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 DftcORDER
FA guide to CITR fm 102
& CABLE 100 DifirOBDER
^A guide to CITR fm 102
'-' CABI E 100
King Sunny Ade' Interview
King Sunne Ade' and his
African Beats are a musical
phenomenon in their native
Nigeria and throughout Africa, having released over 50
records in the past 16 years.
They seem set to achieve the
same sort of success here in
North America, with their first
domestic release SYNCHRO-
SYSTEM selling remarkably
well and their live performances on their second tour of
this continent garnering rave
praises.
Jennifer Fahrni and Michael Shea were fortunate
enough to talk with King
Sunny while in Montreal,
where he and his African
Beats had just completed two
shows at the Spectrum.
The Music Speaks For Itself
This tour you are bringing
to North America a music that
most people on this continent
are not familiar with. How
would you describe the kind of
music you play?
Yes, first of all I should
describe it this way. It is the
root of jazz ... where jazz came
from ... because jazz came
from Africa. And the root of
jazz is what I am playing now.
It is the music of my greatgrandfathers that I have been
playing. In fact, it is the music
that was being played by the
traditional worshippers before
Christianity, Muslim religions
comes to Africa. Even before
the colonization by the whites.
Is it still being played now?
It is still being played now.
It is being refined by my
sisters. Now this music has
nothing to do with religion ...
it is just an independent music
that has no connection with
any ritual, any magic ... has
nothing to do with politics. So
it is mainly a party music ...
music for enjoyment.
But don't you think even
perhaps, maybe not so much
here, but when you play in
Nigeria for instance, for a lot
of people it could be a
religious experience?
Well you can, you can use
juju music for religion because some of the music of
mine, they used to play it in
the churches for the backing
songs instead of using organs
or another kind of harp of
anything ... they used juju
music in the churches and in
many of the other religious
organizations. I too can sing
gospel songs because I was
born into a Christian family
but now I am playing the
natural music which has nothing to do with any religion.
How much do you write of it
yourself?
Well I... sometimes 80% of
all the songs. I write myself
and I sit down with all my
members and we're doing it
together.
Do you base much of your
music on traditional music?
Yes. We have self-composed songs all the time,
occasionally we can take any
of the traditional songs to fit.
Like the songs we played last
night are like the songs they
have during the Mardi Gras in
Lagos streets ... like carnival
songs, so everybody outside
dancing.
When you perform live do
you play the songs different
each time? Do you improvise a
lot?
Well, yes ...we have a lot of
songs because we made well
over 50 albums now, and by
the time we can sing 10
albums out of 50 albums that
would be about 24 hours. We
have enough songs that the
moment I start singing a song
the members of the group
know what to play and where
they are going and where they
are coming from.
So there is not a lot of ahead
planning. You do it while you
are on stage?
Yes, I can sing another
song. They are ready ... they
are always watching my first
step, they are always watching my hands, they always
hear and listen to my guitar
and they always watch my
actions. Because if we list
down some songs, you know,
by the time you finish one
song the lights might go off
and you don't see the next
one. But they know most of
the album because the band is
always on the road ... the
tunes   we  played   the   day
before yesterday here in Montreal are quite different to the
other ones we played the
second night. So there are a
lot of different songs we can
play. They all know the direction we are going in.
How long have you been
playing with this particular
group of musicians?
Well, we are eight for about
5 or 6 years, and from then we
are twenty ... for the past 10 to
11 years. The same people.
We had one drop dead and
two left the band because the
family built a hotel for one of
them and they are running it.
And the other can not because
he has pneumonia both ways
of his ribs. We have extra
people ... we have fifty-two.
But when we are going on tour
we always like to be twenty to
twenty-five.
When did you first start
playing as a public performer
in Nigeria?
That was the end of 1966. I
formed this group by that time
with a few of my friends ...we
were about nine people, including me. When we introduced the second talking
drum we are ten. When we
introduced two guitars more
we are twelve, when we
brought the vibraphone we
are thirteen, when we brought
drums we are fourteen ... and
that is how it goes to a
twenty-piece band.
When did you first put out a
record of your music in Nigeria?
That was 1967. I recorded a
first single in 1967 which we
took to a private company
because the EMI, the Phonogram, the Decca ... those big
companies, they have a lot of
musicians queueing because
of few recording studios in
Nigeria. Ours brought us
down to a radio station and we
recorded our first single. It
sold about, according to them,
it sold about 13 copies. But we
are very happy and it was
being played on the radio. We
have a lot of airplay. We are
happy that it got to the people.
And the people really love it.
And they can't find the record
because they printed few. But
luckily for us the next year
there is a football team that
used to win the cup every year
called Stationary Stores. And I
am a fanatic fan of football
and I recorded a tribute to
them. In fact, I wanted to
record a single just for them.
So, I know the first single sold
13, and I know the members of
the team should be 11, making
24, the coach making 25, the
manager making 26, and then
a few of the fans ... and I
believe in my mind that it
would actually sell more than
13 copies. So that is the game
I have in mind and the
recording company agrees
with me. But we were finally
surprised that when the record came out within two
weeks it sold well over 500,000
copies ...so that is when the
band shoot out and then we
started from there.
Was there much competition with other musicians?
Oh yes, we have a lot of
jumu musicians, all playing
different versions of juju music and those that play like me
too. And it depends on the
ability and the stamina and it
depends on the kind of music
and the kind of innovation and
it depends on the fans. If the
fans love you, you can make it
good. Even though the music
is no good. You have to work
hard to bring good music to
them, because sometimes the
fans can find the leader of the
group, they can fancy him,
they can use that to buy the
records. But if they fee! the
music that is given to them is
no good, they won't look into
it again. So we always notice
that we have to work hard and
do very good work before
releasing an album to anybody.
Now, in that time the record
sold very high. Within 1967-70
we recorded a lot of singles
and extended plays, and in
1970 we were the first band to
record a non-stop LP first
side, and in tracks the other
side. So, the record sold very,
very high at that time. And we
used to record 3 to 4 albums in
a year, because the people
keep on saying we don't want
this old one, we want a new
one ... every month if you can
give us one. Anytime it is in
the papers that my record is
going to be out, everybody is
ready.
What kind of music did you
listen to when you were
younger?
Well, to me, I do listen to
good music all of my life. I
don't want to know where the
music comes from. In fact, I
listen to a lot of American
music because they used to
play it a lot on the radio ... you
can find it in the market,  in
the cinema, and it is like we
are living in the heart of
America. I am telling you how
popular the American music
is, and also the British music,
Indian music, any music from
all over the world you can find
it in Nigeria. When I was
young I do listen to jazz music
because my father loved jazz
music before he died ... and I
listen to Spanish music also.
So I listen to a lot of country
music also, and when I went to
introduce a local violin it
always sounded like a pedal-
steel guitar. Then I decided to
use pedal steel, because I
heard what it sounds like on
Jim Reeves' records, but I
played it in a different way. I
listen to good music all of my
life, that is the way I can put
These musical influences
are evident in King Sunny's
eclectic mix of traditional
African polyrhythms and electric guitar licks. Listening to
this on record is great, but
seeing King Sunny and his
African Beats perform alive is
a unique experience. Here, he
closes with a few comments on
his music and performing it
live.
...the policy of the place
where we played last night in
Montreal, they want us to
break the show into two so
people will have enough time
to relax and drink. So that is
why we didn't do so well, we
like to go straight for 3 or 4
hours like that. Because I am
not really interested in talking
... some don't want to talk,
they came to hear the music,
some don't want to hear the
music, they came to see the
show, some doesn't want to
hear anything, they want to
see the instruments, some
doesn't want to see anything
but they want to see who is
King Sunny Ade! Or what is
African nights look like, you
know? A part of why I don't
like to talk to people too much.
Because music itself is a
language on its own ... that's
my style.
page 1 DISCORDER Sep* '983
Cinn^DjSfeQRBER
fml03 Cable 100
Editor:
Jennifer Fahrr
Features Editor:
Michael Shea
Reviews Editor:
Jeff Kearney
Contributors:
Jeff Kearney
Gord Badanic
Rob Simms
Robin Razell
Mark Mushet
Steve Robertson
Jennifer Fahrni
Michael Shea
High Life
Distribution:
Harry Hertscheg
Vijay Sondhi
For copies of any photographs contact CITR at 228-3017.
Tues., sept. 6
AMS AMS AMS AMS AMS AMS
0TR    &     Georgia Straight
m present
Oik
from Toronto
Mon. Sept 26 SUB Ballroom UBC campus
8:30 p.m. No Minors Please
AVAILABLE AT VTC/CBO OUTLETS, WOODWARD'S,
AMS BOX OFFICE.
FOR  INFORMATION PLEASE PHONE 687 <
AMS AMS AMS AMS AMS AMS
letters
to the
airhead
Dear Airhead:
I have two peeves about the
music played on CITR:
1) Too many songs have
noises in the mix that sound
like phones ringing. These
songs seem to be played only,
early in the morning or when
I'm in the toilet.
2) Too many songs have
screams in the mix that sound
like my mom yelling my name.
These songs are generally
only played when my mom
isn't expected home for 3
more hours, which usually
coincides with me doing something strange in my bedroom.
Signed - lyee Jones
I dunno, maybe your mom's a
CITR DJ. Did you ever think
of that? Ask her (subtly of
course). - ED.
Dear Airhead:
I'm really enjoying the ongoing DJ soap opera you've
been running in the last
couple of issues. It's been a
scream watching Mr. Johal
and Mr. Mushet tear each
other to shreds in print. My
only fear is that these two
characters will kill themselves
off, thereby ending the "I'm
the only DJ at CITR who
knows where it's at" show.
This would be a tragedy. How
about expanding the scope of
personal station slags to include the gory details of The
Girl's sordid past or the
mysterious disappearance of
Ethan Minovitz. We'd all
really like to know. And don't
lie because I'm keeping tabs.
An avid listener
I admit it is a tempting
concept. Maybe we could call
it "All my DJs." - ED.
Dear Airhead:
Formula for straight - half
wave dipole antenna:
492 x .94   =   462.48  =  4.53
which is approx. 4 feet 6 1/4
inches.
U'bYt,
Rece/veR
The horizontal line is the
actual antenna. The wires
leading to the receiver (A-B)
are ca;;ed transmission lines
which should be kept short to
reduce signal loss. The 4' 6
1/4" length should include
the space between the wires
which is approximately 1/4".
This antenna is strictly for the
frequency of CITR and will not
greatly help in the reception of
other stations.
Yours,
Sir Reel
Emily Carp - gone fission
Dear Airhead:
Yes, it's all just fine and
dandy for you people at CITR
to say: "If you can't get CITR
on your radio - get cable!"
Well, what about us poor folk
whose only source of music is
a Baycrest HB-409? Huh?
How can you hook cable up on
that, eh? Are we to suffer in
silence listening to static all
day? I say not. But what can
we do? - Refuse to buy your
sponsor's product? What
Sponsor? Writing to you was
my only resort ... And J'm
getting my anger out even if it
doesn't get you - er -- people
off your - uh -- chairs to get
your act together. What do
you expect me to do - listen to
C-Fox? For the love of Sid,
you've gotta be kidding.
Something must be done.
Static in the Attic
Static in the attic? Sounds
familiar. I had the same
problem until I sent a certified
cheque for $99.95 payable to
the Airhead. I still don't get
CITR, but after just a few
sessions with the Airhead,
I've learned to live with the
static on my radio. Now it's an
integral part of my life. My
next project is to convert my
TV so that I can hear nothing
but blissful static on every
channel. There's no business
like snow business.
— A satisfied Customer
(funning amok)
For you less technically hardy
souls, your local stereo store
can provide you with a ready
made FM Dipole antenna at
nominal cost. But that's no
fun, is it? - ED.
Sorry, nobody's perfect. Some
always go astray. But for the
special reduced price of
$69.95 I promise to stop
soliciting certified cheques for
$99.95.
|| THE £*ariN«, UNPtA$€A I
»—. AovewruRE* of r1—'
?ACk HAKVSOtJ IS A WU-PLIPE
oFPlCeR irV JAN DIE60. H|S St* gUP,
KA5 A OCDUATED vWpeRSCA AU.V I"
HI? FltlErVP, HAAVEV THE 5EA ANEfVoHE   ■
ewTAN&Lfer, ih rxr bow i-iwe of a
LArttiC CAOlfV CRUKEfc. Sound d'Afrique '83
With the attention King
Sunny Ade has been receiving lately due to his two
startling LPs on Island Records, interest in African music in general is on the
increase. Hopefully, this review will help steer the curious away from the abyss of
confusion and toward the
musical treasures that await
the intrepid explorer.
One myth that needs puncturing is that of a homogeneous tribal Africa pulsating
with an incessant drum beat.
This is a continent of abundant cultural and musical
diversity, and increasingly
modern and urban. While the
Nigerian Juju music of Ade,
Ebenezer Obey and others is
strongly drum based, it's the
exception in modern Africa.
The currently influential
"Congolese" sound of French
speaking West Africa, with its
trademarks of bubbly horn
and guitar interplays, is closer
to today's Latin and French
Carribean sounds than to
yesterday's African ones. Kinshasa, Zaire and Brazzaville,
Congo are the seismic headquarters of the style that has
caught the fancy of Africans
from west to east as well as
many European capitals such
as Paris and Brussels. The
music  of   major   artists   like
Franco, Tabu Ley Roche-
reau,    Pamelo Mounk'a and
Pablo is at once infectiously
danceable and hypnotic. It
combines the melodic aspect
of European based music with
the repetitive aspect of traditional African music. The two
compilations on Island Records, SOUND DAFRIQUE I
and II, offer a cross-section of
styles from various Francophone countries, while LPs by
individual artists offer longer
selections which allow for
more development of the
rhythmic interplay.
East Africa is under the
musical spell of the Kinshasa-
Brazzaville sound. Major
bands in Kenya and Tanzania
such as Orchestra Super
Mazembe and Orchestra
Makassy (each with an appealing LP on Virgin records)
consist of transplanted Zaire-
ans who moved east to capitalize on the large audience for
their style of music.
Turning south to Zimbabwe
and South Africa, we see a
more pronounced jazz influence (from the U.S. via London) and, more recently soul
and rock influences. The
SOWETO compilation on the
Rough Trade lable offers a
good sampling of the "sax-
jive" jazz-rock fusion in South
Africa, while the just released
VIVA ZIMBABWE compilation on Earthworks samples
recent examples of the captivating   fusion   of  styles  in
Zimbabwe. Both records feature music with a harder,
sharper edge than the lyrical,
sensual sound of Francophone
Africa. The struggle for
majority rule seems to have
lent the music extra bite, not
surprinsingly South Africa, as
well as a thriving pop music
scene that blends local folk
styles with soul music. Miriam Makeba and Letta Mbulu
are two of the most famous
singers in this style.
Heading north again, we
come inevitably to Nigeria.
Easily the most populous of
African nations, it is also one
of the most diverse with
radically different tribal
groups comprising various
areas. The Muslim dominated
north produces Arab style
music. The dominant Yoruba
tribe of western Nigeria is
responsible for the increasing
popular Juju music as well as
the "Afrobeat" of the every
controversial Fela Ransome
Kuti. Fela, along with Manu
Di Bargo of Cameroon, was
one of the early popularizers
of African Music abroad, playing in London and N.Y. in the
early 70's with players like
Ginger Baker. Juju developed
from the traditional Yoruba
folk music dominated by the
"talking drum" ensembles
into the most subtle and
complex of African musics
with the addition  of  electric
?i!$Mm;Mm®m
guitars, and then Hawaiian
style steel guitar (Yorubas
have a passion for American
country music by artists like
Jim Reeves) and synthesizers.
The Ibos of eastern Nigeria
produce the lighthearted,
calypso inflected Highlife
music that was borrowed and
adapted from the earlier version in Ghana. Horns and
guitars dominate, as in the
Francophone music, but here
the reference points are Trinidad, Jamaica, and the United
States. Prince Nico Mbarga
(who has two LP's on Rounder
Records) and the Ibenga
Super Stars are among the
most popular artists of this
style in Nigeria, while Ghanaian groups like the African
Brothers Band and Atabora
Manu present a slightly different version of Highlife.
This overview of modern,
urban based African music
just skims the surface of the
overwhelming range of styles
now thriving on this continent.
Acoustic stringed instruments
of all types, many marimba
variations and all manner of
drums are prevalent in the
equally diverse realm of folk
music that still figures prominently in much of Africa.
What characterizes nearly all
of these musics is the expression of celebration and joy at
the sheer wonder of existence,
a feeling and attitude that is
hard to resist. Cynics beware.
DISCORDER Sept 1983
Highlife Records & Music
African Music Chart
1. King Sunny Ade - SYNCHRO SYSTEM - Nigeria
2. Chief Commander Ebenezer Obey - EYIYATO -
Nigeria.
3. Bebe Manga - AMI -
Cameroon.
4. Franco - VOL. I - Zaire.
5. Prince Nico Mbarga -
SWEET MOTHER - Nigeria.
6. Tshala Muana - AMINA -
Zaire.
7. Pamelo Mounk's - Congo.
8. Prince Thony Adex - JUJU
FUNK EXPLOSION - Nigeria.
9. Afro National - TROPICAL
FUNK MUSIC - Sierra
Leone.
10. Tabu Ley Rockereau -
VOL. 5 - Zaire.
11. SOUND D'AFRIQUE II -
Francophone countries.
12. King Sunny Ade - JUJU
MUSIC- Nigeria.
13. VIVA ZIMBABWE - Zimbabwe.
14. SOWETO - South Africa.
15. Fela Ransome Kuti - VOL.
1 & 2 - Nigeria.
16. Lolo Lolitta & Tchico -
JEANNOT - Ivory Coast.
17. NAIROBI SOUND - Kenya
18. Orchestra Jazirs - LOVE -
U.K.
19. ZULU JlVE- South Africa.
20. Orchestra Zib Hombers -
WICKED BROTHER - Nigeria.
21. Atakora Manu - PALM
WINE - Ghana.
22. IKANGA SUPER STARS -
Nigeria.
23. The Four Brothers - MO-
BOROBOTO - Zimbabwe.
24. Miriam Makeba - CLIP-
SONG - South Africa.
25. AFRICA DANCES - various.
So You Warn Be A Rock'n'Roll Stor?
Diamonds in the rough.
Cheap rhinestones polished to
a smooth edge. Jagged cut
glass. An analogy we might
use to describe a good number
of bands that participated in
last year's CITR HOT AIR
SHOW in UBC's Pit Pub.
Actually the HOT AIR SHOW
competition is open to any acts
of any nature (except where
prohibited by law and good
taste) although in recent years
musical acts have predominated. What makes the HOT
AIR SHOW unique is its
unpredictability. One never
knows from week to week
whether Monday night at the
Pit will be an evening of
orthodox musical entertainment, an onslaught of aural
destruction, or a travesty of
comic diversion, spontaneous
or   contrived.    Examples    in-
t
French kick lessons available from Gus of the Actionauts.
Teenage Barnacles, all five of
them!! The Enigmas, with the
Actionauts and A Cast of
Thousands - SUB Ballroom,
Friday, September 9.
elude the appearance of the
inimitable Egghead in full
eggshell regalia or perhaps
the most infamous incident of
last year's competition, a fist
fight between a judge and a
contestant on the night of the
finals. All rather spectacular.
Over forty bands participated in last year's HOT AIR
SHOW, vying for prizes that
included recording studio time
and cash. Emerging victorious
from a host of bands, widely
divergent in style, personality, and musical competence,
were four lads with a penchant
for ' 'Greco-I ndo-Af rican
Heavy Metal;" none other
than those purveyors of piggyback rock, The Actionauts.
Winning the HOT AIR SHOW
afforded the Actionauts the
opportunity to enter the studio
and immortalize some of their
finest moments on tape, opening the way for a possible
release of an EP. Yet perhaps
the best thing about the HOT
AIR SHOW is that it gives
what   are   often   otherwise
strictly garage bands the opportunity to play in front of an
audience and get the feel of
performing live without the
hassle or cost of arranging
their own gigs. Those interested in participating in this
year's HOT AIR SHOW competition should contact Vijay
or Roxanne at CITR, 228-3017.
All contestants receive prizes
and the winners of each
week's show advance to the
next round, culminating in the
HOT AIR SHOW finals in late
March. If you don't feel
inclined to participate as a
contestant, we encourage you
to visit the Pit Pub on Monday
nights. Come early and come
often because each Monday
night holds the potential for
surprise, pleasant or unpleasant. We never know what to
expect ourselves. There's no
cover for HOT AIR SHOW
Mondays at the Pit, so what
have you got to lose? It all
starts September 19. Only
time will tell what "it" actually is. -Steve Robertson
TAKE A MOVIE
HOME TONIGHT
VCR-1 FREE MOVIE
7.95
Sun thru Thurs
$1.99
Movie Rental
|VCR-2FREEMOVIES|
$14.95
Fri, Sat or Holidays
The VIDEO STORE
4605 W. 10th., Vancouver, B.C.
Ken Hippert Hair
We Offer Student Discount
Expires Sept. 31,1983
With presentation of ad
to Terry, Mary, Debbie
^     For appointment
jj    228-1471
5736 University Blvd.
(Next to Lucky Dollar Store)
Advertise in _^%gffg&
page 3 DISCORDER Sept 1983
_Vimi
ELVIS COSTELLO
Imperial Bedroom (CBS)
X building is somewhat less
^ melancholy than the Robt.
+ Wyatt hit version (in the
* U.K.) but is equally as touch-
^^^^^^^^ * ing and features the plaintive
than   that  of   the  previous* trumpet of   Chet Baker
IMPERIAL BEDROOM. *      The   rest   of   puNCH   JHE
In spite of the more obvious J C/_0CK |g more obviouS|y
nature of this I.p., the songs* -.punchy.. (if you wMl). The
nevertheless remain as cha-J   TKQ     h the   backi
lengmg as those on IM PERI-* vocals of Afrodiziac and the
AL BEDROOM. Melodically^ mjxj of Langer/Winstan-
they are fabulous, reflecting a* , jve the ,      a bounce and
spiritual if not actual tribute to* warmth |ackj on IMPERIAL
Soul and Stax. Lyrically Cos- *BEDR00M. The songs talk
tello continues, with thisl.p. *about p0|jtics sex, |ove and
to reign as the best traditional *famj|ies encouragjng action
songwriter of the post-77 £ whj|e a|ways keeping a sense
period. Every song tells a J of humour dose at hand ,
captivating story and even the ^on| wish , cou|d mc|ude a
catch  Everyday      Write   The + {    jc sheet t0 show that
Book takes an old theme and *standouts such as The Ele.
reworks it in an engaging and + men( Wjthjn Her> Jhe Great_
witty    fashion        Costello    *es, m nd The World and
stands almost alone in under- * Hjs Wjff} are as d as ,
standing the value of Ian-* E|vis Coste„0>s PUNCH
guage and he successfully * JHE CLQCK. classic popular
attacks that difficult process of * muslc equalling the high stan-
us.ng the few words of a 3^dards of IMPERIAL BED.
minute popular song to say*fl00M but infinite|y more
something that rises above the ^accessib|e Thirteen beauti.
mundane. And you can sing *fu|| written , d and
the chorus too! TtJC£duced  songs  that  reassert
while producing accessible Moreover,   PUNCH   THE*   costello's      pre-eminence
popular music. CLOCK contains  two  of  the *  mid the dross that passes for
The sound of PUNCH THE      vears   best   son9s-   Both   are Ipopular music today. Get it
CLOCK  is  bright  and   more      comments (with anger) on the ^     Wjthjn  weeks f// be
obviously lively thanks to the      state of society Shipbuilding +        re-opening the shipyards
production of    Clive Langer        ripaiswith thPfiiiPrnmanf ihp ^ .
and Alan Winstanley. The
recent success of Madness
and Dexy's Midnight Runners is due, in no small part,
to the influence of this production duo. The same is possible
here. The sound is clean, with
the bass and horns getting a
prominent place in the mix.
The sound is also less dense
Since his first release of
1977 Elvis Costello has released NINE albums containing over 130 songs. Over that
time Costello's songwriting
and image have changed and
improved considerably. He is
now more relaxed, less vitriolic, and his live shows reflect
that fact. With his nineth,
PUNCH THE CLOCK, Costello finally appears to have
reconciled this more relaxed
attitude with the need to
remain   tough   and   honest
deals with the dilemma of the ^
poor and unemployed in choo- *
sing the economic benefits of *
war (the Falklands) while*
hiding from the death to*
follow and rejecting their anti- *
pathy toward violence. Pills *
and Soap takes a broader look *
at the strange hypocrisy's of *
Thatcher's Britain. Both are £
odd  sonjgs on  the  I.p.  Ship- ^
And notifying the next of
kin
Once again
It's all we're skilled in
We will be shipbuilding
WITH ALL   THE  WILL   IN
THE WORLD
DIVING FOR DEAR LIFE
WHEN    WE    COULD    BE
DIVING FOR PEARLS
No. 1
BIG COUNTRY
The Crossing
(Polygram)
Big Country has been
around only since last November. Since then, they've played on the very last Jam tour,
released three exceptionally
good singles (two of which
made it into the upper portions of the U.K. charts) and
most recently have released
an album. Fronted by   Stuart
Adamson (ex- Skids guitarist and songwriter) it is hardly
surprising that Big Country
sound so much like Skids II.
Their album THE CROSSING,
is comparatively disappointing in light of their earlier
releases. As a whole THE
CROSSING has a very smooth
sound;  not  as  dense as  the
Skids but still carrying considerable momentum. Unfortunately, Adamson's guitar
work is mixed behind slick
harmonies and his guitar
sound misses the bite that can
be found on any earlier records of both Skids and Big
Country, instead, there is a
slower, more layered approach on this album. All the
singles have been redone for
the LP, but only In a Big
Country sounds better than
the original version. The other
seven songs come as a letdown - rather as if the band
was rushed into the studio
with not enough material. The
new songs sound somewhere
in between the Skids' ABSOLUTE GAME and U2's OCTOBER. The most notable
tracks include Porrohman,
Storm, and 7000 Stars, as well
as the redone versions of
Harvest Home, Fields of Fire,
and In a Big Country. Some of
the other songs sound uninspired and wandering. By the
time this review goes to print
(Three weeks from now) the
album will be out domestically
on Polydor along with a 12"
single with Fields on one side
and Big Country on the other.
Gord Badanic
ClfinRepOrt: Albums
1869 West 4th Avenue
738-3232
ARTIST
1 BAUHAUS
2 KING SUNNY ADE'
3 ELVIS COSTELLO
4 SURPLUS STOCK
5 MALCOLM McLAREN
6 VIOLENT FEMMES
7 PETE SHELLEY
8 AZTEC CAMERA
9 TALKING HEADS
10 MOFUNGO
11 YELLO
12 ALAN VEGA
13 KILLING JOKE
14 HOWARD DEVOTO
15 JULUKA
16 EYELESS IN GAZA
17 TRUE WEST
18 FLESHEATERS
19 TOM TOM CLUB
20 THE GO-BETWEENS
21 SUBHUMANS
22 BIG COUNTRY
23 THE CURE
24 DEATH CULT
25 HUNTERS & COLLECTORS
26 R.E.M.
27 CABARET VOLTAIRE
28 DAVID THOMAS
& THE PEDESTRIANS
29 THE WILL
30 DURUTTI COLUMN
31 YELLOWMAN
32 GRAHAM PARKER
33 VARIOUS
34 X-MAL DEUTSCHLAND
35 KAS PRODUCT
36 SHADOW MINSTRELS
37 RENT BOYS
38 DENNIS BROWN
39 MONSOON
40 THE ALARM
ALBUM
Burning from the Inside
Synchro-System
Punch the Clock
Dance Ersatz
Duck Rock
Violent Femmes
XL1
High Land, Hard Rain
Speaking in Tongues
Out of Line
, You Gotta Say Yes
Saturn Strip
Fire Dances
Jerky Versions of the Dream
Scatterlings
Rust Red September
True West
A Hard Road to Follow
Close to the Bone
Before Hollywood
No Wishes, No Prayers
The Crossing
The Walk EP
Death Cult EP
Hunters & Collectors
Murmur
The Crackdown
Variations on a Theme
Causa Sui
Another Setting
Zunguzzeng!
The Real Macaw
Tidal Wave
Fetisch
By Pass
Great Expectations
Squeal for Joy
The Prophet Rides Again
The Third Eye
The Alarm
DISTRIBUTOR
POLYGRAM
WEA
ROUGH TRADE (BRD)
POLYGRAM
WEA
POLYGRAM
WEA
WEA
ZOAR (US)
WEA
WEA
PASSPORT
VIRGIN (UK)
WEA
CHERRY RED (UK)
B.O.Y.D. (US)
UPSETTER (US)
WEA
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
SST (US)
PHONOGRAM (UK)
WEA
SITUATION 2 (UK)
VIRGIN (UK)
A&M
SOME BIZARRE (UK)
ROUGH TRADE fUS)
INCENDIARY
FACTORY (UK)
GREENSLEEVES (UK)
POLYGRAM
UNICORN (US)
4AD (UK)
RCA (UK)
PTERODACTYL (US)
RBI
A&M
PHONOGRAM (UK)
IRS (US) DISCORDER Sept 1983
%f %/ l^vWwl^
ALAN VEGA
Saturn Strip (WEA)
At first glance, the cover of
Alan Vega's first domestic
release, with its leather clad
man against a lurid background of dayo'ow pink,
purple and chartreuse will
likely create a negative reaction in the tasteful record
buyer. The producer of the
album, Ric Ocasek , might
force the same reaction in the
buyer's mind. However, first
impressions in this case are
not accurate. This is not a bad
album, and it is quite access-
able to the average listener
who has never heard any of
Alan Vega's previous work.
Vega is a vocalist in his
mid-thirties, who was one half
of the pioneering electronic
band, Suicide He has put
out two previous solo albums,
ALAN VEGA, and COLLISION DRIVE, which were
both critically acclaimed.
This album relies heavily on
keyboards, (mostly synths), as
well as some power chords
liberally supplied by Mark
Kuch and Ocasek . Overall,
the songs are varied, and
uneven in quality, with some
songs that must be regarded
as filler because of arcane
lyrics, and repetitive music,
such as Kid Congo and Je
TAdore. Saturn Drive is just
that: a driving electronic number which is reminiscent of
Suicide's Ghostrider. Video
Babe is a pop number similar
to those mid-sixties classics
like 96 Tears, and is very
similar to Jukebox Babe on his
first solo album. Wipeout Beat
contains some of Vega's
patented Stoned in the middle
of the desert seeing religious
visions imagery which he used
so well on his last album.
Every 1 's A Winner is the old
Hot Chocolate disco fave
which Vega twists towards
his own purposes of exposing
the virtues of mankind, and he
does this quite effectively.
The rest of the album bears
something of a resemblance to-
the Cars' Panorama but has-
better lyrics. No doubt Mr.'
Ocasek has something to do'
with this. Gone are the ex-'
tended dirges like Frankie]
Teardrop or Viet Vet, and.
lyrics dealing with great,
amounts of death and violence, as well as any truly-
blood-curdling screams. This-
is too bad, but as this is an'
album destined for commer-'
cial airplay, the afformention-'
ed items might upset far too'
many people, and were thus .
left out.
Vocally, Vega is in good
form, with a rockabilly style
tempered by Iggy Popisms
and a good deal of power.
Although this album is not as
good as his previous work, it
retains the early rock and roll
feel in otherwise incongruous
songs. In summary, an alright
album, but ALAN VEGA,
COLLISION DRIVE and any
Suicide albums are better.
-Rob Simms
; BAUHAUS
I Burning From the
[ Attention Bauhaus haters;
; prepare to test your resolve!
: Put aside your biases just long
I enough to hear BURNING
J FROM THE INSIDE, the
[ group's latest endeavour. And
c for those of you who are still
t sitting on the fence, this
i album just might make you a
c Bauhaus convert.
! True, Bauhaus critics
1 have a point. At times
I throughout their nearly four-
E year recording career, their
t music and persona have been
t burdened by self-conscious-
t ness and self-indulgence,
t their wit dimmed by serious-
c ness. Yet, with the release of
1 BURNING FROM THE IN-
[ SIDE, they've managed to
! shrug off their dark mantle.
t The result is an album full of
t light and warmth. Overall, the
t sound is not so layered as the
t previous THE SKY'S GONE
' OUT, and in that sense, this
1 album marks a return to the
1 more elemental approach of
1 their first album IN THE
[ FLAT FIELD. The simplified,
t relaxed approach is carried
i through even to their inner
i sleeve, with lyrics scribbled in
c pen or pencil on crumpled
{ looseleaf or whatever scrap
1 paper was handy - clearly a
1 deliberate effort to move away
' from the stylized approach of
t the past, while alluding to
f their collective schizophrenia.
i She's In Parties opens the
t album, with the sinuous voice
Inside (Polygram)
of Peter Murphy and still
more sinuous guitar of Daniel Ash winding around each
other seductively. The song
melts into a hypnotic dub that
ends far too soon. King Volcano spotlights sparkling piano notes floating up one side
of the scale and tumbling
down the other, anchored at
points by chanting voices and
the thud of a single drum.
Throughout the LP an acousitc
sound pervades and provides
many of the highlights. In
fact, the only two songs that
don't seem to work, Antonin
Artaud and Honeymoon Croon
sound like artifacts from the
last decade, relying to their
detriment on sheer force and
repetition.
It is clear that Bauhaus'
intention, smong others, is to
court those who have been
sitting on the fence. They
have certainly begun to outgrow the standard criticisms.
--Robin Razzell
CIHRepOrt: Singles
ARTIST
SINGLE
LABEL
1   THE FALL
The   Man   Whose    Head    Ex
panded
-   ROUGH TRADE (UK)
2   A CAST OF THOUSANDS
On the Q.T./ln For the Kill
**DEMO TAPE**
3   XTC
Wonderland
VIRGIN (UK)
4   HOWARD DEVOTO
Rainy Season
VIRGIN (UK)
5   3 TEENS KILL 4
Tell me something Good
POINT Blank (US)
6   SHRIEKBACK
Working On The Ground
Y (UK)
7  J. WALTER NEGRO &
Cost Of Living
ALBION (UK)
NICKY TESCO
8   CAPTAIN SEN   IBLE
Stop The World
A&M (UK)
9   ECHO & THE . UNNYMEN
Never Stop
KOROVA (UK)
10 ROBYN HITCHCOCK
Kingdom Of Love
ALBINION (UK)
11 THE CREATURES
Right Now
WONDERLAND (UK)
12 CULTURE SHOCK
Forever & Ever
BIG DUMMY
13 BEAST
Love In A Dying World
AMDUSIAS (US)
14 KEVIN ZED
Roulette/U.R.
**DEMO TAPE**
15 MELODY PIMPS
(You) Freak Me Out
DEMO TAPE**
16 KRAFTWERK
Tour De Fance
EMI (UK)
17 X
Breathless
ELEKTRA (US)
18 STYLE COUNCIL
Long Hot Summer
POLYDOR (UK)
19 CHRIS & COSEY
October (A Love Song)
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
20 CABARET VOLTAIRE
Crackdown
SOME BIZZARE (UK)
21 ELVIS COSTELLO
Everyday I Write The Book
CBS
22 PORT SAID
Moonsoon/Rites Of Passage
AEON (US)
23 BIG COUNTRY
In A Big Country
POLYGRAM
24 MONOCHROME SET
The Jet Set Junta
CHERRY RED (UK)
25 FARMER'S BOYS
For You
EMI (UK)
26 DOA
Burn It Down
SUDDEN DEATH
27 YAZOO
State Farm
SIRE
28 ICICLE WORKS
Birds Fly
SITUATION 2 (UK)
29 FELT
Penelope Tree
CHERRY RED (UK)
30 THE GLOVE
Like An Animal
WONDERLAND (UK)
31 COOK DA BOOKS
Low Profile
KITESTREET (UK)
32 MANIC HEAV2N
Ultraviolent
**DEMO TAPE**
33 UB 40
Red Red Wine
DEP INT'L (UK)
34 LORDS OF THE NEW
Live For Today
IRS
CHURCH
35 ANIMAL SLAVES
Eye Of The Hurricane
"DEMO TAPE**
36 MILKSHAKES
Red Monkey
WALL CITY (BRD)
37 ORANGE JUICE
Flesh Of My Flesh
POLYDOR (UK)
38 COCTEAU TWINS
Peppermint Pig
4AD (UK)
39 TUXEDOMOON
The Cage
CREPUSCULES (BLG)
40 FLESHTONES
Right Side Of A Good Thing
IRS (UK)
THE SAFE WAY
to stay alert without
harmful stimulants
LUV-A-FAIR    keeps    you Next time monotony makes you
stimulated with great tunes and feel like throwing your arms in
exciting   visuals   six   nights   a the air with despair, or work has
week yet is not habit forming. got you down, do as millions
LAF   is   faster,   handier,   more do....perk    up    with    a    safe,
reliable and is definitely not as effective dose of LUV-A-FAIR.
expensive 12?5 Seymour Street  Teh 685-3288
COLLECTOR'S R.RM.
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456 Seymour St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Ph. 685-8841
SOUTH
VANCOUVER
4470 Main St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Ph. 876-8321 DISCORDER Sept 1983
DIGICON 83: Screens to Replace the Canvas?
The International Conference on the Digital Arts,
DIGICON '83, held at the
Robson Square Media Center
August 15th through the 17th,
must surely go down as being
the first major reference point
in the rapidly emerging world
of computer art. An ambitious
project from the start, DIGI-
CON'S purpose was, "to
bring together visual and per-
forming artists, musicians,
sculptors, photographers,
video artists, educators, computer users, and all those
concerned with cultural
change, to collaborate and
explore new media and establish new relationships." At
that end DIGICON was an
unparalleled success. It succeeded in bringing such a
diverse array of people together that it is hard to
conceive of any other circumstance under which so much
information on the subject of
computer art could be exchanged. True, with such an
event there are always shortcomings, but all things considered DIGICON did prove,
to me at least, that the
computer is GOING TO BE a
force to be reckoned with
when it comes to new art
forms. I say GOING TO BE
because there tended to be too
much emphasis on hardware
and technique rather than its
applications to art.
There were scores of displays set up to showcase
manufacturers latest lines of
synthesizers, computers, processors and gadgetry, and an
equal number of "hands on"
set ups and playlabs. Unfortunately, for a person with no
prior knowledge of such
equipment, these tended to be
rather uninspiring, for all one
could do in such a case was to
extract any number of blips
and bleeps without really
knowing the processes involved in the creation of a given
sound. The prime focus of
attention of the manufacturers
forum and of the worlds first
"Teleconcert," held at the QE
Playhouse as part of DIGICON, was the Fiarlight computer, a rather intimidating
piece of machinery that gives
the operator access to any
sound found in the natural
world, can replace an entire
orchestra, can process and
perform a piece of music
written in seemingly imposs-
iiiiiiiii
ible configurations, and all
one needs is a Ph.D. in
computer programming. The
real value of the Fairlight
seems to me to be its capacity
to change the face of music
composition and the possibilities now open to us with its
many avenues of sound synthesis and treatment. Another
important aspect of such high
technology lies in the promise
of future relationships between the computer and
acoustic instruments as well
as the human voice. Unfortunately these topics were
poorly addressed during the
course of the conference but it
was recognized that, in the
words of Jean Piche, one of
Canada's major exponents of
Fairlight technology; "In
terms of using the computer
as a new creative tool and a
new way of doing things the
possibilities are endless." A
Fairlight computer is yours,
for about 28,000 dollars.
As for the series of lectures,
the range of speakers included
commercial videographics experts of the kind behind Tron,
Star Trek, and some of those
flashy computer animated TV
ads, to Barry Truax, one of
Canada's longest standing
and foremost practitioners of
experimental computer composition. The lecture topics
ranged from rather technical
matters (for those of us uninitiated) such as the use of
computer software in music
composition to the relatively
accessable topic and perhaps
the most important of all;
"When is it art and what is
technology doing to it?" Although I'll admit that you
have to "have your chops
together" just to consider
using the computer in the
process of artistic expression,
absolutely anybody can develop his or her own opinion as
to the validity of computer art.
David Em, Joan Trucken-
brod, and Dr. Herbert Brun
addressed a full house on this
most pertinent subject and put
their message across in no
uncertain terms. The reason
the public has the wrong
attitude towards computer art
is that we are constantly
bombarded with computer
generated images that are
created by engineers and thus
have an air of clinical sterility
and precision that, although
superficially impressive, is de
void of the essence of art, the
human element, the dimension of imperfection and spontaneity. Joan Truckenbrod, of
the University of Northern
Illinois, has used the aid of the
computer to create some visually stunning tapestries,
ceramic tiles, and wall hangings. She maintains that there
is indeed enough of an element of chance and spontaneity, inherent in present
computer design imperfections, to allow the artist a
challenging degree of uncertainty in the outcome of his or
her work. This certainly
stands against the popular
notion that an artist must have
his or her "hands in the clay,"
as she says. David Em is
probably best known to the
public via his appearance on
NOVA'S "Artists in the Lab"
special. His emphasis was on
the "De-mythification and de-
mystification" of computer
technology. He says that too
many people are put off by
what they perceive as an
overly complex, inaccessable
technology that, in reality, is
very easy to adapt to. After
seeing his work, which appeared on the DIGICON posters and in the Robson Square
gallery, and hearing him say
that he had had no previous
experience with computers, I
now feel that there is good
cause for those of us who
don't know an envelope from
an algorythym to take heart.
Dr. Brun, though not clearly
addressing the question of
"When is it Art?" gave us
some food for thought with his
rather grating piece of computer generated music called
"I told you so." It involved
the individual's perception of
what is, or is not, aesthetically
pleasing. He believes that if
you don't like a piece of music
or work of art, you don't say,
"I don't like it" or "It's
garbage" but rather, "I do
not like myself in the presence
of that work." Hmmmmm	
DIGICON was certainly a
very necessary and fruitful
event. Although a lot of
questions remain unanswered, at least we know where we
stand and enough people were
able to get together and
exchange ideas to make it that
much more worthwhile. Hopefully, future "DIGICONs" will
lead us on and help this new
technology to define its place
in the world of modern art.
--Mark Mushet
What is this man doing? Deep-
throating a microphone?...no,
no! nothing quite as lewd as
that but almost as crude. But
only Phil Smith knows for sure.
Come and see him fronting
Corsage with guests the
Modernettes detonating the
SUB Ballroom, Saturday, September 10 at 8 p.m. Tickets only
$6. Another CITR presentation,
-who else would take the risk?
Monday to Friday
NEWS DIET
A healthy ingestion of news, sports, and weather five times
each day.
Wakeup Report (8 a.m.)
Morning Newsbreak (10 a.m.)
Lunch Report (1 p.m.)
Afternoon Newsbreak (3:30 p.m.)
Afternoon Sportsbreak (4:30 p.m.)
Dinner Report (6 p.m.)
SPORTS (8 p.m., 10 p.m., 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 6 p.m.)
As well as regular sportscasts CITR features live play-by-play
broadcasts of  Thunderbird  football,   hockey  and   backetball
games. Birds Eye View, UBC Sports special will now include
Thunderbird Profiles.
GENERIC REVIEW (8:35 a.m., 5:35 p.m.)
An analysis of various forms of entertainment in Vancouver.
INSIGHT (6:13 p.m.)
A CITR editorial on any and every contemporary issue. Heard
nightly after the Dinner Report.
AT UBC (7:30 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 4 p.m., 6:40 p.m.)
A UBC calendar of events heard four times daily.
HIGH PROFILE (8 p.m.)
An hour focus on musicians and bands which have surfaced
and, at many times, stayed on the CITR Playlist past, present,
and maybe even future. (See box for nightly features.)
FINAL VINYL (11 p.m.)
Each night one complete album is featured. (See box for nightly
features.)
Saturday
THE FOLK SHOW (10 a.m. - 12 p.m.)
Mostly traditional folk music.
CITR PLAYLIST SHOW (3 p.m. - 6 p.m.)
Countdown of selected music from CITR's weekly album and
singles playlist.
SATURDAY MAGAZINE (6 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.)
News, sports, a summary of the week's Generic Reviews, and
surprise features.
Sunday
MUSIC OF OUR TIME (8:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.)
Classical 20th century music.
4 September - Composer Anton Webern -  program  of
complete works to celebrate centenary of his
birth
11 September - Composer Edgar Varese - complete works,
centenary program
18 September - George and Ira Gershwin's porgy and Bess
25 September - Bertram Turetzky Concert Preview: Bartok
plays Bartok
SUNDAY BRUNCH (12:15 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.)
Showcase of literary works in poetry and prose.
ROCKERS SHOW (12:45 p.m. - 3 p.m.)
Reggae music from Jamaica and other areas.
RABBLE WITHOUT A PAUSE (3 p.m. - 6 p.m.)
Unusual,   unpredictable,   and   unconventional   describe   this
music show mixed with theoretical and practical banter.
SUNDAY MAGAZINE (6 p.m. - 6:20 p.m.)
Wrap up of the weekend's news and sports as well as a Generic
Review.
FAST FORWARD (9:30 p.m. - 1 a.m.)
CITR's music alternative to our regular music programming.
Monday
THE JAZZ SHOW (9:30 p.m. - 1 a.m.)
An eclectic mix of musical jazz forms.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
Defending National Champions
vs
University of Calgary Friday, Sept. 16
University of Alberta Friday, Sept. 23
at Thunderbird Stadium
Live on CITR 102 FM
7:00pm
STUDENTS FREE
(with AMS card)
Bring your radio to the game T^tAputm JtafantA
DISCORDER Sept 1983
HIGH PROFILE  s:ooc
Thurs   1
Killing Joke
Fri        2
New Age Steppers
Sat        3
James Brown
Mon     5
Television
Tues    6
Tom Robinson
Wed    7
Bill Nelson
Thurs   8
Shriekback
Fri        9
Tom Tom Club
Sat      10
Punk Poets #1: John Cooper Clarke
Mon    12
Robert Gordon
Tues   13
The The
Wed  14
The MO DA MU Label
Thurs 15
Kraftwerk
Fri      16
Fun Boy Three
Sat     17
Punk Poets #2: Patrik Fitzgerald
Mon   19
Material
Tues  20
Cramps
Wed  21
Sham 69
Thurs 22
Mekons
Fri      23
The English Beat
Sat     24
Punk Poets #3: Attila the Stockbrocker
Mon   26
Special AKA
Tues  27
Theme: Bands with Bald People
Wed   28
Yello
Thurs 29
Was (Not Was)
Fri      30
UB 40
October Sat     1
Punk Poets #4: Various
FINAL VINYL noopm
NEGLECTED ALBUMS FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER
September   4    Cluster & Eno: Cluster & Eno
September 11    Kerry Leimer: Land of Look Behind
September 18    Von Zamla: Zamlaranamma
September 25    Embryo: La Blawa Sparozzi
CLASSIC ALBUMS FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER
September   2 UB 40: Signing Off
September   9 Specials: Specials
September 16 Talking Heads: More Songs About Buildings &
Food
September 23 Various Artists: Fast Product Sampler
September 30 Echo & The Bunnymen: Crocodiles
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 900a.m.
MONDAYS ... AMNESTY ACTION
A community access program providing a forum for human
rights issues of concern to Amnesty International.
12 Sept. - The Amnesty International Technique of Releasing
Prisoners of Conscience
19 Sept. - The Death Penalty
26 Sept. - Human Rights Violations Against Children
Tuesdays ... UBC ON TAP
6 Sept.  -   Canada/USA:   Speakout  on   Life  with   Uncle  -
highlights of a forum held at UBC in June.
13 Sept. - Meet the Pres. with new UBC president George
Pedersen.
20 Sept. - Life with Brian: Stornoway or Sussex Drive? with
UBC political science professor Don Blake.
27 Sept. - Asking for Sex - a discussion at the Learned Societies
symposium held at UBC in May.
Wednesdays ... SPEAKER'S CHOICE
7 Sept.  - The Future of  National  Broadcasting  with  CBC
president Pierre Juneau.
14 Sept. - Newspaper Publishing: Truth or Profits with Gerald
Haslam, publisher of The Province.
21 Sept. - Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms with B.C.
justice Thomas Berger.
28 Sept. - Urban Revolutions:  Past and Present with UBC
history professor Christopher Friedrichs.
Thursdays ... COUNTER FORCE
8 Sept. - Strategies for Stopping the Arms Race
15 Sept. - Nuclear Nightmare: The Reality of Being Hit by The
Bomb with Dr. Helen Caldicott, head of Physicians
for Social Responsibility, who gave an emotional talk
at UBC in July.
22 Sept. - Violence vs. Non-Violence in a Liberation Struggle
29 Sept. - The Myth of Scarcity: Toward a Just Economic Order
SUNDAY
MONDAY             TUESDAY          WEDNESDAY       THURSDAY
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Fridays .
9 Sept.
23 Sept.
30 Sept.
. DATELINE INTERNATIONAL
The Nature of China's Military Modernization with
SFU president William Saywell.
- Poland According to Wiatr - in conversation with
controversial Polish' professor Jerzy Wiatr, who
taught political science at UBC this summer.
Sino-Soviet Relations Today
- The Prospects of Japanese Military and Security
Policies
• ELECTRONIC VIDEO
•5 PIN BOWLING
• PINBALL
• BILLIARDS
AND        REDEEM YOUR COCA-COLA
FUN CAPS
AT
SUB GAMES ROOM
Downstairs Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
Open: Monday to Saturday 8am -12:45 at night
Sunday 10am - 11:30pm
Any Advanced Bookings — Please call
SUB GAMES ROOM 228-3692 

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