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 DiScORDER
¥A guide to CITR tm 102
& CABLE 100
Vol, 1 No. 9
OCTOBER 1983 DiScORDER
^A guide to CITR fm 102
*-* CABLE 100
Open Your Ears and Change Your Sight
"New Music": contemporary composition growing
from serious music art traditions, West or East. That is
how I define it. Recently,
everybody who claims to be or
do anything in sound now also
claims the epithet. Constant
usage by all and sundry has
blurred any definition. But not
for me. Hackles fly. Someone
prepares to brain me with a
drum machine. Carefully
made up eyes role coiffure-
ward in disgust. Exclusionist
ideals!
Hold on a moment. The new
music scene has been and
remains the cutting edge for
sonic experiments. I'll wager
not many electro-synth organizations have lasted
through, let alone digested, a
performance of contemporary
music from the sources I
describe. For that matter, not
many other people take the
time or energy either. You
should. Its important to know
about the world we live in.
Musically, most of us still
hanker after a harmonic language that was surpassed in
the first decade of this century. Those who made the
change were the great composers of that time: Debussy,
Stravinsky, Bartok, Schoen-
berg, and Varese. These are
the key names in shaping this
century's so-called "serious"
music. If you listen through
their art, you will hear certain
elements along with incredible craftsmanship. First, the
breakaway from harmonic
structures and tonal centres;
second, the introduction of
polytonality and polyrhythms;
third, the influence, not imitation, of ethnic music; fourth,
the development of serial
music, using all twelve notes
of our octave equally; fifth,
the abandonment of notes for
tones and sonorities. (Each
characteristic sums up the
corresponding composer's innovation.) As you can no
doubt   guess,   a   ten   word
description does no justice to
composers whose works musicians and scholars can study
for a lifetime.
Since their time many
events have occurred. Things
changed. Music, like painting,
theatre, and other arts,
changed with the times. Unfortunately, the aesthetics of
composers became separated
from the expectations of most
concertgoers in the 1930's. On
the whole, since World War II
serious (but not humorless)
music composers have become less immediately comprehensible. The brevity of
my article forces me to make
this gross generalization to
summarize a complex period.
Electronics, spawning revolutionary notations, have
changed the way music can
look.
We live in a unique era. At
no other time has there been
such a widespread denial of
contemporary work. For example, in Mozart's time if a
piece was written more than a
year before, or in another
country, audiences were not
interested. Today in Canada,
how many are familiar with
the output of Barbara Pent-
land or Claude Vivier? With
society unsettled by various
factors, most people seek art
that comforts and lulls. Remembering that, notice the
nostalgia for the surety of
classical tonality and easily
defined measures in most
popular music. Meanwhile,
art that studies and reflects on
contemporary realities and
truths continues to flow from
various sources. An illustrative comparison in theatre
could be made between playwrights Neil Simon and
Samuel Beckett. The impressions left in an audience are
very different. So too are the
techniques used to leave that
imprint. Yet, both write
comedies of a sort. Its the
same with music. In fact,
staging and  music are often
Dada:   Marcel   Duchamp's    haircut - 1927!
combined, making a performance more important than a
recording. Also important now
are innovations offered
through mathematics, chance
operations, and magnetic
tape.
If you've followed me so far,
prepare to experience the real
thing. The possibilities! New
music concerts are put on at
various places in Vancouver
by different groups.
The Vancouver New Music
Society is the cornerstone of
public, non-academic new
music concerts. Now in it's
twelfth season, each year the
VNMS presents a series of
recitals featuring performer,
solo or ensemble, and composer. The Society is run by
Paul Grant, musician turned
co-ordinator, with help from
members of academic, musical, and business communities. This year offers great
value to subscribers. Including the first concert in September, a seasons ticket costing $40 general and $27 for
students pays for 14 concerts.
Even their occasional drinks
are cheap!
Saturday, October 15, 8:00
p.m. Recital Hall, UBC.
Frances-Marie Uitti performs
avant-garde pieces for cello.
Composers featured include:
John Cage, Louis Andriessen,
herself, Ottawa resident Patrick Cardy, and Brian Ferney-
hough's Time and Motion
Study II, a technically demanding work written for her.
Tuesday, November 1, 8:00
p.m. Recital Hall, UBC
Schoenberg Ensemble, a
famed chamber group from
the Netherlands play fascinating transcriptions of music by
Debussy, Max Reigger, Bu-
soni, and Zemlinsky among
others.
Sunday, November 13, 8:00
p.m. Vancouver East Cultural
Centre. New  York
experimentalist composer Al-
vin Lucier performs works still
being debated, perhaps
Moving Lines of Silence.
Sundays, November 20, 27,
December 4, 2:30 p.m. Museum of Anthropology, UBC.
Special World Music Series
featuring cantor Murray
Nixon for historical Synagogue chant, the Vancouver
Koto Ensemble, and Davinder
Hundel, classical East Indian
violinist, respectively.
Sunday, January 29, 8:00
p.m. Vancouver East Cultural
Centre. Challenging Dutch
composer Louis Andriessen
appears with local musicians
in a performance of his works
Hoketus, and // Duce.
Sunday, February 12, 8:00
p.m. Vancouver East Cultural
Centre Annual Evening of
Electronics focuses this year
on West Coast composers,
some of the finest in this field.
These will be Barry Truax,
Jean Piche, Hildergard Wes-
terkamp, John Celona, and
Martin Bartlett.
Wednesday, February 29,
8:00 p.m. Ryerson United
Church. . CBC Vancouver
Chamber Orchestra with soloists Robert Aitken and Erica
Goodman,   both   leading   ex
ponents of new music for their
instruments. The program will
be made up of works by
Takemitsu, Komorous, Vivi-
er's Zipangu, and the world
premiere of Altamira, commissioned from John Burke.
Sunday, April 8, 8:00 p.m.
Vancouver East Cultural
Centre. A concert to celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Canadian Music
Centre. All-Canadian, it will
include Etudes for Piano by
John Beckwith and a new
piece of from  John Rea.
As well, there will be a
series of Spring Concerts not
yet finalized. Something else
many of us are looking forward to: in May Laurie
Anderson will give one performance of United States,
Parts 1-4. Her last time in
Vancouver, brought in by
VNMS, was great! Last year
she received raves in Europe.
She is worth seeing! The exact
date has not been worked out.
Watch for it!
Beyond the VNMS, another
venue to keep an eye and ear
on is the Western Front
Lodge. Performers local, national, and international appear frequently, at irregular
intervals. Don't be afraid to
call them.
All university music departments in the city (U.B.C,
S.F.U., V.C.C.) have concerts
of recent works, including
student and faculty compositions. These are spaced
throughout the school year.
Starting with the University
of- British Columbia out here
at Point Grey, the music
department tends to produce
"conservative" new music.
For those unfamiliar, do not
be misled. That means they
hark back, at times all the way
to the 1950's. Us laypersons
will still find much challenge
and interest there. Every
week is filled with concerts,
but for new music alone watch
for the Contemporary Players.
CONTINUED PAGE 2
Laurie  Anderson   shows   her    sine language.
pagel {HlfcDiSfcOBDEft
fffllOS Cable 100
EDITOR:
Michael Shea
REVIEWS:
Chris Dafoe
Vijay Sondhi
FEATURES:
Michael Shea
ADVERTISING:
Jennifer Fahrni
Harry Hertscheg
DISTRIBUTION:
Harry Hertscheg
Vijay Sondhi
CONTRIBUTORS:
Paris Simons
Mike Dennis
Fiona MacKay
Steve Robertson
Harry Hertscheg
Vijay Sondhi
Dean Pel key
Gerald Bostock
Robin Razell
Sean Cahill
Neil Dowie
Hilary Russell
For copies of any photographs contact CITR at 228-3017.
HIGHLIFE
RECORDS &MUSIC
REGGAE
ROCK
AFRICAN
FOLK
ELECTRONIC
DISCOUNT
USED
REQUESTS
251-6964 ■ TUE.-SAT.
1317 COMMERCIAL DR. AT CHARLES
CONTINUED FR PAGE 1
Listed concerts for the ensemble fall on October 13 and
14, November 2 and 3, February 3, 20, March 16 and 17;
times alternate between 12:30
and 8:00 p.m. in the Recital
Hall. There is no cost. Check
with the department for info
on other recitals of interest.
Simon Fraser University's
music department, begun by
Canadian composer R. Murray Schafer, is geared largely
toward electro-acoustic and
electronic composition, not
traditional music performance
like UBC. Works presented
there, whether on tape, instrument, or both, tend to be
more radical than those heard
across-town. Resident ensemble Magnetic Band perform December 1 and January
20, both at 8:00 p.m. The
Centre For the Arts also
brings in experimental players
from all over, so call them for
a schedule.
Vancouver Community College has a music program I am
not familiar with, so I can't tell
you anything. Embarrassment!
Elsewhere UBC's Continuing Education offers a course
on twentieth century music for
laypeople starting in October.
Their guest lecturers offer an
intriguing mixture. Still more
updated information on new
music events will be available
every Sunday morning on
CITR in the New Music Calendar heard at 10:30 a.m.
There you have it. A summary of the new music season.
At least what I, and as you can
see many others, call new
music. It might not all appeal
to you. Perhaps not all of it
will achieve artistic immortality. But remember, people
laughed at Beethoven's late
work. Stravinsky's Rite of
Spring caused a riot. Just
think of the fun in store for us.
- Paris Simons
WORDS FROM THE AIRHEAD
Space ... the final frontier.
These are the voyages of the
Starship Airhead. My five
year mission. To explore
strange new drugs. To seek
out new ways of spending
other peoples money. To boldly and unabashedly waste
time like no man has before ...
What the hell am I going to do
with all this space? A good
gag can only hold my attention
for so long. When it's a bad
gag, well ... So what is all this
claptrap you ask? It's your
punishment for being a bunch
of indolent, uncaring slobs.
You're making my job very
difficult, I hope you know
that! What's the matter, did
you all run out of monogram-
med stationery or something?
Someone pull the plug on the
old life support system?
Hmm? Speak up! What have
you got to say for yourself
young man/lady? Obviously,
no much. Untrue, actually. I
did receive a letter from a
fellow complaining about the
atrocious sound quality of a
recent CITR High Profile featuring The Circle Jerks. Unfortunately, airhead that I am,
I lost the letter (suppose I
shouldn't be admitting these
"airors"). Nevertheless, what
I'd like to see is some evidence that you're all at least
one brainwave from comatose.
Complaints are great. Complain a lot and often. Write
poems, pose trivia questions,
send  money -  anything.   Be
symbolic; blow your nose in a
piece of paper and send it in
(might be tough to print, But
I'll think of something). The
address is, once again:
AIRHEAD
c/o CITR Discorder
6138 SUB Blvd., U.B.C.
V6T 2A5
Speaking of trivia questions, here's one to get you
started. It's a toughie. What
was the first song CITR played
at the frequency of 102 FM.
Jog those memories. The date
was April 1st, 1982 at high
noon. The first person to
provide me with a correct
answer will win a socially
objectionable disease of his or
her choice.
Here's a first for Discorder:
a true blue retraction. CITR
staffer Fiona MacKay bites
the bullet.
"/ have discovered that
Walter Steding's latest album
"Dancing in Heaven," which
I reviewed in the May issue of
Discorder, is in fact his second
LP, not his debut, as I had
stated. This first record is
3ntitled "New" and was released on Red Star Records
(RS3) in 1971. It too was
produced by Chris Stein, and
features "Shout" (the old
Isley Brothers tune) and Elvis'
"Hound Dog" (with Robert
Fripp on guitar). In 1979, it
was touted as a good record
but, four years later is probably nowhere to be found.
Please accept my apologies for
the error and spare me that
terrible Airhead wrath."
That took real guts, Fifi.
Rumors from various
sources have The Cramps,
Gang of Four, Violent
Femmes, and perhaps Jonathan Richman coming to town
in the near future (not on one
bill, mind you). Time will tell
how many of these actually
pan out. Stay tuned to CITR
for further updates. (Further
update: Violent Femmes, Oct.
26th, SUB Ballroom).
It's rather distressing to
observe the sagging attendance at the local gigs these
days. I know "money's tight"
as the old cliche goes but if
local bands can't attract
enough support to break even,
we'll soon find ourselves with
fewer and fewer opportunities
to see these bands perform
since there aren't many decent venues in this town to
begin with.
On a related note, you
might find it worth your while
to check out John Barleys on
Monday nights. A succession
of excellent local and out of
town bands have passed
through there in recent
months. As well, CITR's Hot
Air Show lets off steam (often
smelly, however) every Monday night in UBC's Pit. Especially good for those of you
on a tight budget (don't
everyone speak at once).
Set a course for the next
page, Mr. Sulu. Ahead warped factor one.
Why is this man smiling? He's just discovered the Solid
Pleasure of using CITR's new broadcasting equipment. DISCORDER Oct 1983
CITR INTERVIEW
mm
CH 3 From Southern California
Channel 3 (AKA CH3) is
an up-and-coming southern
California group, and a perfect example of the recent
renaissance of hardcore and
punk that the area has beei
experiencing. The band has
received rave reviews
throughout North America
and Britain for their two
albums, Fear of Life and After
the Lights Go Out (recently
playlisted at CITR). CH 3
has just completed a continental tour, and Mike Dennis
had the opportunity to speak
with lead singer, lyricist and
guitar player Mike Magrann
while the group was in Vancouver during August. They
appeared at Stalag 13 where
they performed an action-
packed and dynamic show.
CH 3 seems to be one of
the few American bands that
has broken through in Britain.
Why is that, and how do you
manage to get picked up by a
British record label... that is a
fairly rare occurrence for an
American punk band?
Well, first of all, the British
seemed to like our sound,
because they said it was more
melodic and harmonic than a
lot of the other hardcore
thrash bands. Secondly, the
president of Posh Boy Records, our American label,
Robbie Fields was raised over
there, so he has a lot of British
and European contacts. He
goes back there quite a bit, so
he picked up the No Future
record label's Punk and Disorderly to distribute in the
States. The deal was that No
Future would pick up one of
Posh Boy's bands to distribute
records for in Britain. They
knew CH 3 got a fairly good
response over there, so they
picked us.
You were supposed to tour
Britain a few months ago but
the tour got cancelled. What
happened there? ft
It was just a day or so before
we were to leave, and Blitz,
the British band which was
headlining the tour, decided
to break up. So that messed it
up for us since all the concert
dates were all firmly set up for
Blitz as headliners. As a
result, we had to cancel.
Does CH 3 plan on going to
Britain at a future date then?
It's really up to No Future
records since they were promoting the tour. And then, it
would have to be in the
summer or Christmas break
since Kim, our lead guitarist,
and myself both are in college.
College students! What are
studying, and where at ...
UCLA?
We go to Long Beach State
actually. Kim is studying Sociology and communications,
and I'm an English major.
That leads to another point
... I've noticed that your lyrics
seem to be a lot more intelligent than the average punk
band. Also, your lyrics are
more about personal and social topics, rather than political. Why is that?
Well, I think that more
people, especially the ones
attracted to our music, can
relate to songs about social
issues and everyday personal
experiences as opposed to a
song about the White House's
policy on say, matters thousands of miles away in Nicaragua, for example. And admittedly, I really don't think I
am enough of a political
expert to be able to say what is
right and what is wrong in the
world of politics.
So you're definitely not a
political band. You are fairly
diverse in your sound. What
do you consider yourselves as
then ... a punk band which has
evolved into hardcore? (The
difference, please?! - ED.)
Yes, basically. One of the
things which attracted me to
punk was that there wasn't
really any limitations ... that
was one of the original concepts behind it. But now some
people say well, in order to be
a punk or hardcore band, you
can't play under a certain
rapid speed. Then, by saying
that, they've lost the original
idea behind the whole movement. Then next, they'll say in
order to be a thrash band, you
have to play as fast as possible
and melt your guitar picks
(everyone laughs ha!!
Speaking of thrash bands,
are there still a lot down in
southern California?
Oh yeah ... there's hundreds of them now. If you
want to be just a thrash band
in the Los Angeles area, you
just suffocate because there
are so many of them, and
hardly any clubs to play at.
The clubs keep getting closed
down, and running into legal
hassles and so on.
That sounds similar to the
club problems we face here in
Vancouver. Is it true that
some of the Dead Kennedys'
gigs have drawn like 3,000
people or so and that they are
really raking in the money
from some of them?
Bands like the Dead Kennedys and Black Flag live
off their music ... they're
touring and recording constantly. I've heard stories
about the DK's demanding
$3,000 per show and flying to
shows. But I'm not really
against people progressing or
whatever, because if people
are going to spend a few bucks
going to see a concert they
may as well spend it on the
DK's rather than Toto or
Journey (more laughing ha!!
ha!!).
What direction does CH3
plan to take in the future ...
more diverse?
Actually, the band just
started out as a hobby, just to
have a good time. Then we got
a bit more serious. Putting out
records allows us to tour to
promote them, and it has
worked out really well because
we really enjoy touring and
travelling, meeting different
people. It's like a free vacation, you might say, since part
of our travelling expenses are
covered by Posh Boy Records.
But if it ever becomes more
work than enjoyment, then it
isn't worth doing. We're still
at the enjoyment stage of it,
fortunately!
The Charles Bogle
Phonograph Dispensary
Imports
New Wave
Punk-Rock
Blues-Folk
Classical
Children's
4430 W.
10th Avenue,
New & Used LP's
Rare Records
Collectibles
Sound Tracks
Comedy & Old
Radio Shows
224-0232
Vancouver, B.C.
1
If you hear it on CITR you can buy
it at Charles Bogle
RECORD SALE
ALL USED ALBUMS DRASTICALLY REDUCED
Every single domestic LP $5.61
$2.00 OFF all imports
Fri Oct 14
11 a.m. -9p.m.
Sat Oct 15
11 a.m. -6p.m.
Sun Oct 16
Noon-5 p.m.
FULLY LICENSED
CANCSAf
\ "Traditional Q&co-RomanCwsiae
)th Ave.    Vancouver, B.C.
I:  228-9512-3
DELIVERY
Gems of
Saturday, October 22,1983 - 8:00 p.m.
TUPPER AUDITORIUM j
419 East 24th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.    ^.
Tickets:   A^^A^^J^£^!!!^   1!
$8 00 VANCOUVER FOLK FESTIVAL OFFICE ■ 3271
yv.w OCTOPUS BOOKS - 1146 Commercial OriM
©' DISCORDER Oct 1983
ADRIAN BELEW f ENIGMAS EP (Mystery)
Twang Bar King (Island) *,
"rip bash smash burn up a
fret
i can keep it in tune and
nearly beat it to death
. . . oh listen baby
i ain't braggin' but i'm the
twang bar king''
Modest, Adrian Belew
isn't, but he is honest. Twang
Bar King is his second solo
album. As with last year's
Lone Rhino, it strikes immediately as a breath of fresh air in
a commercial market that is
fast becoming far too predictable. It is not one bright hit
single surrounded by eleven
mediocre backing cuts. No,
here is an album on which all
the songs are well worth
listening to. Indeed, no two
are alike. Is straight ahead
chainsaw hard r&b to your
liking? How about fusion,
quirky electronics or ambi-
ances? The unifying factor is
this madman from the American mid-west who plays the
electric guitar with a combination of finesse and true left
field insanity. The Jimi Hen-
drix of the eighties, someone
shouts. No, it's just Adrian
Belew, but he is the Twang
Bar King.
In case you've been hibernating for the past few years,
Adrian Belew is the man
Robert Fripp chose to play
guitar with him in the most
recent incarnation of King
Crimson. As well, he's made
guest appearances with Joan
Armatrading, David Bowie,
Riuchi Sakamoto and Talking
Heads (both live as a group
member, and on many of the
Heads' solo projects). His
trademark (the Hendrix connection) is feedback. Point
your guitar at your amplifier
and cause aural chaos. Then
try and create something with
+
it. Belew comes up with *
elephants, rhinoceroses, blue*
whales and assorted other +
strange of mythical beasts. +
This weirdness can also be a ,
cing around, loansharks lurking, and barnacles flipping
their lids. I especially liked
those bubble sounds at the
start and end. The B-52ish
sounding guitars, wild sound
effects, and humorous lyrics
all add to the song's appeal.
It's melodic and catchy as
well. Pancho Villa follows, and
can be described as a ballad
about some heroic Mexican
dude. The Spanish-acoustic
sounding  guitars  and  casta-
problem though. There's a bit *
too much of it on Twan Bar *
King. One gets the impression +t
that Belew is trying a little too ■¥
hard to be unique - to make +
each song completely differ- + _
S' TZT.TZr^ J„ Th. 5-so„g ,.«-«„«, EP by
-a-- * own ki„d S predic- % "Stt&STJZtt
tability + McKenzie and the boys has    nets make this sond sound like
im   being   picky   though « succeeded   jn       ui       out   a    part of a sound-track from one
Twang Bar King is a del.gM-Jdecent effort forMa banyd which
fully   abnormal   album   well* er
masterpiece of  emotion,  and *     *       « »    descrjbe or
power. Here Belew takes on *
Sis TtTe s'a dep K° aS + these guyS aS being any °ne
trails   Theres  a depth  and ^ar f  band   (je.
sens.t.v.ty both to the vocals+ £ garage-rock, rockabilly,
and to the ever .tortured,{ elect 0 salsa-pop-core, etc.,
mut.-layered tram whistle* However, I will venture
guitar that drives    he song * as       ■ h      their
One   immediately   things   of* f       danceable, and
Bruce Springsteen circa Born *   .    diffprent'
to Run. Powerful stuff   If only *ah- ™°r™s off with Teer,-
Be aw could pu   together an J wnjcn   ,
6t   nn   1 U  mali   nnt    itJ Phonal   fave.   The   song
m "HP'JSnnTS? + evokes ima9eS °f an animated
m.ght be dangerous. J cartoon gea movie> wjtn c|ams
He can sing, too sometimes * clapping away,  starfish dan-    sounding   (you  know:   James
with remarkable power, as on -n
the first tune on Twang Bar +
King, a searing cover of the
early Beatles raver I'm Down.
Belew matches Paul McCartney's  raunchiness  grunt  for
grunt, then embellishes it*
with his own particular brand *  ARTIST
of dementia. There's a lot of *
weirdness on the album. She *
Is not Dead, a touching ode to -*  1 l^R_A^JV^ERJ^1
the  good   old   planet   earth, -it
sports a backwards guitar-*
track as its instrumental foun- +
dation. The ideal woman fea-J  4 ICICLE WORKS
tures on tape various good folk +   5 CREATURES
from the streets of Cincinatti £  6 UB 40
commenting on just that sub-1   7 TOM ROBINSON
ject. Belew cuts in for the odd*   8   LORDS   OF   THE
chorus and it makes for a lot of +c     CHURCH
fun. In an ideal world it would*   9 DOA
be a top ten hit. * 10 STYLE COUNCIL
+ 11 XTC
•GeraldB0St0Cktl3 3TEENSKILL4
those TV westerns that
always come on at about 3
a.m. when there is no one
awake except for a few all-
night party commandos. The
song is, well, unique but one
of the weaker cuts on the
record. Nice guitar solo in the
middle, though. Last on Side I
is Roll with the punches, an
energetic, quick, pop number
well suited for party dance
music. I liked the saxaphone
blasts on this one, as well as
some of Mike Davie's lead
guitar riffs.
Daymare starts off Side 2
with a hunting premonition of
doom for the working class.
The body of the song then
kicks in after the spy-movie
Bond, Dr. No, etc.) start. The
song is average, nothing to
really rave about. While listening to this tune I did notice
how calculated, well-metred,
and precise Randy Bowman's
drumming is. Perhaps too
precise, because a more diverse beat could have spiced
the song up a bit. And I know
Randy is capable of it from
seeing and hearing him drum
with his former band, the
now-defunct Subhumans.
Greenstreet is the final cut on
the platter, and starts off with
a funky bassline courtesy of
Brian Eolinek. The rest of the
group then kicks in, including
that wild sax which reminds
me of Bad Manners or Madness. The song has a catchy
rhythmn, and is definitely one
of the highlights on the EP.
The choru's keeps running
through my head. Paul's voice
here, like the rest of the
songs, is clear, quite strong,
and shows fair control. Reminds me of John Doe of X.
Totally it all up, this EP is a
damn good first effort. It's
well worth the fin or so you'll
have to shell (barnacle?) out
for it. The packaging is close
to professional. Production by
Bill Barker at Profile Studios
is right up there with the rest
of the local studios, not bad at
all.
Get this record and solve
the elusive enigma!
- Mike Dennis
ijOTReport: singles
2 ECHO
MEN
3 FLESHTONES
THE   BUNNY-
THE SAFE WAY
to stay alert without
harmful stimulants
LUV-A-FAIR keeps you
stimulated with great tunes and
exciting visuals six nights a
week yet is not habit forming.
LAF is faster, handier, more
reliable and is definitely not as
expensive 12?5 Seymour Street. Tel: 685-3288
Next time monotony makes you
feel like throwing your arms in
the air with despair, or work has
got you down, do as millions
do....perk up with a safe,
effective dose of LUV-A-FAIR.
,14 THE GLOVE
15 THE FALL
16 COMSAT ANGELS
17 NEW ORDER
* 18 ACTIONAUTS
* 19 BLACK UHURU
¥ 20 NEGRO & TESCO
* 21 FARMER'S BOYS
*22 MANIC HEAVEN
*23CINEBAR
24 A CAST OF THOUSANDS
125   KID   CREOLE   &   THE
COCONUTS
* 26 CAPTAIN SENSIBLE
* 27 BUNNY WAILER
+ 28 GIRLS CAN'T HELP IT
+ 29 DER MITTLEGANG
+ 30 ROBYN HITCHCOCK
31 GANG OF FOUR
32 THE THE
*33 STRAWBERRY SWITCH-
* BLADE
*34 PUBLIC IMAGE LTD
* 35 HOWARD DEVOTO
+ 36 JOHN FOXX
+37 THE SMITHS
*38 SLEEPING DOGS
T39 REDSKINS
£40 PORT SAID
Tour de France
Never Stop
Right Side of A Good Thing
Birds Fly
Right Now
Red Red Wine
War Baby
Live for Today
Burn It Down
Long Hot Summer
Wonderland
Breathless
Tell Me Something Good
Like An Animal
The  Man  Whose  Head   Expanded
Will You Stay Tonight?
Confusion
Vagabond
Party Next Door
Cost of Living
For You
Ultraviolent
Another Fine Day
On theQ.T./ln for the Kill
There's Something Wrong ...
Stop the World
Boderation
Rhythm of the Jungle
Startled
Kingdom of Love
Is It Love
This is the Day
Trees & Flowers
This Is Not A Love Song
Rainy Season
Your Dress
Hand In Gove
Same Old Story
Lean On Me!
Monsoon/Rites of Passage
DISTRIBUTOR
EMI (UK)
KOROVA (UK)
IRS (UK)
SITUATION 2 (UK)
WONDERLAND (UK)
DEP INT (UK)
PANIC (UK)
IRS
SUDDEN DEATH
POLYGRAM
VIRGIN (UK)
ELEKTRA (US)
POINT BLANK (US)
WONDERLAND (UK)
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
JIVE (UK)
POLYGRAM
**DEMOTAPE**
ISLAND (UK)
ALBION (UK)
EMI (UK)
**DEMOTAPE**
**DEMOTAPE**
**DEMOTAPE**
ZE (UK)
A&M (UK)
SOLOMONIC (JA)
VIRGIN (UK)
**DEMOTAPE**
ALBION (UK)
EMI (UK)
EPIC (UK)
HAPS (UK)
VIRGIN (UK)
VIRGIN (UK)
METAL BEAT (UK)
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
CRASS (UK)
CNT (UK)
AEON (US) DISCORDER Oct 1983
DAVID THOMAS AND THE PEDESTRIANS Despite   purporting   to   re- J
volve  their  songs   around   a J
Variations on a Theme (Rough Trade/US) S^^-X^i?!:
fatuous rockabilly ditty here *
us that the band is dealing in
some thematic context. Just
what that theme is still escapes me after several listenings. New
facets of the songs reveal
themselves every time you
hear the album - a guitar
figure there, a yodel here -
and your interest won't wane
before you decipher the cryptic lyrics.
For this album Thomas has
remained with the core of
musicians used on last year's
HOWARD DEVOTO
Jerky Versions of the Dream (IRS)
David Thomas and the
Pedestrians1 latest album may
make you ask yourself a few
questions:
a( How can such an unlikely
group of artists put together
an album that's more infectious than pretentious?
b) How can a man with a
voice like a gibbon communicate more feeling than Frank
Sinatra?
c) Why don't records like
Variations on a Theme arouse
the public's reaction the way
As the nigh on electropop tortured yell from Devoto, and
as  on   the  first  album,   and-it beat of Rainy Season resounds the music is mildly stimula-
Richard Thompson stamps + in my ears, I cannot help but ting, Formula ever the contor-
each song with his idiosyncra- + ponder the psyche of Howard tionist in the background. But
tic talents. Although the post- + Devoto.   Being   one   of   the it is soon struggling though a
industrial     bleating     that X progenitors  of   the  so-called bog of repetition of the same
Thomas gave to Pere Ubu's * alternative music scene which message
music has been forsaken for a * surrounds us now, it has come
more docile style, his vocal * to be expected that he
chords prove to be versatile.*-* turn out original material,
He is a vocalist in the literal + something which is distinctly
sense of the word, for he + lacking in his first solo effort
doesn't so much as sing but + Jerky Versions of the Dream
rather uses his voice to form + (his Szajner project could
musical sounds. These range £ hardly be called solo). Some-
from   wistful   meanderings £ thing new from (Devoto) has
get me out of  my  cold
imagination
let me out, I've got a cold
imagination
through and through
hey,   I'm  freezing,   no
news of a thaw
I   don't   know   anyone   I
telephone any more
vocalist and everybody's favorite large person, has made
a record that speaks to the
sensibilities of the intelligent,
open-minded listener with an
impeccable sense of humo-
Judging from the outcom- ,,
this album and his first ort,
1982's Sound of the r ,d and
Other Songs of the Pedestrians, David's head is not a la
ostrich.
Variations on A Theme
presents itself as a more
unified LP than Sound of the
Sand; it is a record that truly
deserves the title of "album."
There is a continuity from
beginning to end, reminding
that many have placed upon
him because of his association
with Fairport Convention. Anton Fier of Lounge Lizards/
Feelies/Pere Ubu fame and
Chris Cutler, formerly of
Henry Cow and the Art Bears
and now collaborating occasionally with the Residents,
appears on drums. Lindsay
Cooper, Jack Monck and Jim
Jones also contribute. How
well such an assemblage of
musicians with widely different backgrounds have managed to merge into a coherent unit is another intri-
guing aspect of Variations on
A Theme.
ClnnReport:
Albums
LABEL
1 BIG COUNTRY
2 HOWARD DEVOTO
3 ALAN VEGA
4 ELVIS COSTELLO
5 ENIGMAS
6 TOM TOM CLUB
7 THE ALARM
8 KING SUNNY ADE
9 BAUHAUS
10 DAVID THOMAS & THE
PEDS
11 3 TEENS KILL 4
12 VIOLENT FEMMES
13 ADRIAN BELEW
14 AZTEC CAMERA
15 MONSOON
16 CABARET VOLTAIRE
17 RENT BOYS INC
18 FLESHEATERS
19 THE WILL
20 SUBHUMANS
21 YELLO
22 THE MEKONS
23 MALCOLM McLAREN
24 KISSING THE PINK
25 SHADOW MINSTRELS
26 KILLING JOKE
27 HUNTERS   &   COLLECTORS
28 JULUKA
29 NOMEANSNO
30 VIRGINIA ASTLEY
31 THE CHAMELEONS
32XTC
33 PETE SHELLEY
34 PETER HAMMILL
35 TRANSLATOR
36 EYELESS IN GAZA
37 SURPLUS STOCK
38 ANNE CLARK
39 NEW MARINES
40 BONGOS
The Crossing
MERCURY
Jerky Versions of the Dream
IRS
Saturn Strip
ZE
Punch the Clock
COLUMBIA
Enigmas EP
MYSTERY
Close to the Bone
SIRE
The Alarm
IRS (US)
Synchro System
ISLAND
Burning from the Inside
VERTIGO
Variations on A Theme
ROUGH TRADE (US)
No Motive
POINT BLANK (US)
Violent Femmes
SLASH
Twang Bar King
ISLAND
High Land, Hard Rain
SIRE
Third Eye
PHONOGRAM (UK)
The Crackdown
SOME BIZARRE
Squeal for Joy EP
RBI
A Hard Road to Follow
UPSETTER (US)
Causa Sui
INCENDIARY
No Wishes, No Prayers
SST (US)
You Gotta Say Yes ...
ELEKTRA
The English Dancing Master
CNT (UK)
Duck Rock
CHARISMA
Naked
ATLANTIC
Great Expectations
PTERODACTYL (US)
Fire Dances
PASSPORT
The Fireman's Curse
VIRGIN (UK)
Scatterlings
WB
Mama
NOMEANSNO
From Gardens ...
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
Script of the Bridge
STATIK (UK)
Mummer
VIRGIN
XL1
ARISTA
Patience
NAIVE (UK)
No Time Like Now
COLUMBIA
Rust Red September
CHERRY RED (UK)
Dance Ersatz
ROUGH TRADE (BRD)
Changing Places
RED FLAME (UK)
No Peace
AMERICAN (US)
Numbers With Wings
RCA
Lyrics which make us want to
pause a moment to reflect on
where the hell we're going
voices in themselves on most * album of substance, this LP when our pop hero evokes this
of the tunes. This album is a + somehow comes up empty, dismal bit of hysteria,
case of the whole being more + From his hit single (which Another track which de-
than the sum of its parts; each + clawed itself to the top of the serves mention is, of course,
player's performance creates 1j CITR charts in less than 5 Rainy Season, which is en-
a sense of novelty in every £ weeks) to Way out of Shape, trancing both in tune and
song that never wears out. * the album is undeniably pop lyrics. I think the song relfects
If you are a light-hearted * oriented, and likely to be a a commercial move on Devo-
iconoclast and are looking for * commercial success. to's   part,   but   it   remains
inventiveness and eclecticism -* The thing which is so dis- separated from most romance
in the music you like to listen + turbingly missing from this trash with its refreshing dance
to, Variations on A Theme + release is the slightly paranoic beat and penetrating, memor-
should belong in your record + sarcastic wit which has able melody. Similarly, Wait-
collection, One can only hope * characterized Devoto's earlier ing For a Train is a blindly
that musicians of such ability * work and has been one of his optimistic cut which although
will continue to collaborate to * most attractive features. But'
produce fascinating work such * Devoto, whose frenzied tunes
as this album. ■¥ Boredom and Breakdown (off
-Fiona MacKay   + tne Buzzcocks Spiral Scratch
-    * single) somehow captured the
* essence of and indeed provided  much   impetus  to  the
* early punk movement, is now
+ a much more puzzling aartist.
+ Even his work with Magazine,
"+which indicated a significant
wleap from his simpler, more
*emotional association with
* punk,   reflected  a  depth   of
* thinking and dexterity with
-it words so often absent with
+ many bands. This lyrical base,
+ when combined with the outstanding musical styles of
J Dave Formula and John Mc- oumc u. mo unucnyiny oym-
*Geogh could only be seen as a   cism  which  was  so  evident
* progression from the by-then   with Magazine.
* dying punk movement. De- So, instead of triumphantly
■¥ voto was ahead of the game    taking a further leap forward,
* and continued to pump out Devoto has dealt a cruel blow
■¥ classics, most notably the to his fan's expectations.
+ three Magazine albums with Jerky Versions of the Dream is
+ the provocatively wordy titles an album worth acquiring,
+ Secondhand Daylight, An Al- though since it stimulates the
£ ternative  use  of  Soap,   and    listener to reflect on the state
* Magic,  Murder &  the   Wea-
* ther. Almost all tracks (especially on the first LP) aggres-
* sively attacked all musical and
-it lyrical/vocal   barriers,   which
+ had not been challenged  by
+ most bands up until then.
+     And yet, here is an indivi-
* dual who we just MUST notice
* (if only for his past), and he
* has kicked us in the eye with
* what is, all told, a rather bland
* album. That isn't to say that
•¥ Devoto's voice isn't still cap-
+ tivating, or that Dave Formu-
+ la's keyboard expertise is in
1j any way diminished. But most
* cuts on this album are flawed,
* mainly by the fact that neither
•* of the two artists exploit their
■¥ talents enough.
+ It's almost as though De-
+ voto is openly admitting that
+ he has run out of new ideas
? with  the first  track  on   the
* album,  entitled  ironically,
* Cold   Imagination.   The   cut
* begins   promisingly,   with   a
forging no new ground, is a
useful cure for mild depression.
The remainder of the album
alternates between the overbearing, slightly maudlin style
of / Admire You - CHQM-
don' t-d isturb-pop that
wouldn't even phase your
mother (is Devoto's brain
starting to soften?) and Topless, to the confusingly meandering tracks Some Will Pay,
Taking Over Heaven, and Out
of Shape With Me. The last of
these is a disgustingly obvious
regurgitation of Way Out of
Shape, which is the only track
on the album that retains
some of the underlying cyni-
of the music scene and most
importantly it leads to the
question of where we might be
going (and who will pave the
way). It seems to suggest that
a new philosophical and musical synthesis is direly needed,
otherwise we'll soon end up in
the same stagnant state which
existed before punk happened
(full circle). - Sean Cahill
COSTUMES
CABBAGES
306 W CORDOVA DISCORDER Oct 1983
THE MEKONS
The English
Dancing Master (CNT/UK)
Against all odds, The Me-
kons have released a four song
EP entitled The English dancing Master on the extremely
independent CNT label. Anyone who has followed The
Mekons checkered career
knows how musically unpredictable they've been over the
years and The English Dancing Master is no exception.
At their outset The Mekons
were a sligh.iy deranged
group of individuals riding the
coattails of the dying English
punk movement. Their sound
was described as "mutant
pop" and, appropriately, they
could barely play their instruments. After several releases
on four labels (Fast Product,
Virgin, Red Rhino, CNT)
they're a wholly different
band. While they've retained
their lovable lunacy, they take
a far more understated approach to their songs. Gone
are the crashing chords and
shots of the classic Where
Wete You (1978) in favor of
the swaying, hypnotic
rhythms and pleasantly
melancholy and melodic vocals that characterize No
Country Dance, Mr. Confess
and, to a lesser degree, The
Last Dance which is, perhaps,
the definitive track on the EP
if only because it contains
within it the hybrid folkele-
mjnts found elsewhere on the
E.°. The country fiddle predominates with some strangely appropriate discordant guitar jccasion.Jly rearing its
head like an unwelcome guest
at a party. The effect is
patently silly and you get the
feeling that it could only work
Oil a Mekons record. Unlike
the first three tracks, Parson's
Farewell sounds, for the most
part, like a straggling bunch
of drunken Highland men
having a good yell about
nothing in particular and beat
ing the shit out of some poor
violin. A great song. All in all,
a truly inspired record from a
band who know they're never
going to make any money but
keep plugging away for their
handful of fans and, basically,
just for the fun of doing it. If
you can find it, get it.
- Steve Robertson
CABARET VOLTAIRF
The Crackdown
(Some Bizarre)
•We wanted to try another
formula, just change things
around and see what the
end result was, instead of
carrying on releasing
another album that we'd do
in isolation and release on
Rough Trade again. That
seemed like a formula that
we'd tried and tested and
we though it was getting a
bit safe.'
- Richard H. Kirk, Cabaret
Voltaire. Melody Maker,
July 16/83
Why then does The Crackdown, the new product in
question, seem safer than
ever?
Perhaps what Kirk is trying
to say, but doing a misleading
job of it, is that he and
Stephen Mallinder, the other
half of Cabaret Voltaire, have
never before attempted an
entire album of club-oriented
dance music. Well, the formula may be new to Cabaret
Voltaire, but formula it is.
What makes it such a safe
choice -and a disappointing
one— is that just about everyone else has made it already.
I'd somehow hoped that Kirk
and Mallinder would have
chosen not to jump on that
already crowded bandwagon.
One eye on the chart and
the other on the wallet makes
a pair; it's only the unsuspecting listener who will be looking for innovation on this new
album. Too bad, because it
had seemed the Cabs had hit
their stride in 1982 with 2X45
which was both highly original
and incidentally danceable.
Before that, particularly before the comparatively smooth
Red Mecca, their music was
complex, disjointed, and experimental. And although
alongside other groups that
have created their own versions of modern electro-pop
-Yello and New Order, to
name a couple— the new
Cabaret Voltaire sound truer
to their experimental roots, in
fact the commercial sound of
The Crackdown is all too
obvious when compared to
iheir older material. The only
time The Crackdown gets
away from this commercial
formula is on the four-song
12" included (for a limited
time) with the LP; it contains
the only couple of songs that
can't be danced to.
But even though The Crackdown is disappointing, it is
still better than most other
current efforts of its genre.
After all, mechanical repetition, a strong percussive element, and endless electronic
effects have always been
essential to Cabaret Voltaire's
music. With The Crackdown,
the Cabs have proven that
they are very capable of
exploiting these elements as
successfully as others have
adopted them.
Originally, their conformity
extended only to the narrow
confines of their own music.
Let's hope that, despite all
indications, Cabaret Voltaire
are not moving towards conformity of a different nature.
- Robin Razzell
CITR PROFILE: The Jazz Show
CITR devotes 3Vfe hours a
week, Monday nights from
9:30 to 1 a.m., to the (Jazz
Show Shelley Freedman and
I, Fiona MacKay, alternate as
hosts of this special feature,
playing albums from CITR's
jazz library and from our own
collections to bring you a taste
of the varied forms of music
that come under the title of
jazz. At 11 p.m. a new jazz
album is played in its entirety
as part of CITR's nightly Final
Vinyl feature. Since there is
no radio station in Vancouver
with a complete jazz format,
we feel we are playing a very
important role in bringing jazz
music to the ears of the public.
Jazz originated over eighty
years ago and has grown in
popularity in every corner of
*he world. It has taken many
rorms since its inception as a
musical genre - dixieland, big
band, swing, bebop, fusion,
free jazz and innumerable
permutations of these styles.
It has been a herald of social
change in every decade of the
century, reflecting new attitudes among its musicians
and fans.
Exemplary individuals have
created songs that have withstood the tests of time and still
sound as fresh today as they
did when they were first
written. These artists and
songs are the cornerstones
around which jazz has developed.
Jazz is not an easily accessible music. It takes a fair
amount of exposure to even
begin to understand the essence of it. Countless critics
have tried to define it, but the
feeling behind jazz cannot
satisfactorily captured in
words (nor can that of Rumanian folk music - Ed.). The
greatest jazz artists have
created works that are so
complex that even many of
their peer musicians cannot
adequately describe what
makes them so unique. Thus
there is a tendency for many
of these works to be bypassed,
works by such artists as
Thelonius Monk, Charles
Mingus, John Coltrane and
Ornette Coleman to name a
few. A radio station like CITR
is the perfect outlet for jazz
that does not fit into any
particular mold. If the Layperson who doesn't play an
instrument (me included)
can't put themselves into the
jazz musician's shoes and
understand how the music is
conceived, then at least he can
hear how it differs from other
music of the artist's day and
appreciate its melodic beauty
and technical virtuosity.
Another of our aims on the
Jazz Show is to present music
by "up and coming" artists,
particularly Canadian ones,
and to preview recent releases. The high prices and
limited availability of jazz
albums deter many from exploring unfamiliar music.
Hopefully by playing new
artists' music and other recent
albums, Shelley and I can
acquaint you with the current
state of jazz and with who will
play important roles in the
future.
We hope that you'll tune
into the Jazz Show and open
your ears to the.wide variety
of artists and styles that make
jazz today so exciting. We
invite all reasonable requests
and comments that might
assist us in preparing a better
presentation. The (Jazz Show)
Monday nights at 9:30 — hear
you there!     . Fiona MacKay
Monday to Friday
NEWS DIET
A healthy ingestion of news, sports, and weather fiye times
each day.
Wakeup Report (8 a.m.)
Morning Newsbreak (10 a.m.)
Lunch Report (1 p.m.)
Afternoon Newsbreak (3:30 p.m.)
Afternoon Sportsbreak (4:30 p.m.)
Dinner Report (6 p.m.)
SPORTS (8 p.m., 10 p.m., 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 6 p.m.)
As well as regular sportscasts CITR features live play-by-play
broadcasts of  Thunderbird  football,   hockey and  backetball
games. Birds Eye View, UBC Sports special will now include
Thunderbird Profiles.
GENERIC REVIEW (8:35 a.m., 5:35 p.m.)
An analysis of various forms of entertainment in Vancouver.
INSIGHT (6:13 p.m.)
A CITR editorial on any and every contemporary issue. Heard
nightly after the Dinner Report.
AT UBC (7:30 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 4 p.m., 6:40 p.m.)
A UBC calendar of events heard four times daily.
HIGH PROFILE (8 p.m.)
An hour focus on musicians and bands which have surfaced
and, at many times, stayed on the CITR Playlist past, present,
and maybe even future. (See box for nightly features.)
FINAL VINYL (11 p.m.)
Each night one complete album is featured. (See box for nightly
features.)
Saturday
THE FOLK SHOW (10 a.m. - 12 p.m.)
Mostly traditional folk music.
CITR PLAYLIST SHOW (3 p.m. - 6 p.m.)
Countdown of selected music from CITR's weekly album and
singles playlist.
SATURDAY MAGAZINE (6 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.)
News, sports, a summary of the week's Generic Reviews, and
surprise features.
Sunday
MUSIC OF OUR TIME (8:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.)
Classical 20th century music.
9 October - VNMS Concert Preview: Uitti, avant-garde cellist;
preview on  UBC Continuing  Education course:
20th Century Music
16   October   -   VSO   Concert   Preview:    Eckart-Grammatte,
Stravinsky's   Symphony   of   Psalms;   Continuing
Education Program #1: Historical Overview
23 October - VSO Preview: Hindemith's Mathis Der Maler;
Continuing  Education  Program  #2:  Schoenberg
and the Serialists
30 October - Hallowe'en Show; Webern Festival, Part 2; VNMS
Concert Preview: Schoenberg Ensemble
SUNDAY BRUNCH (12:15 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.)
Showcase of literary works in poetry and prose.
ROCKERS SHOW (12:45 p.m. - 3 p.m.)
Reggae music from Jamaica and other areas.
RABBLE WITHOUT A PAUSE (3 p.m. - 6 p.m.)
Unusual,   unpredictable,   and   unconventional   describe   this
music show mixed with theoretical and practical banter.
SUNDAY MAGAZINE (6 p.m. - 6:20 p.m.)
Wrap up of the weekend's news and sports as well as a Generic
Review.
FAST FORWARD (9:30 p.m. - 1 a.m.)
CITR's music alternative to our regular music programming.
Monday
THE JAZZ SHOW (9:30 p.m. - 1 a.m.)
An eclectic mix of musical jazz forms.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
Defending National Champions
vs
MANITOBA Fri., October 14
at Thunderbird Stadium
Live on CITR 102 FM
7:30 p.m.
STUDENTS FREE
(with AMS card)
Bring your radio to the game lP*»yuimJeat«m&
DISCORDER Oct 1983
HIGH PROFILE 8:ooP.m
for the month of October, 1983
Sat       1 Punk Poets #4: Various
Mon     3 Nick Lowe
Tues    4 More New L.A. Bands
Wed    5 Victoria Bands
Thurs   6 The Fall
Fri        7 John Foxx
Sat       8 Siouxsie   and   the   Banshees
Mon   10 The Bongos
Tues  11 Colin Newman
Wed  12 Hunters and Collectors
Thurs 13 The Birthday Party
Fri      14 No High Profile Due to Live Broadcast
Sat     15 Penetration
Mon   17 T-Bone Burnett
Tues 18 Altered Images
Wed  19 Iggy Pop
Thurs 20 The Damned
Fri     21 The Supremes
Sat     22 Cabaret Voltaire
Mon   24 X
Tues  25 Lords of the New Church
Wed  26 Gang of Four
Thurs 27 Ian Dury
Fri      28 Brian Eno
Sat     29 Wreckless Eric
Mon   31 Easybeats
FINAL VINYL
11:00 p.m.
NEGLECTED ALBUMS for the month of October, 1983 - Every
Sunday Night at 11:00 p.m.
2 LEW, BROWN, & HOLLANDER Deuxieme journee
9 UNIVERS ZERO Ceux du Dehors
16ARTZOYD Phase 4 (pt. 1)
23 ART ZOYD Phase 4 (pt. 2)
30 MOEBIUS Tonspuren
CLASSIC ALBUMS for the month of October, 1983 - Every
Friday Night at 11:00 p.m.
7 Gun Club - Fire of Love
14 The Monochrome Set - Volume, Contrast and Brilliance
21 Yello - Solid Pleasure
28 U2 - Boy
Starting this month the Thursday night finyl vinyl feature heard
at 11 p.m. will be replaced by "Mel Brewer Presents." Mel
brings you the latest in local and international demos and
independent releases.
Mary Jo of the  Modernettes,   in  action  at   last  months
Corsage/modernettes gig at the SUB Ballroom.
Fridays ... ARTISTS ONLY
A new CITR public affairs program offering interviews with
various artists.
7 Oct. - Eric Burdon
14 Oct. - David Johansen
21 Oct. - The Stranglers
28 Oct. - Wall of Voodoo
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
9:00 a.m.
MONDAYS ... AMNESTY ACTION
A community access program providing a forum for human
rights issues of concern to Amnesty International.
3 Oct - Human Rights: The Challenge
10 Oct. - Death of a Human Rights Worker
17 Oct. - Human Rights Violations in Zaire
24 Oct. - A Korean Prisoner of Conscience
Tuesdays ... CAMBRIDGE FORUM
A new CITR public affairs program presenting authoritative
speakers confronting issues of public concern.
4 Oct. - The Cold War and the Arms Race with M.I.T. political
scientist Noam Chomsky.
11 Oct. - Fairness: Free Press Issue #1 with Thomas Winship,
editor of The Boston Globe.
18 Oct. - Global Stakes: The Future of High Technology with
Ray Strata, president of Analog Devices.
25 Oct. - Can't We Control Nuclear Weapons? with nuclear
analysts   Randall   Forsberg,   founder  of  the  freeze
movement,  and  McGeorge Bundy,  proponent  of  a
no-first-use policy.
Wednesdays ... SPEAKERS CHOICE
5 Oct. - Canada/USA: Speakout on Life with Uncle - several
noted speakers discuss Canadian-American relations
in a forum at UBC.
12 Oct.  - China's  Race Against Time:  Modernization  and
Education with new SFU president William Saywell.
19 Oct. - Education Under Siege: Academic Freedom and the
Cult of Efficiency with new UBC president George
Pedersen.
26 Oct. - The State of Privacy in Canada: Was Orwell Right?
with Peter Burns, dean of UBC's law faculty.
Thursdays ... COUNTER FORCE
6 Oct. - If You Love This Planet with Dr. Helen Caldicott, head
of Physicians for Social Responsibility.
13 Oct. - The Global Imperative for Peace and Justice.
20 Oct. - The Deterrence Debate: Maintaining Peace or Fuelling
Destruction?
27 Oct. - The Plight of Guatemalan Refugees with the music of
Guatemalan refugee band Kin Lalat. CITR FM 102 and Georgia Straight present
violent
femmes
wHh
A Cast of Thousands
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26
SUB BALLROOM
UBC CAMPUS
Doors: 7:30pjn   All Ages Welcome
$9 Advanced
Tickets: Zulu, Odyssey, Am Box office
Produced by ARTS
AMS PRESENTS
I
with GUESTS
AMS $8
Gerneral $9
Day-of-show $10
Available at:
VTC/CBO outlets
Woodward's,
AMS Box Office.
For information please phone 687-4444
LEPERS
 DANCE FUNK RHYTHMS	
BILLY
SHEARS
 POP-ROCK! EX-SCISSORS	
OCTOBER 14
A.M.S. MEMBERS $6.50 ADVANCE AT A.M.S. BOX OFFICE.
TRTEToAn^.|iro™
SINGLEmh l^-i K$S
ODYSSEY, RAVE ■
i^^'l
ALL AGES WELCOME

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