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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Mar 1, 1986

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 ^s."*
That Magazine from CITR fml02 cable 100
March 1986 • FREE March
7/8 FRANK FRINK FIVE
14/15 Record Release Party
SOREHEADS & OMNISQUID
21/22  UNIT E plus LINEAR B
28/29 BIG ELECTRIC CAT w/guests
I LIVE MUSIC IN THE LOUNGE I
I   FRIDAYS FROM 10:30-SATURDAYS FROM 11:30 P.M.    !
ARTS CLUB THEATRE   1181 SEYMOUR   683-0151
From hand-drums
to hi-tech...
\iA
with Vancouver's
hottest percussionists!
MARCH 13, 14,15 • 8:30 PM
TIX: 254-9578
The Wallflower Order presents
1H£ MNCe
WQAPE *
MARCH 18 - 22 • 8 PM
TIX:  VECC 254-9578 • VTC/CBO 280-4444
Front Row Centre 683-2017 • Folk Music
Festival • Black Swan and Highlife Records
VANCOUVER EAST CULTURAL CENTRE
1895 Venables at Victoria Dr. DfcORDER
That Magazine from CITR fml02 cabielOO
March 1986 • Vol. 4 No. 2
Editor
Chris Dafoe
Contributors
Don Chow, Kandace Kerr, Bill Mullan,
Mark Mushet, Larry Thiessen,
CD, Lane D. Hartwell, Kevin Smith,
Jerome Broadway, Iain Bowman,
Photos
Dave Jacklyn, Mi la Geran
Cartoons
Chris Pearson, R. Filbrant
Cover
Bruce Walther
Production Manager
Pat Carroll
Design
Harreson At ley
Layout
Randy Iwata. Alan Scales. Pat Carroll.
Toby Thiersch. Karen Shea. David Hart.
Robin Razzell
Program Guide
CD, PC
Typesetting
Dena Corby
Advertising Representatives
David Hart, Robin Razzell
Distribution Manager
Mike Johal
Business Manager
Mike Dennis
DISCORDER, c/o CITR Radio, 6138 SUB Blvu.,
Vancouver, B.C., V6T 2A5. Phone (604) 228-3017.
DISCORDER Magazine is published monthly
by the Student Radio Society of the University of
British Columbia (CITR-UBC Radio).
CITR fm 101.9 cablelOO.l broadcasts a 49-watt
signal in stereo throughout Vancouver from Gage
Towers on the UBC campus. CITR is also available via FM cable in Vancouver, West Vancouver,
North Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Maple Ridge
and Mission.
DISCORDER circulates 15,000 free copies. For
advertising and circulation inquiries call 228-3017
and ask for station manager Nancy Smith.
Twelve-month subscriptions available: $10 in
Canada, $10 U.S. in the U.S.A., $15 overseas.
Send cheque or money order payable to CITR
Publications.
Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, cartoons and graphics are welcome but they can be
returned only if accompanied by a self-addressed,
stamped envelope. DISCORDER does not assume
responsibility for unsolicited material.
The offices of CITR and DISCORDER are
located in room 233 of the UBC's Student Union
Building. For general business inquiries or to book
the CITR Mobile Sound System call 228-3017 and
ask for station manager Nancy Smith. The Music-
Request line is 228-CITR.
16
12
14
17
20
22
In This Issue
U-Men
Lane D. Hartwell sees the U-Men in their
underwear. She is, not surprisingly, amused.
Skeleton Crew
Mark Mushet bites down to the bone with Fred
Frith. Tom Cora and Zeena Parkins.
CITWDiscorder Listener/Reader
Survey
The last chance to make your feelings known
about Radio Hell and this humble little rag. And
this month we actually tell you where to drop
them off. Don't blow it, punk.
In Every Issue
Airhead
Memos, gripes, stamp-collecting, flyers, limited
time free offers.
Behind the Dial
MASSIVE Programming changes, New Shows, and
other fun stuff from behind the green door.
On The Dial
A new name and new look, but the same old
reliable guide to the wonders of FM 102 Cable 100.
Vinyl Verdict
Faith No More, Big Audio Dynamite, Paul Dolden
and more...
Armchair Eye
Space Shuttle — The Movie! Bill Mullan gets a
jump on the competition.
Roving Ear
Emma Peel discovers the other side of black
leather and London. DSCORDER
rhSajs
After   browsing   through   Vox
(CJSW's magazine) I find Discorder a more independent alternative
with more to say about the local
aMK^y^^wy^y^s*^ scene. One reason may be the
superior music being developed in
Puppy Tush
About K**** Tong's letter in January's Discorder. He's absolutely
right!! The most valid point he
made and certainly the one that
got me steamed up enough to write
this letter is regarding Skinny
Puppy.
Skinny Puppy started out as a
great sub-culture band. Although
much of their stage show and
reputation are arguable pretentious, it harmlessly lives out the
ghoulish "vampire/death rock"
fantasy.
Now, however, it seems most of
the newer "puppy people" are
teenage girls who are only out to
ogle Nivek (Kevin) Ogre's precious
buttocks. Not that he doesn't have
a lovely derriere, or that it's their
fault, but the sight of all those
gawdawful trendies at their last gig
made me want to run out and throttle each and every one of those
c/o CITR Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T2A5
"shaker babies."
I just don't know how much
longer some of us can stand it. I
cannot help but think twice before
admitting any association with
them anymore. Sorry Kevin, Kevin
& Bill, but it had to be said. Let's
hope that no more of our glorious
sub-culture bands are zapped up
the way we seem to have lost
Skinny Puppy.
Yours Sub-Culturally,
I. CORRUPTION
Foreign Mail
Howdy CITRites
Just a note from your subscriber
somewhere in Alberta.
Your counterpart in Calgary,
CJSW is celebrating a birthday
(1st) and distributing stickers promoting their station. Is CITR? If so,
I would appreciate one or two to
CITRize my life in the oil patch. If
not, how about starting for all your
listeners and readers.
Vancouver as compared to Calgary. Maybe someday...(doubtful).
Til then the Vancouver music
scene cannot be rivaled. Keep up
your superior reporting.
Thanks
Brian A. Pratt
Cancelled!?
Dear Airhead,
I suppose if CITR does take Party With Me Punker off the air it will
be because everybody assumes
the show is only directed at bristle-
headed dopes from PoCo and that
it isn't really worth the bother.
Well, I think we should give Party With Me Punker and Mike Dennis a little more credit than that. In
fact, I think the show serves as a
good primer of punk rock, with its
continual looks back at pioneer
bands like the MC5, the Heart-
breakers and the Dead Boys.
All the impressionable little
mohawks and johnny-come-latelies
out there might need reminding
that Punk Rock didn't begin with
GBH, don't you think? Party With
Me Punker probably does 'em a bit
of good anyway by keeping the
little darlings away from He Man
and Transformers.
At any rate, I think that Party
With Me Punker is a mainstay of
CITR, as necessary as the Rockers
Show, Music of Our Time and all
the other specialized programs. It
serves a function and if taken off
the air will be definitely missed.
Even though I'm not a hardcore aficionado, I consider it to be one of
CITR's better programs.
Yours truly,
Guy Montrose
Guy, thank you for your letter of concern. We'd change our mind but for
one factor: we never intended to
cancel PWMP in the first place.
Needless to say, your letter caught
us by surprise.
We put Rumour Control on the
matter—here's what they came up
with. Mike Dennis has (gasp!) found
gainful employment for the summer,
making it impossible for him to do
the show from April to September.
He mentioned this on-air one day
and allowed that the show may
have to be cancelled as a result.
Since then, however, an intensive
search for a replacement host has
been undertaken. Any interested
parties may contact Mike by writing
c/o CITR, 6138 SUB Blvd, UBC,
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 2A5.
£0 ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
SUNTANNING
10 Sessions — $39
HAIR STYLING
15% off any hair service with
presentation of ad. Expires Mar. 31
5784 University Blvd.        Ph. 224-1922
(in UBC Village) 224-9116
BIG  BROTHERS
proudly present
THE ROYAL CANADIAN
AMI FA!<§!
AT  THE  ORPHEUM
FRIDAY,  APRIL  4th,   1986
Tickets $10/$12/$14 at VTC/CBO COLLECTORS
KP.to.
A DIVISION OF:
COLLECTORS
R.P.M.
TELEPHONE:
(604) 685-6041
MUSEUM
456 SEYMOUR ST., VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA V6B 3H1
BUY - SELL - TRADE
NEW - USED - IMPORT - DOMESTIC
OPEN
MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY, FRIDAY
SATURDAY
10-6
10-9
10-6
watch for GRAND OPENING of new store
AT 2528 MAIN STREET IN MARCH DISCORDER
MEET JOHN BIGLEY, SINGER
for Seattle band, the U-Men.
He's dressed in black, a bandana wrapped around his head
d\rate-style, and a string of beads around his
neck, sitting quietly in a chair, sipping a
oeer. He looks more like a puppy dog than
a frontman for a rock band: shy, apprehensive, a little lost. Five minutes later, though,
he disappears for a moment, and then
comes back and climbs onto the stage, sans
pants. Gone is the quiet John Bigley; replacing him is a raving lunatic who stomps
across the stage in a pair of baggy white
knee-length Fruit-of-the-Loom briefs. He
parades around like a cheap stripper, howling into the microphone while the band
pounds away behind him. Somehow,
though, he still seems childlike and innocent
even while he's acting like a total wild man.
It's quite an act, but it's not an act at all.
The U-Men have been around for five
years and have two records under their belt.
The first, an eponymous six-song EP released on Seattle's Bombshelter Records (another store-turned-record-label) in 1984 was
critically acclaimed and has now sold out its
limited pressing. Stop Spinning, the band's
latest effort, is another six-song ER this time
on cool New York indie label, Homestead.
Stop Spinning clearly shows that they've improved stylistically and as musicians. The
first record was easily identifiable as punk;
the second one is more unclassifiable as
they've moved into their own original territory. Recently the U-Men have toured across
the continent, getting good receptions practically everywhere, and in New York City they
packed out the world-famous Danceteria
nightclub.
But they're far from being stars—Bigley
still has to buy his underpants at Goodwill.
"They're very comfortable," he says. "I have
two pair. They were brand new, they were
these factory mishaps. There were no labels
and the stitching was all fucked up. Fifty
cents a throw for spankin' new knee-length
briefs."
The new record is a little hard to get into;
the rhythms are strange, the melodies are
quirky, and Bigley's growls and yelps effectively mask the cryptic lyrics. But after a
listen or two and a look at the lyric sheet,
things become clearer. There's an odd kind
of primitiveness to their songs, as if they
were making soundtracks for post-nuclear
tribal rituals. Guitarist Tom Price makes all
kinds of weird and wonderful noises without
using a single effects pedal. Bassist Jim Tillman and drummer Charlie Ryan are a heck
of a rhythm section, driving the band along
with their body-shaking beat stuff. There's
nothing quite like them, but the band admits
they feel a certain kinship with bands like
the Butthole Surfers and Scratch Acid. All
in all, it's a brilliant and unusual record, full
of subtle hooks and mysterious depths.
When at home in Seattle the band has no
problem drawing people to their shows, but
that isn't the case here in Vancouver. Although the U-Men wiped the floor with the
highly-overrated Replacements at the Commodore this December, only a handful of
people turned up at their return gig at the
Town Pump a few weeks ago. But they played great for the three people who were
dancing.
"I think it's interesting," said a frustrated
Ryan after the show. "Most of the time we
have like 500 maniacs hammering nails into
their foreheads when we play, and when we
come here they just sit in the corner and
clap."
PERHAPS PEOPLE DIDN'T DANCE
because the band is so interesting
to watch. They run around, they
dance, they act like idiots. Tillman peers out
from under a shock of straight blond hair as
he plays his bass, Price kicks up the heels
of his worn cowboy boots and does a dorky
sort of squaredance, while Ryan wears a
funny black top hat as he bashes away at his
drum. There is never a dull moment watching this band. They look sharp, they look
cool—Tillman says that they're fashionable CITR fm 102 cable 100
Lane Hartwell
catches Seattle's
alphabet men
with their
pants down.
Dave Jacklin's
shutter sticks.
"in a retarded sort of way'—but they're
natural and spontaneous about everything.
They put their music first, not their haircuts.
The U-Men have already begun recording
material for a new release, but they're unsure what form the next record will take. It
may be an EP or it may be an LP, depending
on their budget and how many songs they
have ready. The band doesn't have a firm
commitment to Homestead Records—their
existing deal only covers Stop Spinning—
but they seem confident that something will
fall into place, although they're deliberately
vague when talking about the offers they've
received. In the near future, they're trying to
set up a tour of western Canada for the
spring. "I want to play in Hudson's Bay and
be heard in New York," Tillman says. "Satellite?" someone asks. "No," he replies, "big
PA."
Right now the U-Men are more concerned with playing their own music their own
way than with panting after commercial success. Only one of the four of them has a day
job, but they seem to have the determination needed to lead a life where they have
to buy their underwear at Goodwill. They'll
be travelling in their rickety old school bus
for a while yet, and, hey, maybe next time
they swing through town a few more of you
can shell out a couple of bucks to check
them out. You won't be disappointed.
Schlondorff's
THE TIN DRUM
9:30 Fri. Mar. 28 - Sun. Mar.
with 1984 @ 7:20
Eisenstein's
BATTLESHIP   POTEMKIN
7:00 Mon. Mar. 10-Tues. Mar. 11
with  REDS   @   8:15
30
*|
Break   new   ground.
Discorder   Magazine...
very   effective   advertising.
Call   228-3017. Talk   to   Robin   or   Dave. WCAT
PRODUCTIONS
^    •   ►
Q: How do you make a wild mood swing?
A   RHYTHM   MISSION
with special voodoobilly guests
THE    U-MEN
Wednesday, March 12, 1986 • 9 P.M.
LUV-A-FAIR    1275 SEYMOUR STREET
^ • ►
Your Sundays may never be the same!
SKINNY  PUPPY
in a major theatrical performance.
ARTS CLUB THEATRE    GRANVILLE ISLAND
Sunday, March 30, 1986
Tickets: VTC/CBO and Usual Outlets
Refreshments Available • Bring I.D.
Lounge Opens 6:30 P.M.
Show Starts 8:00 P.M.
Direct from Holland
CHANNEL ONE KLUB
proudly present
EDWARD    KA-SPEL
founder of the
LEGENDARY    PINK    DOTS
In Residence, April 8-9-10, 1986
Tickets: $6.00 Advance at Usual Locations
CHANNEL ONE KLUB    860 DENMAN STREET
    ^ • ►   	
#1
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PRESENTS
--*?n;^=-a=a FORMERLY NG3
iiwoml MijtoftirY-^T?
MARCH
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EDGE 1225 HOMER AT DAVIE ALL AGES WELCOME
DOORS 8 0CL0CK TICKETS $5.00
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For private bookings, fund raisers. ^C
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THE WILD SIDE         Open to toe public from T am-5 am ^ CITR fm 102 cable 100
Mark Mushet discusses Anatomy
with Skeleton Crew
T
I red liith
HINK HARD. WHEN WAS THE
last time you saw a performance
that really warranted FOUR encores? Having a rough time?
Thought so. Thursday, January 30th, 1986.
The Savoy saw three people, a skeleton
crew at best, hold a capacity audience captive from start to extended finish. Fred Frith,
Tom Cora, and Zeena Parkins are all of
special collaborative note in the American
new music improv scene and each possess
a lengthy list of individual credentials that
includes the likes of Henry Cow, Art Bears,
Curlew, News from Babel, Material (and on
the OAO stable), David Moss, John Zorn,
Etron Fou Leloublan, etc.
In this instance, the three of them comprise the latest manifestation of Skeleton
Crew, a group which formerly consisted of
just Fred and Tom. Though the duo was
very good, the new three-piece version is
tighter, more coherent, and even more
dazzling to watch.
Skeleton Crew have often been characterized as an "avant-folk improv group." As
far as labels go, I haven't anything better
to offer so we'll take it from that point. Over
the course of an evening's performance,
Skeleton Crew will indulge in a wanton display of "political art noise" and then pro- DISCORDER
ceed to execute a brilliant seque into, say,
a Kashmiri folk song. There is a strong folk
element in much of the group's music, if only because of the members' interest in folk
and ethnic musics and their offshoots.
To this writer's ear, Skeleton Crew seems
like a logical extension of folk traditions.
Perhaps this is what contemporary folk is
all about. Folk music has evolved over the
centuries in large part due to a certain
amount of improvisation. Thus it would
make sense that in this most turbulent of
centuries, its various forms would undergo
some pretty massive transformations.
Fred is not short of thoughts on the subject. "What does 'folk music' really mean
anymore? I don't think folk music can ever
have the same significance for us now,
looking back in retrospect. A lot of the folk
music that people are influenced by these
days is very much a Western ossification
of something that doesn't really exist anymore. It is something that is very clearly an
aspect of imperialism, if you like. We would
really like certain cultures to have a certain
kind of music and in fact, that music for
them is more of a museum piece and is not
alive anymore but they keep it alive because they know that Western people are
interested in it. In a way we want to preserve
something because we want to feel that
there are other people who are pure and
simple and not like the way we are: corrupt
and kind of speeded up. Folk music, where
it exists, is done by people who are doing
it to entertain .each other in the best possible way."
Zeena interjects. "They go out to a farm
and they come back to have something to
drink and play a couple of numbers. It's not
done to prove anything."
As I recall, people were drinking that
night and many, one could assume, were
doing so after a hard day's work. I didn't feel
the group was out to prove anything either.
Some distinctions still need to be made.
Fred continues, "As soon as we start taking elements of other people's music and
start putting them into shows where we
travel around getting paid for doing it in
front of people, it's got nothing to do with
where it came from. In a way I have a lot
of trouble with that approach to music. I do
it because I enjoy playing it but I don't
always feel comfortable doing that."
As far as the element
of exploration is
concerned, it's got
more to do with how
we work together
than how we work
as individuals.
Frith is best known for his adventurous
approach to the guitar. There are many
legendary performances on record and on
record, if you know what I mean. The same
holds true for Tom, though his instruments
of preference are the cello and bass. Unfortunately, there is not much of Zeena's marvelous harp and accordion work to be heard
on vinyl. This will soon change. As you
might guess, each is very much concerned
with exploration of sound. Fred elaborates:
"As far as the element of exploration is concerned, it's got more to do with how we
work together than how we work as individuals. What I'm doing at the moment in
Skeleton Crew has nothing to do with exploration at all. I play the guitar completely
conventionally from start to finish. It's got
more to do with how the group puts all the
material together, how it all meshes, how
we all manage to play several instruments
at the same time and the kind of rhythmic
tension we create in doing so."
To many, it is the novelty of Skeleton
Crew, the fact that each member tends to
play more than one instrument at any given
time during a performance that makes
them so noteworthy. Without a doubt, this
makes the group's live performances something of a spectacle in terms of a concert
presentation. CTR fm 102 cabe 100
This is, however, not a circus. It goes
much deeper than that as Tom goes on to
explain. "One of the exciting things about
playing the drums at the same time you're
playing another instrument is that it forces
you to redefine the role of the other instrument. You start to find that the guitar, the
cello, the bass, and the organ take on percussive and rhythmic characteristics that
make for a completely different rhythmic
structure of the songs."
struments or organ that he's playing with
a drumstick. It's really a limb approach. The
basis of a lot of our songs is the collectiva-
tions of our limbs as a drumming ensemble. We replace the drums with other
sounds. What we're dong is not that unusual."
I don't think Skeleton Crew are all that
unusual either, but try and explain that to
your average fan of top-forty rock. An audience accustomed to musical virtuosity in
Frith continues:"Very often, the strong
parts of the material that we're working on
comes from a rhythmic basis and that's an
area in which there's a lot of potential for
improvement and experimentation whilst
still retaining the idea of doing "songs." The
songs we're doing very often have a very
conventional harmonic structure; the way
they become something other than "ordinary" songs is partly because of the way the
rhythm works. It's so completely different
from the way that any other group would do
it. The rhythmic counterpoint between all
the different lines gives it a kind of intensity."
Yes, sad but true. Most of us are completely enslaved to the standard Western
notion of rhythm, "common time," 4/4 rock
'n' roll. But the question remains. Can
Skeleton Crew save us from the almighty
thudbeat? Mr. Tom Cora: "I don't think it's
so much a matter of time signatures as
much as the orchestration of more and
unusual rhythms. You take a drummer and
all the things a drummer normally does.
You take what the right foot normally does
and instead of it being just a high-hat or
bass drum, it's some voices on tape that
come up everytime. Instead of his left hand
being the snare, he's got some string in-
the arena would be more than taken aback
at a Skeleton Crew show, especially if you
told them that they were all excellent musicians in their own right. To the uninitiated,
the words "unbridled cacophony" might
rise to the lips. This would be unfair. Tom
explains it from his point of view: "A bass
player would probably not think to play a
bass part as simple, perhaps, as I have to
because I'm playing the drums at the same
time. Sometimes the parts are simplified
because we're doing two things at once."
With Skeleton Crew, the annoying "virtuoso" aspect of a performance involving
accomplished players is virtually tossed out
the window. "It's a different kind of virtuosity..." starts Frith. Cora continues: "You work
on your craft and what you do. Maybe because there's not one person sitting there
playing lead guitar or playing bass it does,
in effect, get thrown out the window."
When the group last toured as a duo, one
review likened a Skeleton Crew performance to the image of two men bringing a
sinking ship into port for a hero's welcome.
This time around, with an extra crew
member, not only did they bring it in for a
hero's welcome, but there wasn't even the
suggestion that it had sprung a leak in the
first place.
—Mark Mushet
From March 18th
MOTHERS
AND FATHERS
By Joseph Musaphia
New Zealand's
funniest comedy
at
CITY STAGE
751 Thurlow St.
8:30 Mon. - Sat,
5:30 Sat. (2 for 1)
Tix: VTC/CBO 280-3311
Reservations 688-1436
CAROUSEL THEATRE
PRESENTS
V**^°
\
MODERN
DRESS
LIMITED RUN
March19io29
^.s*
^\^
V
Benefit for
Carousel Theatre
March 18
7:30
9:30 p.m.
BOTH AT
Waterfront Theatre
ADVANCE   TICKETS
685-6217 BE
DIAL
The Mole had been working very hard
all the morning, spring-cleaning his little
home. First with brooms, then with dusters;
then on ladders and steps and chairs, with
a brush and a pail of whitewash; till he had
dust in his throat and eyes and splashes
of whitewash all over his black fur, and an
aching back and weary arms. Spring was
moving in the air above and in the earth
below and around him, penetrating even
his dark and lowly little house with its spirit
of divine discontent and longing.
from Wind In The Willows,
by Kenneth Grahame
LIKE GRAHAME'S MOLE, we at CITR have
chosen spring as the time to do a little house-
cleaning; the time to put the odds and ends in
order, to put a new face on things. The result of
this spring fever is a revamped CITR programming schedule: more orderly, less anarchic, and,
DISCORDER
we think, easier for you, the listener, to follow.
The changes were planned in early February.
Armed with preliminary Listener Survey results
(and the counsel of a number of well-known
psychics) and with the goal of simplifying CITR's
programming schedule a crack team of CITR
programmers sequestered themselves in a motel
room in Boston Bar. They emerged, bleary eyed,
several days later with the following changes:
— High Profiles, CITR's Monday to Friday bio-
in-a-box moves from 8:00 to 12:00 p.m.
— The CITR Dinner Report moves from 6:00
to 5:00 p.m.
— Every weekday morning at 10:30 CITR ventures into the world of current and cultural affairs
with five different public affairs programs. Featured programs include:
Monday — Soundtrak: a compelling mixture
of words, music and sound with your host ESI.
Tuesday — UBC Weekly: life behind the ivy
curtain is explored by our intrepid reporters.
Wednesday — Vancouver Institute: We bring
you speakers of international stature recorded at
the Vl's long-running Saturday night lecture
series.
Thursday — UBC Amnesty International and
Students for a Democratic University: focus
on human rights and student issues on alternating weeks.
Friday — Friday Magazine: The White Wolf
(a.k.a. Kirby Hill) sniffs out the scoop on a variety
of issues.
Most of our specialty music programs have
moved to 8:00 p.m. weeknights. The Monday to
Friday line-up includes:
Monday — The Blues Show: a new show
featuring the best of traditional and contemporary
blues, with your host Eric Von Schlippen.
Tuesday — The Folk Show: Steve Edge
relocates from Saturday morning hangover land
to prime time with the best in folk music.
Wednesday — The African Show: Todd
Langmuir, Patrick Onucwulu and Dido bring you
African music, news and special features.
Thursday — Top of the Bops: host Mark
Bonko explores the roots and seeds of rock 'n
roll.
Friday — Soul Galore: Ann Devine and Fiona
MacKay follow the winding path of Black American popular music, from doo-wop to funk with
stops in between.
Other changes include: The Early Music
Show moves to Saturday morning 8:00 -10:00
a.m. from Sunday late nights; Party With Me
Punker, Power Chord and Just Like Women all
start one hour earlier than before — Party With
Me Punker 3:00 - 5:00; Power Chord 3:30 -
5:00; Just Like Women 5:15 - 6:00; Speculum
moves to Friday 5:30 - 6:00 p.m., from Sunday
nights.
Your comments are welcomed on these programming changes. (Yes, even if you like them.)
We think they allow us to better serve you, the
listener. We hope you agree.
New on the 'R
MARCH SEES THE DEBUT of three new shows
on CITR.
Michael Wilmore's Rock Talk joins CITR after
stops at CFRO and the CBC. Wilmore, an authority on the history of Vancouver music, explores
the roots of rock 'n' roll every Sunday afternoon
from 3:00-6:00 p.m.
The Blues Show (hey, we could call it something else, but people might get confused, right?)
To ERR is Human . . . To SIN,
Q 7L:
A VERY SPECIAL PERFORMANCE
RESCHEDULED TO WED. MAR 5
AT THE LUV-A-FAIR
TICKETS AT VTC/CBO AND ALL USUAL OUTLETS
Plus Divine Videos All Evening!
CREATE YOUR OWN ILLUSION
AT THE
BALL OF CONFUSION
GRAND OPENING
MARCH 1ST, 1986
315 W. CORDOVA ST.
GASTOWN    PH. 689-1195 CITR fm 102 cable 100
with host Eric von Schlippen, will mine the
motherlode of American music, from the traditional to the contemporary. What does a nice
white boy wearing rubber boots know about the
blues? Tune in Mondays at 8:00 p.m. and find
out.
Do you enjoy the thrust and parry of a good
argument? Do you like to listen as the thin veneer
of civiliation erodes under the pressure of the moment? Tune in to The CITR Debates every Monday at 5:30 as moderator Brent Kane tries to
keep the two sides from ripping each other to
shreds.
CITR Listeners Survey
Have you been walking around for the last
month with a copy of the CITR Discorder Listener
Reader Survey in your back pocket and a vague
feeling that you'd been left out of something?
Don't worry, you can cancel the appointment with
the doctor. It's not your fault.
No, it's ours (gasps of disbelief at the unprecedented admission of fallibility by Discorder staff).
Yup, we screwed up. We, uh, forgot to tell you{
where to drop the surveys off. Sorry. It won't hap-'
pen again.
So, let's give it one more try for the Gipper. OK,
not for the Gipper then. How about for Mel
Brewer? Mel Torme? Mel Blanc? Anyway, please
fill out the survey on page 14 of this magazine,
then deposit it in one of the convenient boxes
located at: Zulu Records, Odyssey Imports, Collectors RPM, Cabbages and Kinx or Octopus
Books East. Or you can send it to CITR at Room
233, 6138 SUB Blvd., UBC, V6T 2A5.
CITR Presents...
Coming to the mysterious and sometimes
daunting S.U.B. Ballroom at U.B.C. March 7th,
Grapes of Wrath, Moev and Fourth Floor! And
not only are they coming, but they'll be bringing
instruments and playing music, too! And you're
invited! You have to pay, of course, but not too
much! And you're still invited if you can't legally
consume alcohol! Yes, that's right, an all-ages
show! Oh, except 24. You definitely can't come
if you're 24. Oh, all right, you can come, just
make sure you behave yourself.
Mecca
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Fox & Fluevog Boots & Shoes Ltd. 852 Granville Street. Vancouver British Columbia V6K1K3 688-2828
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PRESENTS SPECIAL
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11:30-11    Mon. -Thurs.
11:30-1     Friday
12-1    Saturday
5-10    Sunday Eve. cinnR
Listener/Reader Survey
Age  DISCORDER
Sex   MDFD
Are you a student of: UBC □
Other Post-Secondary Institution □
High School □
Life □
None of the above D
Have you listened to CITR? Yes D No D
Do you normally listen on: 102 FM □   Cable 100 FM D
How often do you listen? Once a month □
Once a week □   Few days a week □
Daily □    Never □
Are you having problems picking up CITR? Yes D No D
What are your feelings towards the following CITR
features: (Rate on a scale of 1 - 5, 5 being "enjoy
immensely" and 1 being "avoid like the plague.")
Regular Music Programming	
News	
Live Sports Broadcasts	
Public Affairs programming	
High Profiles	
PSAs	
Music of Our Time	
Soul Galore	
Fast Forward	
Jazz Show	
UBC Weekly _>__.
Top of the Bops	
Power Chord	
Neofile	
Generic Reviews	
No commercials	
Rockers (Reggae Show).
African Show	
Folk Show	
Just Like Women	
Party With Me Punker _
Mel Brewer Presents	
Big Show	
Propaganda!	
Do you enjoy listening to CITR's regular programming
more or less than you did: 1 year ago: More □ Less □
2 years ago: More □ Less □
What other radio stations do you listen to?
CFRO (Co-op Radio) □    CBC AM □    CBC FM □
Top 40 FM Radio (please specify)	
Top 40 AM Radio (please specify)	
Do you tape music or other items from CITR? (We won't
tell, promise.)   Yes □    No □'
DISCORDER
Where do you pick up Discorder?
Point Grey □ Downtown □ West End □ Gastown □
Kitsilano □ East End □ South Van □ North Shore □
Richmond □ Surrey □ New Westminster □
How many people read each copy?
Just meD2D3D4D
What aspects of Discorder would you like to see more
or less of?
Airhead: More □ Less □
Behind the Dial: More □ Less □
Vinyl Verdict: More □ Less □
Demo Derby: More □ Less □
Armchair Eye: More □ Less □
Roving Ear: More □ Less D
Music Features: More □ Less □
Local Music Features: More □ Less □
Non-music Features: More □ Less □
Cartoons: More D Less □
Do you refer to the Program Guide in Discorder before
tuning in to CITR?
Yes D No D
Would you be willing to pay for Discorder? (Just asking.)
Yes D No D
And under what circumstances?
more pages □ to benefit CITR □ less advertising D
Which of the following would you like to see in
Discorder?
DJ Profiles □ Local Gossip Column □
Book Reviews □
Political and/or Social Commentary □
Stories dealing with student issues D
Broader Arts coverage (dance, theatre, etc.) □
Comments about CITR or Discorder:
NOW WHERE??
Deposit your completed surveys at the boxes located at:
Zulu Records 1869 W. 4th Ave.
Odyssey Imports 866 Granville St.
Cabbages and Kinx 306 W. Cordova
Octopus Books East 1146 Commercial
Collectors RPM 456 Seymour St.
FREE RECORDS!!!
Simply by scrawling your name and phone number on your completed Survey, you become eligible to win a complete collection
of releases from Nettwerk, Zulu, or Undergrowth Records, plus a
copy of the 1986 BLACKBOOK. Remember, one entry per person. ON
"THE
DIAL
CTR fm 102 cable 100
10 Mar.   Art Blakey and the Jazz
Messengers 1985 album Live at the
Sweet Basil.
17 Mar.   What else on St. Patrick's Day but a
famous Jazz Musician of Irish descent? Baritone saxophonist Gerry
Mulligan's What Is There To Say?
24 Mar.  Harold Floyd Brooks was a great
saxophonist who recorded for Blue
Note between 1958-1961. We feature
some unreleased recordings.
31 Mar.   Catwalk, a new album from guitarist
Emily Remler.
WEEKDAY REGULARS
7:30 am    Sign-On
8:00 am    WAKE-UP REPORT
News, sports and weather.
10:00 am BREAKFAST REPORT
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEW and INSIGHT.
12:00 pm HIGH PROFILE.
1:00 pm   LUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
>\ Hi pm    AFTERNOON SPORTSBREAK
l-M) pm    DINNER MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather followed
oy GENERIC REVIEWS  INSIGHT ana
a DAILY FEATURE
4:00 am    Sign-Off
WEEKDAY HIGHLIGHTS
MONDAYS
SOUNDTRAK
10:30-11:30 am
Dear Mom: Sorry for not writing sooner. The
weather's okay, I'm not married yet, but I do
get to sleep in on Monday morning now. In
March, I'll be pulling some poetry out of the
Downtown Eastside of Van. Love, your son.
CITR DEBATES
5:30-6:00 pm
Brent Kane hosts the logical successor to
rock wrestling.
THE BLUES SHOW
8:00-9:00 pm
Can blue men sing the whites? Join host
Eric Von Schlippen to find out.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00 pm-12:30 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time Jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview, and local music news.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
03 Mar.   Andrew Hill's classic albumt Point
of Departure.
TUESDAYS
UBC WEEKLY
10:30-11:00 am
A new show dealing with issues of concern
to students at UBC.
THE FOLK SHOW
8:00-9:30 pm
It's Tuesday night, there's nothing on TV,
nothing to do. So, CITR fills the void by
transplanting the Folk Show from the Saturday morning hangover-recovery slot right into
prime-time. Host Steve Edge presents a foot-
stomping mix of Celtic & Rogue-Folk, as well
as traditional music from around the world.
Featured artists during the month are:
04 Mar.  The Pogues. We have a studio
guest, Tom Bishop, a leading Pogue-
Maniac to explain how he survived
some of their gigs.
11 Mar.   Clive Gregson. Formerly with Any
Trouble & Richard Thompson's Big
Band, he now has a fine solo debut
LP Strange Persuasions.
18 Mar.   Silly Wizard. Stupid name, great
band. Highlights of their latest 2 LPs
recorded live in Cambridge,
Massachusetts.
25 Mar.  Billy Bragg. The big-nosed cockney
bard has starred in many Folk
Festivals in Europe in recent
months, and some of his songs
have been adopted by U.K. Folkies.
Is he really a folk singer?
BUNKUM OBSCURA
9:30-11:00 pm
A variety show of sorts, from time to time
there will be live in-studio interviews, perhaps
some poetry reading, music, of course, etc.
Bunkum latin (n) Bullshit
Obscura latin (adj) hidden
LOVE PEACE AND VIOLENCE
11:00-1:00 am
An earnest effort to resolve 7,000 years of
passion, sedation and empty threats (read
civilization), featuring live sex, tape loops,
simulated drug taking and lots of normal
music. "Some things are so stupid that they
must be done." E. Raoul
PLAYLOUD
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Caput reproborum et caput omniam malorum
(Trans.: Listen to Playloud in the final spasms
of pain of destruktion.) Aural Surgeon: Larry
Thiessen
/EDNESDAYS
VANCOUVER INSTITUTE LECTURES
10:30-11:30 am
05 Mar.  Prof. Michael Smith on Genetic
Engineering—1986
12 Mar.   Dean Victoria Fromkin on Brain.
Mind and Language
19 Mar.   Canadian U.N. Ambassador
Stephen Lewis on The United Nations: What Does the Future Hold
26 Mar.  Martin Goldfarb on the Role of Polling in Canadian Society
JUST LIKE WOMEN
5:15-6 pm
Woman, heal thyself with Ann and Lil's
remedy for the Old Boys' Network: an hour of
news, interviews, and music. A shot in the
arm for all women, and for any man who
likes them.
THE AFRICAN SHOW
8:00-9:30 pm
A program featuring African music and
culture with hosts Todd Langmuir, Patrick
Onukwulu and Dido. Tune in for the latest
news from Africa, plus special features at
5:00 pm.
THE KNIGHT AFTER
Midnight to 4:00 am
Music to clobber Yuppies by—featuring radio
shows traded with alternative stations in
Europe and the U.S. This show will really
mess up your BMW!
THURSDAYS
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL/
STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC
UNIVERSITY
10:30-11:00 (alternating weeks)
PARTY WITH ME, PUNKER!
4:00-6:00 pm
A new time slot for this two-hour show which
specializes in music described, for the lack
of a better word, as "punk rock." But it can
mean anything from the alcohol-rock of the
Replacements to the brutal thrash of D.R.I.
and anything in between. With your hosts
Mike Dennis and Andrea Gamier.
06 Mar.  Guest Host Maria from Spuzzum
13 Mar.   Live Husker Du
20 Mar.   Live Minutemen
27 Mar.   Early U.K. Punk Bands
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00-9:00 pm
Oh boy! Do I have a treat in store for you this
month: on the 13th, Gerard Van Herk and
Tony Dewald of Montreal's Deja Voodoo will
be in to play a selection of the coolest and
ghouliest of their faves. On the 27th, I shall
be featuring a tribute to the golden throats
of rock "n" roll, the vocal groups. How do you
spell a cappela??
MEL BREWER PRESENTS
11:00 pm-Midnight
A distinct lack of gossip relating to the local
music scene has been noticed on the show
in the past few months. We will try to remedy
this. Really. We promise...lots of interviews
this month, including at least one with a local
rock critic, and on March 6th. a very special
talk with the Grapes of Wrath, on the eve of
their performance at the SUB Ballroom, plus
your usual dose of feedback and mike
squeals from your hosts Jerry, Jay and
Jason. DISCORDER
FRIDAYS
FRIDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
10:30-11:30 am
STIRRINGS: More insights into cross-cultural
music, poetry and personalities. Expect spontaneity. With Kirby Hill.
07 Mar.  A retrospective of recent blues and
soul concerts, including interviews
with Albert Collins, Etta James and
Koko Taylor, plus a look at authentic
gospel music.
14 Mar.   Fela Anikulapo Kuti: an in-depth
profile and update. Guest host
Harold Konig.
21 Mar.   TBA
28 Mar.  Make way for the Fools. A focus on
clowns, mimes and other expressive
personalities.
POWER CHORD
3:30-5:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring
the underground alternative to mainstream
metal: local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities, plus album give-aways.
SPECULUM' - REFLECTIONS ON
SITUATIONS
5:30-6:00 pm
News; PET. (Pesimists Endurance Training);
and "Forward From the Past."
SOUL GALORE
8:00-9:30 pm
All the tearjerkers, all the hipshakers. From
R&B to funk and especially soul. Join Fiona
MacKay and Anne Devine at this new time.
THE BIG SHOW
9:00 pm-midnight
Why pay money to get into a nightclub on a
Friday night? If Big InternationAI can't get
you dancing, no-one can.
THE VISITING PENGUIN SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Interviews with local musicians and artists,
the newest sounds at CITR, your personal requests and even golden oldies. What more
could you want? Hosted by Andreas Kitz-
mann and Sheri Walton.
WEEKEND REGULARS
8:00 am    Sign-On
Noon        BRUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
6:00 pm   SAT/SUN. MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather, plus
GENERIC REVIEW, analysis of current affairs and special features.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
WEEKEND HIGHLIGHTS
SATURDAYS
EARLY MUSIC SHOW
7:30-10:30 am
Join host Ken Jackson for music from the
Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods,
presented at an appropriately early hour.
01 Mar.   TBA
08 Mar.  Giiles Binchois
75 Mar.   Guillaume Dufay
22 Mar. J.S. Bach "Hunting" Cantata
29 Mar.  Easter show: J. S. Bach St. John
Passion.
NEOFILE
Noon-4:00 pm
"...and on the 8th Day, God created Neofile,
and She looked down on what She had
wrought...and She became violently ill, and
decided that maybe seven days was enough
for one week." But Neofile lives on; in a corrupt sort of way. Tune in for the newest, the
nowest, the latest, the greatest in music from
around the globe. Your hosts Don Chow and
Jason Grant assault your ears the way only
Music Directors can. Tune in or feel out of
place in bulk food stores.
WHATEVER HAPPENED TO
GILLIGAN'S ISLAND?
4:00-6:00 pm
The quest for ultimate truth continues... More
metaphysics of the airwaves. This month,
host lain Bowman exhumes philosophical
methods of thought long dead, and plays
lotsa other neat stuff. For instance:
01 Mar.  Stanley Holloway
08 Mar.  Morecambe and Wise
75 Mar.   Sounds of the BRM V-16
22 Mar.  More TV Themes Than You Can
Shake A Stick At
29 Mar.  I Can't Tell You Now Cause It's A
Surprise
PROPAGANDA!
6:30-9:00 pm
An eclectic mix of interviews, reviews, music,
humour, High Profiles, and other features
with Mike Johal.
08 Mar.  owner Drew Burns talks about the
Commodore Ballroom, past, present
and future.
75 Mar.   SFU Dance Troupe
29 Mar.  Tow-truck drivers—they've been called every colourful word that exists in
downtown Vancouver. Tonight Gor-
die, a local tow-truck driver, present
the case for the defense.
High Profiles
01 Mar.   Laibach—the Einsturdzende
Neubauten of Yugoslavia
22 mar. SPK
Regular Features
08 Mar.  Political Satire with AEIOU—the
22 Mar.    Artists Educational Iconoclastic
Organization (Un-)Limited (6:55 pm)
Today in History
Starting this month, Propaganda!
presents video reviews. The reviews
for the five Saturdays of this month
will be Bauhaus Live/Chrome, Gregory's Girl, Cabaret Voltaire, Le Chien
Andalou. and New Order.
PYJAMA PARTY
9:00 pm-1.00 am
Your hosts Mike Mines and Robin Razzell
present everything from ambient music for
snoozing to upbeat tunes for popcorn and
pillow fights.
TUNES  R' US
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Music, Music, Music, Handyman Bob, Music,
Music, My Favorite Album, Music, Music,
Experimental To Classical, Teddy Kelowna
presents, and yes more music.
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
8:00 am-Noon
A sampling of the vibrant, electric and exhilarating sound often erroneously filed under
the misnomer of "classical" (i.e. pedantic)
music. Paul Smith continues his musical lexicon of the twentieth century, and is joined by
Tyler Cutforth, with his favorite remedies for
Sunday morning complacency.
02 Mar.  Arnold Schoenberg Pierrot lunaire
09 Mar.  Maurice Ravel Piano Concerto in G
Major
15 Mar.   Jean Franciax Quintet for Winds
23 Mar.  Gabriel Faure Requiem
30 Mar.  Expressionist opea par excellence
Alban Berg's Wozzeck
ROCKERS SHOW
Noon-3:00 pm
The best in Roots, Rock, Reggae, DJ and
Dub. With your hosts George Family Man
Barrett, Collin Hepburn and Bruce James.
SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE
8:00-9:00 pm
More live than the others will ever be.
02 Mar.  The Young Lions. A concert of new
music played by seventeen exceptional musicians at the Kool Jazz
Festival June 30, 1982.
09 Mar.  TBA
76 Mar.   Frank Zappa.
23 Mar. Skywalk—Live at the Montreux/
Detroit International Jazz Festival
1980.
30 Mar.  David Bowie.
FAST FORWARD
9:00 pm-1:00 am
Probably Vancouver alternative radio's most
alternative show. Mark Mushet searches the
world over for experimental, minimalist,
avant-garde, electronic, and other non-
mainstream sounds.
02 Mar.  Selections from the long awaited,
now released (REALLY!) Security
Show transcription tape.
09 Mar.   Voices, Notes, Noise. A graphic compilation LP of special note.
75 Mar.   The Sound of Radio. A compilation
of tape pieces by New York area
radio performers. More clever uses
for the much neglected medium.
23 Mar.  Recommended Quarterly Vol. 1,   2.
Duck and Cover, John Oswald, and
More. Will include excerpts from the
magazine accompanying the release
from November Publications, a wing
of Recommended.
30 Mar.  The Fourth Various Artists radio performance. Larry and I will be improvising a fourth live tape mix from
CITR's production studio. If you are
able to submit sound beds or recordings of any kind for this show,
phone 736-8849. The performance
will begin at 10 pm and will consist
of four 15-minute sets.
LIFE AFTER BED
1 am-4 am
The return of the nightmare from the people
you're parents warned you about. Ugly radio
has returned. Warn your avaiados. CTR fm 102 cable 100
Vinyl Verdict
Big Audio Dynamite
This Is Big Audio Dynamite
Columbia Records
ONCE THERE WAS A BAND. THE BAND
was called the Clash and they were good.
Time passed. The band became successful.
They had arguments and one day the singer and
the bassist threw the guitarist out of the band.
The guitarist did not like this at all.
"I'll get even with you for this," he shouted at
them. "I don't need you two assholes." In the
distance, a dog barked.
The guitarist, whom some now called the man
with no band, went home and watched reruns
of Leone-Eastwood spaghetti Westerns and old
episodes of Rawhide on his television. He brooded on the injustice of the world. Outside, the
rain pattered on the window.
One day the man with no band went to New
York. He watched the rain from his hotel window
and he went to dance clubs. He heard music they
called funk and he heard music that some called
rap, and it was good. One night, he had an idea.
"I will form a band," he thought as he left the
club. "I will form it with my friend, Don Letts, and
it will play funk and occasionally rap. I will sing
in this band and I will sing about the injustices
of the world. I will produce the record myself and
I will use plenty of dialogue from The Good, The
Bad and The Ugly and other films. I will start to
dress like an extra from a spaghetti Western and
it will be good." He smiled to himself and stepped into a waiting taxi. It had stopped raining but
the streets were still wet. The taxi's headlights
gleamed on the slick pavement.
The man with no band returned to London. He
went to Sarm West with his friends Don Letts,
Leo 'E-Zee Kill' Williams, Greg Roberts and Dan
Donovan. Together they recorded an album.
They recorded songs about the injustices of the
world. The man, whom they now knew as Mick
Jones, had a band again, and it was good.
This Mick Jones sang about Africa, just as
Papa Hemingway would have if he had been a
singer with a conscience and not a writer. He called the song "A Party" and in it he took snide
shots at rock stars who recorded songs for charity. He also sang about modern Japan and its
culture and he called the song "Sony." He sang
about sex diseases and called the song "Stone
Thames." He called a song about teenage drug
abuse and heavy metal "Sudden Impact; and
this tied in well with another song called "Medicine Show," which featured a long piece of dialogue from a Clint Eastwood film and sound
effects of guns.
"This is good," the man thought as he mastered the tapes. "But the world is bad and full
of injustice and I must reflect on that." He thought
about this paradox for some time. He had a
thought:
"I will call the record This Is BAD and I will call
my band BAD," he said to his friend, Don Letts.
"But you cannot do that," Don Letts replied.
"People may think we are bad, not BAD."
"You are right. We need an acronym that will
let people know we are BAD, not bad. Let us call
ourselves Big Audio Dynamite. That will fit cleverly with the spaghetti Western theme." Mick Jones
paused. He would get even with those assholes
Strummer and Simonon. He didn't need them,
and this record would show everybody who the
real talent in the Clash had been.
"I'll show those assholes," he said. Don Letts
looked at the man who was called Mick Jones
and nodded. Outside, it had started to rain agan.
A clock chimed one and it was good.
—lain Bowman
Faith No More
We Care A Lot
Label
ALL JOKING ASIDE, CALIFORNIA JUST
happens to be the fount of all modern
musical innovations since 1970. See, I've got this
theory—California is the great mutation frontier
of America where men and women are free to
mix and match whatever types of music they
damn well feel like. Well, anyways, it will all be
out later this year in my new book.
From the same twisted state that spawned the
DKs, the Red Hot Chili Peppers and the Suburban Lawns, emerges another Californian mutation, Faith No More. No more faith in religion?
Life? Cabbage Patch Kids? All and none of the
above. Fired by a hardcore passion and driven
by an overpowering funky backbeat, the album
steamrolls along through some fierce, sarcastic
and intense tunes.
To make a worthwhile album, however, commitment and an electric guitar often aren't enough;
fortunately, Faith No More possess the prerequisite talent and intelligence to accomplish the task.
Good stuff abounds on We Care A Lot; and the
unignorable title track sears with frustration and
anger delivered in the form of some delightfully
sarcastic lyrics:
We care a lot about the Cabbage Patch, The
Smurfs and DMC
about Madonna and we cop for
Mr. T
About the little things, the bigger
things we top
about you people, yeah, you bet
we care a lot.
Yeah, they're out to save the world cause, like
they say, it's a dirty job, but someone's gotta do it.
—Kevin Smith
Camper Van Beethoven
Telephone Free Landslide Victory
Independent Project Records
MY BUDDY PEDRO IS AN ILLEGAL ALIEN
living in the Bay Area of San Francisco.
Pedro has a particular talent for sniffing out
greasy little Mexican diners and for discovering
great bar bands. Proof of his talent is that he
turned me on to Los Lobos long before the guys
with moustaches and Camaros, decorated with
orange rodent-like radio station stickers, started
liking them.
So when Pedro began raving about some
"...punky, hippy-type guys" playing Frisco called
Camper Van Beethoven, I knew he was probably
right. Six months later I find he was right,
because CVB's first LP Telephone Free Landslide
Victory has just been released on Independent
Project Records, and it's a lot of fun.
CVB have successfully made a melting pot out
of Bay Area music types, combining Tex-Mex and
Garage Thrash with Ska and Folk, to produce
a sound similar to a cross between Jonathan
Richman and Rank 'n File. That is to say good
foot-stomping rhythms backing those all-important nonsensical lyrics. Cuts in this vain include
"The Day That Lassie Went to the Moon,"
"Where the Hell is Bill?", and a cover of Black
Flag's "Wasted," which features the memorable
line: "...I was a punker and I had a mohawk, I
was so narly and I drove my dad's car." The best
cuts on this album, though, are "Oh No!" and
the highly political, issue oriented "Take the DISCORDER
Skinheads Bowling." Actually, the only issues
raised by this album are is it better to listen to
CVB while wolfing down burritos and brew, or
while mondo skateboarding on Fisherman's
Wharf?
For these answers I consulted Pedro. He said
he didn't know, but if I wanted to see CVB (I do),
I should come down to Frisco. He says he can
get me a job in a sweat shop building MX missle
parts, and he's found a new greasy diner in San
Mateo and it has salsa that could fuel an aircraft
carrier, and he's discovererd a new band called
Psycho Drama, and they sound like the Go-Go's
would if they were insane, and....
—Jerome Broadway
Current 93 &
Sickness of Snakes
Nightmare Culture
L.A.Y.L.A.H. Antirecords
THE APPEARANCE OF THIS RECORD AT
CITR is probably as good a time as any to
address the issue of unpleasantness in art. We're
not talking Sid Vicious throwing up or whoever
is currently bleeding before enraptured and
cavorting throngs.
This is disturbing, frightening and, to some
people, blasphemous, even viscerally upsetting.
It's also highly creative, original and even beautiful. If the works of Goya depicting priests helping the helpless to their own execution, starvation and other timeless horrors can hang in
museums and command more money than you
or I will ever see, then we must be prepared to
regard music such as this in a parallel manner.
Art need not be pleasant to be attractive. We
must stop anaesthetizing ourselves with musical
placeboes and open our ears to music that helps
us maintain an equilibrium by occasionally going
too far in the other direction.
Perhaps no one exemplifies this attitude more
than Current 93. It's hard to be brief about these
people because there's so much to say. Current
93 is essentially Steven Stapleton (from Nurse
With Wound) and David Tibet 93 (formerly of 23
Skidoo and Psychic TV), with the addition of a
wide and impressive variety of artists as they are
required.
The music itself is primarily comprised of tape
manipulations and vocal recitations. In past years
this would have been enough to cause most
people to lump the result in the "Industrial" grab
bag. My personal view is that Current 93 are far
too much in control of their music and the machines they use to create it to be put in this
category. If it's necessary to find a term, perhaps
neo-surrealism will do.
The literary sources range from Isidore Duc-
asse (a mid-nineteenth century predecessor of
Baudelaire) to biblical texts. In "Killykillkilly" we
hear the Lord's Prayer (backward and forward),
baroque trumpet fanfares, cabalistic chanting,
semi-violent rantings and some horribly dissonant guitar work. It's not quite as successful as
earlier releases like Dog's Blood Rising or Nature
Unveiled, but still gives a fairly accurate representation of what Current 93 does—terrify.
The B-side of this release features three tracks
by Sickness of Snakes, who are Coil members
John Balance and Peter Christopherson. They
are joined for this project by Boyd Rice, who
worked in the U.S. before moving to Europe to
work with such notables as Genesis P. Orridge
and Frank Tovey. Coil's music changes as often
as they put out new vinyl. Here, they are definitely
at their best.
The three tracks range from a huge orchestral
sound over a backdrop of a holocaust ("Various
Hands"), through bone-clanking xylophonic
ambience ("The Swelling of Leeches"), all the
way to a swirling herd of grunting pigs ("The
Pope Held Upside Down"). Sickness of Snakes
provide a great deal of explanation on each cut
which is an entertainment on its own. If it's possible, side B outshines the Current.
To close, a brief word on L.A.Y.L.A.H. Anti-
records. L.A.Y.L.A.H. is the ultimate female symbol, which has to be interpreted on every plane.
Its numerical value is 77 (the same as God or
Dog) and it is the Arabic word for night and
death—the redeeming force and the highest
magical manifestation of the seven through matter. When all this numerology is transmuted onto vinyl, the result is a record company dedicated
to mysticism, ritual and musical rebellion—all on
pristine recordings with gorgeous packaging.
—Larry Thiessen
Paul Dolden
Sonarchy
Underwhich Editions
C ONARCHY IS THE DEFINITIVE AUDIO DOC-
O umentation of the most accomplished works
of one of the world's finest electro-acoustic composers. Paul Dolden has won numerous awards
in the field of "electronic" music. These awards
are made conspicuous by the fact that Paul's
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music is almost exclusively concerned with the
harmonic and timbral characteristics inherent in
certain acoustic sound sources.
For the past few years, Dolden has focused
his attention on convincing us through his work
that plumbing the depths of acoustic sound is
imperative if we are to avoid the aural desensi-
tization that a world of "contemporary" electronic
music has to offer.
If you have an ear for highly intense, emotionally charged sound, Sonarchy comes highly
recommended. In the world of contemporary
electronic music, Dolden's work comes as a
breath of fresh air, and though it does come from
a certain "discipline," it (perfectly) avoids sounding the least bit academic. The aural maelstrom
that concludes "The Melting Voice Through
Mazes Running" or the carefully-woven wall of
sound that is "Veils" have dazzled many whose
only previous awareness of electronic music has
come in the form of Kraftwerk, Tangerine Dream,
or Jean Michel Jarre. This is what electronic
music is all about.
Paul's music also tends to elicit decidedly contrasting and very personal responses. It has
upset a few women, presumably due to the violent imagery that certain pieces are likely to conjure up. It has even been described by a few
twisted individuals as "anti-women." Others,
obviously possessing a set of cloth ears, consider
"Veils" to be ambient music. Neither interpretation is rational; for this music sounds like all of
nature, all at once, and as we all know, nature
is powerful and indescriminate. So is the music
of Paul Dolden.
"Chiarascuro 1 & 2" are perhaps the most tur- v
bulent and confrontational pieces on the tape.
The piano sounds like it is being pulled apart with
the force of something unreal, countered, in the
second part, by the more conventional virtuosity
of pianist Andrew Czink's palatable passages.
In fact, in nearly every piece, the only readily
identifiable sound is that of the piano, though
those familiar with computer generated sounds
will hear that the usual cliches have been avoided in "The Melting Voice" and "Chiarascuro 1."
"Veils" is Dolden's MA Composition (SFU)
thesis piece. It.is a completely acoustic exploration of new tuning systems and "textural transformations" that involve the multi-track layering
(up to 280 tracks) of different instruments. Each
section of the piece is comprised of dissolving
layers of one-multi-tracked, specially-pitched instrument. With only variable tape speed to aid
in the more difficult pitching (to accommodate
the strange tunings), "Veils" achieves an immense wall of sound which would be impossible to obtain with electronics. The harmonic overtones in this intricate mass of sound are truly
mesmerizing. Here, unlike the other pieces, the
human voice is the only readily identifiable sound
/instrument.
While there is truly brilliant electronic music
to be heard, electronic music is always identifiable as such and hence sonically limited. Sonarchy takes the first major constructive step in
exploring new acoustic soundworlds and challenging the collective notion of what "contemporary" electronic music is all about. Sonarchy
represents a brilliantly conceived and structured
cacophony that can only serve to increase the
listener's aural literacy and, with any luck,
change the way he or she thinks about and
listens to music. If you can't find Sonarchy in any
of the local independent record stores: DIAL-A-
COMPOSER at 874-5737.
—Mark Mushet
FORGING NEW PATHS   IN MELODIC ENERGY
BEAT THE 7"   EP by
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IN THE STORE NOW:
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OUT SOON:
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(with limited edition astroturf cover) DISCORDER
28th, in the early morning Florida sunshine,
seventy-two seconds into their historic journey*—
with an impressive flash and a lot of smoke.
Insert Tasteless Already Old Joke:
"All you people in TV land,
I will wake up your empty shells.
Peak time viewing blown in a flash,
As I burn into your memory cells."
Peter Gabriel from Family Snapshot
IT'S LATE AT NIGHT. YOU'RE ALONE. YOU
should be asleep, but you're not. You're down
to your last can of Diet Pepsi. There are no
more potato chips. It happened almost a month
ago, but you just can't shake it. What was once
simple shock is now something far more insidious.
Why did she have to die? She was just a school
teacher who had a special way with kids. She
had a dream (to quote the president) "To touch
the face of God." Christie McAuliffe—wife,
mother, American—was to be the first civilian in
space. But it was not to be. Maybe God doesn't
like having his face touched. Maybe it was those
damned Libyans. Maybe they have flouridated
water in Florida. Maybe the experts will never
know for sure. Only one thing is certain: it all ended for the Space Shuttle Seven Tuesday, January
«W!
HAT DOES NASA Stand for?"
"Need. Another. Seven. Astronauts."
One of them should be a school teacher with
a fresh face and a winning smile, for Christie
McAulifee shall not be soon forgotten. Her name
will go down in history with George Washington's,
Davey Crockett's, Evel Knieval's, General Custer's and Brook Shields'. "The little lady who
tried."
And Steven Spielberg will make the movie. The
rumor on Entertainment Tonight earlier this week
was that Amblin' Productions had purchased—
for an undisclosed amount of money—the exclusive rights to her family's story: the heartbreaking true-to-life tale of the attractive young schoolteacher (Sally Field) who reaches for the heavens
and finds them (mind you, in a far more emphatic
and terminal manner than intended). Needless
to say, the heartbreak among family and friends
is overwhelming. It rips into these normal people
and unleashes hidden demons. Lurid scenes of
violence, drug taking and weird sex quickly ensue. Yet through it all, the human spirit stands
indomitable. In the final scene, Christie's
daughter Wendy (Mary Lou Retton) looks out her
window into the starlit sky and hums sadly to
herself "God Bless America."
Also Starring:
LAN ALDA AS HER HUSBAND,  Ricky
Shroeder and Emmanuel Lewis as the
A
blind twins, Charlton Heston and Joan Collins
as her parents, Sylvester Stallone as the gay RE.
teacher, Ronald Reagan as the senile president
and Michael J. Fox, in a cameo role, as Brian
Mulroney.
And She Was An American Girl demolishes
every box office record. And it wins every Academy Award (except best director). And then
Charlton Heston gets the Republican nomination for the '88 election, and he chooses Stallone
as his running mate—but it's going to be a tight
race because the Democrats have Alda and
Field. And the little dog laughs to see such fun,
and the cow jumps over the moon, and all this
bullshit goes on and on forever like a bad
headache in a slaughterhouse until the handsome prince finally kills the dragon, scales the
castle wall, kisses the sleeping princess, and
suddenly everybody snaps awake in a cold sweat
—and they've all had a horrible dream, but none
of them can remember what it was about.
Advance Response To Cries of
"Poor Taste!"
WITH REGARD TO The Challenger Vaporization, optimum poor taste was achieved
as early as noon the Tuesday in question when
ABC (or was it NBC?) (CBS?) aired the first
replay of Christie McAuliffe's parents' reaction to
the disaster. And we've been floating in it ever
since. I'm just trying to come to terms with the
fact that the Information Police stormed my place
in the middle of January and confiscated my
VCR, and I've had nothing to look at since but
regular television and the wall.
—Bill Mullan
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Come on down to Bentley's and
take a walk on the wild side C TR fm 102 cab e 100
from p. 22
the radios here in London. But most of those
clubs have really small dance floors. It's frustrating. But there are a few good clubs to check out:
the Apollo Club (great live music with the Ariwa
Posse, and city-funded group of black musicans,
rappers and DJs); the Cat in the Hat, great soul
and funk disco with a big dance floor; and the
Electric Ballroom."
Ah, yes, the Electric Ballroom. Where this
whole caper had practically started.
"Well, where do you get your records? Are
there better stores than others?"
"Oh yeah. There's lots of big ones, but all they
have is American top 40 schlock. Like Virgin, the
biggest one, a huge money-splattering fart of a
place, complete with armed security guards, a
cafe and their own travel service, and the largest
collection of "fading rock stars on vinyl" ever
found in one place. For independent and local
stuff, check out the record stores in the Camden
Market area, like Rhythm Records. Or check out
political bookstores like Houseman's or Collet's
International for good jazz, folk and international
recordings. And, of course, Rough Trade in
Brixton."
"I just have one final question. How do they
get their hair to stand up like that?"
She paused. "Christ. You're as bad as the
tourists. Dishwashing soap. Or egg whites. How
do you get yours to lie so flat to your head?"
IT WAS GETTING CLOSE TO 10, where my
look-a-likes were to meet at the Hope and
Anchor. Chris was heading there too, so we headed over to Islington together. I stopped off at a
wine bar for some fortification before heading into
the bar.
Steed, it was just awful.
Ten at night, in an area I didn't know very well.
The sign over the door read The Hope and Anchor. Three punks in leather jackets, torn jeans
and kilts (the latest fad, I was later told) asked
me for money for drugs (at least they were honest). It looked like the bar hadn't been open for
months, but I'd heard from Chris that this was
a "free" bar, squatted by people organizing
against the gentrification of their neighbourhoods. You know, turning pubs into wine bars
and pasta restaurants. The Hope and Anchor had
been empty for about a year when a group of
anarchists and punks had taken it over and
started weekend gigs.
I looked up at the sign. Inside were some pretty
awful sounds. I held my breath, and stepped
through the door.
There they were, against the wall—and my
friend's daughter Chris was with them! She pulled me over to their spot on the floor, gave me
a warm beer and began to talk. Steed, I craved
a glass of Chablis '69, not that awful warm beer.
"Wow," one of them said. "You look so cool—
just like Emma Peel."
"Thanks." I smiled.
"Got any money, chum?" Trapped. I surrendered a pound coin.
We sat against the wall all night, drank warm
beer and then left. I followed them into the
streets, but lost them after a few turns in the
narrow streets and foggy night.
I went home, took a long hot bath (which, as
you know, in this city is not easy) and drank
scotch.
Next day I went back to get my John Coltrane
records. And suddenly there, across the road,
more look-a-likes. But it was a different pair!!
Does it ever end, Steed?
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The Roving Ear
LOOK STEED. I SWEAR IT WASN'T MY
fault. There I was, in Camden, buying
John Coltrane discs in Rhythm Records,
across from the Camden tube stop, when these
three young women dressed just like me walked
in. You know, black leather from top to toe, high-
heeled black leather boots and that secret smile.
They thumbed through Rhythm's jazz, r and b
and funk sections, and then headed upstairs to
look at the independent labels.
I had to follow them, Steed. Why did they look
so much like me? I went upstairs, watched them
buy a few records, and then followed them out
the door and across the road to the Electric
Ballroom. Lots of other young women, Steed, all
looking the same: it was very uncanny. I know
we'd agreed to go antique shopping in Blooms-
bury, but what else could I do? In the best interests and service of the state, I had to investigate.
They were obviously up to something, perhaps
plotting some unnatural anti-state activities I had
to follow them.
With my leather it was easy to slide into the
Electric Ballroom unnoticed. Scores of people,
in various clothing and hair colours, curled
around video games and pinball machines. Outside the rest bargained their way through the
various stalls of the Camden Market, one of the
city's punkiest. It was perfect cover. The Ballroom
is one of the city's best-known nightclubs. Weekends Jazzifunk keeps the dance floor filled. The
day I was there The Men They Couldn't Hang
were setting up: the following week everybody's
fave skinhead socialists, the Redskins, were in.
I was getting serious about my game of Donkey
Kong when I noticed my look-a-likes were leaving.
I followed them onto the tube which took us
into London's East End to a new club—Torture
Never Stops. It's an afternoon club, open from
12:30 to 4:00 and only on weekends. Hanging
over my Pernod, I observed my quarry drinking
and consorting with similar sorts. "Lets' go hear
Ali McMordie's new band, Friction Groove," one
suggested. "No, I'm not into r and b." a second
replied. "I liked him better with Stiff Little Fin
gers," mused a third. McMordie? The head of
this seemingly ever-growing youth conspiracy?
Not a name I was familiar with. I jotted it down
for later investigation.
Torture Never Stops features taped music and
live bands—that day The Chills from New Zealand. And something called Foetus—very odd.
Soon, my look-a-likes left the bar, and I too. We
left, paces apart, while the DJs spun the latest
in British and American independent labels. That's
Our correspondent in happier times.
all they play, Steed. No Madonna here. A conspiracy against state controlled rock and roll, controlled by cleve' men.
BY NOW IT WAS SUPPERTIME, so I nipped
into a pub for a snack and a glass of beau-
jolais nouveau. I knew where my quarry was going, but felt the need to do a bit more background
research on them and their way of life. This lifestyle was very new to me, being of the jazz and
This month:
Emma Peel
rediscovers London.
scotch variety (civility, Steed, is a marvelous
thing). So I called a friend's 18-year-old daughter
to fill me in.
"Nightclubbing, bright nightclubbing, is an
expensive undertaking, much more than the current exchange rate will allow. Gigs sell out very
fast, venues are often either very small or cavernous, often hard to find and you sometimes have
to be in the know to find out who is playing where.
A good example happened last month with Captain Sensible and the "come on down" tour. It
sold out weeks in advance, but was still be advertised as tickets being available. All kinds of people showed up the night of the gig and there was
no way we could get in. Meanwhile I heard the
show was shit hot—and packed into this tiny hall.
"But live gigs—you can go crazy trying to see
everything. Take last week. In one week, I saw
New Model Army, Gil Scott Heron, The Chills,
the Flying Pickets, Madness and Johnny Thunder and his new band—and I missed Sweet by
ten minutes. Tomorrow I'm going to see Attila the
Stockbroker, in a triple bill with Surfin' Dave and
Mr. Nasty at Apples and Snakes, a cabaret.
"And last night, it was a special hi-lite night
for three bands on Creation Records. The most
often discussion amongst my pals is not, 'Why
is there nothing to do?' but 'Okay, if we leave now
we can catch the first set of this band, then leave
and rush over here for the second set and still
make it to the bar at the Town and Country for
the last set...' "
"But aren't gigs expensive? How do people
afford them?" I asked.
"Even on the dole there are ways to get to gigs.
There are lots of benefits, multiple gigs that are
good value for your pounds and freebies happening. Nightclubs are usually pricey and pretentious. By and large they fit the "impressive dank
dripping squalor with appropriate videos," or "the
logic of commercial ostentatiousness taken to its
conclusion, for the smart set with the fat wallets"
descriptions. A lot of clubs are heavy into funk
and soul and rap, which is all you hear now on
cont. p. 21
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261-0258 (Open Sundays 11 <
RICHMOND: Lansdowne Park
278-3041 (Open Sundays 111
PORT COQUITLAM: 2877 Sh;
941-0551 (Open Sund      '

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