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 THAT NEW COUCH MAGAZINE FROM CiTR 101 9 FM//SUPP0RT,NGVANC0UVER'SINDEPEN^
October 2009 fe<it&ing.../
VIFF/LEE HUlluLAK/24 HOURSOFTHI rg^BIRD RADIO HELL/
KIDNAP KIDS/ ARTS CUTS/ INSTRUMENT^VE/ HOKO'S
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/arI  It-Yves nnTiorr]
Now On Sale!
REBEL!
AKHOQUfiHW. -
k   MAD
CADDIES
with guests THE JOHNSTONES
november 4
Venue
AIRBORNE TOXIC EVENT OCTOBER 28 | COMMODORE BALLROOM • FLOGGING MOLLY OCTOBER 29 & 30 | COMMODORE BALLROOM • JAY BRANNAN OCTOBER 29 | THE BJLTMORE CABARET
Wfimmmmmm
i utvennTion.com s J
Q ROGERS EDITOR
Jordie Yow
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Reis
COPY EDITORS
Liz Brant, Debby Reis, Al Smith,
Corey Ratch
AD MANAGER
David Stanfield
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Melissa Smith
RLA EDITOR
WEB EDITOR
Reilly Wood
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Melanie Coles
PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR
Leanna Orr
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn
DISTRIBUTION
Jamie Anstey
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brenda Grunau
Student Radio Society of UBC
COVER
Image by Lee Hutzulak
EDITOR'S NOTE
Dearest Discorder Reader:
This month has not been one full of good news.
With the closures of Hoko's and the Cobalt (see page
ii) our city is losing some of the best venues for small
bands to play. On a much larger scale though, the
B.C. provincial government has made drastic cuts to
arts and cultural organizations (see page 12). Because
of this you can expect there to be fewer festivals and
cultural events throughout the province, as organizations that run them start scaling back. The lack of
grants for arts and cultural organizations is going
to affect a lot more than the groups who applied
for the grants. The effects of these cuts are going
to trickle down to all the people who worked with
them and all of us who enjoy the myriad works of
the arts community. The effects can already be seen.
Organizations, who are seeing large portions of their
budgets disappearing, have to lay off employees or
even shut their doors because they are no longer
able to pay rent.
For now, at least, there are still some wonderfully
creative people in Vancouver who have yet to be
driven off by the unfriendly cultural climate provided by our lovely local government. You can read
about some of them in our pages: the Kidnap Kids
are putting out some adorable folky pop music (page
14); our reporter Shaun Stander explores artists rela
tionships with their gear by interviewing PrOphecy
Sun, Collapsing Opposites, the Greff Band and Red
Cedar (page 16); CiTR's Thunderbird Radio Hell is
celebrating it's anniversary this year by bringing
bands into the studio for 24 hours of live music (page
25); the employees at the Vancouver International
Film Festival are bringing us some great films this
year and we reviewed four of them (page 8) (on a
side note: any funding problems VIFF was concerned
with are probably over now that they've received
nearly a half million dollar grant from the federal
government as a marquee program).
This issue looks a bit different now that its appearance is now looked after by Lindsey Hampton, who
is taking over as art director and promises to keep
our magazine looking wonderful. You may recognize
her work from previous issues of the magazine and
countless show posters around town. We would also
like to welcome David Stansfield, our new ad manager, and Jamie Anstey, our new distro guy. Soon we
will also have a new person looking after our Under
Review section as Melissa Smith has taken a job in
another city. We wish her all the best.
You will see us again next month,
Jordie Yow
OCTOBER CONTRIBUTORS
WRITERS
Katherine Boothroyd, Nathaniel Bryce, Bryce Dunn, Simon Foreman, Robert Fougere, Melissa
Foye, Dan Fumano, Brenda Grunau, Alex Hudson, Justin Langille, Adam Mannegren, Miranda
Martini, Gord McCullough, Sean Nelson, Mark PaulHus, Gavin Reid, Robert Robot, Al Smith,
Shaun Stander
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Merida Anderson, Clubhouse Collective, Robert Fougere, Cyrus McEachern, Leora Morinis, Sean
Nelson, Nicole Ondre, Jill Southern, Shaun Stander
LAYOUT HELPERS
Joan Mendoza
PROOFREADERS
Simon Foreman, Trey Taylor, Reilly Wood
©DiSCORDER 2009 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All
rights reserved. Circulation 8,500. Discorder
is published 11 times a year by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at www.citr.ca,
as well as through all major cable systems in
the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White
Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR
at CitrMgr@ams.ubc.ca, or pick up a pen and
write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C.,
V6T1Z1, Canada.
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address, and we will
3017 ex. 3 or email
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mall you a Discorder
ing promotions.
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illustrations, please
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able upon request.
er@gmail.com. TABLE OF CONTENTS / OCTOBER 2009 / WWW.DISCORDER.CA
// FEATURES
12/ARTSCUTS
Are you all out of things to get outraged about? Wait until you learn
just how bad the B.C. Liberal's arts cuts are and what that's going to
mean for us.
14/KIDNAP KIDS
They are pretty much the most adorable thing that's ever happened
to music. For serious.
16/INSTRUMENTAL LOVE
Shaun Stander explores the relationship musicians have with their
instruments by interviewing PrOphecy Sun, Collapsing Opposites,
Red Cedar and the Greff Band.
25/24 HOURS OF HELL
CiTR 101.9FM is going to have bands on the air for a non-stop live
music broadcast Check this article for details and tune in for some
great bands.
26 / ART PROJECT: LEE HUTZULAK
Lee Hutzulak is a musician, who also makes beautiful drawings. We are
pleased that he took some time off from leading Dixie's Death Pool and
his other projects to make some images for our magazine.
// REGULARS
6/TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
Bicycle Diaries by David Byrne
7/RIFF RAFF
The Bug Nasties / The Dictaphone / Random Cuts / Sex Church
8 /FILM STRIPPED: VIFF
A sneak peak at some of the films that will be showing this month at
the Vancouver International Film Festival in this extra big version of
Film Stripped.
11/VENEWS
Hoko's / The Cobalt
20/CALENDAR
by Leora Morinis
22/PROGRAM GUIDE
38 / CHARTS
JARRED GREFF'S FOOT AT SMOOTH SAILING / PHOTO BY SHAUN STANDER
II REVIEWS Tf
29/UNDER REVIEW
Amelia Curran / Duplex / The Fugitives / Magneta
Lane / Carolyn Mark 8c NQ Arbuckle / Parlour Steps
/ Silver Starling / Two Hours Traffic / The Wheat
Pool
32/REAL LIVE ACTION
3 Inches of Blood / Band of Horses / Das Boot / Dun-
gen / Eldorado / Gang Gang Dance / Rose Melberg /
Monotonix / Om & Lichens / Smooth Sailing / Sunny
Day Real Estate //TEXTUALLY
ACTIVE
BICYCLE DIARIES BY DAVID BYRNE
(VIKING, SEPTEMBER 2009)
REVIEW BY ANDY HUDSON
llllllljlllpl
■■■■■■■
■   (This book is bright orange.)
David Byrne packs a big suitcase. SO big, it could likely hold the giant
suit he wore when he belted out "Psycho Killer" on the Talking Heads'
arty but still popular Stop Making Sense tour in 1983.
Now picture Byrne—a trim Scottish-American in his mid 50s, sporting
a smart collar shirt and brushed white hair—as he rolls that big suitcase
up to a hotel room in Manila, Istanbul or New Orleans. He shuts the
door, slips on rubber gloves and quietly unfolds and assembles a full-
size bicycle without getting a spot of grease on his fingers.
Sometime after he grew out of the Baltimore suburbs, art school
and geodesic domes, David Byrne started zipping around New York
by bicycle. That was a pretty uncool way to go between clubs and
galleries in late the 1970s, he wrote, but he loved it. He loved the air,
the speed and the cyclist's world view—one that looks for street life
before it looks for cars.
Bicycle Diaries aspires to be the kind of trip Byrne found in W. G.
Sebald's novel, The Rings of Saturn, which traces a narrator's thoughts as
they slip from the significance of hospitals to silkworm and an esoteric
17th-century scientist named Thomas Browne, all in the course of a
long walk along the British coast
And, like Sebald, Byrne scatters black and white photos all through
Bicycle Diaries. Some of the shots are reproductions of paintings or
installations by the various artists Byrne meets with and others are
neat archival photos, such as a portrait of artist Grayson Perry with
his wife and daughter on the day he accepted the Turner prize and
said, "It's about time a transvestite potter got this prize!" Some of the
best, though, are Byrne's own, such as a nondescript snapshot from an
office desk in the Stasi museum.
The photos, and the side trips to places like Argentina's shrine to
the Saint of Unemployment, give Bicycle Diaries the look of a classic
travelogue. There are lots of curiosities here—embalmed dictators and
Australian dogs who've gotten hooked on licking cane toads.
But, more than a travelogue, Bicycles Diaries reads like a set of freewheeling essays. The far-flung cities, combined with Byrne's awesome
art projects (he made a singing robot, another Brian Eno album and
a set of NYC bicycle racks all in the last year), give Byrne dozens of
jumping-off points to say what he likes about souks [ed. a.k.a. a souq,
this is the market in any Arabized or Muslim city], PowerPoint and mediated bike lanes; and what he hates about car culture, PowerPoint and
Robert Moses.
If you happen to be a liberally-minded cyclist who digs outsider art
and good music, you might not find a lot of surprises in what Byrne
has to say. But the way he says it, earnestly, with bits of swearing and a
frequent use of the word "funky" that really dates him, makes Bicycle
Diaries an inspiring read.
According to his blog, Byrne is nearly done recording an audiobook
version of Bicycles Diaries, which will play with some kind of soundscape
in the background. Better still, he is toying with the idea of podcasting
the book for 99 cents a chapter—a wonderful thing if you ride with
headphones, [ed. Andy! Don't tell people to do things that are unsafe! You'll
get us in trouble!] // RIFF
RAFF
BY BRYCE DUNN
Sex Church/The Dictaphone: Sweet Rot Records
(umukmyspace-rnm/sttKetrotrecords)
Random Cuts: Nominal Records (726 Richards St. Vancouver B.C. V6B 3A4)
(ioum.tnyspace.com/ranaomeuUrandomcuts)
The Bug Nasties: Flotation Records (P() Box 23121 Seattle WA USA 98102)
(umw.myspace.fmiAhebugnastks)
It seems with the last few columns I've been paying a lot of lip service
to the local scene, but who am I to complain? There's been a helluva
lot of good stuff being released in the hood, and to add to the mix this
month, our boys in Sex Church hope to convert the non-believers to
their altar of noise, with their debut on local label Sweet Rot no less!
Ex-members of Ladies Night and Master Apes have joined forces with
a current Defektors/Vapid member and the only thing that matters is
that it rips. "Dead End" is wave after wave of undulating guitar with a
howling vocal underbelly along with a rhythm section that peels the
paint off the walls until the last moment. The song then stops dead in
its tracks, cleans itself up after the mess with some crystalline guitar
and calls it a night. "Let Down" slows the pace to a crawl, the group's
undeniable Cheater Slicks' influence like a sombre walk along a cold,
rainy street to destination lonely. Sex Church has me joining the congregation post haste and soon you will, too.
Since it is the norm is for Sweet Rot singles to arrive in pairs, the yin
to Sex Church's yang is the Dictaphone. The folly of this French band
is this reviewer's frustration, as fragments of broken songs filled up six
spaces on each of this record's sides. Barely-there vocals are buried by
clattering drums, Mark E. Smith-isms and catchy chords that catch your
attention if only for a brief moment. I wanted more, but the single
fared better than I expected with tunes like "Controlled Meetings" and
"Fake Plague" making an impression that stayed.
As promised the ink well is running dry just trying to keep up with
Random Cuts, who it seems are taking the old adage "strike while the
iron ishot" literally with two more singles now ready to singe the fingers.
"Sleep" and "Jail Stripes" work the angular guitar/bass/drums formula
with ease, while "Make Damage" and "Pigeon Park" provide the punk
edge, particularly in the latter tune, where one of the girls (can't tell
if its Mildred or Elanor singing, let alone if I can tell they are actually
girls), [ed. If this sentence seems weird to you it's because Mildred and Elanor
appear to be mannequins, though there are clearly female vocals in Random
Cut's music. ] Anyway, lyrics like "rats and Nikes" and the bridge "There's
a weirdo on the corner" are vivid reminders of the most colourful street
corner in the poorest zip code in Canada. Something to be celebrated
in song? Random Cuts seem to think so, so break out the bubbly!
For the finale, the Bug Nasties party train has pulled into the station
for the last time, but their swan song ("She's So Right" Parts I and 2)
will have you doing the Locomotion 'til the sun comes up. Make sure
you have enough coal in the engine 'cause the party lasts over two
sides. Much like soul brothers of the past James Brown or Dyke & the
Blazers, there's more than enough wailing organ, girl group backups
and snappy bass to shake and pop to. As the band's front man Brother
James bids a fond farewe 11 to this combo, we hope they've all got more
music making in their future. SUMP
PEP/
CASTRATION BY MfRHJA ANDERSON)
^t'flONAtftt.MFESTI
VAL
We were given a sneak peek at a few of the films that will be shown this year at the Vancouver International Film Festival, which just received
$467,250from the federal government to become part of the Marquee Tourism Events Program. Thefest runs from Oct. 1 to Oct. 16 and according to VIFF's website it's "cosmopolitan, innovative, friendly, culturally complex and very accessible." We thought these four films in particular
might pique the interest of our average reader. If you want to see the whole schedule and lineup head on over to the VIFF website at
www.viff.org. As with every film fest there's a bit of good and a bit of bad. Here's what we thought.
ASHES OF AMERICAN FLAGS:
WILCO LIVE
(USA, 2009,87 MIN)
Directed by Brendan Canty of Fugazi fame and Christoph Green,
Ashes of American Flags re-imagines the tour documentary as a free-form
rumination on music and Americana, and on the relationship between
performer and audience. Following Wilco on their 2008 American tour,
Canty and Green intersperse concert footage with band interviews and
gorgeously photographed roadscapes as the tour bus cuts a criss-crossing
line across the map. And speaking of cinematography, it is consistently
excellent across the entire film—the concert footage is enthrallingly
dramatic and the interstitial sequences effectively juxtapose warmly
decaying rural scenes with jarringly corporatized suburbia. The interviews have moments of sublimity as well, as when multi-instrumentalist
Pat Sansone talked about his tour hobby of photography, documenting
the forgotten details of a backwater America on what is now a disappearing medium (the recently discontinued Polaroid film). The editing
is also superbly paced, never lingering on one scene for too long, but
refusing to succumb to overly jumpy MTVisms.
Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy makes an excellent documentary subject—his charisma as a performer is matched by his eloquence as he
holds forth on things like modernity's disaffection with representational
art. Another excellent subject is Nels Cline's guitar playing—that guy
fucking shreds. But not in a lame, Steve Vai way. You know? So you
should go see Ashes of American Flags—you won't be disappointed. The
structure and themes of the film mirror something intangible about
Wilco's music: a preoccupation with what is lost in the incontrovertibly
changing, and a wistfulness for those small and soon-to-be-forgotten
details.
—Al Smith
OCT.  1 // 9:30 P.M. // VANCITY THEATRE
OCT.  7 // 9:15 P.M. // EMPIRE GRANVILLE 7
OCT. 13 // 4:20 P.M. // EMPIRE GRANVILLE 7 TfLMSl
MY TEHRAN FOR SALE
(AUSTRALIA, IRAN, 2009,96 MIN, SUBTITLED)
My Tehran for Sale is a heartfelt drama dealing with the struggle of
artists and free thinkers in Iran's capital to live satisfying lives under
the restrictive Iranian government. It tells the story of Marzieh, an underground actress trying to emigrate from Tehran to Australia, all in a
series of flashbacks that occur after her arrival in Australia. Shot on-site
in Tehran, Iran, My Tehran for Sale manages to balance universality with
authenticity and never allows the stark and often disturbing faces of
the city to overwhelm the sense of deep love for, and commitment to
it that shines through in the characters (and the filmmakers). This love
is apparent in Marzieh's every action, even as she attempts to escape
the suspicion and repression of her homeland.
Deliberate and dreamlike, the film takes its time to unravel the details
of Marzieh's journey. This measured approach means that it suffers from
occasional dramatic dry patches and lack of momentum. Nonetheless,
it is a moving depiction of Iran as a land in transition, successfully
capturing the feelings of frustration, isolation and impotence felt by
citizens whose lives are in a state of slow decay.
—Miranda Martini
OCT. Ill 9:00P.M.//EMPIREGRANVILLE7
OCT. 4// 1:50P.M.//EMPIREGRANVILLE7
OCT. 11 //11:20 A.M. //EMPIRE GRANVILLE 7
ISLAM
(CANADA, 2009,80 MIN)
Filmed guerrilla-style by Montreal filmmaker Omar Majeed, Taqwacore
is a look at a burgeoning subculture of Islamic punk rockers in North
America. These kids are a diverse group of young Muslims spread across
the continent and Majeed's documentary finds them coming together
as a unified scene, galvanized by Michael Muhammad Knight's novel
The Taqwacores, which was first self-published in 2003.
It's an interesting idea—young Muslims, mostly first- and second-
generation immigrants, expressing through punk rock the frustrations
of living in a post-9/11 America—but disappointingly, Taqwacore is not
as compelling as it could have been.
The main problem is Majeed's unfortunate decision to focus largely
on Knight himself, instead of the scene that his book named. Knight's
personal story takes up too much screen time, from his troubled childhood, to his adolescent conversion to Islam, to his ongoing relationship
with the faith.
If Majeed had focused on the kids and the bands that make up the
Taqwacore scene instead, it could have been a fascinating look at a
unique group of young Muslim-Americans struggling to reconcile the
two sides of that hyphenate.
We get some glimpses into the bands and their lives, and invariably,
these are the most memorable parts of the film. There's a Taqwacore
band from Vancouver, an all-female punk combo called Secret Trial Five
whose singer, Sena, identifies openly as both a lesbian and a Muslim,
and is in a same-sex marriage. Sena explains that it's sometimes difficult to be gay, punk and Muslim, but this is only briefly mentioned,
and never developed.
Instead, it's Knight's story that takes up most of the movie, and although he's obviously an important figure in this scene, it doesn't help
that he comes off as annoying and puerile most of the time.
Despite significant thematic differences, it's hard to not compare
Taqwacore to Heavy Metal in Baghdad, a far superior documentary examining Muslim youth and rock subcultures. Rent that instead.
—Dan Fumano
OCT. 3 // 9:30 P.M. // EMPIRE GRANVILLE 7
OCT. 5 //1:15 P.M. // THE VISA SCREENING
ROOM IN THE EMPIRE GRANVILLE 7 FILMSTRIPPED7A
8*5tw»«®
BERLIN PLAYGROUND
(GERMANY, 2009,62 MIN, SUBTITLES)
This bittersweet documentary directed by Claudia Lehmann follows
Hans "Tomato" Narva, bass player for the '80s East German punk band
Herbst in Peking (Autumn in Beijing) around Berlin. Narva reminisces
about his 40 years equally divided between the communist-era German
Democratic Republic and post-Cold War Germany. Imprisoned for sedition when he was 14, he went on to form Herbst in Peking, now known
as part of die anderen Bands ("the other bands"), a loose descriptor of
music in the German Democratic Republic (GDR), which was openly
critical of the East German political establishment. One anecdote from
the film involves Herbst in Peking losing their performing license
after observing a moment of silence for the victims of the Tiananmen
Square massacre. Now, 20 years later, Narva has been arrested twice for
drunk driving and seems rudderless, stumbling his way through life
after the Berlin wall. His rueful optimism is infectious though and he
becomes an especially engaging character in his tortured relationship
withrhis mother—and in the way his glib facade evaporates when he
visits the prison he was confined to, which is now being converted
into condominiums.
The film provides an interesting look at post-communist Germany
though the eyes of someone who lived as an outsider in the GDR and
after reunification. Narva comes off as a charming ne'er-do-well, while
today's Berlin is portrayed as overly capitalistic and materialistic, and
not necessarily improved since the Cold War-era East Berlin. Premiered
earlier this year at the 59th Berlin International Film Festival, this is
highly recommended.
—Al Smith
OCT. 11 // 9:30 P.M. // VANCITY THEATRE
OCT. 12//11:00 A.M. //VANCITY THEATRE
10 VENEWS // HOKO'S 11111
AND THE COBALT CLOSE THEIR DOORS
\I7 lljpRATION BY
CLUBHOUSE COLLECTIVE
Sad news for Vancouver showgoers this month as both Hoko's and
the Cobalt are closing their doors.
Hoko's, the karaoke bar, sushi restaurant and place for small bands
to book shows is no longer playing music after it was handed a ticket
by a liquor inspector.
According to Tian Chao, the ticket was issued for several infractions on a night when a provincial liquor inspector observed that not
enough food was being served while Hoko's remained open around
ii p.m. In addition to that, Hoko's is being further fined because the
liquor inspector saw a patron carry a drink to the stage, which is a no-
drinking area, and also saw a patron dance, despite the signs posted
that clearly say "No Dancing."
"How can I monitor people if they are going to move their bodies
when they sing?" said an upset Chao over the phone.
At the time of this interview the ticket had not been assigned a
value, but Chao is expecting it to be at least $10,000, given that the last
one she received was $7,500 for a similar infraction.
The fate of Hoko's is very uncertain at this point and it certainly
won't be a venue in the future.
"I cannot afford to pay this penalty and right now," Chao said, "I
can't even afford to pay the rent."
The venue will also be closed to karaoke goers and the owners
are uncertain if they will be able to afford to keep it open as a restaurant.
The city has spoken about changing enforcement policies that
antagonize Vancouver music fans, but this ticket for Hoko's speaks
volumes to how well that policy shift has been going and it has many
Vancouver showgoers enraged.
"The idea that in an area like the Downtown Eastside,the problem
is a sushi restaurant playing music over 90 db while a drink rests on a
3-inch raised platform is quite obviously insane. As is punishing Hoko
and Jian for finding a way to attract new business to their restaurant
in an area the city has left to die," larrett Evan Samson, who hosted
the Phantom Islands night at Hoko's, wrote in the comments section
of the Georgia Straight's article on the closure.
This closure is a clear case of Vancouver's archaic and terrible
liquor laws working to destroy the livelihood of two people who have
done nothing but good for their neighbourhood, as well as music and
culture in our city. The repeated ticketing and harassment of tins venue
is not only damaging to our music scene, but it discourages others from
running innovative businesses like Hoko's that could do something to
revitalize a tough neighbourhood.
Hoko's is just one of two important venues that are closing,
though.
The Cobalt has also closed its doors on the many metal, punk and
hardcore fans who frequented it after Wendyi3, who ran the place, was
evicted by her landlords, the infamous slumlords, the Sahotas. The last
show was the weekly experimental music night Fake Jazz, ending its
career at the Cobalt and closing the place down.
With the loss of these two venues, young Vancouver bands will have
fewer places to play. The Cobalt was a venue where many Vancouver
bands cut their teeth, and though Hoko's has not been a venue for
as long, it has always been a welcoming place where any band who
wanted to book a show could do so, merely by asking the owners.
Vancouver might be trying to buck its No Fun City image, but it isn't
going to do it when venues like these can't get the support they need
to keep going.
11 YMA
ARTS CUTS:
//THAT MOVE TO MONTREAL IS STARTING TO LOOK MORE APPEALING, SASKATOON ISN'T LOOKING TOO BAD EITHER
BY BRENDA GRUNAU
On Sept. 9, over 400 people assembled in the
rain on the steps of the Vancouver Art Gallery
(VAG) to protest the B.C. provincial cuts to arts
funding. Speakers included Amir Ali Alibhai,
executive director of the Alliance for Arts,
Spencer Herbert, culture critic for the NDP,
artists, administrators and patrons.
The B.C. government slashed next year's
B.C. Arts Council budget by 40 per cent, but
the recent cuts to gaming grants, which are
raised through lottery and gambling revenue
to support arts, culture and other community
groups, have been even more shocking. Late
spring, arts organizations learned in the middle
of their budget year that their usual gaming
grant applications were frozen. In August, most
received a letter stating they would not be
receiving their funding this year. After public
outcry, on Sept. 2 the government announced
they would honour the multi-year gaming
contracts, leading the public to believe that arts
funding had been reinstated, but this is only a
portion of the funding that was cut.
Alibhai stated this in his speech from the
stairs of the VAG, "A lot of people think 'Oh,
everything's OK, money's been put back in,
contingencies funds were found for gaming'—
thaf s not true. That's absolutely not true. Total
support for arts and culture organizations in
B.C., from 2008 to 2012, including all sources,
is going down 85 to 92 per cent. No other
province in Canada has reduced support for
the arts sector."
These cuts will have a huge impact on B.C.'s
economy. The Ministry of Tourism, Culture
and the Arts Service Plan Update states that
B.C. employs 78,000 people in arts and culture,
with an economic benefit of $5.2 billion. "Of
Canada's ten provinces, B.C. has the largest
percentage of its labour force in arts occupations," commented Alibhai. With large cuts to
the funding that pays this labour force we may
see a migration of our arts and culture workers
to climates friendlier to their profession.
Donna Spencer, artistic producer with the
Firehall Arts Centre, spoke to the impact of
losing gaming funding. The Firehall used
to receive $74,000 annually from gaming.
They were gearing to up to make drastic cuts
mid-season when they heard that the government would honour their three-year contract.
"Originally, we thought we'd be either losing a
position or losing a show... 1.5 positions. An
organization our size can't afford to downsize
the staff, because we have to run a building
and a series." However, the Firehall will be
making cuts to their operating budget next
year, knowing that the gaming money will be
disappearing when their contract expires.
The Vancouver Folk Music Festival was not so
lucky this year. Without a multi-year contract,
the festival will no longer be receiving $90,000,
which it had expected and planned for. The
festival received notification that the granting
funds were frozen in June—heading right into
the festival, with no time for contingency planning. In August, post-festival, artistic director
Linda Tanaka learned that the funding was cut
"To start, we're not able to keep on staff that
we hoped to keep on. Next year there will be
at least $115,000 cut in funding... now we're
cut back again."
Gaming grants support community organizations including arts and culture, sport,
environmental, social services, public safety
and parental advisory councils. Gaming funds
have supported such diverse groups as the Vancouver Association for the Survivors of Torture,
the Centre for Not-for-Profit Sustainability,
the B.C. SPCA, the Vancouver Aids Society,
the Stanley Park Lawn Bowling Club and the
B.C. Civil Liberties Association.
According to the Gaming Policy and Enforcement Branch website, in 2008/09, $156.3
million dollars of provincial gambling revenues were distributed to community organizations—800 of them in Vancouver.
Gaming funding has been consistent for
many community organizations, and this consistency has caused many organizations to rely
on the funding. In 2002/03, $162 million in
gaming grants were distributed to community organizations, with similar funding given
out every year until now. Many community
organizations have received the same grant
amount for years, allowing them to leverage
that money with other funders. Certain grants
require funding from other sources—if gaming money is secured, other funders will come
on board. This fiscal year, only $53 million
will be dispersed as grant money throughout
the province of B.C., one third of the funds
available in previous years. According to Rich
Coleman, the Minister of Housing and Social
Development, this money will be given to
12 priority organizations, including health, social
services, public safety, "a limited number of
arts and culture activities" and organizations
with written multi-year contracts. Only 540 of
4>998 provincial recipients of gaming funds
had multi-year contracts.
"Lotteries is the gift that allows organizations such as ours to actually exist. It gives
us the momentum and support in the early
stages of our development and in our lead up
to be able to generate revenue and allows us
then to deliver programs to a larger audience,"
said Barrie Mowatt, president and founder of
the Vancouver International Biennale. The
Vancouver Biennale is a two-year event exhibiting 33 major sculpture installations in public
spaces around Vancouver, particularly in and
around Stanley Park.
Although Mowatt's organization had a multi-
year grant and did receive the funds promised,
he spoke to those who were unlucky. "It's a travesty for those smaller organizations who didn't
have multi-year funding who are dependent on
the few dollars they get to operate. For those
of us with a larger budget and bigger demands,
those multi-year grants were essential since the
staffing and programming plans were based
on a long-term commitment."
There are many arguments to support the
arts, both esoteric and economic. On a purely
economic level, the arts provide incredible
benefit. Firstly, the provincial government
itself figures that every dollar spent on arts and
culture brings in between $1.05 to $1.35 in tax
revenue. According to another report entitled,
"Valuing Culture: Measuring and Understanding Canada's Creative Economy" published by
Canadian Heritage and the Conference Board
of Canada, the culture sector accounts for 7.4
per cent of Canada's GDP, with a footprint of
$84.6 billion dollars in 2007. In contrast, arts
spending from all levels of government totalled
$7.9 billion. The arts and cultural sector employs more people than the auto industry in
Canada (according to Hill Strategies Research
Inc.), and artists typically earn salaries half the
size of other Canadians. In addition, in 2002,
the value of volunteer time donated to arts and
culture was valued at $3.6 billion (says Statistics
Canada in the "Satellite Account of Nonprofit
Institutions and Volunteering: 1997 to 2004."
So, not only does the arts and culture sector
provide incredible economic benefit, but at
half the cost of any other industry.
Mowatt doesn't understand how governments ignore their own research. "What's
interesting for us is that when cuts are made
at government levels, it appears that the arts
are most frequently hammered the strongest,
when it's the arts that generate the largest
return per dollar invested than any other government investment"
So why are arts budgets targeted during the
recent cuts?
// ILLUSTRATION BY CLUBHOUSE COLLECTIVE
Barrie replies, "They assume unknowningly
that the arts are a diversified, dysfunctional
and ununited and incohesive group that can't
talk with one mouth, with one voice. That's a
sadness to think that way because the recent
federal election in Quebec highlighted how
significant culture is to that province, and to
that people, and they spoke loudly when it
came to the polls."
Prove that the provincial government is
wrong by calling up your ML A and registering your opinion on the recent arts cuts. Write
a letter, and copy Gordon Campbell and Kevin
Krueger, the Minister of Tourism, Culture and
the Arts, and let them know that you are not
impressed. Flex your democratic muscle. Email
them or phone their offices.
Gordon Campbell:
premier@gov.bc.ca,
(250) 387-1715
Kevin Krueger:
TCA.Minister@gov.bc.ca,
(250) 953-4246
You can also put in your opinion on the new
budget by visiting www.leg.bcca/budgetcon-
sultations/
13 PtkidnafTODs
// ILLUSTRATION BY CLUBHOUSE COLLECTIVE
//POSSIBLY IRONICALLY CUTE,
POSSIBLY
TONGUE-IN-CHEEK CUTE
"I kinda hate it when someone's like, the chords from that chorus are the same as the chorus from that other song,"
said an outraged Celina Kurz.
"Yeah, seriously. Get over it," agreed band mate Alie Lynch. "Every song is a three-chard pop song."
14 7TKIUNAPR1U:
Kidnap Kids is fronted by Kurz and Lynch. Their music
is simple, but upbeat and catchy. They perform simple
pop songs and even though one of their songs might
have the same chord structure as Iggy Pop's "Passenger" their timbres, rhythms and lyrics are so different
it won't bother most people.
Lynch and Kurz are the gregarious duo who do the
majority of the talking for the Kidnap Kids during our
interview at the Lonsdale Quay food court where they
are being interviewed. Sitting quietly next to them is
their bass player Enzio Verster. The Kids are young
indeed; Lynch and Kurz are 19 and Verster is 17. Their
drummer Fred Hawley could not attend and both Kurz
and Lynch agreed he was busy "going to school and
doing his girlfriend" in Prince George.
The Kidnap Kids' moniker was created after endless
debate. They rotated through several other band names
before settling on it. For a while they were Bears &
Chairs, which became Beggars & Chairs, and at some
point they were Satellite Senior & the Junior Lagoons,
eventually settling on King Kong Kids before making
a realization.
"King Kong Kids [acronymed] to KKK so we decided
not to do that," said Kurz, and they switched it to Kidnap Kids.
The names they erratically bounced between are much
like their conversation style, which is an endless series
of tangential ideas, which could be considered annoying if it wasn't so amusing. The band's strong friendships seem to be a large part of their appeal when they
perform. The back-and-forth banter between Kurz and
Lynch that dominates the interview isn't far off from
their stage banter, and their sense of humour is readily
apparent in their music.
With a sound a bit like the anti-folk of the Moldy Peaches, the band is simultaneously adorable in sound and
uncomfortable in content.
The songs are cute numbers that'll get your head bobbing, but the lyrical content of some of their songs
(pedophilia, having your insides on your outsides) is
definitely not cute.
"I like the funniness of having a really cute [sound]
and all our songs are—'Whoa that's pretty creepy!'"
said Lynch.
They follow this up by saying they were worried about
being too cute for their audience, but this degenerated
into an argument about what kind of cute they were
(tongue-in-cheek, ironic or something else?) which
showed they still had a little way to go if they didn't
want to be branded as a cute band. Their other songs
about annoying ghosts and make out parties tends the
band toward the cuter end of the spectrum.
Their first album, You Would Run From Ratboy Grave, is
coming out on Oct. 3. It was recorded by Verster, who
doubles as their recording engineer and also plays
around town in Half Chinese. The album had been
finished for three months, but had been waiting for
someone to create album art for it until Verster's friend
Liam Shiveral was asked to do it. It's 12 tracks long and
contains most of the songs they've been playing live
and you can find a number of them on their Myspace
page (www.myspace.com/kidnapkids).
The album is being released on Geographing, which is
run by Jarrett Evan Samson (who is a director at the Safe
Amplification Site Society and a member of Collapsing Opposites, Role Mach and Shipyards). Samson, in
addition to all this, was instrumental in the formation
of the band. "Alie promised Jarrett she would be in a
band for Teen Rave Up [an event}," said Kurz. This was
enough for Lynch to get Kurz, who she had previously
sang with at an open mic night and worked with at
a video store, to join her and form the band. Verster
and Hawley joined later, providing the band with a
rhythm section.
Kidnap Kids are having their CD release party with Fine
Mist, Candles, the Magician & the Gates of Love and
Half Chinese at Goonies on Oct. 3 and will be playing
again at the Railway Club for Shindig with Move On
Citizen and the Receptionists on Oct. 13. Albums should
be available at both events. The relationship between musicians and their gear is a cm
awkwardly. However awkward or romantic the conncctioi
spent some time with a few of Vancouver's forthcoming a
WORDS AND PICTURES BY: SHAUN STAJttKB
WWW.SHAONSTANOER.C0M
■
■
<**»3# -IsF ^■O^^ X        BKfefc Will 11. J& Sit
PROPHECY
//SUN
I arrived at PrOphecy's home a little after 2 p.m. on a warm Sunday
afternoon curious to see what this experimental artist used to create
her rhythmically haunting ambiance. After meeting Velcro and Gorby,
PrOphecy Sun's twin cats, we sat down on her living room floor amongst
an array of gadgets, tape recorders and other unlikely instruments. I
wasn't surprised to discover that her parents were both musicians, her
mother was a vocalist and played guitar and her father was a percussionist who loved simple and unique sound.
"My dad has this really weird relationship with sound which I think
has really affected me. He would do things like play sounds of bells
or birds and say to me 'Listen to this!' and I would be like, 'Dad, this is
really weird,'" she explained. Clearly this exposure to "weird" sounds
has permeated PrOphecy Sun's current style and selection of instruments—which includes two Eiki cassette tape recorders, a digital hand
recorder, a Casio PT-30, a Little Tikes kids piano, a beat up harmonica,
a theremim, a morse code taper and an effects pedal (with a looping
feature) amongst other things.
"[The] instruments I used were probably shakers, little shaky things— 'cause my parents would be playing, and I would be banging things—
whether it's pots or pans or making acoustic sounds to whatever they
were doing. It's weird. But I'd say my first 'instrument' was my voice.
I've had more of a relationship with the sounds that come out of me
and kind of how it relates with my body and physicality."
Her voice is indeed a powerful instrument. When used with the effects
pedal, it takes on her signature ghostly presence, bundled with fourth,
fifth and sixth generation field recordings made with her digital and
cassette tape recorders and various clicks and taps from a tapper and
shaker, it becomes a heavily layered work. Throw in the eerie sounds of
a homemade theremin and you have a pretty unique sound. PrOphecy
Sun's gear is mostly made up of fairly inexpensive "garage sale items"
but she mentioned that her effects pedal is her centerpiece. "I'd say the
effects pedal is how I can create my atmosphere. It's the key to allow
me to layer. I can layer a certain amount with my tape players, but it's...
it's... kinda like my mother ship and these [other instruments] are my
subsidiaries, little floating ships."
// RYAN MCCORMICK (collapsing opposites)
Collapsing Opposites started as a solo recording project in Ryan McCormick's bedroom
sometime around 2002. Using an RC20
LoopStation and a MXR micro amp McCor-
mick pieced and looped songs into existence.
More members gradually joined and now
McCormick tends to shy away from using the
original pedals.
"Dudes would come up to me after a show
and be like 'Whoa dude what are those crazy
pedals? You got the DD6 and the RC20 and the
Micro amp!' And I'd be all 'I just got whatever
they gave me at the store I don't even remember.' It seemed to attract gear guys. It actually
started to bug me after a while. People would
kinda be more interested in the gear than the
songs in some ways ... Eventually that made
me turn the other way and use less and less
gear," McCormick explained. "It would be nice
to completely not use it, cause it's kind of a
hassle to set it all up and everything. I love
just seeing a band that's super simple and they
just plug in their stuff and go, you know that
don't need all these cords and wires."
McCormick tends to use his old 1965 Yamaha
electric guitar along with his bandmates Jarrett Evan Samson on bass, Jessica Wilkin on
keyboard and Laura Hatfield on drums for a
fuller, quirkier sound—a rather drastic change
since their first album that almost exclusively
used the pedals.
In the past year the band has also been hosting an art exhibition on Hatfield's Canwood
maple kick drum. Various artistst have been
doing work on the beautiful Alberta-made
drum. The artist Emiliano Sepulveda has recently added a spectacular photo-lenticular
structure entitled Object for Passive Light Show.
More can be seen at fouronthefloorprojects.
blogspot.com.
Ryan alongside Laura's Canwood kickdrum, artwork by Emiliano Sepulveda
^^fe-^^s^V
L^g^ ill |//IN^IKUMhNlALLUVL
/ BRUCE LEDINGHAM
(RED CEDAR)
"Key Crazy" is the term Bruce Ledingham used to describ himself during our meeting at Red Cedar's Vancouver character home. Ledingham
grew up with piano in the house but never really took to it, preferring
to play guitar. Then three years ago a lightning bolt struck.
"I saw the keys player from the Decemberists [Jenny Conlee] playing a real Hammond tone wheel organ and the expression you could
achieve with it, the amount of emotion that come out of one of those
things was amazing," Ledingham explained. And it seems he's never
looked back.
Ledingham owns an impressive collection of rare keyboards and
organs which consist everything from modern portable alternatives to
classic organs used in the '70s, ranging from a Hammond B3 Digital Organ, Moog analogue synthesizer, to his prized Rhodes digital piano.
"The Rhodes piano ... I have a very rare version. It was only in
truce Ledingham's somewhat crowded rehearsal corner
production for half a year in '84 and it was the last model they ever
made—arguably the ultimate form of the Rhodes piano. There are
only 1,100 in the world. I managed to track one down and drove all
the way to Edmonton to get it So for me it has massive sentimental
value. I'll never sell it—never get rid of it!"
Ledingham also has a Memotron synthisizer with a digital duplicate
of a Mellotron electro-mechanical polyphonic keyboard. "They're this
funky keyboard from the '60s, '70s—that used tape loops. Each key
had an assigned magnetic tape loop for eight seconds of any sampled
instrument of anything in that key, so you'll have flutes, strings, choirs,
guitars... anything. And it had a lot of quirky character and hiss.... It's
kinda the classic ensemble of '70s keys, but modernized." [ ed. Like the
one from Ferris Bueller's Day Off!]
Deeply inspired by Pink Floyd's Richard Wright's richly textured
work, Ledingham relentlessly pushes forward, always adding to his
gear and style.
18 //INblKUMb
NTAL LOVI
JARRED GREFF (the breff
Jarred Greff is shopping for a new acoustic guitar. His last, which also BAND)
happened to be his first, which was bought 15 years ago, was recently
crushed. Down in the basement of the Greff brothers Jarred and Scott's
rehearsal space Jarred told me the story. "My brother's girlfriend kinda
accidentally sat on it. [laughs] Actually, I handled it really well because
I realized it was more my fault I put it under the couch leg 'cause I was
glueing the bridge and didn't have a wood clamp and the only thing
***%%!***
tfi**!
that I found that was the right weight that wouldn't be too heavy
and push through, was the leg of the couch!"
After giving me the rundown on his current gear—including a
Fender Telecaster Highway One Series guitar, a 2x10 combo Laney
amplifier and two reverb pedals, I realized that, much like his musical
stylings, Greff enjoyed a "stripped down" approach to his gear.
"We have a mandolin, I think it's from about 1918 or 1920. My
grandmother ended up passing away three years ago and she left
us a really small inheritance and so me and my brother figured we
should go in together and buy something that we could kinda keep
but still could use. And so we bought this super old mandolin that
was roughly around the age that she was.... I love the sound. It's
got character," Greff told me. "Character" seems to be an important
element when selecting a new piece of gear for Greff "Whatever
instrument you play on will dictate how you work in the future and
the style you come out with, so I've kinda been choosy to what I put
into my guitars."
- With his equipment bearing various dings, scratches and worn
edges, there's no babying going on here.
"Theres definitely a personal connection for most musicians and
their gear—like I can't count the amount of times I've actually slept
with my guitar. It feels good. It feels right, [laughs] Wait! That makes
me sound lonely."
Scott Greff (left) and Jarred Greff (right) performing "Sharp Woman" on a
Mason & Risch acoustic piano and a borrowed classical guitar.
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[f i //CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
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ever suave, Gavin Walker.
Laugh Tracks is a show
more. It's Radio with sass!
Dedicated to giving local
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
Features at 11pm.
about comedy. Kliph
music acts a crack at some
(Eclectic) 8-nam
Oct. 5: Into Somethin'! A
Nesteroff, from the 'zine
WEDNESDAY
airplay. When not playing
Your favourite Brown-
fine album by a man they
Generation Exploitation,
the PR shtick, you can
sters, James and Peter,
called "the Coltrane of
hosts.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
hear some faves you never
offer a savoury blend of
the organ," Larry Young
generationexploit@ya-
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
knew you liked.
the familiar and exotic in
(aka Khalid Yasin) with
hoo.com, musicalboot@
Live from the Jungle
a blend of aural delights.
guitarist Grant Green
yahoo.ca
Room, join radio host
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
breakfastwiththebrowns@
and tenor saxophonist
Jack Velvet for an eclectic
(Pop) 5-6pm
hotmail.com
Sam Rivers.
WINGS
mix of music, sound bites,
Alternating Sundays
Oct. 12: Into Something:
(Talk) 2-2:30pm
information and inanity.
British pop music from
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
The versatile Yusef
Not to be missed!
all decades. International
(Talk) 12-ipm
Lateef (flute, oboe and
Reel to Real
dj@jackvelvet.net
pop (Japanese, French,
Alternating Mondays
tenor saxophone) made
(Talk) 2:30-3pm
Swedish, British, US, etc.),
Hosted by David Barsa-
this album just before
Movie reviews and criti
POP DRONES
'60s soundtracks and
mian.
he joined Cannonball
cism.
(Eclectic) io-n:3oam
lounge.
Adderley's band. Lateef is
CANADIAN VOICES
heard with pianist Barry
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
ANOIZE
SAINT TROPEZ
(Talk) 12-ipm
Harris and drum great
(Talk) 3-4pm
(Noise) n:3oam-ipm
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Mondays
Elvin Jones.
A national radio
An hour and a half of
Alternating Sundays
Oct. 19: Four Altos: Phil
service and part of an
avant-rock, noize, plun-
Welcome to St. Tropez!
PARTS UNKNOWN
Woods, Gene Quill, Hal
international network of
derphonic, psychedelic
Playing underrated music
(Pop) i-3pm
Stein and Sahib Shihab
information and action
and outsider aspects of
from several decades!
An indie pop show since
playing arrangements
in support of indigenous
audio. An experience for
st.tropez10i.9@gmail.com
1999, if s like a marshmal-
by pianist Mai Waldron
peoples' survival and
those who want to be edu
low sandwich: soft and
and Teddy Charles. A rare
dignity.
cated and EARitated.
QUEER FM
sweet and best enjoyed
item on Prestige Records.
lukemeat@hotmail.com
(Talk) 6-8pm
when poked with a stick
Oct. 26: Now's The Time:
RADIO FREETHINKER
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
and held close to a fire.
A live recording by bass
(Talk) 4-4:30pm
THE GREEN MAJORITY
bisexual and transexual
virtuoso Richard Davis
Promoting skepticism,
(Talk) i-2pm
communities of Vancouver.
LET'S GET BAKED
with tenor saxophonist
critical thinking and sci
Canada's only envi
Lots of human interest
(Talk) 3-4pm
Clifford Jordan and Mar
ence, we examine popular
ronmental news hour,
features, background on cur
Vegan baking with "rock
vin "Hannibal" Peterson
extraordinary claims and
syndicated by CIUT 89.5
rent issues and great music
stars" like Laura Peek, the
on trumpet. Edgy and
subject them to critical
FM Toronto or www.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
Food Jammers, Knock
compelling.
analysis. The real world is
greenmajority.ca.
23 pnr
lui.y nvi muuRKivruinnr
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-5pm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
AUDIOTEXT
(Talk) 6-6:30pm
The juiciest Canadian
writing: poetry readings,
author interviews, short
stories, spoken word, etc.
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with
a focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.
THE CANADIAN WAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big
emphasis on our local
scene. C'mon in! A kumba-
ya-free zone since 1997.
folkoasis@gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-iiPM
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment
in the realm of relationships and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/catego-
ry/sexy-in-vancity-radio
Hans Kloss' Misery Hour
(Hans Kloss) upm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET AND HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and
hot jazz from the 1920s,
'30s and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the
pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored
by donuts.
duncansdonuts.word-
press.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop
and whatever else I deem
worthy. Hosted by a closet
nerd, www.weallfalldown-
citr.blogspot.ca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we
interview a different creator to get their unique
perspective on comix and
discuss their upcoming
works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:30pm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World) 3:30-5pm
French language and
CAFE RADIO
(World) 5-6pm
Iranian talk and music
syndicated from CJSF
Simon Fraser University,
Burnaby, B.C.
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
(Rock) 6-7:30pm
Psychedelic, acid punk,
freakbeat, prog and other
grotesque and socially
relevant artifacts from
1965 to today, with an
emphasis on Vancouver's
freak flag with pride.
www.myspace.com/stereo-
scopicredoubt
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-
art, sound collage, field
recordings, etc. Recommended for the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-iipm
Featuring live band(s)
every week performing
in the CiTR Lounge. Most
are from Vancouver, but
sometimes bands from
across the country and
around the world.
HYPNOTIC GROOVE
(Techno) npm-i2am
Aural Tentacles
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird,
or it could be something
different. Hosted by DJ
Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.
FRIDAY
SYNCHRONICITY
(Talk) 9-ioam
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality,
health and feeling good.
Tune in and tap into
good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
This is not your average
spirituality show.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program.
djska_t@hotmail.com
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
(Hip-hop) 12-ipm
Top notch crate digger DJ Avi Shack mixes
underground hip-hop,
old school classics, and
original breaks.
beatstreet@telus.net
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix
of super-fresh weekend
party jams from New
Wave to foreign electro,
baile, Bollywood and
whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment Doot doola doot
doo...dootdoo!
nardwuar@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
HOT MESS
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
On temporary hiatus. Will
be replaced with UBC
Sports.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
On temporary hiatus. Will
be replaced with UBC
Sports.
RAINBOW GROOVE
(Dance) 9-io:3opm
On temporary hiatus. Will
be replaced with UBC
Sports.
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) io:30-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional
hits and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampires-
ball.blogspot.com.
thevampiresball@gmail.
SATURDAY
The Saturday Edge
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European music in the first
half, followed by Celtic,
blues, songwriters, Cajun
and whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.c0m
GENERATION ANIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk
and old-school hardcore
backed by band interviews,
guest speakers and social
commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
24
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided
by Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
codeblue@buddy-system.
org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada.com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment
and music for the Russian
community, local and
abroad.
nashavolna.ca
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(Dance/Electronic) 7-9pm
Broaden your musical
knowledge with DJs MP,
Socool, Soo and their
guests. Working across
music genres including
electronic and club-based
music.
shadow.jugglers@hot-
mail.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-npm
If you like everything
from electro/techno/
trance/8-bit music/retro
'80s this is the show for
you!
www.synapticsandwich.
net
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip-hop) upm-iam
Hosted by J-Boogie and
Joelboy. The latest tracks,
classics, rare and obscure,
current events and special
features of peeps coming
into the studio. Listeners
can expect to be entertained... church.
klymkiw@gmail.com **&m
//TWENTY
f OUR HOURS OFJIELL
Btmnn mo i illustratidn by jiu southern
If you are a lover of music then chances are you
feel a special connection to live performance.
There is something magical when experiencing
live music that does not occur when simply
listening to a record. This is why it is commonplace to see artists release live DVDs and CDs.
In Vancouver, we enjoy a thriving and eclectic
local scene. As a fan, attending shows on a
regular basis can be a difficult commitment
to make—and at times a costly endeavour. So
what is the hardcore music fan to do? How can
one stand in awe of such a deliriously diverse
buffet of musical offerings and satisfy his or
her voracious appetite? Simply by tuning into
CiTR 101.9 FM on Oct. 1, that's how. In recent
years Thunderbird Radio Hell has sought to
bring the live experience to its listeners and
now it will go one step beyond and offer a
full 24-hour showcase of Vancouver's finest
local music live.
Besides giving fans of the show a unique
chance to hear tons of their favourite acts,
the program will also give artists a kind of
exposure and experience that they may not be
accustomed to. From 6 p.m. on Oct. 1 to 6 p.m.
the next day, bands and solo artists will roll into
campus and bring their best to the airwaves.
I sat down with Ben Lai, host of Thunderbird
Radio Hell to find out a bit more about his
hopes for the show. "Right now we're thinking between 24 to 30 acts. We're trying to be
slightly conservative in our scheduling since
it's our first year doing this. Initially we were
thinking about breaking some record, but
for now we are just going to try and squeeze
as much music comfortably into the show as
we can."
Expect to hear a bit of everything from rock
and ska to New Wave, hip-hop and psychedelic.
In our discussion, Lai could confirm the participation of electro-punk act Ttoin Crystals, New
Wave revival rockers You Say Party! We Say
Die!, garage punks What's Wrong Tohei, ambient/folk singer/songwriter Leah Abramson and
psychedelic rockers the Green Hour Band.
Hosting duties for Thunderbird Radio Hell
began in 2002 for Lai. Prior to taking the reigns
in Hell, Lai was involved with Shindig {ed.
Shindig is currently happening every Tuesday at
the Railway. Come down!], a battle of the bands
program in which the winning act earned a
live showcase on Thunderbird Radio Hell. Out
of this relationship, he soon inherited hosting
duties, and is now primed to take his love of
presenting live music to the next level.
In an undertaking of this kind, there are
numerous obstacles that arise in terms of production and scheduling.
"The change over is gonna be a big deal. Setting up gear, people getting in and out of the
lounge. We're hoping we can cut time down
from half an hour to maybe 20 minutes. Getting a house drum kit and some amps in here
will hopefully save us some time." Another
factor Lai noted was the volume of people that
could potentially be buzzing around campus
at noon while bands are trying to unload their
vans. "My show normally runs at night when
campus is empty. With this, when everybody's
at lunch or whatever and bands are coming
out here through traffic, we're gonna have to
tell them to come early." While rock 'n' roll
and punctuality rarely go hand in hand, Lai
remains cautiously optimistic.
Lai even has a plan to keep going throughout
this upcoming marathon of music "There will
be a bed of sorts somewhere. I don't handle
coffee all that well. There's also the afterparty.
I'm thinking maybe power naps."
Tune in Oct 1 at 6 p.m. to 101.9 FM or online at www.citr.ca for Twenty Four Hours of
Thunderbird Radio Hell. The afterparty will
be taking place at the Ukrainian Hall on Oct
2 with bands to be announced soon.
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_28_ // UNDER
REVIEW
AMELIA GURRAN
HUNTER, HUNTER
SmShooter Records
Todays wefyone is in a hurry-
to catch the bus, to make an appointment or to make it to work
or class. And sometimes, without
even realizing it, we need something to push our pause buttons
and force us to stop, slow down
and breathe. Amelia Curran's
Hunter, Hunter does just that.
With her fifth album, Curran, a
Newfoundland native, confesses
dark and sad thoughts that we all
think ourselves, but are perhaps
too hesitant to acknowledge. With
shades of Sarah Harmer and Joni
Mitchell, Curran proves her infinite talent as a wise and mature
artist
One of the most admirable
qualities of this album is Curran's
simplistic and intimate approach.
There are no lush harmonies, overpowering rhythm sections or overcomplicated arrangements. In fact,
most of the arrangements consist
only of Curran's welcoming and
haunting voice, a guitar and bass.
While in most cases this lineup
might prove to be repetitive, Curran makes it work. One can't help
but feel as though Curran is sitting
right beside you whispering her
confessions into your ear.
Suggested tracks include "The
Mistress" and "The Dozens"—
the latter providing a break from
the confessional feel of the other
tracks. The accordion and more
up-tempo cabaret style makes
one feel as though they have been
temporarily whisked away to the
streets of Paris.
Don't be surprised if you find
yourself nodding in recognition
to Curran's many confessions. Just
pour yourself another glass of red
wine and realize that sometimes
all you need in order to breathe
is a song.
—Melissa Foye
gpLEX
mmmi
MintRei^^^-)
There's a delicate balance between
simplicity and complexity in children's songs like "Baby Beluga" or
"I am a Pizza." Music that's overly
complex or difficult to listen to
can be alienating to children—
or anyone really. Music that's too
simple will bore children (and
their parents).
According to their press release
Duplex's sophomore release continues their mission to deliver indie rock to kids. Occasionally this
album probably errs on the side of
complexity for a five-year-old, but
there's a lot of fun tracks here that
kids will get into. "That's How we
Make a Sandwich" is catchy as hell,
easy to sing along to and about an
activity thaf s fun to participate in.
"7 Noble Gases" is an educational
intro to chemistry that disguises
itself as a ridiculous heavy rock
song. The album stands strongest
when it's trying to be fun, and it's
hard not to imagine kids rocking
out with their parents to those
ones.
Where the album falls down is
when it tries to introduce heavier subjects, like evolution, with
cringe worthy lyrics such as those
on "Alive" ("Species, what is species? / Not a matter of distinction
but a matter of degree") or the
story of same-sex divorce, which
is unlikely to help any child going
through it to feel any better about
the situation ("We're unhappy /
We feel stuck / We give up up up
up / You will see we'll love you
more / Instead of two dads now
you'll have four")
Gaffes like that aside, this album
is pretty adorable and the players
on the album (Veda Hille, Geoff
Berner, members of No Kids and
AC Newman to name a few) do an
excellent job of putting together
simple songs that will do a good
job of bridging the gap between
Raffi and the New Pornographers
for young listeners.
—Jq$$&Xjdw
THE FUaHIVES
FIND ME
Independent
Va^^Speef band the Fugitives
deliver a new EP with the heartstrings-tugging conceptual theme
of people in solitude and isolation.
"Find Me" is soaked in folk-feel
and Canadiana, with touches of
gypsy flair: banjos, mandolins and
accordions all figure into the sad
is. UNDER REVIEW
sonic translations of loneliness.
The Fugitives got their inspiration
from tales in newspapers and overheard conversations, searching for
ways to talk, musically, with and
about people who seem as distant
as anyone could possible be, like
the subject of the track titled "To
the Man Found in His Apartmerit
Seven Years After His Death."
The sound of "Find Me" is reminiscent of Sufjan Stevens or Beirut, and the songs are diverse and
well balanced. Interweaving spoken word and poetry between and
within tracks adds some lyrical
heft to the EP. The ironically titled
"Music" is a spoken word piece
where two of the band members
recite some musings on the very
nature of music in synchrony.
The Fugitives have been touring all over North America and
Europe to much acclaim. Having
played at a variety of festivals,
they seem to have really gelled
as a band and deliver tight, well-
composed music that demonstrates great storytelling and lyrical ability. The diverse EP shows
creativity and imagination, giving
a sampling of the spectrum that
the Fugitives are capable of All
round, a solid release.
—Adam Mannegren
MAGNETALANE
GAMBLING WITH GOD
Last Gang i?$$iplr;"-v
Galling with God, the second
full-length from much hyped Toronto trio Magneta Lane is a near-
flawless piece of indie rock. Lexi
Valentine's near-perfect voice and
straightforward guitar style both
have enough beauty and attitude
to carry gentle ballads and full
rock-outs. French's bass lines are
deep, tight and consistent, gluing
the songs together. Nadia King's
phenomenal beat-keeping is dynamic and interesting. The band
has a great sense of song structure and the lyrics are thoughtful.
The track list is diverse and well-
ordered. Most of all, these ladies
manage to create a huge sound
with just three people.
However, there is still something missing. Gambling with God
is good, but why isn't it great? It
is not particularly mind-blowing,
but it is enjoyable to listen to. It
isn't particularly groundbreaking,
but it is well done. Perhaps there
is something lost in the mix; it is
almost too clean and perfect. It
could use more grit—more life.
It sounds as though something is
held back. It has all the ingredients to hit but fails to connect. In
the end, it is a good album that
will probably sound great live.
—^SlJ^ffi"5
CAROLYN MARK
&NQARBUCKLE
LET'S JUST STAY HERE
Mint Records
CaroryuMark & NQ Arbuckle,
both good team players as well as
solid individual acts, have finally
built on the promise of their earlier collaboration on the track "Fireworks" from Mark's 2005 release,
Just Married: An Album of Duets. The
new product, Let's Just Stay Here, is
a charmingly meat-and-potatoes
album, full of wholesome hooks,
beefy string lines and hot, brothy
harmonies. (Maybe I should have
had dinner before I wrote this.)
Let's Just Stay Here is careful to
maintain an appealing balance
throughout—balance between
the cynical and the apologetically maudlin (as in the blushingly
sweet "Officer Down"); balance
between sunny sing alongs and
gritty 2 a.m. ballads; and of course,
in the time honoured country tradition of male-female duos, balance between hoarse rumbling
and honeyed, Neko Case-esque
crooning. The result is an album
that's sturdy and even, but that
rarely builds to anywhere. If a
song begins strong, it will probably end strong. Most tracks fly
beneath the radar and dole out
modest payoffs. While this can sustain interest for a good long while,
the home comforts of the well-
built country song may start to
seem a little stale towards the end.
Luckily, the album's penultimate
song—"When I Come Back"—is
also its best, shimmering with all
the energy and unruliness missing
in the other songs. It's enough to
revive the listener's interest for
the title track, a sweet and wistful waltz, which closes out the
album.
—Miranda Martini
PARLOMpTEPS
THE HIDDEN NAMES
Nine Mik Se^ftib
Tfi®|f|'Jfe|"fDng on Parlour Steps'
latest case called "Little Pieces"
that contains these words, "We
break and then we go / We try,
we try and stay hopeful / But it
seems the more we learn, the
less we know." These words are
so true, so simple, so real and so
well placed within chords,. The
movements and progressions are
so precise. And such is the standard with Parlour Steps. Gorgeous
music wound around conscious
and smart lyrical wordplay that
melds together to form a perfect,
almost otherworldly art form. Yes,
the West Coast musical landscape
just got a little brighter with the
release of The Hidden Names. Hot
on the heels of last year's outstanding Ambiguoso, Hidden Names is ripe
with precious moments and is a
marked step forward and upward
for a band that keeps getting better with each release. Singer/songwriter Caleb StulFs voice mixes
happily with bassist Julie Bevalis
and newest member, keyboardist
Allyson Mara, and is a large part
of what makes their music so stunning as drummer Robert Linton
keeps time with the best of them
and guitarist Rees Haynes adds
a cooling finishing touch. This
music is a wake up call to an audience that needs a tuneful shake
up and Hidden Names is a shiny
soft weapon aimed directly at the
heart that will be sure to leave fans
breathless and even more rabid in
their love of this excellent band!
—Nathaniel Bryce
M. 7/UNI
SILVER STARLING
SILVER STARLING
Last Gang Records
SilvefMterting is the latest band
to emerge from under the mighty
shadow of Arcade Fire. Violinist/
keyboardist Marika Anthony-Shaw
is a touring member of the iconic
Montreal collective, and frontman
Marcus Paquin is engineering the
band's upcoming album. Comparisons between the two groups are
warranted, given Silver Starling's
penchant for moody, baroque-
tinged atmospherics. Paquin's
vocals are strained and emotive, at
times sounding distinctly similar
to Win Butler.
The group's self-titled debut
is an assured, mature-sounding
album, although it's a little
smooth around the edges. The
guitars shimmer rather than bite
and the rhythm section is more
plodding than it is rocking. At
times, the group is so mellowed
out that it sounds like Bon Iver.
This is especially noticeable on
the quietly reverent "Love and a
Broken Heart," a reverb-soaked
ballad with haunting pedal steel
flourishes.
When Silver Starling finally kicks
into high gear on "This Is Not a
Dream," it's a moment of revelation that shows the band's massive
potential—if only it was willing to
show its claws more often. For the
most part, however, the album is
pleasantly atmospheric The chugging, bass-heavy groove "Closer"
and the slow-building opener
"Something Over Nothing" would
be ideal for movie soundtracks,
but they're unlikely to hold your
full attention.
T-rAlex Hudson
1WBM&TRAFFIC
TERRITORY
Bwftsimd
Two Htmrs Traffic's last album,
2007's Little Jabs, earned the
Charlottetown group a short list
nomination for the coveted Polaris Prize. Given this successful
track record, if s not surprising
that the band chose to employ
a similar formula for the follow-
up. None of the songs on Territory
are as immediately catchy as past
singles "Stuck for the Summer" or
"Nighthawks," but there are still
plenty of memorable moments.
"Noisemaker" is a shimmering
pop anthem structured around a
two-note guitar hook and subtle
falsetto harmonies. The fuzz-
drenched "Happiness Burns" scales
back the group's usual earnestness
in favour of dreamy guitar leads
and effectively deadpan vocals.
Although the singles have less
immediate pay off, Two Hours
Traffic honed its ballad writing
abilities for Territory. The keyboards are more prominent than
ever before, as the haunting "Wicked Side" is punctuated by chilling
electric piano riffs. Best of all is
the closer "Sing a Little Home."
With a faintly distorted electro
beat, resonant piano chords and
"love is all you need" f-style lyrics, it's the gentlest and most effective moment of the album.
Special credit goes to producer
Joel Plaskett, who coaxes out
the atmospheric elements of the
group's sound and prevents the
album from seeming too much
like a Little Jabs rehash.
—Alex Hudson
mmmmi
NAUNTAUS
KiltlmlMm?-
Edmonton's the Wheat Pool return with their sophomore release
Hauntario. An album written over
the last two years while touring
and laying low, Hauntario is a
gentle step away from the folk
country sound that rounded out
their first record and heads in a
more indie rock direction. The
music is pure Canadiana in content and sound and the influences
are steeped in notes of Blue Rodeo and Wilco. With sweeping and
impressive vocal arrangements,
nice harmonies and crisp production, Hauntario is an impressive
follow up that ought to merit full
attention from first track to last
The music goes back to basics with
less reliance on studio wizardry
and more focus on pure talent
and good songwriting, which is
refreshing. The album opens by
setting a comfortable tone that is
sure to draw in the listener, starting with the star track "This Is It,"
a catchy little number that is effective in its storytelling and tastily
fleshed out with backing piano,
beefy guitar hooks and banks of
horns. With obvious attention to
detail, Hauntario plays like a love
note to the country in which the
band resides, yet not shamelessly
so. Smart, dark and haunting, yet
still carrying a hope of light at the
end of a tunnel, the Wheat Pool
have created a very good album
that is sure to capture the ears of
new and old fans alike.
—Nathaniel Bryce
31 // REAL
LIVE ACTION
photos (clockwise) //basketball by nicole ondre / pissed jeans by
sean nelson/meatdraw by robertfougere
W& %$$!featuring:
HAHK PiNE & LILY FAWN / GRASS CITY / MEATDRAW / THE ALLEY
BOIIRBON BOOTLEGGERS
AutifB&j&he Atibi
The elegance, clean lines and lore of a wind-powered yacht are difficult to disregard. Truly, there are few occasions when a motor vessel is
superior to a sailboat. One such occasion, however, is a voyage whose
journey is the destination: on a vessel whose passengers are higher than
the seas. The event: was named Das Boot after a 1981 German WWII film
by Wolfgang Peterson about "42 raw recruits caught up in a war they
didn't understand and the captain who must lead them in their struggle
to survive." It required the Transport Canada-approved 370-person
capacity of the 140 foot Atibi to be transformed into a rock-and-roll
flotilla complete with a full wet bar, to contain the raucousness of the
bands and recruits held within her hull.
The concert line-up was hand selected by organizer Amanda Cochrane,
based largely on the bands' pure entertainment value. Openers the Alley Bourbon Bootleggers sprinkled on the old-timey bluegrass flavour
and managed to keep the crowd calm long enough to pretend we were
motoring into international waters as we cruised under the Burrard
Street bridge. As the captain of the ship made his rounds, Hank Pine,
and the sweetest girl on board, Lily Fawn, took the proverbial helm and
immediately took their performance to legendary levels by performing
on stage with an actual topless mermaid, [ed. She had the tail ofajhh!]As
night fell and the sun set on English Bay, Grass City made sure things
got heavy, proving that the best boats are, in fact, made of metal. Grass
City definitely drew a large contingent of fans to the event—there were
a lot of beards on board. MeatDraw was a natural encore for Hank
& Lily, as the Victoria supergroup utilizes Lily's saw playing skills to
complement the sounds, joy and spectacle of their live show.
In a city that has been so bereft of fresh venues, all on board appreciated this one-of-a kind event.
—Roh^fymgere
SMOOTH SAILING
August 2$/BUtmore Cabaret
SunnM&litight have been ending, but the weather was just right for
some smooth sailing. Twelve of Vancouver's finest bands (plus a few
guests) turned up at the Biltmore event in full marina regalia to perform covers of'70s yacht rock hits on a light-hearted night not soon
32 forgotten.
Having arrived too late to catch the bittersweet folk stylings of Valerie
Graham (since when do shows start on time?), the first band I caught
was Shane Turner Overdrive, with an earnest set full of yearning, befitting the best of high school dances. Next, Thee Ahs charmed with their
jangly renditions of smooth tunes like Bread's "Baby I'm-a Want You."
Jody Glenham and prOphecy sun then played a hauntingly ambient
version of "Maneater" stretching out to ten minutes, and, following
up the slow jam, Fine Mist and Island Time got bodies moving with
their raucous set including the Doobie Brothers smash "What a Fool
Believes." Apollo Ghosts next decided to waste away in Margaritaville,
covering the original yacht-rocker Jimmy Buffet, and they made sure
that form matched content by serving up the appropriate drinks to
audience members on "Margaritaville" and "Tequila Sunrise." Boogie
Monster and Kidnap Kids played a simultaneously intense and cute
set with Toto's "Africa" and Journey's "Don't Stop Believing," the Greff
Band serenaded with some soulful power ballads, and B-Lines brought
a hefty dose of punk sneer to such classics as Neil Sedaka's (or the
Captain & Tennille's) "Love Will Keep us Together," ensuring beer was
spilled like the tide coming in.
The Greff Band will be sailing in style on the yacht ride they won
for being declared the evening's "smoothest" band by their audience
(Second place: B-Lines, Third place: MT-40). However, this writer was
stuck taking the bus and so had to miss out on Red Cedar, Role Mach,
and MT-40 (thanks a lot, Translink), but it can only be assumed that
the sailing was smooth off into the night
—Sean Nebon
DUNGEN/WOODS
September 2 /Venue
If yotr^iidn't know that Vancouver was hurting for live music venues,
this gig brought the sad reality home. The place was half-full at its
busiest The "sexy" club decor, complete with sports scoreboard-style
lights lining the back of the stage, highlighted the incongruity between
the cheesy newness of Venue and the catchy revivalist styles of the two
bands. This aside, both bands did their jobs well. Woods made me feel
like an old man, but in a good way, reminding me of the lo-fi scene I
enjoyed in the '90s. Not much for stage presence or speaking to the
audience, the group played adequately, and generally entertained those
who made the effort to arrive early to see them.
The house became more boisterous once psych-hippies Dungen took
the stage. Geddy Lee look-alike Gustav Ejstes and his merry group of
Scandinavians launched into the better known work from their last
two albums with ease and flair. Reminiscent of Ash Ra Tempel, Dungen
are part psychedelic rock, part Krautrock, and part '60s jam band. I
was impressed by their Vancouver fan base, considering that they were
singing in Swedish to a primarily English audience. Being ignorant of
the words makes one not only concentrate more on the music, but to
the meaning you attach to the foreign words, resulting in an odd feeling of connection to the lyrics. A couple of slow songs, a few flurries
of flute and a respectable three-song encore (it was a weekday, after
all) left those of us who stuck it out to the ripe old hour of midnight
glad that we did.
—Robert Robot
BANG GAtfG DANCE / BASKETBALL / MACHU PICCHU
September 4 /mltmore Cabaret
In late August of this year, Pukkelpop festival security guards assaulted
Gang Gang Dance drummer Jesse Lee as he tried to go backstage without
proper identification. After seeing the band play at the Biltmore on Sept
4, we can confirm that the incident has not affected Lee beyond some
superficial damage—akin to Walt Comiskey taking a sledgehammer to
the Charlestown Chiefs' bus to "make it look mean." The ferocious and
precise rhythms that form the bedrock of this experimental world beat
rock outfit were in fine form that night, accentuated by Liz Bougatsos'
distinct croon-meets-wail.
The fantastic "Egowar" from Gang Gang Dance's 2005 record God's
Money quickly engaged the diverse crowd of tribal enthusiasts and
jaded ne'er-do-wells, kicking off a set that was as fluid and seamless
as it was eclectic. The centrepiece of the group's performance was
everyone's favorite: "House Jam" from 2008's brilliant Saint Dymphna,
which not only showcases the band's astonishing growth since starting
in 2004 but also their accessibility. 2009's First Communion from the
EP of same name further indicates that this band isn't running out
of ideas and is quite capable of commuting between difficult weirdo
jams and terrific hooks.
Local heroes Basketball got the crowd going prior to Gang Gang
Dance with their own brand of quiver/quake tribal rock. After a year
in Europe, the group has seemingly inherited bits and pieces of various continental sounds and has perfectly integrated them into their
already unique output And most people would agree that these guys
are just getting warmed up.
Another local group, Machu Picchu, opened the show with a sneaker-gaze hammer of Thor set that got people talking. Jason Sulyma
(My!Gay!Husband!) mans the drums for this band of competent Van-
couverites—you can catch them playing around town in the upcoming
weeks.
—Gord McCullough
BAND OF HORSES / CASS MCCOMBS
September 4/Commodore Ballroom
With a 4<*uble header like this, expectations ran high at the CommodorePontnis Saturday night. The critically acclaimed Cass McCombs
and his touring band of indie darlings were technically flawless, if a
little underwelming. With a lack of any up-tempo moments, watching
McCombs was kind of like taking in a Luna show, except that Luna's
Dean Wareham made sure to crank out a ripping guitar jam every so
often, just to snap you out of your mid-tempo coma.
For me, Band of Horses have always sounded like Built To Spill's
country cousins. They write rock anthems like BTS, but with a little
country flair. As they took the stage, it was clear that they're a much
beloved band. I remember hearing the song "The Great Salt Lake" on
the crappy Fox show Standoff. It was emotive then, and even more so
live—let's just say I got a little verklempt. They played songs from their
whole catalogue and new stuff that I imagine will find its way onto
their soon-to-be-released third album. Now, I know BOH are a little
bit country and a lot rock 'n' roll, but the country seems to be getting
the better of them on their new material. Not being the biggest country fan, I wasn't especially fond of this new style, but it didn't seem
to bother anyone else; in the end, these good oP boys treated us to
some fine pluckin', drummin' and singin', and made this city bumpkin
mighty grateful indeed.
—Robert Robot
ELDORADO
September 4/The Railway Club
Starting at a little past midnight, Vancouver's own Eldorado at the Railway Club played a late show. The evening kicked off with a look at the
band's new video, and while it was good, the crowd was there to watch
them play. Everyone was polite, but eager for the show to get started.
Eldorado plays a mix of southern blues and country, very smooth and
easy to listen to—it makes your toe start tapping involuntarily. Sitting
to the side of the stage was Michael Flunkert on slide guitar. Rather
than mugging for the audience, he was happy to let his musicianship
do the talking. His guitar formed the backbone of the sound, wide
Julie Bavalis' bass thumped away enthusiastically in the background.
But it was clear from the first song the two stars of the show would be
Angela Fama and Nen Jelicic. Jelicic takes most of the focus by default:
he towers over his bandmates, swaying with his guitar, and tops it all off
with a cowboy hat without seeming cheesy—he has the stage presence
to pull it off—and lead vocalist Angela Fama is cute, cute, cute! She has
a velvety-soft voice with a beautiful bass undertone that dripped aural
sugar on the audience all night Eldorado play evocative music with a
cinematic quality to it; reminiscent of the Cowboy Junkies and Mazzy
Star, there isn't anything new or innovative about them, but
33 />-•>
monotonvc by cyrus mceachern
they are pure pleasure to listen to. Earthy and sweet, like honey for
the ears, every song is delivered with humour and a smile—even the
sad songs don't sound that sad.
—Katherine Boothroyd
IIffCHES OF BLOOD /BISON B.C. /THE GOLERS
Sj0$mber 11/Commodore Ballroom
What better way to say goodbye to summer and welcome the season
of the witch than a triple bill of local metal? On Sept. n, legions of
loyal metalheads let down their greasy locks, put on their dirtiest jean
vests and swarmed into the Commodore for a night of earsplitting
pandemonium.
The Golers warmed up the boozy crowd with an entertaining set of
tunes that pinballed around the grey area between punk and metal,
quickly proving that tonight, the only difference between the Commodore and the Cobalt was the size of the stage and the price of the
beer.
Next up were Vancouver's beloved ambassadors of thrash, Bison B.C.
A year or so of relentless touring has only made them louder, tighter
and their hair longer (haircuts are most likely contractually forbidden
by their label, Metal Blade). The expectations are always high when
Bison B.C. takes the stage, and they never disappoint Their epic thrash
and endless energy took control of the room.
With the crowd well worn in, but not worn out, it was time for the
evening's Dungeon Masters to make an attack roll, and it was evident
from Cam Pipes' first glass-shattering note that 3 Inches of Blood would
score a critical hit. They blasted through a set that had their rabid
disciples frantic with approval. The loyal minions smashed into one
another with their fists pumping and horns waving, and were rewarded
with a handful of tunes off the brand new album, old anthems like
"Deadly Sinners," and even a Blue Oyster Cult cover.
After a battle well fought, the masses marched proudly past the
pillaged merch booth and into the night with obliterated eardrums,
battered bodies and victorious grins.
—Mark Paulhus
Mnm DAY REAL ESTATE / THE JEALOUS SOUND
September 17/ Commodore Ballroom
It's tough to explain the Big Deal about this band to someone who
doesn't already know about it. One has to convey that in the early '90s,
the term "emo" wasn't a pejorative applied to the likes of Simple Plan,
but instead signified an exciting transition within post-hardcore circles,
from rabid aggression to a greater depth of feeling. Sunny Day Real
Estate were among the pioneers, arising from the Pacific Northwest in
1994 with whirling guitars, complex songwriting that often pushed past
the five-minute mark, and high-pitched vocals before that became the
norm. Their second reunion, and first tour in a decade, began in front
of a devoted audience at our very own Commodore Ballroom.
Openers the Jealous Sound played decently punchy rock tunes, but
were put to shame by the magic of Sunny Day emerging from their
own legend with undiminished technical skill and zeal for performance.
Singer Jeremy Enigk's elongated syllables and climbing pitches drove
songs like "Seven," unaffected by a sore throat that was all too apparent
in his speaking voice. Mood shifts were common as things moved between delicate guitar picking, pounding climaxes and layered, complex
chord structures. All three were often present in a single song, as in
"J'Nuh," whose many buildups and transitions washed over the crowd
like a rolling tide."Iscarabaid"'s chorus exploded out of nowhere into
a maelstrom of fury and dynamic drumming by William Goldsmith,
while a new song written less than a week earlier fit right in with the
band's peak material.
The focus was on the first two albums, as it should have been, since
it was on debut Diary and the self-titled follow-up that Sunny Day Real
Estate crafted their most memorable work. Encore "In Circles" had just
as much gravity as on its original recording, and confirmed that these
forefathers of emo (whatever that means now) have been transported
to the present day unscathed and in fine form.
—Simon Foreman
ROSE MELBERG / ANGELO SPENCER / AUNTS & UNCLES
September 18/Little Mountain Studios
Rose Melberg may have told her audience that "this is a small show
for a small record," but it definitely had a big heart. The evening started
off with Melberg and a special guest serenading early arrivals with a
ukulele. The sweet island melodies assured that smiles were placed on
faces. Next Aunts & Uncles took to the stage to play a potent blend of
indie rock and chamber pop. The four-piece brought an amazingly full
sound to such a small space with delicate interplay between strings,
guitar, xylophone and drums.
Olympia's Angelo Spencer next took listeners out of the gallery and
"into the desert" through a set of extended surf jams that would have
made Link Wray proud. Spencer brought a playful, relaxed vibe to the
stage and even managed to get some of his mostly seated audience up
and dancing.
34 // KtAL
LIVE ACTION
The last dance, so to speak, was saved for Ms. Rose Melberg, for whom
this record release party was thrown (Homemade Ship, out now on K
Records). Several guests joined Melberg onstage, including members
of Aunts & Uncles and Apollo Ghosts Adrian Teacher for a heartfelt
rendition of "Each New Day." The ever-talented Larissa Loyva (Kella-
rissa) joined her for the duration of the set, and for several songs she
had a very special guest: Rose's mom. Melberg played a soft acoustic
set (her songs are quieter now to keep her son from waking) delivered
with tender vulnerability. This vulnerability was definitely felt on one
of the evening's most affecting numbers, a cover of Roy AcutFs "Blue
Eyes Crying in the Rain" performed by Melberg, her mother and Loyva.
There was an undeniable sweetness to this mellow evening, one that
won't soon be forgotten despite it only being a "small show."
—''^^^^n
OM/LICHENS
September 18/Bdtmore Cabaret
SearaB&jki'a worn kitchen chair under disorienting green stage lights,
with nearly everyone in the room huddled next to him (hecklers
included), Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe (a.k.a. Lichens) stole this highly
anticipated show from stoner/doom rock icons and tour mates Om.
Employing only his voice, an array of effects pedals and a lone electric
guitar, Lowe developed an audience-performer communion rarely seen
in venues the size of the Biltmore. Beginning with shrill, sustained
streams of singing, he ventured into expanses of baritone drones and
mutated guitar layer harmonies that stretched minutes into uncharted
passages of time, overlapping one another and then fading away, directionless. Forty minutes later, after deep, gradual excursions into sonic
abyss, he stepped off of the chair with little fanfare, acknowledging
rounds of applause with a few subtle nods of the head. I give kudos to
Lowe for having the balls to bring this kind of brooding meditative
abstraction to an uppity Vancouver crowd.
Comparatively, Om came off as melodramatic and pompous. The
depth of bassist Al Ciscernos' riffs and the subtlety of Emil Amos' huge
percussion was impressive, but they failed to bring the same unifying
energy to the diverse crowd, even with Lowe's ornamentations guiding
them through their staid soundscape. Towards the end, Ciscernos had
to demand silence to get even a minority of the crowd to get into it,
pleading, "If you want to talk, can you go outside please." Eventually,
after he was frustrated enough, he went with a more straight-forward
"shut the fuck up." Om's synchronicity was enthralling at points, but
Ciscernos' drawn out, monotone vocals and the band's general lack of
vision for the set made their performance pale in comparison to the
spirit of Lowe's ambitious improvisation.
There was a core set of fans grouped tightly around the stage for Om
at all times, but things fell apart rather quickly once Ciscernos started
demanding tokes of Indica and pontificating about how special the
night was. To be fair, this wasn't the ideal Friday night billing. The
pace and aesthetic of the music wasn't befitting of the let-loose-and-
talk-shit mood that the crowd seemed to be in. It was obvious from
the constant level of conversation, the number of PBRs being cracked
and the amount of people standing outside in the rain smoking that
people wanted to party. Om might have a legacy for inflecting rock
with an undercurrent of brooding eclecticism on record (and with
their old group Sleep), but their live show didn't have enough pull to
tame an East Van Friday night
—Justin Langille
M0N0T0NIX / THEE MANIPULATORS / MT-40
September 2$i(mltmore Cabaret
On Sept 21, exactly one night after Rosh Hashanah marked the beginning of a New Year on the Jewish calendar, three wise men from the
Holy Land brought a few hundred enraptured followers to a fever
pitch, through the rites and rituals of a rock 'n' roll ceremony in a dark
basement in East Van. It was a highly religious experience, and a great
way to ring in the year 5770.
After a couple of raved-about Vancouver shows last year, anticipation was high as the Tel Aviv garage rock trio known as Monotonix
made their return to town. The evening was ably opened by a couple
of great (and disparate) local acts: the synth-electro-punk grooves of
boy-girl duo MT-40, followed up by the swingin' garage-punk R&B
blast of Thee Manipulators.
Then Monotonix's set began. As is their standard practice, they eschewed the typical stage set-up, opting instead to perform in the middle
of the teeming, sweaty masses. The hirsute trio, sounding not unlike the
MC5 and looking like outcasts from Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention, maintained a remarkable energy level. Singer/insane bandleader
Ami Shalev bounced around the dancefloor and the rest of the room
in a tiny pair of red shorts. Beer, water and sweat flew and soaked the
crowd. The drum kit was taken apart and re-assembled piece by piece
on top of the outstretched hands of crowd members, while drummer
Haggai Fershtman, also supported atop the crowd, battered out powerful, muscular rhythms.
If it sounds crazy, it was. But if you've been to a Monotonix show
before, it was pretty much what you would have come to expect. That
being said, this set was also (just a little bit) more subdued, (ever so
slightly) in control, and on this night, more than the last time they
played in town, you were able to hear actual songs. It was a wild night,
and anyone seeking a reckless, crazy rock 'n' roll spectacle wouldn't
have been disappointed. But tins time, Monotonix also seemed to be
interested in performing their songs in the midst of the craziness, and
it worked well.
—DanFumano
35 m
PAUL HYDE
peace sign
First new album in
seven years from
Payolas singer.
It's intense.
ALTERNATIVE TV
ATV
A greatest hits live
recording with liner
notes by leader/punk
pioneer Mark Perry.
No mixing.
No overdubs.
No nothing.
Just play it loud.
Toronto hates you,
too. An oral history
of Toronto punk &
related 1977-1981:
Teenage Head,
Diodes, Viletones,
Forgotten Rebels,
Demies, and lots
more; sex, heroin,
depths of hell, etc.
400 pages.
(yes, that's Don Pyle).
WWW.B0NG0BEAT.COM
fMiDoSS^I H#<#RliH
Carolyn Mark and NQ Arbuckle
* ' A     'Let's Just Stay Here *.^%
out October 13*» CO / LP
aibuin release fwrigA \ I
Monday, November 23
The Biltmore Cabaa&f,.^
Ij&|j3|i www.<»r©ijrtMMark.coni        ,-.' i '. -
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STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF OCTOBER
lwfc-5
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
zyff£
ARTIST	
ALBUM
JABJL
'"•"*' \
Various
Friends in
Bellwoods 2
Out of this Spark
26
Kronos Quartet
Floodplain
Nonesuch
2
Black Mold*
Snow Blindness is
Crystal Antz
Flemish Eye
27
Zeus*
Sounds Like Zeus
Arts & Crafts
3
Ohbijou*
Beacons
Last Gang
28
Little Girls*
Tambourine
Paper Bag
4
B-Lines*
burnt cds 7"
Nominal
29
Sunset Rubdown*
Dragonslayer
Jagjaguwar
5
The SSRIs*
Teems
Independent
30
Bloodshot Bill*
Git High Tonight
Transistor 66
6
Char2D2*
Small Vampires
Independent
31
Mew
No More Stories ...
they Washed Away
No More Stories
the World is Grey
idS
Miesha&the
Spanks*
Mmmadefor Me
Transistor 66
32
Let's Go to War*
Karmageddon
Last Gang
8
Rich Hope*
Is Gonna Whip
It on Ya
Sandbag
33
Felix Da Housecat
He Was King
Nettwerk
9
Sex Church*
sit 7"
Sweet Rot
34
Rick White
Album*
1-3-7
Blue Fog
10
Jay Reatard
Watch Me Fall
Matador
35
The Apples in
Stereo
#1 Hits Explosions
Yep Roc
11
Jandek
Portland Thursday
Corwood Industries
36
Various*
Beatroute 5th
Anniversary
Independent
12
Polvo
In Prism
Merge
37
Health
Get Color
Lovepump United
13
Nadja*
The Bungled &
the Botched
Blocks Recording
Club
38
Extra Happy
Ghost!!!*
How the Beach Boys
Sound... No Feelings
Saved by Radio
14
The Manvils*
sit
Sandbag
39
Fortunately
Everything Dies*
Censored
Independent
15
Pissed Jeans
King of Jeans
Sub Pop
40
AmyMillan*
Masters of the
Burial
Arts & Crafts
16
Picastro*
Become Secret
Blocks Recording
Club
41
Eric Copeland
Alien in a Garbage
Dump
Paw Tracks
17
Various*
Le Son 666: Audio
Le Son 666
42
The Got to Get
Got*
Sahalee
Noyes
18
The Fresh &Onlys
Grey-Eyed Girls
Woodsist
43
Young Galaxy*
Invisible Republic
Independent
19
Dan Mangan*
Nice, Nice,
Very Nice
File Under: Music
44
The Rural Alberta
Advantage*
Hometowns
Independent
20
YACHT
See Mystery Lights
DFA
45
Vivian Girls
Everything Goes
Wrong
In the Red
21
Box Elders
Alice & Friends
Goner
46
Ruthie&
Winfield*
Rough Bubba
Trauna
Independent
22
Destroyer*
Bay of Pigs
Merge
47
Various*
MusicWorks # 104
MusicWorks
Magazine
23
Reigning Sound
Love & Curses
In the Red
48
Xela
In Bocca Al Lupo
Type
24
The Action*
Complete Punk
Recordings 1977-78
Sudden Death
49
Various
The Sound of
Wonder
B-Music
25
The Wind
Whistles*
Animals are
People too
Independent
50
Dirty Projectors
Bitte Orca
Domino
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian. Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at
(604) 822-8733. His name is Luke Meat. If you ask nicely he'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts
at www.earshot-online.com.
I 38 ■IIP
IMIP
A SUNNY DAY IN GLASGOW
Ashes Grammar CD
Two years ago A Sunny Day In Glasgow's debut,
Scribble Mural Comic Journal, perked up the ears ot
new and old fans of shoegaze and created a devout cultlike following, albeit quite small. The cult should blow up
into a full on fervor across the nation with their sophomore release, which raises the stakes on their debut considerably. ASDIG have been holed in the studio since the release of their last record
and have come out with an album layered with so many vocals, guitars, and effects
that some critics may scoff at its overproduction. This would be missing the point
entirely. ASDIG, much like their predecessors My Bloody Valentine did with Loveless,
have used the studio as their main instrument and spent the last two years piecing
together this triumph. Layers of harmonizing vocals, provided by twin sisters Robin
and Laura Daniels, soar around guitars that are plucked, strummed, and so totally
smeared wii |ftels and effects that they no longer resemble anything six-stringed. It
seems as if shoegaze is coming back 'round again, but unlike some of their blander
contemporaries (I'm looking at you, Pains Of Being Pure At Heart), ASDIG have
spent the time honing the craft and creating this stunning studio record.
CD 16.98
CRANFIQDANDSLADE
12 Sun Songs LP
IQSun Songs is a yellow vinyl album made up of covers of pop songs about the
llsun. Aping a 1970s concept album, Cranfield and Siade present 12 songs
arranged to represent a day, beginning with songs about the sunrise and winding
down with songs about sunsets. Tracks range from classics such as George
Harrison's Here Comes the Sim and The Kinks' Waterloo Sunset to the lesser-
known Sun by singer-songwriter Margot Guryan or Where Evil Grows by
Vancouver's The Poppy Family. The album combines field recordings made in various Vancouver locations with electronic sound and acoustic and electric instruments.
Based in rainy Vancouver, Cranfield and Slade are made up of visual artist Kathy
Slade and artist/musician Brady Cranfield, working with musicians including Larissa
Loyva (P:ano, Kellarissa), Johnny Payne (Victoria Victoria, The Shilos), and Chris
Harris (P:ano, Parks and Rec, The Secret Three, Womankind}; and special guests
John Collins (The New Pernograpjters, The Evaporators) and artist Rodney Graham
(The Rodney Graham Band, UJ3RK5)
LP 26.98
THE MOUNTAIN GOATS
The life Of The World To
ComeCD/LP
Some people will be scratching their heads upon the
arrival of this amazing new release from long-time
Zulu fave John Danielle and his Mountain Goats.
Critically praised as one of the best lyricists in modern
alternative adult rock and roll, Danielle has always engaged language, poetics and
the large themes in his storied work. Here, he out does even himself, as he triumphantly tackles the bible as the source material for this unparalleled concept
album about "hard lessons the bible taught" him. It is not a Christian record, or a
Dylan-esque "I found god" release — no instead, Danielle explores poetics, theology, and all points in between. You got to have fall in mis guy to make everything
great. Owen Pallett of Final Fantasy conducts the strings on this one too.
CD 16.98   LP 19.98
Zulu Art News!
Lauren Keogh
Amplify This!
October 1-31,2009
CAROLYN MARK & NQ AR8UCKLE
Let's Just Stay Here CD
Geography is no obstacle for Toronto's alt-country heroes NQ Arbuckle and
Victoria's hootenanny queen, Carolyn Mark. This time, they've joined forces and
the results are stunning. Their creative collision is a little bit-gritty, filled with bourbon-tinged tales of Canadian globetrotting, heartbreak, mystery and adventure. For
Carolyn Mark (who is typically a spontaneous, hair-on-fire, one take in the studio
kind of gal) the results showcases her spirited golden goddess vocals at their best.
It also features cameos from Corb Lund (on mandolin), Lily Fawn (and her musical
saw), Jenny Whiteley (vocals), and a Justin Rutfedge cover. Now, what's not to
love? We recommend pairing this with a leisurely afternoon, a bottle of red wine and
(if you can find a copy of Carolyn's latest cookbook) some warm mushroom and
goat cheese salad. Mmmm.
CD 16.98
CLIENTELE
Bonfires On The Heath CD/UP
Bonfires On The Heath is a return to the Clientele's roots; the dreamlike suburban landscapes first encountered in the early singles, their trippy sense of menace stronger now. Back in London, they've drawriln older traditions of English folk,
which exist here side by side with the band's more familiar bossa and pop elements.
Mel Draisey's contributions on piano and violin add beautifully to MacLean's
timeless, eerie songs. Instantly identifiable, the Clientele sound like no one else,
although they are cited as an influence by. bands as diverse as Spoon and the
Fleet Foxes.
CD/LP 16.98
THERAVEONETTES
In and Out of Control CD
Staking out their own spot between Suicide, Velvet Underground, Jesus and
Mary Chain, and some obscure '50s garage pop, Danish duo The Raveonettes
have certainly claimed their corner of the feedback drone pop! Each new record is
an exhilarating ride into the blissed out realms of oceanic rock as waves upon waves
of fuzz, reverb and delay create a psychoacoustic Spell that is instantly enthralling,
absorbing, disorienting and frightening. In and Out of Control is their most ambitious release to date, as it captures the more up beat side of their music. Like a
David Lynch version of the White Stripes, this duo also has a penchant for the dark
side of '50s culture as they channel the sweet innocence of the Everly Brothers
through some damaged voodoo child freakout. Recommended.
CD 16.98
More Music to Move the Moments:
VIVIAN GIRLS - Everything Goes Wrong
CD/LP
VIC CHESNUTT - At The Cut CD/LP
EDDY CURRENT SUPPRESSION RING - s/t
CD
MISSION OF BURMA - The Sound The
Speed The Light CD
GOSSIP - Music For Men CO
BEBEL GILBERTO - All In One CO
YOU SAY PARTY...-XXXX CD
NO AGE - Losing Feeling 12"
AIR-Love 2 CD
METH TEETH - Everything Went Wrong LP
PENS - Hey Friend, What You Doing? CD/LP
GRASS WIDOW -s/t 12"
KRAFTWERK - Remastered Reissues
YOKO ONO - Between My Head and The Sky
CD/LP
SHUDDER TO THINK - Live From Home eO/LP
BERT JANSCH - The Essentia I CD
STRUNG OUT ~ Agents of The Underground CD/LP
ALIENS-Luna CD
LOU BARLOW - Goodnight Unknown CD/LP
CORB LUND - Losin lately Gambler CD
PEARL JAM - Backspacer CO
MIKA - The Boy Who Knew Too Much CD
MASON JENNINGS - Blood Of Man CO
DAVID GRAY - Draw The Line CD
DEADMAUS - For Laek Of A Bettor Name CO
HIDDEN CAMERAS - Origin: Orphan CO
JESUS LIZARD - Head, Goal, Down CD/LP
REMASTERS!
DAMON ft NAOMI - The Sub Pop Years CO
PRICES IN EFFECT UNTIL OCTOBER 31,2009
I K£cavt&\
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver. BC
tel 604738.3232
wvvw.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed   10:30-7=00 Zulu understands the cartBttaWtofc
TIMES NfW VIKING
Bom Again Revisited wg
Back before time began we lived in caves and
roamed the wilderness looking for any sjgftef *
culture. I am talking 1991, a time when "ttfaWKfy )
ans'(who are really just thieves) decided $&& 8$ $*»'
aesthetic had sufficiently been bom andtij&aiHhlh
Soi*Yo^shltDeforeitwas8jiftlPfl^it»
squeeze into tubes for export fti& hiM, bfaftg, &A $ reckless ds$ra tereapbira
pure sound became the trademarks a^p era. Times New Vflriuaj aft Jit/taj^,-:
band to intrinsically synthesize this sooMAl^r^epft^ ^18^^100^, - ^
ravage the sacred cool iandse^e> ^le%9 Vr^l 9^lStf)8w ^Sft ^Bd^iO 9ftee^j^^C ^'
and hyper chanting and singing, Tines Mew Viking drive fttftV fl^CrVefc$» t^H>
into a blissful tree-fail of ultirrjeit|^^i1)^&Fr^isrl^ln^j^^^ra^^o^^ir
visceral snarl. They are nomads^fci travel the sonic wastelands.
C016.98
THE FRESH &0NLYS
bum ftwdiiiinwr
San Francisco's Fresh ft Oniys have only-Seen plBjf&S^ t^jSiefSlaeftihe n-
spring of 2008 but the five-piece haw afjiiSv released 9 foS fBj^tt JLP Ott   ',
Castteface Records (run by John Dwyer of line Oh Sees% ^Jltfitfttftfe -£f$fi?' .
settes, and two seven inches, plus they have another LP due on ItfttaJasf&w * -
year's end. Ever since the songwriting psjj of Tim Cohen (formerly of skewed ."
■^^^04-W^Kfifl^109kti^ Sartio{ap«%Hme Jeweflod Antler
Collective member) got together with |^^|^^^^po deep into the SF
underground music scene, they have beeripii H|^^pa|rstoppable
spree of bringing psychedelic pop perfection to oof:;f^^fc|||^^^tt;,
ground being broken here, rather, the group are the newest band «i4:d«f Wfr\
age of San Francisco psych-pop. Each and every song is memorable and cratiR;~
Ml o, inventive hooks and choruses, and there is an immediacy and sincerity
here missing in so many of the bands that get a tot more undeserved attentijjtr \.
in the here and now. Time will tell, but we here at Zulu predict that the Fresh &
Oniys are one for the ages, destined to carve out their space one way or another. We are here to help with that carving.
CD/LP 16.98
KURT VIE
Childish Prodigy CD/LP
Philadelpia's almost-tost son (Vile recorded and
played music for 12 years before finally being
noticed) emerges with his most triumphant record
thus fan After releasing the heavily praised Constant
rfitmaker on taste-making label Woodsfst, The    /
Hunchback EP on Phiily's Richie Records, and his
twice-instantly sold out God Is Saying This To You LP on the hip Mexican
Summer label, Vile is finally about to bask in the tight that only an indie-powerhouse label like Matador Records can supply. For those who haven.t had their
ears caught by Kurt Vile after coming Into the shop (we play him incessantly)
or have somehow missed his name via the blogosphere, now is your chance for
the perfect introduction to his unbelievable mix of folk, pop and blues wrapped
up in a warm and hazy psychedelic dream swirl. Yup, that's a lot of genres
stuffed in, but, trust us, the man has somehow managed to bridge 50 yeart of £
pop music and make something unique, recognizable, and highly addictive.
Welcome to your new favorite artist.
co/umss
FUP THE PAGE!
ISLANDS
CD
t ick Diamonds' pop^pfi^p^^p|
FllsjiiCfcwftfc tisirObW stetBd aiiriMtiMJtitorc a collec-
!iiM&tofl;$fc^#*1snafetelB^
l^^tet^ffl grooves, etertro-Krautr^^^i^i^:
and svagtSoirtBslinkyhumcharts.AttHpiarMfe* ,: v
Diamemts,: ul^ftWe melodies, giving uk$$$£aVvf the
.^Ht^ottfltions of $$dem pop songs ^pPaiddBiiaui^^^^Ms^ suits.
After S^ifiStasp^hiSfrth their 2006 rjei^JhAptttftlptGoal flwfermed with a
, Cast af characters ftsfti Montrsat% tiujyfi^ r^^ssne including members of
^^|Bpjf#^rtli'mht), ex-Oaicorus Mii|pMfl^|a|d Jaime Thompson
SrtBd m/ft for SOGTs Aim's Way. Longtime Up wis be ecstatic to learn that
^irtlMlnfliMi ham icturrtiidfor Vapours, and tf^panti has regained much of the ragged
wm^f*Jhj&ftiniie. Return to Urn Sea a 0f^stjnd|fnf|^f^|.
Cf|S4»
GJRLS
Album CD
Dd$t$et rUPWKmp;, I love SSj^ftanctsco. it is just that
1 &SM nJvSf ^tiiem-isJ^icalry would become a
SBrttflsr.of tile MEf&ttVMi I checked out their spread in
f$$e? &Mgj&kjM and instantly was struck by their cavalier
sense of ja|^^^^^a«d deep desire to make music. I
:^fi In tevitiaAife^abond thrift store circus universe
^io|stGP|e^a9EJf£M other side of the tracks-ness of Girls pulled me in. There is a
i^^ftf^ilked up feelings that come with modern life, and turning that into
^^t^^^^tfyf seems like the way to go. As for the music, it is my bag—and
^pjj^liiliiii.u is as honest as it comes! I dig the Velvets, The Fall, The Dolls and
W^0m, and i know that the party can't go on forever so for now I am going to dig
||p|i|gt Come down and tell me your story, mm
CD 16.98
THE xx
xx CD
Comfortably fitting in somewhere betpen contemporary cool (Grizzly Dear) and classic alternative (The
Pixies), South London's xx have delivered easily the
most anticipate debut recording of 2009 Amazf|piMj|
actually lives up to the hyperbole that precedes iUftQtr
electronic press! Yes, this debtsfls* startling athfMM
hits the nerve within seconds of JPr opening song and
into their hermeticaiiy sound drs^iwOTl^^Peak observs
loss skip across the Cerebral cjip#tilpa seduce om
tars, electronics, and interwojpi^SB^fc tssult is no
Porfehead s Dummy for the ftEi^na^^W are shatter
reordered, and a new universe is rolled:,cA} an even m
before. If you listen to only one record thfeyaajr-
□
y transports JGtt-
«jt life, love and
sh language of gui-
ntions shifted and
rtic fashion than
-pleas*
CD16.98
PRICES ill EFFECT UNTIL OCTOBER 31,2003
12
"i«*a
Zulu Records     I store hours
1972-1976 W«tfi Ave      MontoWed 10;3o-7:oo
VanCOUVer, BC Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00
tel 604738.3232 » *»-*
3 'ZamfotLi        j Sun 12:00-6:
wvvw.zuiJUrecords.com I . ,

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