send email to DiSCORDER at discorder@club.ams.ubc.
ca. From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be heard at 101.9 fM as well
as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the
CiTR DJ line at 822.2487, our office at 822.3017, or our news and sports lines at 822.3017 ext. 2.
Fax us at 822.9364, e-mail us at: citrmgr@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at www.citr.ca or
just pick up a goddamn pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1, CANADA.  Riff Raff
SATURDAY
|AUGUSTS
30Ro6gitfa'|
HO   ABBOTT   »T  ■
Just as the sun is scorchin' the skin
of friends to the East, I'm feelin' the
heat a little myself as I've got very little
to report this month, but let's make do
with what we've got shall we?
Ladies and gentlemen, boys and
girls, let me introduce you to a brand-
record label that's sprouted up-
here in Van City, and it goes by the
name of La-Ti-Da Records. A clever
play on words fusing the names of longtime friends Tim Homer and Dale Davies
and their undying support of good old
fashioned rock and roll, their aim is to
give the bands they love their due and
document their tracks to wax. The first
installment is a fitting tribute to some
great Vancouver acts (four in all) that
fit snugly on each side of only 500 hand-
numbered copies. Side A kicks off with
The Beladeans, our masters of movin'
and groovin', with an ode to the stretch
of sidewalk known as "the Seawall" that
outlines Stanley Park. This cut struts and
sways like the waves that continually
crash into the concrete, thanks to sharp
sax work and jazzy drumming, so it gives
this tune a Dick Dale-meets-Bill Doggett
flair and gets fhe feet loose right off the
The groovin' continues with Raised
By Wolves with a tune called "Trouble"
letting loose with a distinctively different
their neo-rockabilly growl.
Opting for a Standells-style three-chord
pounder, it chugs along nicely, and
Billy Wolf can't resist a little howl near
the end just to make things interesting.
And speaking of interesting, or maybe
geeky, however you look at it, their
song is exclusive to this platter, and not
featured on their recent full-length, so
there is truly ample reason to pick this
puppy up.
Flipping over to Side B, we've
got Ladies Night greased up and
going ape-shit on "Natural Disaster,"
complete with reverb-drenched vocals
and double-barrel guitar blasts. Not for
the faint of ear, but good for the soul
when you want to exact a little revenge
on that annoying upstairs neighbour.
Fans of the lo-fi, no-holds-barred
approach to song writing should take
note. Like the Pink Ladies are to the
T-Birds, Vancougar is to Ladies Night.
Their sugary pop stylings on " Mine
First" round out the side and soothe the
savage beast that came before them.
Decidely quirky, but rife with melody,
comparisons to early K Records acts
like Tiger Trap spring to mind.
Potential upcoming releases
for  the  dynamic  duo  include  San
By Bryce Dunn
francisco's soul clan Harold Ray Live In
Concert and a battle of the Montreal
one-man-bands with Skip Jensen
kduking it out with BBQ. Also, a cross-
I country series of rock from nearly every
province is in the works so the guys
have their work cut out for them.
Those of you in the local hood
should check out the inaugural La-Ti-Da
Records launch Saturday Aug.6 at the
Lamplighter with The Beladeans, Ladies
Night and Raised By Wolves all causing
a ruckus for your amusement.
A website is in the works, but
if you want to get in touch, email
la_ti_darecords@hotmail.com.
^<__ii
Strut Fret And Flick (er)
By Penelope Mulligan and Flick Harrison
Im«tope:
The last time I went to Europe, an eight-month stay turned into
yen years. Now I'm going back for three months (no, really) and
insteaHsQf shutting the column dowa_j___J«r©d -a sifter rttcTCHarnson—
writer, via%%_rapl\erni1m-maker, politically rebellious, good with animals
and children—is twitching with anticipation.
But first, our unanimous recommendation for this summer's anti-
blockbuster movie: Top Spot by U.K. artist Tracy Emin. The hour-long film
manages to be many things—an engrossing narrative, a documentarylike interrogation: a moody hymn to adolescence, an arty montage, and
a music video—and it shifts among them without ever letting you go. The
whole thing hangs from the unfolding stories of six teenaged girls in the
seaside town of Margate. As Emin was raped there at age 13, the work is
. autobiographical (in a composite sort of way), but you get the feeling that
the girls are telling their own tales. Emin's camera loves them relentlessly
but is never precious. Instead, it reminds you what it smelted like to be 16.
Flick:
Thanks to Penelope fpr bringing me on boardl Top Spot was indeed
a great little video, crossing that ephemeral line between art-film and
video-installation aesthetic. There were moments when I felt Hke I'd
wandered into a gallery and was taking my sweet time absorbing a
mesmerizing single shot of a bird, then something from the storyline would
break back in and I'd remember I was at the cinema.
This film rode the line between documentary and fiction in many
ways; at first, when we see a bunch of teenage girls being individually
interrogated, conscious of the camera and slowly being forced to reveal
embarrassing and compromising details, of their lives ("We went to this
lady's house and she made us, do things, she said she'd tell that we were
smoking if we told anyone"), it isn't clear what fhe situation is. Are they
being interrogated by a fictional authority figure, in a fictional world? Are
they being prodded by a nosy documentary-make/? And if so, are we
to understand this as real doc or a fictional one? Or is the camera privy
to a real interrogation by a real authority? And as Penelope pointed
out, there is another layer of documentary as Emin's life-experience is
mapped onto the whole drama.
Again, stylistically, there's nothing here that couldn't be produced
by a BBC documentary crew: no big complicated mise-en-scene shots,
but very styTish montages and some rather sordid details (the film's title
comes from a brifish slang term, i.e. the penis hits the "top spot" when it
goes so deep inside a girl she can feel it banging her cervix).
Top Spot is very beautiful, in all senses of the word. One could
easily pass an hour staring into the innocent young face of a smartly-
dressed schoolgirl, story or no. The intensity and occasional darkness
of the narrative, in fact, increases the temptation to lose yourself in the
visual pleasure, and, of course, makes a nice thematic counterpoint.
One subplot about a girt who claims hertover is glamourous and French,
when he's probably just a lame local delinquent, highlights the tension
between naivety and youthful, indomitable hope. When she travels to
Morocco to meet him, reciting a romantic fantasy in her head, both
these threads become more powerful and intriguing.
These screenings are on at 6pm on Pay-What-You-Can Thursdays
at the Vancouver Art Gallery as part of an exhibition called Body: New
Art from Hie UK which includes a documentary video about Emin's work.
There's other great work there including creepy drawings by Jake and
Dinos Chapman, who have taken images from Satan's own colouring
book. There's some wickedly funny photography from Sarah Lucas,
including a group of self-portraits that play on gender realities and
stereotypes inthe wittiest way I've seen lately.
Top Spot screens at the Pacific Cinematheque on August 11 & 25 and
September 8 at 6:00 pm. Body: New British Art is at the Vancouver Art
Gallery until September 5. Textually Activ
The Comics Go To Hell: A Visual History of the Devil
in Comics
Fredrik Stromberg
Fantagraphics Books/Raincoast Books
Realistically, the images in any book that deals
_^Mflxj3n4G0B~as~wio^Jy-*endere_«^^
only be but the thinnest slice of the pie. That said,
Fredrik Stromberg gives a fairly good cross-section of
that slice, showing the breadth and depth of such
images. He goes for a fairly wide sampling, including
genres such as humorous strips, superheros dramas,
underground" comics. Christian religious tracts, and
even some medieval images that Stromberg felt fit
the basic definition of a comic—a series of images
that tell a story. Depictions range from fairly innocuous
and even silly Devils to the traditional evil monsters to
corporate types dealing in souls as a commodity.
Stromberg has divided the book into nine main
sections, including the earliest ideas of the Devil,
moving through images and ideas of Hell, varieties
of Devils, and Faust. It seems his ambitions are a little
scattered, which is something one might expect from
an anthology of such diverse images, and his results
are scattered as well. It's a fun little book to peruse.
but other than as a source of inspiration, it doesn't
do much other than simply present a image on every
left-hand page with an explanatory paragraph on
the right. On the other hand, other thq/r pointing out
a fair number of spelling and gramrnatical mistakes,
the worst thing I can sayobot,|Ht is "so what?" The
"~l3estttW?gTcaFrsa^ of the artwork in here
is fabulous, and it points the direction to many more
to explore.
Vampyra Draculea
I RUMBLETONE PRESENTS:
Wed. Aug 3 @ Pub 340
YOU SAY PARTY, WE SAY DIE!
ROLL GYPSY ROLL (from Ottawa)
plus guests
Wed. Aug 3 @ The Railway Club
miA-r" ■
Rumble-line: (6Q4) 878-GoGo
The PETUNIA-BILLIES (Petunia, Steve & Sam)
Doug Andrew & The Circus In Flames |
plus guests
|___5_i_____H___a__
BEND SINISTER
CADEAUX
SEAN WOOD & THE VANCOUVER VIPERS
JOHNNY WAKEHAM
Fri. Aug 5  @ The Candy Bar
BENEATHTHESE IDLE TIDES (Calgary)
plus guests
J @ The Railway CIl
WAX MANNEQUIN    from Hamiltoi
THE REELS from Halifax
THE FITS   Patsy Klein and Veda
RUTH MINNIKIN   fror   "
Sat Aug 6 @ The Anza Club
DUVALLSTAR
SANNE LAMBERT TRIO
BRANDY BLUE'S BURLESQUE
HOT TODDIES
P The Railway Club
Tues. Aug 16 @ The Candy Bar
SHAPES AND SIZES (Victoria)
THE FEMINISTS
AWAY, RI'O! (Victoria)
Wed Aug 17 @ The Railway Club
PEOPLE VERSUS
Fri. Aug 19 @ The Marine Clubl
OLD RELIABLE (from Edmonton)!
RODNEY DeCROO & THE KILLERS!
. Aug 19 <& Th
TRANSMItORS
THE PARALLELS
THE BADAMPS
Fri. Aug 20 @ The Candy Bar!
GHETTOBLASTERl
plus guestsl
Wed. Aug 24 @ The Candy Bar
SMAQu-2 & CREW
Wed. Aug 24 @ The Railway Clubl
SHUYLER JANSEN from Old Reliable!
AARON GRANTI
KEN BEATTIEI
Fri. Aug 26 @ The Candy Bar
THE SQUAREHEADS (Winnipeg)
FUN 100
THE PEOPLE VERSUS
Sat. Aug 27 <
Fri. Aug 12 @ The Marine Club I
GOLDEN WEDDING BAND
plus guests
ri. Aug 12 @ Th
MOTORAMA
THE HUNTER COMITH
USER SISSY
& The Candy Bar!
HARD CANDY!
BELINDA BRUCEl
plus guestsl
Wed Aug 31 @ The Railway Club
\ REMOTE KID from Calgary
GO GHETTO TIGER
RUMBLETONE RADIO A-GO-GO
fend & 4th Wednesday 3pm to 5pm
CITR 101.9fm • www.citr.ca
Sat. AUG 13 w The wise Hall
Geared to Go-Go* 4th Gear with
Legendary psych/garage band from the 60's THE  SEEDS
THE FIENDS   • RAISED BY WOLVES • TRANZMITORS
*®*®[*lt._..
The Lonely Planet Guide to Experimental Travel
Rachael Antony and Joel Henry
Lonely Planet Publications
I really like to tell the story of the time when the
car stalled, going the wrong way down a one-way
street in Valencia, Spain, only to be met by oncoming
r. When I think of my trip to
TIM VESELY'S     FLOPHOUSE
HERALD NIX—RODNEY DeCROO —RONNIE ARTUR —VIOLET ARCHERp     ~JR —
headlights of a police c
Spain I remember that
near-disaster more
than I remember
any of the paintihgs
in the Prado or the
architecture of the
Alhambra; it was
something that
happened to us by
accident, yet of our
own accord, not
an activity planned
out or sanctioned
by Lonely Planet .or
The Rough Guide to
Spain.
The backpack-
and-guidebook way
in which we fling
ourselves about the
globe has become
a standard trope
of travel, and the
Lonely Planet guide
is the basis of this.
When we were on
this trip through Spain
we used the Lonely
Planet as a backup—
our primary guide was written by a man named Rick
Steves who runs a travel empire out of Seattle. Rick
was the fourth person on our trip, constantly telling us
where we ought to eat dinner and what things we
should pay attention to at Pare Guell. Rick also knew
all the secrets of the city, and gave us instructions like
"Walk 20 paces down the road, turn right, push the
top buzzer button by
the green door, say
'dulces' and the nuns
will let you in." So yeah,
we ate some delicious
nun candy, but only
because Rick knew
the way. And we kept
meeting all these other
people that Rick was
slutting around with,
taking them on the
same dates he had
taken us—it was easy
and fun, sure, but it was
the travel equivalent
of dancing according
to those numbered
footprint charts.
The Lonely
Planet Guide To
Experimental Travel,
created by Lonely
Planet in conjunction
with Latourex (Le
Laboratoire DeTourisme
Experimental, which is
less of a laboratory and
more of an art-event
collective) is all about instilling the idea that travel
does not have to be like this. This book, through its
collection of 40 different travel experiments, offers
some activities and experiments to try out in the
world. The word "travel" is defined very loosely by
writers Rachael Antony and Joel Henry (Joel is the
founder of Latourex, not-so-incidentally) who use it to
stand in for any sort of exploration of place, whether
that place be an exotic European city or the back
alleys of your own hometown.
The experiments draw from a variety of sources,
and the book's lengthy introduction gives a good
historical basis for the movements that have inspired
the experimental travelers. From Conquistadors to
Situationists to Fluxus to The. Beats, the writers take
careful note of the variety of forms that travel and
exploration. Then, each
travel activity is explained,
and field reports are
published. Many of the
games are adapted
from the projects and
activities of these historical
predecessors—such as
the Exquisite Corpse Gad
About (taken from the
surrealist drawing game
also called Exquisite Corpse,'
this experiment has each
member of the travel party
deciding on one aspect
of the adventure without
knowing what the others
have chosen), Mascot
Travel (the classic garden-
gnome-tour), Slow-Return
Travel (taking Marshall
McLuhan's famous "the
medium is the message"
edict and applying it to
transportation methods),
or Taking A Line For A Walk
(named after artist Paul
Klee's description of what
drawing is, this is where you
draw a line or a shape on a map and then follow that
route in the real world).
These games are all about structuring the
unstructured and about setting yourself up for purely
random encounters. Before you go out, you decide
on a route or a plan or a protocol and that is it.
Always turn left; wear a costume; visit a location that
a guidebook suggests you
avoid. The experiments
in this book don't always
sound like they will be fun,
some seem overly simple
while some sound rather
difficult and tiring, but that's
not wholly incongruous with
travel. For every brilliant
adventure there is twice as
much waiting around in train
stations and getting lost in
bad neighbourhoods; what
the Guide to Experimental
Travel suggests is that the
mundane can be really
interesting if you are
determined to make it so.
This book is' not like
other Lonely Planet books,
and it's rather refreshing
and exciting to know that
the giant travel empire is stiH
capable of doing unique
and innovative things. And
gladly, this book doesn't
look like other Lonely Planet
books either: it's beautiful.
It's all full of line drawings,
swirly flourishes, and pretty red spot-colour; having it
in your bag makes you feel like you're ready for an
adventure, and with the travel-projects offered up in
this volume, you are.
Dory Kornfeld s'^jm Geoff Berner's      ^K
Improbable Mix Tape
i 08
^
Cut out this rectangle and put II In Hie case when you make the lapel
This  month's  Mix Tape
was made for us by
^Vancouver's own
klezmer supelstaT~GeX^~B@mer_...__
On his latest album. Whisky Rabbi,
Berner asserts that boredom is
ultimately responsible for all the
world's evil. Anyone who's seen
him play knows that he's battling
on the side of all that is interesting
and good, armed with an
accordion, freely flowing liquor
and a scathing sense of humour.
Currently, Mr. Berner is fighting evil
on the European Front.
My idea forthis tape is to excite you
about the sometimes wonderful
improbability of everything, and
I will do this by telling you about
some of the most improbable
people I know. Being improbable
these days generally makes one
unfit for the pop charts, or for
Supreme 36-Month Hipness, so
you may have never heard of
some of these musicians. Still, they
all make wonderful strange good
music that you should hear.
Di Naye Kapelye
"Hangu And Freylachs From
Podoly"
Bob Cohen, the leader of Di Naye
Kapelye, the only klezmer band
that matters, is a New York Jew
who lives in Budapest. He speaks
Hungarian, Romanian, three
dialects of Gypsy, Yiddish, Zulu, and
Brooklynese. He's been studying
the music of surviving klezmorim
for 30 years, starting when he
used to slip past the Romanian
Securitat, smuggling penicillin into
isolated mountainous regions.
He's the only person left in fhe
world who can get Wexler, the last
Jewish fiddler in Romania, to play.
How? Dirty jokes in Yiddish. He has
a fascinating theory about the link
between Little Orphan Annie and
the 5 percent Nation of Islam.
Tagaq
"Ancestors"
Tanya Tagaq is from Cambridge
Bay, Nunavut, where there are no
trees, and school is closed only
when temperatures reach -65
degrees. She's about five feet tall
and can shoot, skin and carry an
entire caribou on her back for five
miles. Although she is extremely
chaste, she has the foulest mouth
of anyone I've ever met. People
hear Tanya do her throat singing,
and they are always immediately
terrified and turned on. She now
lives in Spain with her Basque
boyfriend. Together, they have
made fhe first Basque-lnuit baby.
This track features her little pal,
Bjork.
The Soft Rebels
"Enjoy Me Baby, I Am
Sunshine"
TfisrjLWOZOTfra^^ Soft
Rebels. He lives in Oslo and
performs only occasionally, but
records compulsively. He always
dresses in an impeccable black
suit with black shirt, and he only
drinks red wine. He composes his
songs in a "mental and emotional
space" he creates for himself,
called "The Pathosphere." His
songs are pathetic, laughable,
clever and heart-breaking, all at
the same time.
Kathleen Yearwood
"Universal Incest"
Kathleen Yearwood is a woman
who plays guitar and sings, but she
has almost nothing in common
wjth anyone else who does that.
She is mind-destroying. In the 80s,
she was kicked off the opening
slot of Sarah McLachlan's tour
because the audience found
Sarah so boring afterward.
Kathleen Yearwood is a genius.
She lives in a shack in the woods
three hours outside of Edmonton.
On one of her European tours, she
broke into the zoo in Amsterdam
and set some of the animals free.
She was also on tour in Bosnia
when the war started there.
Coincidence?
Origami Galaktika
"Sacred Lake, Holy Mountain"
Benny Braaten is the seven foot
tall Viking leader of Origami
Galaktika, one of a constellation of
European bands that collaborate
under the "origami" rubric. Those
bands include Origami Arctica,
Origami Romantica, and Origami
Bratislava. Benny is probably the
nicest man you will ever meet,
despite the fact that he could
easily rip your arms off. He listens
to a lot of death metal and Sly
and the Family Stone. I always
stay at his house when I'm in Oslo.
My friend Kris Demeanor had to
turn this CD off once when he was
alone in his apartment, because it
was scaring him.
Carolyn Mark
"The Wine Song"
From Sicamous, BC, the lovely
and talented Miss Carolyn Mark) It
just doesn't make sense that one
person could be this much fun.
Carolyrris my hero.
Ford Pier
"My New Bar"
Ford Pier has perfect pitch, a seven
octave vocal range, the ability to
score a symphony orchestra, and
he's the man Martin Tielli chose
as lead guitarist for hislband. He
writes better songs thajp you, you
just have to accept ft. His last A
CD got five stars iinyfhe Globes
and Mail. Cansemeone tell me|
~~w^y~heXj>oTwor1d-famous and
wealthy?
Diona Davies
"Drunk All Day"
Okay, well she's in my band, but
listen: she's a direct descendant
of Chief Sitting Bull. She can drive
one of those huge yellow digger
trucks. In fact, she can drive and
fix anything with wheels on it.
You bet she can handle firearms.
Many girls have had their first
inkling of bisexuality when they
saw Diona play. She's on a first
name basis with Billy Bragg and
Willie Nelson. A Romanian Gypsy
girl once made out with her on her
husband's grave.
Carmaig de Forest
"Green Guitar"
He plays ukelele, solo. His songs
are like Raymond Carver stories
you can hum along to. He
keeps getting discovered. Some
examples: Discovered by the
Ramones and asked to open
for their first San Francisco show.
Discovered by Alex Chilton,
who came out of retirement to
produce and play lead guitar on
Carmaig's first album. Discovered
by both the Violent Femmes and
They Might Be Giante, who took
him on tour with them, just so they
could hear his songs every night.
Discovered by fhe McGarrigle
Sisters, who are pals of his.
Discovered by Bob Wiseman, who
produced his last released album.
El Camino Real. Discovered most
recently in the film Rock That Uke.
Discover away, people.
Red Organ Serpent Sound
"In Search of Orgasmuz"
Seemingly from Deny, scene of
Bloody Sunday, the event that
started the Troubles, but really from
outer space. The most dynamic
and charismatic rock n' roll front
man you will ever see.
Attila the Stockbroker
"Tyler Smiles"
Surreal punk-rant-anarcho-
socialist mandola-violin-guitar-
playing poet. Has made his living
as a poet for the last 25 years.
How probable is that? And he's
from Sussex.
I realize now that I could have put
more effort into describing the
music.   But   I   hate   describing
music.
Need weed in Vancouver?
A connoisseur selection of
marijuana & hash
is available over the counter.
for prices, hours and location: VaitC_Weed@yahoO.Ca ^___in
album out September 6 -        [Jgy
i Release Party: September 9 Railway Club j j ?i
www.immaculatemachine.com .   «_|'
MINT RECORDS
www.mintrecs.com
IT'S BIGGER THAN A BATTLE OF THE BANDS.
•'IT'S BIGGER THAN A GIG.
IT'S A WAR ON NO-FUN CITY.
CiTR 1§ 1.9
WANTS YOU
fro en|ist§
IN SHItfDIG!
2005
%i4.
We're putting out the call for local bands and solo
artists of all genres and styles, to compete in CiTR's
annual musical deathmatch. Fame and fortune
await the victor (not to mention recording time at
Vancouver studios).
Send your stuff to:
SHINDIG 2005
c/o CiTR Radio
#233-6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
DEADLINE: August 15
http://shindig.citr.ca eustachian tube
(leads to throat)
uvula
adenoid
(not visible)
Eminem: Anatomy of Success
by Zach Goelman
This is an article about Eminem, but it is not a critique, a
review, or an evaluation. The rapping Detroit sensation of four
acclaimed solo albums has unquestionable lyrical talents,
good looks, a team of market-savvy A&R reps, artistic photographers,
music video directors, and the backing of major figures in hip hop. But
none of this makes Eminem all that interesting. Right about now, any
article analyzing Eminem points out the still-stunning fact that yes, he's
White. But no, that doesn't make him interesting either. The secret of
fame is a simple equation: Eminem j'ust worked it out.
Until Eminem's beginnings as a rap icon. White performers were
notably excluded from mainstream hip hop (exceptions of note include
the Beastie Boys, who made a name for themselves, early and kept the
creativity up right through the 1990s, and Vanilla Ice, who got a hit single
in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze, but flickered
shortly after). White performers were held back because hip hop in the
mid-1990s had calcified around an image that was exclusively Black.
Throughout the decadent years of the 1990s, rap music was wrapped
tightly around a new image of African-Americans. The image was
glamorous, vainglorious, the evolution of the 1970s Blacksploitation pimp
into one more suitable for the affluent 1990s: SuperDy with a scratch.
Foxy Brown with a hook, out with the afro and in with the comrows,
same old gold teeth and silver rims. The language had evolved further
into a completely distinctive slang, and the music's image completely
encompassed a race of Americans.
The image was so exclusively Black that Whites couldn't use it
without parodying it. (Recall Offspring's "Pretty Fly for a White Guy.")
In fact, the gap between Blacks using the image as "respectable" and
Whites using the image as a parody grew so far apart that "Whites
acting Black" became as recognisable a gimmick as Blacks acting...
Black. Black people became closely associated with the hip hop image,
notably the younger generation of African-Americans. This is largely due
to White people's willingness to accept an image of Blacks as greedy,
lusty, criminal, and vulgar, and since White Americans buy the most
CDs and concert tickets, artists and record labels appealed to sell this
demographic something that they would buy—both euphemistically
and literally. This image was created, marketed and sold so successfully
that the public stopped seeing rappers and gangstas as separate
or unique from Black America, rather they became emblematically
representative of Black America.
Along came Eminem, who had the talent and the drive but needed
a market niche to establish a foothold in an industry that frowned on
Whites seriously attempting to participate in hip hop. It was considered
distasteful for Whites to degrade themselves to the lever of Blacks,
unless the goal was comedy and satire: When Blacks acted that way, it
was called "Black." When White people acted that way, it was called
"stupid." So we see where the social discrimination lies. Back to Marshall
Mathers, he couldn't alienate his White majority market by attempting
to seriously penetrate hip hop unless he created a new image for the
White guy in the genre.
Eminem was then created for consumption, first with the Slim
Shady LP and then truly jumping off with the Marshall Mathers LP. The
Eminem image was intoxicating for White Americans. It was more than
cash, money, cars and women; it was a narrative tale of a troubled
young man, fatherless and abused by his mother, the unwed dad of a
darling little girl named Haitlie, violently estranged from his daughter's
mom. Born into poverty with only his lyrical talents and large soulful blue
eyes to work with, he fought past his demons and detractors to climb
to fame. His destructive and self-destructive expressions were shocking,
yet invoked pity and apology—the rhetoric of "it's not his fault, he's had
a hard life"—while giving White people White they never realized they
craved: the right to acceptably wear do-rags without being criticized for
acting Black or stupid. This narrative worked amazingly well, culminating
with the film 8 Mile, making Eminem a household name.
The greatest thing about the Eminem Story is that it isn't a unique
one. No matter that Eminem is now synonymous with this epic tale, it
isn't new. It's only new for White people. A large number of Black hip
hop artists come from broken homes and are single parents. Many of
them were bom into appalling poverty and disadvantage and faced
incredible odds in achieving the fame they hold. But their stories aren't
to|d, because they don't need to be told to sell records. White consumers
accept Black hardship as part and parcel with the criminal, sexual and
violent image they have of artists like DMX or Ja Rule. Who knows the
names of Jay-Z's parents or his relationship with them? A better question
would be: Who cares?
The summary: we take interest in hardship when ffs White hardship,
yet accept it without notice when it's endemic to the African American
community. We allow Black artists to keep their degraded image
because we aren't comfortable buying a more human image, but we
expect more from White rappers to make it in the industry. Naturally, this
means that Eminem sells millions of records,^and The Roots sell less. What
is admirable is the fact that Black artists accept losses in record sales in
order to preserve their dignity and indMduality, a choice that flies in the
face of the greedy, criminal image of Blacks we have swallowed. Even
when the path to riches seems well marked, we must encourage those
artists that remain creative and true to themselves, those that recognize
that superstars are ten-percent real, ninety-percent invented for the
record deal. ..-rfeaOO; CFUV vs Malkmus
by Sarah Buchanan
It is the last day of Stephen Malkmus' tour. He is in Vancouver to
play a show and promote his new album. Face The Truth. And his
promoter has hooked him up with an interview with some random
college radio DJ in Victoria, of all places, which isn't even the fucking
city he's playing in. He is very late due to being stopped at the border for
God knows what, has not eaten dinner, and his bandmates are yelling
at him to ditch the radio geek and eat Thai food. But he calls, of his own
accord, and charms me out of my music snob exterior, so much so that I
forget all of my questions and make up new ones. I was going to ask him
to marry me, but I forgot that too. And I heard he's taken.
Sarah: How is Portland treating you? Are you seeing lots of live shows
there?
Stephen Malkmus: Aaaah...about once a month. I saw Sleater-Kinney.
That's a nice band.
Yeah. I saw them at the Commodore this summer. Some girl stumbled out
of the crowd and passed out on a chair. Then the chair tipped over and
she fell off. It was really funny.
Ha ha.
Okay, I want to talk a bit about your new album. I heard you recorded it
in your basement. Did you go for a lo-fi approach?
Not particularly-l fried to make it sound as good as I could. I mixed it
with Phil Eck, he's worked with The Shams and Built to Spill-we threw it
together and it came out sounding pretty good. It was lo-fi in the sense
of taking it back away from the man, the producer guys and stuff. That
was good.
You are still working with Matador after aH these years. How do you feel
about the smaller label approach?
Great. It's as big a label as I would ever need. They can sell a half-million
Interpol records can't be that small. When you're not on the corporate
labels, you don't need a manager, or to be constantly buttering people
up. It's nice.
n album-guitar, banjo.
You play a tot of different Instruments on your ne
etc. Is there anything new you're learning now?
I've been trying to learn clarinet. It's quite difficult. I have a small clarinet
that I only recently learned how to put together, actually-it's that
hard!
Yeah, all those mouthpieces. I remember In band class there was this
one kid who always had a moldy mouthpiece. Nobody wanted to sit
next to him cause it smelted so bad. That was bragging.
Yeah, the mouthpieces do get corroded on the clarinet. They get kind     Yeah,
of gummed up.
Do you have to get in there and clean it wtth weird chemical stuff?
No. I have aluminum floss. That works good.
Does it gross you out a little bit?
Well, the gunk you get in there is slightly repulsive.
Do you save it?
I save it. We smoke it.
Great! I've heard that's kind of like banana peels...you bake them in the
oven and get all high.
Ha ha.
Well, back to being serious. You've been making music for a long
time now. What kind of expectations does this create for you and your
career?
There are a lot of preconceptions more than expectations. People have
heard a lot of stuff, and when they think it's going to sound one way
and when it doesn't, they tune out, or they think you've had enough
time in the spotlight and it's time for you to go and wait in a corner and
just be quiet.
One line caught me in your new album "Don't let reputation predecieve
you." Is that referring to you personally?
No. it's more like if you're meeting people, you've got to not work on
your projections, try to be secure and just see things for what they are.
You can often trick yourself, you know, into being a hater or something.
You can't do that in this life. Wait until you see people-you don't know
what they're like until you talk to them.
You're right. I had a tot of expectations of you from your hair. Seeing your
different hairstyles through the years.
I know it's really horrible now. It's way big. Like puffy.
I like it.
No, I think it's too puffy.
That's ok. Mine is puffy too. You've always had great indie rock hair, and
I respect that.
Thanks. I probably defined it is some ways, not to brag.
Do you think people would crap out on you had if you shaved your
head?
I don't know; it worked for Fugazi.
I guess so. But you're not Fugazi. I'm going to throw words at you, Stephen,
and you tell me the first thing that comes to your mind.
Pirate
Product.
Elephant
Dead zookeeper.
Canada
Beer that smells.
Chesterfield
Garage rock.
Asphalt
Aaaaah dead rat on the street got run over by a bus.
Concrete
Corporate rock
CFUV   '
Lesbian peace rallies.
Thanks a lot for talking with us, Stephen! I mean me. There's only me
(nervous laughter).
Right.
Sarah Buchanan hosts a show called Tiny Machines on the University
of V/cforia's CFUV 101.9fm . We asked for a transcription of her recent
interview with Stephen Malkmus because no one af OTR would eversass
this dude so bad. -"~~__
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EPITAPH.COM
VOLCOMENTERTAINIVIENT.COM
PENNYWISDOM.COM
ijf (J Uiljlh Get Off The Internet, I'll
Meet You In The Street:
Music Sharing Offline
Experiment Conducted by Michelle Chua
Data:
When Jason Kottke, one of the web' s most well known bloggers, compiled
a list of "50 fun things to do with your iPod" in May of this year, the eighth
fun thing on the list was "share your music with complete strangers." This
experiment was based on a 2003 Wired magazine article "Feel Free to
Jack into my iPod," both Wired and Kottke suggested trading iPod jacks
with a fellow iPod user for short (30-second) periods of time, a practice
that is said to be common in smaller college communities like Cambridge
and Oberlin.
While the idea of "reaching out and jacking someone" intrigued me,
I wondered if the people of our fair city would respond well to music
sharing in person. If we have the capacity to share music in the digital
universe (to the point where corporations are claiming billions in lost
ie), why isn't it the norm in the public spaces of everyday life? If
we can swap millions of musical bytes with as many strangers over virtual
connections, why can't we do it face-to-face? Have we forgotten
how? Are we just too shy? Or are we waiting for a revolution in social
behaviour?
Hypothesis:
If one person can successfully share music wtth many people, then a
domino effect can potentially occur.
While I liked the idea of swapping headphone jacks, the idea seemed
rather 2003. Why swap, when you can share? Headphone jack splitters
allow you to have two sets of headphones—one for you, one for your
victim.
Materials:
1 music player
2 sets of headphones
1 headphone jack splitter
Music!
Procedure:
Step One: Put on your headphones and get out of the house.
Step TWo: Listen to music while you' re waiting for a bus, on the skytrain, in
front of your favourite breakfast diner, in fhe park, waiting for yourctothes
to dry, or on a walk. Anywhere you can find potential subjects that are
bored and/or not in a hurry.
Step Three: Get out your headphone jack splitter. No excuses for not
getting one. They are less than $10 and you can find them at any
electronic store.
Step Four Get out your other headphones and plug them into your
headphone jack. If you don't how» another pair, that's okay, it just
means you can only share with subjects who already have their own.
(Note: Take caution of you do this step while you're on the bus, potential
subjects tend to look at you curiously.)
Step Five: Pick one of the curious ones. Make eye contact, smile politely,
and offer your spare headphones to them (or indicate the splitter) in a
non-threatening manner. Generally, you don't even have to speak. Just
your headphones on and your music playing. They'll get the idea,
though time varies greatly with each individuatsubject.. »
Step Six: Observe the subject's reaction. Record and/or photograph.
Total number of subjects approached: 39 over 5 days, 4 bus routes, 1
restaurant, and the entire Expo Line Skytrain route except Waterfront
station.
For the following, please note that some subjects fafl into more than one
category.
Number of people who:
Thought I was selling something: 3 (8%)
Liked the music: 21 (54%)
Didn't like the music: 2 (5%)
Were ambivalent: 8 (21%)
Share similar musical tastes: 5 (13%)
Didn't like the headphones: 3 [8%]
Were really supportive of the idea: 12 (31%)
Declined: 4 (10%)
Asked for my number 1.5 (3%)
Observations:
If a potential subject appears rather misanthropic, do not disturb them.
Your subject will listen longer if you attempt to accommodate them. Ask
them what type of music they enjoy and select accordingly from your
collection.
If your subject has a music player, try listening to their music as weU. This
works weU if nothing you have appeals to your subject.
Some subjects will ask what you're doing, being such a Carebear. Are
you sure you aren't selling something? Just smile. Or tell them you're
writing an article.
Some get rather talkative. You can choose to converse with your subject
or you may divert their attention by quickly handing them your music
player and allowing them to play with the apparatus.
Conclusion:
Over the course of my experiment, I met a saxophone player, an opera
singer, a physicist, an airplane pilot from Chile, an engineering student
from India, a VFS student from Ireland, a tourist from Wffinipeg, and a
mom whose teenage daughters both had Pods. We fctened to (among
others) Eddie Lockjaw Davis, Taking Back Sunday, The Postal Service, The
Trews, Wu Tang Clan, Mates of State, M.I.A., The Decemberists, Iron &
Wine, and The Weekend. Everyone I met was unpredictable, interesting,
different. We might not have spoken the same languages or appreciated
each others' footwear, but we could still enjoy the same music.
The other great effect of the "experiment" was cheering up people I
didn't know and would probably never see again. They would sit down on
the bus or train, looking fired after working all day, nod slightly, surprised
at the headphone offering, and be smiling, talking, and tapping their
feet by fhe time it was all over.
Do you remember the last time you made a complete stranger smile?
>fo? The next time you're waning for your bus or a table {or that revolution
- in social behaviour), consider looking across at that other bored person,
smiling, and handing them your headphones. ioS^&iwSga
<kZ.
JF 7
IV
By Luke Meat and Bleek
Asking Bleek and Luke Meat if they want to interview Negativland is like
asking two Republicans if they want to interview Christ. Negativland has
been an influence on these two since they could hear and think at the
same time. Negativland are the cornerstone of modern cut-up, plunderphonic
and culture jamming audio and no stranger to lawsuits and controversy. This
interview was conducted live on CiTR's "Exquisite Corpse" and "ANoiZE" shows
which Bleek and Luke dubbed "Exquisite Noize" for this special event. The
following is just a tidbit of the one hour interview, you can hear it in its entirety at
http ://bleek.sensoryresearch .com.
Luke: Can you just state your name and your occupation please?
Don: I am Don Joyce, I'm in Negativland. No "e" in the middle.
Luke: You joined Negativland after the project started. How did you meet the
guys and how did the whole thing emerge?
Don: I actually met them through a radio show. I was doing a show first at KPFA
in Berkeley, a non-commercial station. I was doing a weekly show there and a
friend of theirs brought them up to the show...I actually invited them to come
up and play on the show. I wasn't even sure what they did at this point. They
camein with all this equipment! Now, I didn't think of this, and I was in radio, and
they're not and they did; they came in with keyboards and samplers and tape
machines, cassettes and all this stuff and we did a spontaneous mix of all this
material from the station. It worked so good and was so much fun, it was kind
of a revelation to me about what radio could be. I invited them back the next
week and then the next week and the next week...we started doing it every
week and "Over the Edge" became a Negativland show. Shortly after that they
were working on records, and I joined in and became a member.
Luke: What were you guys listening to back in those days? Like on your radio
show—what were you playing? Were you playing actual cutting edge stuff or....
Don: Well this was '81 and I was at that point I was...I was always a weird DJ. I
was always mixing things up. I had no sort of genre favourites or focus to the
thing. I would do little theme sets with a bunch of songs from maybe different
genres about the same thing. But I would play records all the way through, from
beginning to end. I had no idea that you could stop them in the middle.
Bleek: I was wondering what artists you're listening to these days.
Don: You know what, I hate this question because any time somebody asks me I
don't seem to be listening to anything. I think 'oh my god, this is embarrassing'....
I do listen to music, and I buy a hell of a lot of music, but I found that over the
years that my work in Negativland and particularly on the radio show is [the
source of] my need for music, and I really buy stuff for that purpose. Everything is
purposed. I hardly buy anything I would consider for fun or my own enjoyment.
So I have mixed feelings about music, I actually think it's dead, but that's a long
story.
Luke: Are you a member or a fan of Soulseek or any other of the file sharing
software that's out there?
Don: No, you know I'm not into it myself.... I have no downloaded collection of
music and I don't know why, maybe it's just my age. I can see it, I appreciate
it, we approve of it! But it's sort of not my hobby. It seems to me, you know, my
experience is that it's a young people's thing.
Bleek: It's a theme throughout the new album, though.
Don: Yeah. It's definitely-an issue in music, and the internet and in technology.
It's a big issue that I'm very much aware of and very interested in but I'm not a
downloader of music myself.
Luke: Now that downloading is, I don't wanna say more acceptable or whatnot,
but does Its prevalence sort of make Negativland not as...rebellious as they
were, say, in the 80s? I mean, are more people in tune to stealing stuff and doing
the anti-copyright stuff? Are you a fan of the mash-ups and stuff like Go Home
Productions?
Don: Yeah.
Luke: Do you feel that Negativland has contributed to that somehow? And where
is Negativland's place nowdays in that kind of music?
Don: Yeah well, we ask ourselves that all the time. I am a close follower of what's
happening in this realm of sortaTiew music being made out of old music.
Luke: Are you familiar at all wtth Strictly Kev's Raiding the 20th Century?
Don: No.
Luke: You should check that out, if s a one hour audio documentary on the history
of cut-up music and you guys are in there quite a bit. You can get that on his
website, just Google "Strictly Kev.
Bleek: Or DJ Food.
Don: Oh, He's from England right?
Bleek:".... And who gives a shit! "[Laughs]
Don: Yeah I know him. Yeah, I don't know. It's been going on a long time. We've
been doing this for twenty years now and when we started it did seem very
fresh and new and remarkably avant-garde. And just a lot fun. But we weren't
the first either, I think hip hop has to be really credited with the first usage of
other musics in their music. And that was going on before we started, but it
had just started. Over the years it seems to have grown and spread and have
different permutations of how people use it aesthetically. All that's fine, and
we've been right in there the whole time, but I don't know how much effect
we had, I think we were just part of a general aesthetic thathas been growing,
which is pretty much a collage aesthetic with recorded material. Once it's there
as a recording, it's solidified in time and space and you can do anything you
want with it. Well, that wasn't always the case with music. It's only been the last
several decades that we've had all the recording and sampling technology
and naturally I think that artists look at it in creative ways and see the potentials
and among those potentials are...uh, stealing.
Luke: Wtth the new album, one amazing thing, like what we saw in (fhe
documentary) "Sonic Outlaws" was your studio and how you were using 2 inch
tape and stuff. Have you guys given in to the digital revolution or are you still
completely analog?
Don: We're actually both. I have so much archived on reel-to-reel tapes that
the equipment's still here and I still delve into it and stuff, but basically to make
things it's now all digital, all Pro Tools. Which is great, it's a huge improvement!
The time saving is just amazing! It's whole different world than cutting and
pasting with razor blades. The fact is that now this kind of technique which used
to be difficult and esoteric and required reel-to-reel tape equipment now can
be done by anybody at home, sitting in his bedroom at his computer. So it is a
different kind of access to this whole aesthetic and that's a big reason why it's
spreading in so many places.
Luke: Negativland has always had kind of their own little "In" jokes on the records
and stuff. And I just want you to clarify a couple of things.
Don: Yeah.
Luke: "Sete Bee Sate"? What does it mean?
Don: Ah geez, I don't know if I'm supposed to say anything because if I do it'll take
all the fun out of it. Once you know you'll never think about it again [laughs]. This
is a made-up word by the Weatherman who is real good at making up words.
It's sort of an obsession of his, making up words and phrases, crazy stuff that
comes into his head referring to something real though you'd never guess what
it is. But "Sete Bee Sate"—I will teM you what that means. This is an exclusive!
Luke & Bleek: Alright! Da-da-da-daaaahlil!
Don: Alright, "Sete Bee Sate" refers to the material produced by masturbation.
How do you like that? Luke & Bleek: [maniacal laughter] You heard it here first folks)
Bleek: Okay. Is there one of you that particularly takes charge
of the projects, and gives the inspiration and leads everybody
else by the nose, or Is it ail of you?
Don: No, it's much more of a group collaboration. We're all
strong-willed, independent...and have overbearing egos.
You should hear the arguments, it's tremendous. We don't
even call ourselves a band, we're not a band in the usual
sense. I don't play any musical instruments. We call ourselves
a collective for lack of a better term, which comes from a
European aesthetic where a bunch of people get together
under a brand umbrella and just produce stuff together or
individually.
Bleek: I have a question then, about Negativland as a 'group'.
Going through the lawsuits together and going into debt...
Don: It was a horrible experience...
Bleek: Was there ever any one of you who said 'I'm outta here
guys, IVe had it, you're on your own'?
Don: Not when it happened, I don't know if you're aware of
Chris Grigg who was a founding member of the group. He
left in '87,1 think, no a little later than that—he left just before
Dispepsi came out, and I think one of his fears was getting
sued for Dispepsi which never happened...he mentioned
that he didn't want to carry on being 'sue-bait' [laughs]. I
don'teven know though, he had other things. He got married.
Marriage will break up anything.
Luke: That being said, Don, is the band sick of pranks, or Is
there something in the works that will turn the world on Its ear
like you did wtth Heller Stupid or U2?
Don: I don't know. That's not a conscious motif that we feel
obligated to fulfill in any way at all. Basically our idea runs
the gamut on a lot of different directions, but yes, we seem
to be coming up with, every few years or so, another prank
sort of thing. But it comes naturally and it comes from our own
personalities which are very prankster-ish, and we're rather
cynical and ironic about the world that we are stuck in here.
Luke: I once received a five and a half page letter from a
friend, describing your show at the Town Pump in Vancouver
in 1994. He said every single one of his senses were being
completely overloaded, including smell. You guys used to
bum toast onstage!
Don: Yeah, I think that's one of our best ideas ever. Simulate
the smoke machine by burning toast in toasters. It's just great.
People sit in great anticipation waiting for the toast to pop
up but we had disconnected the pop-up mechanism so it
just stays there and it just smokes and smokes and smokes.
You would be amazed at how much smoke the toast would
produce until it just becomes a charred cinder. We just did
two live shows in Toronto, and we will be doing more around
the west coast. The show that you were describing that we
did before, that was our era of media barrage, and we
really did have everything going. It was an over the top
sensory experience. The new show is a completely different
concept, it's really interesting. Deep Wireless was a festival
in Toronto that is basically about radio, and they had asked
us to come over and do the radio show. Over The Edge,
onstage. We said 'that's brilliant, that's great, we'll do this in
front of people just like we're doing a radio show' so there is
nothing to see/there are no visuals, no film, no video, nothing.
Nothing to see whatsoever except us sitting in chairs at desks
with microphones just like the radio station, doing our show,
with scripts in front of us reading off of pieces of paper, just
like the radio show.
Luke: A purely audio experience then...
Don: Yes. We were really worried, compared to what we had
been doing, about how this was going to come across,
whether this was going to keep peoples attention or just be
dull or what? But it came out really great, everyone loved it
. for some reason. I just think it worked really well and we're
just going to keep doing it. My theory about why it works
so well is that, given that situation, the only thing that can
really grip your attention there is the content. The content
has to be overwhelming because you're not given anything
else.[clearing throat] Ahhhhh, sete bee sate! Anyway, the
content of our show: 'There'is no God' is our basic statement
which is repeated throughout the show. We're doing a show
that is about religion, but from a very philosophical...not the
usual ironic raging preachers making, fun of religion by using
excessive examples of it, no, that's been done. We're kind
of doing a philosophy show on why there's no God, how this
is all in your head. In fact, the title of the show is 'It's All In
Your Head.' Most of it is very serious, and only a little bit of it
is funny.
Bleek: I asked Trademark G of the Evolution Control Committee
if anyone gave him a good reason on why he shouldn't
sample other peoples work. Like "Your sampling is hurting my
family"...
Don: That's crazy. If you read the lawsuit that came in against
us and U2 in our book, you'll see that their main and only
emphasis is economic. They are trying to claim that sampling
and using a person's work without compensating them is
stealing from their economic well being, stealing their profits
etc...well that's just not true, it doesn't happen. There is no
economic harm in this stuff, if anything, I think sampling is the
greatest free advertising ever for whatever the source is. And
if the source is old and rather moribund, sampling can revive
things.
Bleek: And It Bleek: And it doesn't make any sense unless you
recognize the source that Is being sampled...
Don: Yeah! Part of the reason you use a sample is because
it's recognizable, and it's part of being part of a culture
that's influenced by this stuff, and it regurgitates it up in new
combinations. Now, as far as copyright goes, we are not
against copyright. We need copyright to stop one thing:
counterfeiting. Counterfeiting entire works and pretending
that it is yours is totally siphoning profits from the original. That is
theft, that's illegal, and that is why copyright is there. However
copyright makes no distinction between counterfeiting and
partial sampling in which you sample to create new art. That's
completely wrong and completely oblivious to art, and it has
to be revised.
Luke: Finally, can you tell us a joke?
Don: Uhhhh, do you prefer a turtleneck sweater or a henway?
Luke: What's a henway?
Don: About 5 pounds.
h>smt
1
\ Ken Michael
AGE: Almost 50
MUSICAL ACT: Essential, a must see. I take every song to the "idol." Just like on
"idol" I respect the first two thirds, but make the final third my own.
HOW MANY YEARS HAVE YOU BEEN BUSKING? I've been entertaining since I
was ten:
WHAT"S YOUR FAVOURITE BUSKING LOCATION? Robson Street.
WHAT'S THE BEST THING ABOUT BUSKING? I feel like I'm full of purpose, like I
have something to live for.
GREATEST CELEBRITY ENCOUNTER:   Being in Paycheck with Ben Affleck and
Uma Thurman—my pay cheque fell on the ground but I got it.
CAN YOU OFFER SOME AUDIENCE TIP ETIQUETTE ADVICE? At least 25 or 50
cents, and later bump it to 75 cents.
WHAT'S YOUR WORST PUBLIC HABIT? Pouring water all over my head.
WHO ARE YOUR MUSICAL HEROS? Elton John, Gino Vanelli.
Just Like Idol
Getting to Know Vancouver's Buskers
Interviews and photos by Rob Brownridge
Rachael Maria Dillman
I AGE: Seventeen.
MUSICAL ACT: I sing classical music, jazz and show
tunes, all a capella with no music or amplification,
just my voice.
| WHAT KIND OF MUSICAL TRAINING HAVE YOU HAD? I
started singing when I was seven years old. I sang in
my parish every week; now I sing in a cathedral.
| HOW MANY YEARS HAVE YOU BEEN BUSKING? The first
time was when I was twelve years old. I stopped for
a while, then I started again when I was old enough
to do it without my mom!
| WHAT'S THE BEST THING ABOUT BUSKING? It's great
training in front of crowds. Once you become a
busker you can perform anywhere.
| WHAT'S YOUR CRAZIEST BUSKING STORY? I ended up
on a German tourism show that was taping here in
Vancouver.
| CAN   YOU   OFFER  SOME  AUDIENCE  TIP   ETIQUETTE
ADVICE?  The   minimum   for  me   is   to  just   be
respectful.
| WHAT'S THE HARDEST THING ABOUT BUSKING? It can
get pretty noisy, but that helps me learn to project
my voice.
Jeremie Cote-Poirier
I AGE: 20
MUSICAL ACT: I play by the side of the road for my
own fun and to entertain the people.
| HOW MANY YEARS HAVE YOU BEEN BUSKING? I live
in Quebec and have been in Vancouver four
days, i have only been performing for two days.
I do it to get practice with an audience, not for
money. But it's still cool that I made $40.
| WHAT'S THE KEY TO BUSKING? You have to
look good. People wiH feel good if you look
comfortable and entertain them.
I HOW MUCH DO YOU MAKE? About $10 an hour.
WHO IS YOUR HERO? Richard Oesjardins.
| WHO IS THE BEST VANCOUVER BUSKER? I saw
a violinist who was very good and cute.
Other than that it's only old drunks going
aaahhhahahheeuuhhrrr.
I BOXERS OR BRIEFS? Nothing.
WHO IS YOUR MUSICAL HERO? Frank Sinatra. I love "Fly
Me To The Moon."
WHO IS YOUR FAVOURITE VANCOUVER BUSKER? The
guy in the top hat who sings Venetian music here on
Granville Island.
Patrick Earnst
AGE: Twenty-something.
HOME TOWN: Whitehorse, Yukon.
MUSICAL ACT: "Paddy Whack" consists of ten
members, with two to six performing at a time.
WHAT ARE YOUR FAVOURITE BUSKING LOCATIONS?
Triangle Square on Granville Island. Also English
Bay and Kits Beach.
WHAT'S THE BEST THING ABOUT BUSKING? We get
kids involved by dragging them up on stage and
getting them to play the egg shakers, cowbells,
maracas etc. It's a lot of fun.
CAN YOU OFFER SOME AUDIENCE TIP ETIQUETTE
ADVICE? Whatever you can afford; if you're
going to appreciate our music then give
something.
WHAT'S YOUR CRAZIEST BUSKING STORY? I had two
strings break on my four-string violin while I was
playing. I had to fix it like I was in bike race with a
flat tire. Luckily I had a string putter-on assistant.
WHO ARE YOUR MUSICAL HEROS? NOFX; Mr.
Django Reinhart.
WHO IS THE BEST VANCOUVER BUSKER? The four
or five professional buskers who perform on
Granville Island year round, full time. That's
impressive.
Diego Zaragoza
AGE: Twenty-something.
HOME TOWN: All over: Mexico, Swahili, and Pat
says I'm from Cuba. He gives me a different
last name every time we play.
MUSICAL ACT: "Paddy Whack" may feature
fiddle, violin, marimba, Congo drums, live
dance, jugglers, guitar and stand up bass. We
do gypsy swing, bee-bop, Latin jazz, Celtic
fiddle rock, old time fiddle and Afro Cuban
jazz.
WHAT ARE YOUR FAVOURITE BUSKING
LOCATIONS? Santiago, Cuba, or outside the
V.A.G.
HOWS THE GRANVILLE ISLAND CROWD? Really
. good.. We make good money, but you have
to let people know we're not paid by Granville
Island.
WHAT'S YOUR CRAZIEST BUSKING STORY?
Yesterday a seven year old came up and
stole the show. He started break dancing,
going crazy and hyperventilating. He was so
amazing that we just had to stop playing. He
got a standing ovation from the crowd.
WHO ARE YOUR MUSICAL HEROS? Esa
Contractor; Mr. Professional.
WHO IS THE BEST VANCOUVER BUSKER? The
band "Mother."
DiSCORDER - March 2005 Under Review)
Electric Frankenstein
Burn Bright, Burn Fast
(TKO Records)
Hey look...another EF
record...great...how many is that
now? I've lost count. Well let's see,
cool Frankenstein artwork on the
cover, check. Songs in the key of
RAWK, check. Eclectic choice of
covers, check. Honestly, if you're
not hip to these New Jersey
monsters yet, then let me suggest
this record to you, because the
formula is basically the same
from one album to the next. Not
that that's a bad thing mind you,
but you just got to wonder some
times, when is it gonna end?
Please don't become Electric
Frankenstein INC, 'cuz then I'll
have to buy stocks and see you
playing Live Aid 25 or some shit.
Stick to the motto of this record
and I think you'll do just fine.
Bryce Dunn
Daniel Lanois
Beffadonna
(Anti-)
I've always been a fan of
Daniel Lanois, and not because
he produced U2, or Bob Dylan,
or Peter Gabriel, or what ever
other production credit one can
think of. I'm talking about his own
music. Although he is not in my
top ten of all time or anything, I
do owe him a debt of gratitude
for being one of a number of
musicians who, early on, helped
me to realize that the artists who
deserve my ears are those who
are inspired and care about the
music they are making.
There are no words
on Belladonna: voices are
sporadically present on the
album, but it's mostly an ethereal,
textural affair, that invites you
along rather than distances itself
from you. Many of the songs
evoke the arid landscapes of
the American southwest. So,
naturally, much of the focus rests
on Lanois' sublime pedal steel.
Right from the beginning, we get
"Two Worlds", with hazy, layered
guitar effects which break apart
every so often to reveal its soft,
pretty steel guitar counterpart,
and "Desert Rose" with guitar
that sparkles and glistens. The
album is varied, though. There is
the Mexican-flavoured "Agave,"
complete with trumpets and
a Mariachi-type snare march;
.the reggae-styled "Frozen," an
upbeat changetroffna'rnostJy---.
relaxed, downtempo record; or
the Eno-like "Telco" and closer
"Todos Santos" (unsurprising, as
the two have worked closely
over the years).
At 53, Daniel Lanois still
makes his own music out of
inspiration. That alone is reason
enough to keep listening.
Robert Ferdman
Hair Police
Constantly Terrified
(Troubleman Unlimited)
Beetles are crawling out
of your mouth, ants out of your
nostrils. Your ear canals are filled
with buzzing, stinging wasps, and
your head is a bomb made of
shattered glass. You try to scream,
but you have no voice. You can't
see. You can't feel your body.
You are surrounded by a total
void. Sucking, malevolent, all-
encompassing darkness. You are
listening to Hair Police. You can
vaguely make out the tortured
ghosts of instruments In the fetid
mist that is Constantly Terrified-
-guitar, bass, drums, oscillators
and tapes—but there's no rock
action here. Hair Police blow past
noise, punk, metal, and improv
jazz (though Wolf Eyes' John
Olson lends a wicked saxophone
skronk to the 13-minute title track)
and end up in an anti-landscape
of trauma, fever, and terror. It's
total violation. No songs, no beat,
no groove, not even hate. Just
the buzzing, wasps-in-your-ear
horror of all-consuming futility. As
the blurb on their website states,
"CT isn't cool, isn't fun, isn't
entertainment." Rather, it's like
the aural equivalent of a workout
video for nihilists. Face your fear.
Listen to Hair Police. They will
make an ubermensch of you.
Saelan Twerdy
Innocence Mission
Now fhe Day is Over
(Badman)
I know what you're
thinking. The Innocence Mission
are . really wicked musicians
and songwriters, but... a covers
albi/m of classic and honourary
lullabies? Honestly, how good
could it be? Well, despite the
somewhat unfortunate clumping
of all the cheesiest and best
known songs right at the start
of the album. Now the Day is
close to perfect for what it's
Jiying^Jc^affain. Few peopled
could come closer to creating
the rustic atmosphere that the
.Innocence Mission do, and as
if that wasn't already enough,
when purchasing a copy of the
album you're given a rare moral
boost of supporting children in
need. If Duplex's new "Ablum" is
the perfect party album for indie
families looking for a party, this
should soon fill in the spot for best
bed-time listening for parents
and children alike.
Soren Bros.
The Makers
Everybody Rise!
(Kill Rock Stars)
Greetings brethren and
sistern, gather round as we
celebrate the glory of rock and
roll from the depths of the soul.
The Makers! Rejoice and revel
in the new supersonic sound
assaulting your senses, bigger
and bolder than ever! The sound
of sex, power and wisdom awaits
you! Welcome with open arms the
rebirth of Timothy Killingsworth, a
Maker once more! Behold the
majesty of Aaron Saye, drummer
of unmerciful power! Marvel at
the guitar prowess of Jamie Frost
and the mystery of Don Virgo,
as he conjures sounds that only
the lower depths could create!
Can I get an amen? Run with
me tonight, my children, the tiger
of the night, Michael Maker, is
awake and hungry and hunting
for ordinary human love! We can
give it to him, just believe and
you're as good as gold! Hallelujah!
Now everyone get on your feet,
'cuz I know you can take the
heat, and feel the thorn in your
side being pulled out, crushed
under those Cuban heels and
let the music take control! It's just
a matter of degrees! Everybody
rise! Everybody rise! The Makers
are here! You've been saved, yes
you've been saved...
Bryce Dunn
The Offspring
Greatest Hits
(Sony/BMG)
There's nothing to say about
this compilation that wouldn't
apply to all greatest hits.discs—if's
for those who like the Offspring's
songs, but not enough to buy
an album or listen to anything
beyond the radio hits.
Drake
Electric Frankenstein
Daniel Lanois       $__&/■■
Hair Police
Innocence Mission
The Makers
:, The Offspring
SS Cardiac ^^~
^ Sage Francb^^
^THM^h0mrust
(Epitaph)
Former Anticon recording
artist Sage Francis has once
again put together one of the
most intelligent albums in hip
hop. Each and every song shows
evidence of careful crafting
and effort, not only in the lyrics,
but also the beats. Sage brings
in guests for all the songs which
include such impressive DJ names
as Sixtoo, Alias, Reanimator and
Dangermouse. Not your average
hip hop album (or punk label
release), it draws on influences
from country music's greats
such as Will Oldham and Johnny
Cash.
A Healthy Distrust is a social
critique of America's (and to a
lesser degree North America's)
current cultural/poilitical climate,
and it is a bitingly clever cynical
critique. Sage's dissatisfaction
would be hard to miss listening
to tracks such as "Slow Down
Gandhi" and "Gunz Yo." But I
don't mean to say that Distrust
is all anger and bitterness: it
contains plenty of dark humour,
which will keep a smirk on your
face as you listen to this complex
and brilliant new album.
Jordie Sparkle
SS Cardiacs
Fear The Love
(Blocks Recording Club)
Jessie Stein must love her
local library. She and the English
language are best friends—
literate lyrics and crafty slips of
the tongue mark her pop songs
as the product of a poetic
imagination. Stein may practice
guitar while listening to old Nell
Young records, but the Cardiacs
add a bouncy grittiness-verging-
on-noise to the classic folk sound
that the current crop of kids ate
betting their record deals on.
They're jealous, I'm sure, and their
jealousy is justified: this is indie
pop done right—unselfconscious
and frank, prettily melodic but
not precious. Notice me, Stein's
little girl voice demands in a
range from whisper to cry, and
notice the world. A library card
is optional.
Joceline Andersen
Relying on your fashion mullet to stay edgy? Throw out your
Dippity Do and write for DiSCORDER. We're just as cool.
email discorder@club.ams.ubc.ca!
Young Man
Reviews
Old Album
Pink Floyd
Dark Side of the Moon
Ah yes! A definite classic. As was once said to me in a
local music store, "one of the most essential stoner
albums of all time." I'm sure that most people have
this album in their collection somewhere, or have had it at
sometime. Or maybe you didn't; many people thWc this is hardly
a demonstration of what lies behind the real Pink Floyd.
People say that to be a true Pink Floyd fan, you must know
who Syd Barrett was, and appreciate his talent. Barrett, the
original lead guitarist of Pink Floyd, was excommunicated from
the band after a massive trip on acid landed him in a mental
hospital. He was then replaced by David Gilmour, who I must
say, changed the style of music to a noticeable degree. One
interesting fact about this album is that all the members of the
band contributed to the album's music. Each of the band
members wrote at least one of the songs, or helped to write
one. Essentially, there was much more collaboration between
the band members.
The Dark Side of the Moon was also engineered by Alan
Parsons, from you guessed it; The Alan Parsons Project. You can
definitely hear some of the sounds of Pink Floyd in the Project's
music, and I'm sure that Parsons has definitely used some similar..
techniques in both of these situations.
Floyd used a lot of effects from a VCS3 (Voltage Control
for Studio with 3 components). This allowed them to allocate
different voltages and power to different instruments, effects,
and sounds on an album. The workings are rather simple, but it
requires skW to use. On this album, the VCS3 was used by three
of the four members of Pink Floyd.
Even with some peoples' negative reaction to fhe album, it
stBautsold most of the albums released in '73, which according '
to the historical charts, was one of the history-breaking years of
rock n' roll.
All in all, I must admit that I simply adore this album mostly
because of its musicality, even though some of the^ongs aren't
musical at all. I still find it important to give Floyd the credit that k
they deserve for creating such a complete and complex bunch
of tunes. Also, it is important to give credit to Syd Barrett (who I
am an obvious fan of), who brought this band together in the
first place, even if he might have torn them apart for a little
Jacob Kalmakov
Facts
Band Members:
David Gilmour
Nick Mason
Richard Wright
Roger Waters
Vocals, Guitar and VCS3
Percussion and Tape Effects
Keyboards, Vocals and VCS3
Bass guitar. Vocals, VCS3, and Tape Effects
Released in '73.
1/20 people under 50 owns a copy of album.
Most successful album ever recorded.
19 DiSCORDER - August 2005 :> r 	
•   '^^|____^^H_
l^^lXJi     Action
Jon Rae Fletcher and The River
July 6
Railway Club
Dear Jon Rae,
Dude, there's nothing like seeing someone after a year of not
seeing them to make you miss them. I got way nostaglic at your Railway
Club show. Seeing you and Anne and sortof meeting all your new
bandmates was great. My only regret was not meeting your drummer,
the Blocks Recording Club dude. You know, it's nice that you can just
drift into town and everything is just back the way it was, all the old
songs, changed a little, but not so much as to make them unsingable.
The new band sounds good, they look like a bunch of fun dudes, and
Anne of course, but she's a fun dude.
It was like the good ole days for a night. It was a pity that you just
moved on through town. Come back again...my place is really small but
we can find somewhere to put you up, and this time maybe you'll stay
for a couple days, and make Myera come too.
I'm glad that everything is coming together in Toronto, just swing
back every once in a while.
I've missed you. This place isn't the same anymore.
Sincerely,
Graeme
What The Heck Fest
July 14-17
Anacortes, Washington
Going to What The Heck Fest is not like
going to any other music festival. It is
not like Folkfest or Lollapalooza where
the festival is a disrete entity unto
itself, a festival where you come and
listen and then leave, and when it is
over it stops existing. What the Heck
Fest functions is like a big open house
for the town of Anacortes Washington
and all the rad stuff that goes on
there. It's a show and tell, it's a family
reunion, it's a big party.
For four sunny July days,
musicans from all over the pacific
northwest—including     Mout     Erie,
Woelv, The Blow, Calvin Johnson, Mecca Normal, Karl Blau, P:ano, Al
Larson—swarmed Anacortes to play music for eachother in the city hall
basement, in the park, and at the Department of Safety. Some came
from even further afield: Kimya Dawson drove in from New York and The
Blow's new best friend. Tender Forever, came all the way from France
and was the highlight of the whole event with her sweet electronic
dance pop and her self-parodying shtick—4he girt gets on her knees and
plays a cardboard-and-ductape laptop! We swooned.
What The Heck Fest is held on Anacortes' big show-off weekend;
Saturday was a city-wide rummage sale known as Shipwreck Day and
Sunday hosted an antique car show all along the town's main drag. For
four days, the city was full of activity, and everyone was out enjoying
it. Thing is that it wasn't just What The Heck Fest that was going on, it
was Anacortes that was going on, and is still going on even when it's
not hosting a festival. What The Heck was just a chance for the town
to invite everyone over to make music, swim in the lake, hang ouiand
meet its friends.
Dory
Sufjan Stevens w/ Liz James
July 23
Richard's on Richards
TThe night opened with some innocuous folk numbers from songstress Uz
Janes, who also features in Sufjan Stevens' band "The lllinoisemakers."
Armed with a ukulele and a female vocal accompanist, Liz began the set
with some simple harmonies that would have felt right at home on Seven
Swans. As the show progressed, other members of the lllinoisemakers
joined in to flesh out the arrangements, contributing keyboards and more
guitars to the mix. Sufjan played drums on many of the songs, looking
slightly bored and impishly crossing his arms or reversing his sticks to make
it all look easy. Despite the plodding tempo and churchy aesthetic
of the songs, Liz established a good rapport with the crowd, eliciting
incongruous drunken cheers with party anthems such as a rousing cover
of "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot". Her set was unabashedly Sufjan-esque
and not overly interesting, but it succeeded in getting everyone warmed
up and ready to feel the lllinoise.
As Sufjan and company took the stage to a pounding drum roll, it
quickly became apparent that the show would shatter and exceed all
my expectations. Although Illinois clearly showcases Sufjan's developing
talent as a songwriter and his knack for grandiose, arrangements, I still
think of the subtle beauty of the banjo work on Seven Swans as his
definitive sound. Even though the stage was littered with instruments, I
half expected the man to stroll up, banjo in hand, and play an evening
of subdued, confessional whispers. When the lllinoisemakers took the
stage, resplendent in orange and blue Team Illinois track suits, I was
quickly proven wrong as the concert became a pep rally. While the
cheerleaders shook their pom-poms and the crowd looked on in grinning
disbelief, the band opened up with "The Fifty States Song," a catchy ode
to Sufjan's absurdly ambitious project of recording an album
in homage to each one of the fifty United States. It all seemed a little
farcical at first, and even Sufjan couldn't suppress his own self conscious
smiles. Yet as the show continued, with nearly every song prefaced by
some choreographed cheerleading, it began to make perfect sense.
The band members were obviously enjoying themselves on stage, and
their enthusiasm was contagious. A brief ditty in honour of the Canadian
provinces had the audience laughing in appreciation of Sufjan's mild-
mannered humour, although he refused to acknowledge the existence
of the oft-overlooked territory of Nunavut.
In the hands of a lesser musician, the cheerleading strategy would
have backfired, turning the concert into a complete joke. Yet the
opportunity to hear the epic arrangements of Illinois performed live,
coupled with some comic relief and friendly banter from Sufjan kept
everyone perfectly attentive and deliriously happy. Not to be overly
gushy, but the man was magic on stage. The vocals were album quality,
and Sufjan's impressive emotive range handled disparate tasks such as
the soaring triumph of songs like "Chicago" and the somber reflection of
"The Seer's Tower" with ease. Unfortunately, time restrictions prevented
the band from playing any earlier material, and'some of the stronger
tracks on Illinois had to go unsung. The first set finished with a potent
rendition of "The Man of Metropolis Steals Our Hearts," leaving the
audience ravenously demanding an encore. After the obligatory delay
and a costume change into some less theatrical clothing, Sufjan emerged
with his guitar to play "a traditional song," which turned out to be the
best damn version of "The Star-Spangled Banner" since Jimi Hendrix's
acid-fueled performance at Woodstock. The American bravado and
bombast of the original was given an extreme minor chord makeover,
and Sufjan's haunting vocals turned the song into a lamentation for a
great nation in decline.
The cover of "The Star-Spangled Banner" truly exemplified Sufjan's
ability to capture that conspicuously American mixture of can-do
enthusiasm and barely concealed darkness, a combination which
author Don DeLillo describes as "American magic and dread." Although
the fifty states project may never be completed, the two albums to date
act as fractals, displaying an acute understanding of the whole nation's
simultaneous glory and decay. The epic scope of Sufjan's albums is
personalized by his vivid individual narratives, such as the unsettling
portrait of a serial killer in "John Wayne Gacy, Jr." This knack for intimacy
made for a strong connection between audience and artist, and made
fhe show a joy to watch.
David Ravensburger /'' Jm CiTR Charts
?#ARTI$X?t
\   1 RAISED BY WOLVES*
||^^^£&RADi*-—
3 THE HIGH DIALS*
4 THE DISKETTES *
5 THE BOOK OF LISTS'
6 REPUBLIC OF SAFETY'
7 BUCK 65*
8 CAROUr^^A
9 VARIOUS*
*              Hot Blood     J^—~— ■—-*""~"""      ""
Stomp and Howl
^,_       _-~^
Sub Pop
War Of The Wakening Phantoms
Weekends at Island View Beach
Rainbow Quartz
Worthy
*              Red Arrows
Global Symphonic
IY*          Passport
independent
Secret House Against the World
Warner
Just Married: An Album of Duets
Mint
90.9 With a Bullet: 20 Years of Calgary Music on
CJSW
Saved By Radio
10 -WE POINTED STICKS*
Perfect Youth (Reissue).
Sudden Death
11    SUFJAN STEVENS
Illinois
Asthmatic Kitty
^^^^lADIES AND
GENTLEMAN*
Small Sins
Boompa
13 . WHITEY HOUSTON*
s/t
Rectangle
U  VARIOUS*
Beatstreet.ca
Beatstreet
15    KINSKI
Alpine Static
Sub Pop
16  TEENAGF FANCLUBT
Man-Made
Merge
17   THESOVIETTES
LP III
Fat
#     ARTIST
Title
Label
18    BEND SINISTER*
Through the Broken City
Storyboard
19   CATLOW*
Kiss the World
Boompa
20   BUTTERSPRITES
s/t
Dionysus
21   LAU PUNA
j^i3$!$bhr I Was Over That
Morr
22   DEERHOOF
Green Cosmos
Menlo Park
23   SHARON JONES AND
THE DAP KINGS
Naturally
Dap Tone
24    DANIEL LANOIS*
Belladonna
Anti
25 TEGAN AND SARA*
5 Songs From the Phoenix
Sanctuary
26ANONYANDTHE
JOHNSONS
Hope There's Someone (EP)
Secretly Canadian
27  THE REBa SPELL" ...
Days of Rage
Independent,
m
28    SOSO*
Tenth Street and Clarence
Clothes Horse
29   THE NEINS CIRCA*
Sunday Anthems
Blue Curtain
HH
30    DUPLEX*
Ablum
Mint
31   GORDON B. ISNOR*
Creatures AJI Tonight Lord Sir
Skronk
■
32    THE RUSSIAN FUTURISTS*
Our Thickness
Upper Class
33   DRUNKHORSE
In Tongues
Tee Pee
m
34    FOUR TET
Everything Ecstatic
Domino
35    NEGATIVLAND
No Business
SeeJand
m
• Denotes Canadian Content.
•FiA<h*rtg   £-£>\f
by   LukJL ftamsjey
<feo
Attentive readers may have noticed that last
month's Finding Joy was printed out of sequence.
i apologizes for the error. We now
o ouk regular programming. CiTR Program
All the shows! In alphabetical order!
I     ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS (Eclectic)
I     A chance for new CiTR DJs to flex
ther   musical   muscle.   Surprises
galore
I      AFRICAN RHYTHMS (World)
I     David "Love" Jones brings you the
best new and old jazz, soul, Latin,
samba, bossa and African music
from around the world.
<www.africanrhythmsradio.
com>
I      AFROBEAT (World)
I     In two hours, I take the Bsfener for a
spin—musically—around the world;
my passion is African music and
" music from the Diaspora.
I     Afrobeat is where you can catch up
on the latest in the "World Music"
scene and reminisce on the classic
collections. Don't miss it.
<uget_qfrobeat@yahoo.com>
I      ALT. RADIO (Pop)
Hosted by David B.
AND     SOMETIMES     WHY     (Pop/
Eclectic)
First Wednesday of every month.
ANOIZE (Noise)
Luke Meat irritates and educates
through musical deconstruction.
Recommended for the strong.
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC (Eclectic)
All of time is measured by its art. This
show presents fhe most recent new
music from around the world. Ears
open.
AURAL TENTACLES (Eclectic)
It could be punk, ethno, global
trance, spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it could
be something different. Hosted by
DJ Pierre.
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT (Hip
Hop)
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE (Roots)
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots
country.
BLUE MONDAY (Goth/Industrial)
Vancouver's only industrial-
electronlc-retro-goth program.
Music to schtomp to, hosted by
Coreen.
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic)
Your favourite brown-sters, James
and Peter, offer a savoury blend of
the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights!
THE CANADIAN WAY (Eclectic)
Independent Canadian music from
almost every genre imaginable
covering the east coast to
the left coast and all points in
between. Yes, even Montreal!
<thecanadianway@popstar.
CAUGHT IN THE RED (Rock)
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING (Pop)
British pop music from all decades.
CIRCUIT       TRACING        (Dance/
Electronic/Eclectic)
CiTR NEWS, SPORTS AND ARTS (Talk)
A volunteer-produced, student
and community newscast
featuring news, sports and arts.
Reports by people like you.
"Become the Media."
CODE BLUE (Roots)
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy and Paul.
DEMOCRACY NOW (Talk)
Independent news hosted by
award-winning journalists Amy
Goodman and Juan Gonzalez.
EARWAX       (Hip       Hop/Dance/
-Electronic)
"noiz terror mindfuck hardcore
like punk/beatz drop dem headz
rock inna junglist mashup/distort
da source full force with needlz
on wax/my chaos runs rampant
when I free da jazz..." Out.
ELECTRONIC SPECTRUM (Dance)
EN AVANT LA MUSIQUE (French)
«En Avant la musique!» se
concentre sur le metissage des
genres musicaux au sein d'une
francophonie ouverte a tous les
courants. This program focuses
on cross-cultural music and its
influence on mostly Francophone
musicians.
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Eclectic)
ESCAPISM (Eclectic)
es»cap»ism n: escape from the
reality or routine of Fife by absorbing
■ the   mind   in   entertainment  or
fantasy. Hosted by DJ Satyricon.
<DJSatyricon@hotmail.com>
EXQUISITE CORPSE (Experimental)
Experimental,     radio-art,     sound
collage,   field   recordings,   etc.
Recommended for the insane.
FLEX YOUR HEAD (Hardcore)
Up the punx, down the emo! Keepin'
it real since 1989, yo. flexyourhead.
<vancouverhardcore.com>
FOLK OASIS (Roots)
Two hours of eclectic roofs music.
Don't   own   any   Birkenstocks?
Allergic to patchouli? C'mon inl A
kumbaya-free zone since 1997.
. <folkoasis@canada.com>
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk)
A fine mix of streetpunk and old
school   hardcore   backed   by
band interviews, guest speakers,
and       social       commentary.
www.streetpunkradio.com
<crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca>
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR (Hans
Kloss)
This is pretty much the best thing on
radio.
HIGHBRED VOICES (World)
I LIKE THE SCRIBBLES (Eclectic)
IN THE SHADOWS (Hip Hop)
LISTEN TO CiTR AT 101.9 FM OR
ONLINE AT WWW.CITR.CA
THE JAZZ SHOW (Jazz)
Vancouver's longest running prime-
time jazz program. Hosted by
the ever-suave, Gavin Walker.
Features at 11:00, as listed.
August 1: "Cannonball in Europe"
featuring one of the best ever
jazz groups performing before an
audience of 40,000 in Belgium.
Altoist/Leader Cannonball
Adderiey with brother Nat and
the great Yusef Lateef and Joe.
Zawinul...lnspired and Compelling
Jazz!
August 8: A classic recording and
the final disc by the original Jazz
Messengers as a co-operative
band before Art Blakey took
over. Blakey is is here on drums
with Donald Byrd (trumpet). Hank
Mobley (tenor-/sax], and most
importantly pianist/composer
Horace Silver who was musical
director...timeless and far-
reaching music!
August 15: give the young guys
some! Tonight a group of younger
players from New York showing
us jazz tradition and extensions
led by boss alto saxophonist Ian
hendrickson-Smith with ryan Kisor
from the Lincoln Centre Jazz
Orchestra on trumpet. Hot and
swinging music from "The Uptown
Quintet" recorded at Smoke in
New York City.
August   22:   A   new   album   by
Vancouver's "Jazzman For All
Seasons" Brad Turner is always an
event. Tonight "What If" focuses
on Brad's long-standing quartet
and features his trumpet and
flugelhorn in a live date recorded
at the Jazz Cellar. Brad with Bruno
Hubert (piano), andre LaChance
(bass) and Dylan van der Schyff
(drums) playing Brad's complex
and lyrical originals.
August 19: This date is the 85th
birthday of one of the 20th centry' s
most influential artists...none other
than Charlie Parker. Even though
the alto saxophonist died at age
34, his music is still significant today.
Gavin will devote the whole show
to the music of "Bird" with the
last hour focused on Parker's last
two great studio dates with his
quartet.
JUICE BOX (Talk)
Developing your relational and individual sexual health, expressing
diversity,. celebrating queemess
and encouraging pleasure at all
stages. Sexuality educators Julia
and Alix will quench your search for
responsible, progressive sexuality
over your life span!
<www.juiceboxradto.com>
LAUGH TRACKS (Talk)
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW (World)
The best mix of music, news, sports,
and commentary from around
sinewave
A  TON  OF  AUTOMATONS    12"
Sinewave's forthcoming CD, Unity Gain, has been a work
in progress over the past three years and includes the
debut single, A Ton of Automatons. This single sees
Sinewave trade in his drum & bass beats for some of the
sweetest vocoder vocals this side of Air's Moon Safari.
Available on iTunes
^yuvulfepubHc
to t mykpM,com/(ii_$k
[artless productions'
and tb.e
Douglas Students' Union |
[performing Arts Committe
a d?4s-up party/eaturing live
b£ueaPndfer entertainment
yohtuBi
!«%■■■■  ^P Sept*
inalive   #       9 \ @t
September 24tK
trV Waldorf
0$t#| the local and international Latin
American communities.
UONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS...
(Eclectic)
Hey Jordie! See your show
description? No? I thought not!
Um..this show has eclectic pop
and rock and hip hop and show
listings and stuff. It's hosted by
Jordie Sparkle.
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL (Live Music)
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell
showcases local talent... LIVE!
Honestly, don't even ask about
the technical side of this. This
month will probably be the best
month ever.
THE LOVE DEN (Eclectic)
<loveden@hotmail.com>
MIRCH MASALA (World)
MOTORDADDY(Rock)
Cycle-riffic rawk and roll!
MORNING AFTER SHOW (Eclectic)
MY ASS (Eclectic)
Phelps, Albini, 'n' me.
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE
PRESENTS... (Nardwuar)
NECESSARY VOICES (Talk)
Socio-political, environmental
activist news and spoken
word with some music, too.
<www.necessaryvoices.org>
<necessaryvoices@telus.net>
NUTHOUSE RADIO THEATRE
(Drama)
All-original Canadian radio
drama and performance art
written and performed live-to-
air by our very own team of
playwrights and yoice-actors.
We also welcome you to get
involved, whether you are a
professional or inexperienced...
ON AIR WITH GREASED HAIR
(Rock)
The best in roots, rock 'n' roll and
rhythm and blues from 1942-1962
with your snappily-attired host,
Gary Olsen. <ripitup55@telus..
net>
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW (Talk)
Comix comix comix. Oh yeah, and.
some music with Robin.
OUR WAVE (World)
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community,
local and abroad.
PACIFIC PICKIN'(Roots)
Bluegrass, old-time music and its
derivatives with Arthur and "The
Lovely Andrea" Berman.
PARTS UNKNOWN (Pop)
Underground pop for the minuses
with fhe occasional interview with
your host, Chris.
PEDAL REVOLUTIONARY (Talk)
Viva la Velorutionl DJ Helmet Hair
and Chainbreaker Jane give
you all the bike news and views
you need and even cruise
around while doing it! <www.
bikesexual.org>
PLANET LOVETRON (Dance/
Electronic)
Music    inspired    by   Chocolate
Thunder,   Robert   Robot   drops
electro past and present, hip hop
and intergalactic funkmanship.
<rbotlove@yahoo.com>
PLEASE ROCK THE DOOR (Eclectic)
Start your week ridiculously early
with Vancouver's super awesome
fun time happy radio show. Playing
all the dance-punk, elecfro, rock,
new wave, hip hop, 80's, etc. sh*t
that your mom thinks is cool.
PLUTONIAN NIGHTS (Dance/
Electronic)
Cutting-edge, progressive organ
music with resident Haitchc
and various guest performers/
DJs. Bye-bye civilisation, keep
smiling blue, where's me bloody
anesthetic then? <http://
plutonia.org>
POWERCHORD (Metal)
Vancouver's only true metal show;
local demo tapes, imports, and
other rarities. Gerald Rattlehead,
Dwain, and Metal Ron do the
damage.
QUEER FM (Talk)
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual, and transsexual
communities of Vancouver.
Lots of human interest features,
background on current issues, and
great music.
RADIO ZERO (Eclectic)
REGGAE UNKUP (Regge)
Hardcore dancehall reggae. Hosted
by Sister B.
REEL TO REAL (Talk)
Movie reviews and criticism.
RHYMES AND REASONS (Hip Hop)
DJ Knowone slaves over hot-multi-
track to bring a fresh continuous
mix of fresh every week. Made
from scratch, samples and just
a few drops of fame. Our tables
also have plethora of guest
DJs, performers, interviews,
giveaways. Strong Bad and
the occasional public service
announcements. <eno_
wonk@yahoo.ca>
RHYTHMSINDIA (World)
Rhythmslndia features a wide range
of music from India, including
popular music from Indian movies
from the 1930s to the present,
classical music, semi-classical music
such as Ghazals and Bhajans, and
also Qawwalis, pop, and regional
language numbers.
THE ROCKERS SHOW (Reggae)
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
RUMBLETONE RADIO (Rock)
Primitive, fuzzed-out garage
mayhem!
SAINT TROPEZ (Pop)
International pop (Japanese,
French, Swedish, British, US, etc.),
60s soundtracks and lounge. Book
your jet set holiday nowl
SALARIO MINIMO (World)
THE SATURDAY EDGE (Roots)
Studio guests, new releases, British
comedy sketches, folk music
calendar and ticket giveaways.
8AM-9AM: African/World roots.
9AM-12PM: Celtic music and performances.
SHADOW JUGGLERS (Dance/
Electronic)
An exciting chow of Drum n' Bass
with Djs Jimungle & Bias on the
ones and twos, plus guests. Listen
for givawas  everyweek.   Keep
feelin da beatz.
SKA-T'S SCENE-IK DRIVE! (Ska)
Email requests to: <djska_
t@hotmail.com>
SOLARIZATION (Talk)
SON OF NITE DREEMS (Eclectic)
SUBURBAN JUNGLE (Eclectic)
SWEET AND HOT
Sweet dance music and hot jazz
from the 1920s 30s and 40s.
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH (Dance/
Electronic/Eclectic)
TANSI KIYAW (Eclectic)
"Tansi kiyaw?" Is Michif-Cree (one
of the Metis languages) for "Hello,
How are you?" It is also a monthly
Indigenous music and spoken word
show. Hosted by June Scudeler (for
those who know me from other
shows-t'm Metis!), the show will
feature music and spoken word
as welt as events and news from
Indian country and special guests.
Contact me at jlscudel@ucalgary.
ca with news, event listings and
ideas. Megwetch!
THESE ARE THE BREAKS (Hip Hop)
Top notch crate digger DJ Avi
Shack mixes fhe underground
hip hop, old school classics and
original breaks.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM (Rock)
Open your ears and prepare for a
shock! A harmless note may make
you a fan! Hear the menacing
scourge that is Rock and Roll!
Deadlier than the most dangerous.
criminal! <bominsixtyrine@hotmal.
com>
TRANCENDANCE (Dance)
Join us in practicing the ancient
art   of   rising   above   common
thought and ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
latest trance cuts to propel us
into the domain of the mysfic-al.
<trancendance@hotmail.com>
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES (Pop/
Eclectic)
THE     VAMPIRE'S     BALL     (Goth/
Industrial/Metal)
Dark,   sinister   music   to   soothe
and/or move the Dragon's soul.
Hosted by Drake.
<thevampiresball@yahoo.ca>
VENGEANCE IS MINE (Punk)
All the best the world of punk rock
has to offer, in the wee hours of the
mom. Hosted by Trevor.
WE ALL FALL DOWN (Eclectic)
Punk    rock,    indie    pop,    and
whatever else I deem worthy.
Hosted by a closet nerd.
WENER'S BARBEQUE (Sports)
Join   fhe   sports   dept.   for   their
coverage of the T-Birds.
WIGFLUX RADIO (Reggae)
Listen to Selecta Krystabelle for your
reggae education.
WORLD HEAT (World)
An old punk rock heart considers
the oneness of all things and
presents music of worlds near
and far. Your host, the great
Daryl-ani, seeks n
<worldheat@hotmail.c
Sunday        Monday      Tuesday   Wednesday Thursday        Friday       Saturday
9
10
11
12p«
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12-
1
2
3
4
5
6
REGGAE LINKUP
(RG)
ARE YOU SERIOUS?
MUSIC (EC)
ROCKERS
SHOW(RG)
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE (RT)
AFROBEAT
(WO)
BREAKFAST WITH
THE BROWNS
m
LIONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS (EC)
ALT. RADIO (PO)
PARTS
UNKNOWN (PO)
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS (EC)
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(RT)
HIGHBRED PLEASE ROCK
VOICES (WO)       THE DOOR (EC)
THIRD TIMES
THE CHARM (RR)
FILL-IN
__C/EC]_
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(EC)
CITR NEWS* ARTS (TK)
EXQUISITE CORPSE (EX)
ANOIZE (NO)
DEMOCRACY NOW (TK)
RUMBLETONE
RADIO
MOTORDADDY
(RR)
FILL-IN
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(EC)
SWEET'N'HOT (EC)
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES (PO/EC)
WE ALL FALL DOWN (EC)
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW (TK)
RHYMES &
REASONS (HH)
FILL-IN
SKA-T'S
SCENIC DRIVE (SK)
THESE ARE THE
BREAKS (HH)
RADIO ZERO (EC)
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS (NW)
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE(RT)
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(PU)
POWERCHORD
(MT)
CODE BLUE
(RT)
9
10
11
12™
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12*m
1
2
3
4
5
6
CHIPS MIH
EfflffMN6(P0)
SAINT TROPEZ
IPO)
WENER'S BBQ (SP)
QUEER FM
(TK)
SON OF NITE
DREEMS (EC)
FLEX YOUR
HEAD(HC)
NECESSARY VOICES (TK)
AND SOMETIMES
WHY (PO/EC) (Gl)
GTR HEWS SPORTSAMP ARTS f!K)
LEO RAMIREZ SHOW (WO)
THE CANADIAN WAY
(EC)
OUR WAVE (WO)
RHYTHMSINDIA
(WO)
WIGFLUX RADIO (RG)
SALARIO MINIMO
(WO)
JUKEBOX     (TK)
ON AIR WITH
GREASED HAIR (RR)
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(DC)
FOLK OASIS (I
TRANCENDANCE
THE JAH
SHOW
(JZ)
THE LOVE
DEN
(K)
ESCAPISM
(EC)
LIVE FROM...
THUNDERBIRD HELL (LM)
PLANET LOVETRON (DC)
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(DC/EC)
ELECTRONIC
SPECTRUM
(DC)
VENGEANCE
IS MINE!
(PU)
AURAL
TENTACLES
(EC)
HANS KLOSS'
MISERY HOUR
(HK)
WORLD HEAT
(WO)
LAUGH TRACKS (IK)
I UKE THE
SCRIBBLES (EC)
PLUTONIAN
NIGHTS (DC)
FILL-IN
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
THE VAMPIRE'S
BALL (GI/MT)
EARWAX
(HH/DC)
REGGAE UNKUP (RG)
DOdance/electronic • DR-drama • EC-eclectic • EX=experimental • FR-French language • GI=goth/industrial • HC-hardcore • HH=hiphop • HK=Hans Kloss * JZ=jazz
LM-live music • LCHounge • MT-metql • NO=noise • NW-Nardwuar • PO-pop • PU-punk • RG-reggae • RR-rock • RT-roots • SK-ska • SP=sports • TK=talk • WO-world Listen, five years ago it
uncool to be playing loui
guitar. If you were makinc
was wWisa-caHled"
gies". If you were a
was on your laptop. H
avant-garde, yt .. ight have usejfe guitar "**$__ it wSS prtJ
pared and buried in the bafckgtound TJh, fife-error of I5_r
ways! Tune in and t .rn up^noisfe rockof t^SfestedJ,tttefJ:
out variety is back and ftariew #iaftipiofis (\vhd have actually
been blowing star ks for jtfars) are. SwwtJ))), Berfc>t ksi_.
Mothers and Kinski;%g^E^rxisT;^lnirnafist-rj^-gfufige
rockers. On this, their &s^8fing^tefflfc«fef|i« bombast
Kinski masterfully mi m WmtBft\d^ws^jit\6 fet fnf gut
tars do some seno^s^|hl|pf$y^eautiful l^rtrtT^^K
unlike the snarlincfrw^w.jr^^rasj;opulatJng.
CD 16.98/1
Pernice Brothers
Discover ilovelier
YouCD "
You will never bejfost on the
rocks again. In the perfectly brief I
spell that it takes for a cube of le
melt into a double of bourbon, artMmte number of comptex-
ities_|t|$ur life will be resolved, but then, inexorably, replaced
with further intricate complications. In acceptinajhis unending dynamic you are free to enjoy the metaphysical ar^^^B
thereby released—a btering transubstantiation, a quixotSc-
relaxed pose, a supine split second sense of reflection and
recognition. The life,s lesson herefitarr't fear the darkness.   -*
Put on this new batch of Joe Pernice melodies and practice
your best "Garden S&Of 2faf like meditation. After the opening reverberated chords of The® |cf s Se Surf, losing
yourself in the redemptjvs^jth of uncertainty — a foundation
not to be feared despite ftsj^hjS|j|t flp-^will be easy.
Discover a Lovelier You"—we meanW 0
CDlf^/
§jp Your Hands Say
msar
Itjpfciijgdantly clear that fed%r^fe
JilfMiMs[$fote%$__*_&k
l^ppif^fldjfeantog $ta$£*
eno^gfee^M^t^rfjd^K^lwfe a^esjSibtlrtg u&itffffi
direrti^p^F^S^ptegjja^^^n compareUto Tom Waits,
TalWnj^^^ltaAM1^telBliifi^Wten*^
Yrts© srtffftlflsi^new $e& o^^er-e^nr^a^isl^l
otfa/owtft of indie focClpitJer this _W£W_wK$ say %
ipjjftgM tts.tD)ers and veins, its intricate flesh. Even beiteJ|L
&jnsume this R8e leafy morsel, surrendering to the trip^Si
ifldwes l$&Mg|ief, images of Arcade Rre and even
Van&uvert sum They Shoot Horses, Dont Thejr? also drift
past in ISfeJgarkted {Jrej^ijrrjigf dmsfyDfiss thus out-Ls
duced 'fa.$faw_MtWs vegetable pleasurrsltfeTy betokens
a timeless percmmaT^^rJie rock always seems to bloom
anew!
melotfies nfark'ihis excellent debut from what will
stireJy'be one of tins fall's most ftlke||p|iwt?jpop acts.
Perhaps you have alreaay been turned on to ihe-"love-
ib ' hazy Ihizz associated with LondOflmfamilial bell-
Hpied shagwpfttstai^ts^^rt if not why
jrf|irVith the coolness-afOyfaa, ttt deepnesjj&. .
lithe- and the I^^^^M^nality and pro tlmilW
^Be.ot The Mamas and P^s, these Magic Numbers
iuysi'agj realty swefl, sweet$rrd deep. One listen to
the_ubJiffle 'forever tost" should tell you thatyife is'
lite ^effect music to help" ojve comfort and supjiHt to
ftfe^fe,i| this troubled time. "^
C016.98
The Juan
Frank Black
Honeycomb
CD
The siren song of
Nashville has summoned yet another shtp,s
captain to its shores, having recently called captains Bill Callahan and WfflT "*"
Oldham. But instead of breaking asindet Aiido%i
craggy protrusions beneath the otherwise «_& \
smooth surface, this little island c# ot^ebr^gjKj'-
musical bounty is welcoming wji southenj-c^^^
easiness, a friendly kind of "hojrvs it goinojr*' thafcpr
belies its legendary statu^repltino. Nashville's many
session kings, such as Stewi Cropper and Spooner
Oldham, old hand FranlelBlack (who just can't be
tpy^ejjtegh it seems) capably takes on country and
jsoaL^ftilaidback aplomb in the dusty heantt^H* -
is sweet ntujie.
Death Cab For Cutie
Drive Weil, Sleep
Carefully OWl
Less Than
Human CD
CD 19.98
H^ffthe heels ol the
killer LCD
Soundsystem debut -cprarthe next phase in the   "~
DFA's hard kick to ^leAssrfthe dance-punk music
scene! The Juan Maclean is a household name to the
many vinyl Jans tijithave been busy spinning his glorious 12-Inch wa&j$if the past two years or so. Now,
| with this mstar^tafchy and booming heavyjiljgfjt,,
debut, it's goingjjo m tetftosfy fucked out there. And
it's about time Maclean got a profile boost he was a
- member offie hafj^fljjnf^rture oriented, but now I
' almost forgstten^t JFingef Satellite (who we totally
loved then ar#stj^hls illssailably cool pedigpe
aside. Maclean's 14 mmuttylj^iriiSe With Me" is going
to be this year's best disco track. OJ^^me.opf— j
or indeed some^ing-^5s|fe»i^^(^o^et    i
mota^i machine) can so c»mptetej^neriter the j
ideal dance flrjf3p_fgor^uit Sgorn —Qur organs are
ontheouTSide^j^^^lKrecommendrlbV '.PM
j^inioipe
N^ffi^is^^oding so fast that the r^ltitufes; ■
afttl^liT^oMrJo^fll set up fleldtnlcsjisU
^^mMi(!0M^ tfirbe^ui^urcacophony of sounds. *
1 Ex^Va^uveriteAishfh«|^iBwkesihis,d_but entry |
kjdoj$&y&rM of new* Auli Jifftprovisj>d composition
v-|58i*N)a&sf; wSiAtf ^feoyaig methodCsuchj^
■ 'tcitscnption. trrfsifojfccJfr, Tfrne-stretcqtnffi' rs*? JL
iplbe^i-tisA, hasnerite extrapnlsrtion, {jtegenerabojl ^
\gr^hij|Barrerror to 4_0£S_k^_ftwo s0??8" ^&y
Tom Waits and CA8e^JJ^*«fe_ft Thorpelraw^^onO
these two sxBjgsio^oJMirae e^re sourrjl material
for this qrMSfjc amtee^fecordjfeet into Jiifee4
early. ar~
CD 14.98 «        k\
CD 16.98
^njggins
RedHaSCD
I^k In rural Connesucuif.an album recor^rbl -
Gary Higgins and friends is released on Gary's
own Nufusmoon Records. Immediately after tfo-
release, legal trouble halts all promotion and sales
momentum - eventually making the small pressing r
of Red Hash a heavily-rumored arjd much sought-
after "losf recording of psychedeif&lfejgrjfcr 2005: '
Well, thirty-two years is a bit too tong,4o> an album
tike this to remainjunheard by the masses;so Drag
City is hor^l tc'present the first-ever authorized j
Asm of Garjr Higgins' psych/folk gem Red Hash
-^mastgred directly from the original master tapes
(with two previously unheard bonus%actel£_nrJ"
packaged with photos and artwork from Gary's
personal archive. Red Hash features eleven haunting tracks of folk-pop playelf on acoustic and electric guitar and arranged with percussion, cello,  -----
flute, piano, organ, bass and mandolin. Move over
Nick Drake.
CD 16.98
E^year.^^ftr^prjpiexiSlr&^e j
^^^^^p^lfmusic docu-
mentiriet^^Kll.tTheir catalog
already includes some amazing ?^^tf|
the scenes" rockumentaries from
WHco, Low and Galaxie 500, amon^p
others. Yes, it's pretty impressive s^r
so far. But as you can see, PlexifjJjJpTtave really saved }fij|
now, With this, their most anjjelpated DVD to date, you JjB cant -|
jump into the tourj^s^piattle's famed, much-adored Death i
Cab For Cutie With plenty of kicking live footage and ajfiiselee-!
tion of special features, including rehearsals, acoustic jaftjftnterr \
views and mucho behind the scenes cool, this DVD is iMfi for'_ -
*Wfi^ home theatre library.
Chris Cunmngham
Rubber Johnny Dw^
Attention: Rubber Johnny can rtcrW-'
come hcmifrwr^yo|.^fpW ^
Records, lauded video artist Chris
Cunningham, thypt mastermind
:■ behind those awesome ftphex Twin,
Squarepusher and Bjork videos?tW^
made a new masterpiece on infrared
digital video. We won't rfjrahe plot for
you, but we can tell you that this exotic little book and DVD also
features some unbelievable photographic artwork and original
drawings from Cunningham's seemingly demented mini Rumor-
mill: when Cunningham screened Rubber Johnny at Robert De
Hire's extravagant Tribeca Film Fest, the audience was flabbergast
ed — and you wil! be, too. Music provided by one Mr. Richard D.
James, by the way.
mzS0mtmm
Exceptor - Throne CO ■f^^^_^^
Wood W^d - Jteem of the Sundnim
CO
Arcadeffre - GcAl Wind T
Bonnie Prince Billy—I Gave You CDEP
Fmit Bats-Spelled in Bones CD/LP
Variojus - Down In A Mirrow—A
Second Trib. To Jandek CD
WiMieltelson-Countryman CD/LP
Various-Blank Field cofeatures
Francisco Lopez
Derek Bailey - Guitar CD
Kid 606-Resilience
Current 93-How I devoured
Apocalypse Balloon CD
Reigning Sound - Live At Maxwells CD
New Order - Jetstream CDEP
Interpol - Antics 2CD (limited version)
SALE PRICES IN EFFECT UNTIL AUGUST 31, 2005
Rock Phot
lugust 6th to SejHmbBf28|R;
KZCO-RV3
Zulu Records
^!-1976W4thAve
Vancouver. BC
tel 604|^ra^^g^
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Hon to Wed   10:30-7=00
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00
24 DiSCORDER - July 2005

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