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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Mar 1, 1983

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 DISCORDER
ZA guide to CITR tm 102
•^ CABLE 100 FROM    AUSTIN,  TEXAS
guide to CITR fm 102
C7 CABLE 100
Rank and File Shape Countrv^New Frontier
\J iscorder spoke with
Chip and Tony Kinman of Rank
and File when they played in
Vancouver last year. This
March 4 they'll be appearing in
the Ballroom out here at UBC.
Discorder: I know you had Rank
and File, "mark I," for a period
of time, but that bit the dust.
CHIP: Uh, yeah, for about a
year. Well, more or less bit the
dust. We went back, we were
living in Manhattan at the time
and we went back and figured
that if we were going to play
country music, we should live in
Austin, Texas, so we moved
there, and we've been there for
a year and a half just playing
and getting our chops together,
so to speak.
Discorder: Why did the first
Rank and File break up?
CHIP: Well, we decided to move
to Texas after we did that tour
where you saw us two years ago
and our bass player and
drummer at the time didn't want
to move. So they quit. Tony was
playing acoustic guitar at the
time and- he moved over to bass
and we decided just to work in
New York for a little while —
make some money so we could
move. We met up with Slim in
Texas, he was playing in a locaJ
band there.
Discorder: Why did you move to
Austin in particular?
TONY: You can learn a lot by
living in Austin, going out and
seeing different kinds of music
there. You can still see old
people playing there, who've
been playing for fifty years. You
can see them any night of the
week and you can learn. They'll
show you things and they'll talk
to you and you can also learn
just by watching — what really
the music's all about.
It's stripped bare. These
guys will be in playing, like
guys will be playing, like every
Wednesday night in a bar and
you know they'll be there.
They don't poster for it,
there's no hype. It's just straight
music. It's easy to learn from
that.   Especially  coming  from
the backgrounds we did, where
everything associated with the
bands besides the music,
was such a big part of it.
Discorder: Initially, how did you
find thestigma of being labelled
a "punk band playing country"
affect you?
CHIP: Well, at first it was pretty,
urn, I don't know if "cold" is the
right word, but it was
appreciative. There wasn't a big
audience, it took us a long time
before we started drawing a lot
of people. About a year ago we
started getting popular. But as
far as being a punk rock band, it
didn't really hinder us.
Discorder: Many people in
Canada see Texas as "red neck
city." How are lyrics dealing
with topics such as the KKK
received?
CHIP: Austin is really not very
red neck, it's a pretty liberated
town. It's the capital and there's
a huge university there. It's not
like living in Megadocis or
Waco, perhaps, where people
can be pretty uptight. Austin's
not like that.
TONY: A song like The
Klansman Song," well, it's
listened to. When you play a
song like that in Austin or in any
other place, people just listen to
it. They're interested in hearing
what the song's about and the
words and of what you're
saying.
Discorder: Listening to you
perform last night, I noticed
your music has far moreenergy
and drive than most country
music.
TONY: We were in punk bands
and that's the kind of music we
do. You have to have that drive
to anything you do. The people
who brought "laid-back" into
country music were not the
great country musicians. They
were the, uh, hippies, like from
California, back in the 60's
when they tried to make
"country rock", which was
neither country, nor was it rock.
Someone like Merle Haggard
was never laid back. Waylon
Jennings was never laid back.
Hank Williams was not laid
back. I think the whole thing
that country got its reputation
I *                1      ill
\      !■
The lg at The
Commodore
Minus scenes of full frontal
nudity and self-mutilation of the
past,   the   Iggy   Pop   concert
Thurs.,    Feb.    17th,   was   still
something to remember. Iggy let
loose for an hour and a half for
Vancouver    fans    at    the
Commodore on a stage virtually
cleared for his insane athletics.
Eat your heart out Bellingham-
ites,   (who   were  treated   to   a
lackluster    performance    on
Tuesday night) guess you folks
just don't know how to bring out
the "lg" in Iggy.
photo - Jamie SIKORSKI
as being a "laid back" music
form, a relaxed music form
came from the hippies bringing
their "laidbackness" into it. I
think what we're doing, as far as
playing a non-traditional
country style, is putting that
drive back into the non-
traditional country sound,
which in the past, meant only
the laid back country sound.
We don't want to have anything
to do with that.
Discorder: What sparked
writing lyrics for a song like
"The Conductor Wore Black"?
TONY: Are you familiar withthe
Woody Guthrie song "Bound
for Glory"? In American
popular music there's a history
of train songs, with Woody
Guthrie's among them. I
wanted to write a song likethat.
In that song Bound For Glory.
it's "....this train doesn't carry
liars, this train is bound for
glory...." I wanted to write a
song about a train that was
exactly the opposite, that is, it's
travelling in exactly the
opposite direction as Woody
Guthrie's train.
Discorder: Do you two, Chip
and Tony, write songs together
as a team or does one member
of the band write most of the
songs?
CHIP: It's different for every
song. Sometimes Tony will
write most of the lyrics and
maybe most of the music, or I'll
write it, but it's usually Tony
and I. Alejandro co-wrote the
song "Rank and File".
Discorder: He was in the first
Rank and File, wasn't he?
CHIP: Mmm-Hmm.
Tony: Him and Chip were the
only ones.
Discorder: I like this better than
any other country I've heard, to
be quite honest.
CHIP: Yeah, a lot of people will
say, and I guess this is kind of an
off-hand compliment, but they
say,    "I    really   hate   country
music, but I think you guys are
great." Well, thanks, I love
country music. That's what we
call it, this record, we call it
country music. We don't
quibble about it or anything....
CHIP: We do well in Texas. We
do well almost everywhere.
Almost everywhere except the
Soft Rock Cafe.
Discorder: What do you think
about bands like the Gun Club
and the Cramps?
CHIP: I love the Cramps, I think
they're really good. The Gun
Club I don't care for, but I think
the Cramps are really good. I
like the last album they put out
"Psychedelic Jungle" with
"Goo-goo Muck" — I think
they're great. I've never seen
them all this time but I like their
records a whole bunch. I've
seen videos of them and they're
really funny. That lead singer
cracks me up.
Discorder: Do any bands like
the Cramps influence what you
do?
CHIP: No, it's strictly country.
As far as influences like
Punk we're our own influence,
you know, from the old days.
We listen to a lot of reggae
music: Culture, Bunny Wailer,
but I don't think any contemporary rock bands really
influence us. Contemporary
country music though...
Discorder: Well, who do you
listen to along those lines?
CHIP: Waylon, Merle Haggard,
Tammy Wynnette, Tom T.
Hall....
TONY: John Anderson.
CHIP: John Anderson, Mo
Bandy. There's a lot of greats
still out there doing it. We just
saw Ernest Tubb in Austin in a
place called the Broken Spoke.
It's this road house in south
Austin. Real authentic. The
stage is about as big as this
desk right here.
-Gord Badanic DISCORDER, March, 1983
fmi02
DiScOrDeR
Reviews Editor
Printing:
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Tel:  228-9512-3
FREE DELIVERY
letters
to the
airhead
c/o CITR Radio
6138S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 2A5
Dear Airhead.
I enjoyed reading my first
copy of Discorder, kindly
donated to me by Kelly's on
Granville along with my latest
purchase of weird, modern
music.
I would like to comment on
the article "Youth Culture in
West Berlin". It is impossible
not to notice that West
Germany is the centre of a new
cultural explosion, with its focal
point in West Berlin.
There seems, however, to be
nothing new in Werner
Jahnke's tribute to this new
expression of youthful
idealism. In 1967 I was a dope-
smoking, acid-popping
peacenik, gravitating to places
like Toronto's Yorkville and
Vancouver's Gastown and 4th
Avenue to share a similar brand
of youthful idealism. Jahnke
refers to thedesireof theyoung
Berliners to reject military
horror and "share a close and
common feeling with others."
This brings back memories of
summers spent not only
pursuing the hippie lifestyle but
of hoping fora brighter, happier
future. The bright future never
arrived, but I am glad that
idealism, in a somewhat
different form, it still alive.
Also: Best of luck with your
new mag!
--Geoff Prescott
Dear Sir:
Can you imagine, if all of us,
every last one of us — world
wide — packed it up and said,
"— it!" Our culture would most
likely prevent us from doing so
— BUT, it may very well come to
that point. The human race may
just get sick and tired of where
the power lies — 'LIES.'
Does the globe seem right to
us? For example — religion,
priorities, technical functions,
the rich, the poor, and last, but
very far from least, the
LEADERS and the followers.
The righteous must strike! It
seems a bit of a shock to put it in
that way. As our elementary
teachers used to say — STOP,
LOOK, LISTEN 	
My Point: Are the people of
this world going to sit back and
allow a 'very' small handful of
people take massive weapons
— nuclear and conventional —
and blow all our heads off.
It seems so	
Ethan, you've have to
understand that we're in a tight
race. We've got to start scoring
or we're gonna miss the
playoffs.
--Ron
Dear Sir,
Local music and Seattle
music is where the action's at.
Vancouver's Persisters are
fabulous Janet Lumb, Wendy,
Doreen Allen, Josie Cedroff
and Mona Arens really let it all
hang out when they rock and
roll. They played recently at the
Soft Rock and John Barleys. If
you want to rock your socks off
go and see them.
Quantum Leap is a great local
trendy outfit. These five girls
assure you of a night of
sophisticated music. The sax
player who also uses a number
of percussion pieces is the best
player. They are better than
Moev. Somebody sign them up
to record.
Seattle's Rally Go played
recently at John Barleys. The
four   girls   are   so   pretty   and
remind me of Bananarama. I
think they are better than
Bananarama. The cute little
guitar player has a distinctive
face that would look out of this
world on a record jacket. They
have a brand new singer also
and she would pass for (an
inside joke if you wish) Miss
Canada.
The last band I want to
mention is Seattle's Visible
Targets. Laura, Rebecca and
Pamela, can rock as good asthe
Delta 5 which is their best
comparison. The male
drummer is great also. He
certainly handles his drum kit.
--Charles Slade
(Charles slade)
Must have written this with
his left hand.
--Ed.
Addition to recent letter:
Janet Lumb of the Persisters
should surely be christened,
Supergirl. She plays saxa-
phone, clarinet, guitar and ice
cube tray with the facility of a
true virtuoso. I just love to hear
her beautiful voice on / hate
being in love, or Lene Lovich's
Home. She is warm and friendly
and always has a ready wit. She
loves to engage customers in
sprightly conversation and
never brags about herself. She
is a saint, a virtuoso and a
supergirl. I salute Janet Lumb,
the great juicy plum. She's
good enough to eat.
--Charles Slade
(Charles slade)
Well Janet,
It looks like the ball is in your
court. "He loves me, he loves
me not " _ .
f2)AD\0
•LIGHT ROCK •LOOSE FUSION
•ELECTRONIC •MAINSTREAM*
•FUNK •REGGAE •UPBEAT*
come to
SUB
GAMES ROOM
Downstairs Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
Hear the sounds of the group of 50
Latest electronic video games
"Truly a unique experience in audio and video manipulation."
r
\
cm dj
-8 LANE 5 PIN BOWLING
-9 BILLARD TABLES
-50 ELECTRONIC VIDEO
& PINBALL GAMES
Open: Monday to Saturday 8am -12:45pm
Sunday 10am - 11:30pm
Any Advanced Bookings — Please call
SUB GAMES ROOM 228-3692 DISCORDER, March, 1.983
SHRIEK-TENS E-BAC K-TO U CH
3rd ANNUAL
'TRIBUTE TO WEST COAST MUSIC
• A blank space has been provided in each section for any
a name that is not on the ballot.
• Please check off or write in one name in each category.
• The vote must be for B.C. Artists only.
• All ballots must be returned by mail to address below.
• Ballots must be received before March 15, 1983
Dters wishing to \a
Group of the Yi
□ Chllliwack
□ D.O.A.
□ Headpins
□ Loverboy
P PayolaS
Album/EP of the Year
□ No Stranger To Danger (PayolaS)
D Opus X (Chilliwack)
D Selection (54/40)
D Turn It Loud (Headpins)
D War on 45 (D.O.A)
Single of the Ypar
□ Don't It Make Ya Feel (Headpins)
D Eyes Of A Stranger (PayolaS)
□ Secret Information (Chilliwack)
□ Watcha Gonna Do (Chilliwack)
□ Workin' For The Weekend (Loverboy)
Independent Release of the Year
Born Free (Los Popularos)
Educated Man (Images In Vogue)
P Losin' Control (Brandon Wolf)
r~ Silverlode (Silverlode)
D War on 45 (D.O.A.)
Club Act of the Year
— Jim Byrnes
D Herald Nix
n David Raven and The Escorts
'"  Buddy Selfish
SIGNATURE
Send Ballot to:
'TRIBUTE TO WEST COAST MUSIC
c/o Doane Raymond Chartered Accountants
1009 • 736 Granville Street,
Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 1H7
The presentations will take place on Sunday, March 27th at the Holiday Inn Harbourside.
Look. Here is is. The
public ballot for the Tribute to
West Coast Music Learn it. Because until the 15th of this
month it will haunt you. The
crucial importance of this
decision will keep you awake
nights, make you drink too
much, chase away all your
friends. This is What Rock
Music Is All About. Really. No
kidding.
This is the third run at 'pat
yourself on the back' from the
BC chapter of the Canadian
Academy of Recording Arts
and Sciences. The event came
about in 1980 after The Rock
Industry in BC decided that it
wasn't getting its fair share of
POTBs (Pats On The Back) at
the national Juno awards in
Toronto. Figuring it could
administer POTBs as well as
anyone, The Rock Industry
came up with its own awards. It
called the awards "A Tribute to
West Coast Music" (isn't that a
friendlier word than "awards"?)
and took a populist tack; the
consumer would have the final
say on group and records of the
year.
These awards went so far as
to include the music scene that
exists outside The Rock
Industry as it stands. DOA got
nominations. So did Art
Bergman. This year there's
even an indie release category.
All very laudable. All smelling
slightly of tokenism. Sort of like
the poor relations that get
invited over once a year for
leftovers.
Chances are this year's
tribute will be the same as last
year. Joey Shithead's back will
go unpatted. DOA's WAR ON
45>and54-40's Selection will not
be chosen records of the year.
Instead the same stable of
bands who have helped to
perpetrate the banality of
commercial AOR radio will
emerge triumphant. You'll get
no predictions here, but odds
are that the group of the year
will earn more in merchandising t-shirts, belt buckles,
lunch kits and garbage bags
this year than all of the bands in
the indie category will make in
the next ten.
The obvious question is, then,
why bother voting at all? Why,
indeed! Well, for one, by not
voting you sacrifice your right
to complain. And while writing-
this whole thing off as a bad
joke may be tempting, in doing
so you may be passing up the
best opportunity for cheap fun
since the rainy Sunday afternoon you spent listening to
"Rabble without a Pause" and
sticking forks into the neighbor's cat.
To  assist  you   in  your fun,
DISCORDER provides you with
the following suggestions:
1) Invite  everyone  you  know
over to your place, reminding
them to bring material to
enhance their enjoyment of the
event.
2) Get 15 or20thousand public
ballots
3) Fill them out the way YOU
think they should be filled out.
(using false names, of course)
OR
Try these for fun:
a) Fill out all the ballots with
the Day-Glo Abortions as
group of the year.
b) Write in the Melody Pimps'
Giver as single of the year.
Watch the panic as the nominating committee tries to find a
song that has never been
recorded.
c) Write in Doane Raymond
Chartered Accountants as club
act of the year. These are the
people counting the ballots.
Flattering them may lead them
to view you as a Visionary Rock
Listener and soften them up to
suggestions that they fix the
rest of the "Tribute".
d) Vote for yourself in all five
categories. After all, what have
Darby Mills or Mike Reno got
that you haven't.
e) Use your imagination. This
can be fun.
In any case, enjoy your ballot.
We'll see you all, no doubt,
bedecked in black tie and tails
at the Tribute on the 27th, a
carefully prepared acceptance
speech in your pocket.
And    remember it's    your
music it's     your    choice	
vote --Chris Dafoe
I he initial touch: bass-
note and drum beat cascade in
unison to form a splash and
dash of spiralling sound. The
electronic whirr purrs alluringly
and alluding to the climax to
come...
"...in the relative calm,
of an all-night party,
I played some strange games
under her bed.
Our bodies moved,
a new foreign gymnast,
dull conversation
went over our heads."
Sex-Think-One appeared in
England during the heat of last
year's summer — the music
critics blamed its existence on
the weather. Steamy, yes, but
not at all sordid, Sex-Think-
One was the first record release
from Shriekback, a group of
rather obscure originsthough it
contains two musical luminaries: Barry Andrews and Dave
Allen, formerly of XTC and
Gang of Four, respectively.
Their talents, combined with
those of Carl Marsh and others
at Y Records of Uxbridge Road
in London, marked the introduction of a pulsating new
sound unlike anything else
heard before in a rapidly
stagnating English new music
scene.
Swirling and soothing, above
all SENSUAL, clear, clean, and
cool....listening to Shriek-
back's six-song album package
Tench, released later that same
summer, is likeswimming inthe
shimmering, frigid waters of the
shark-infested Red Sea. Tench
spins, binds, sears and soars
....it is an orchestrated
cacophony of voice echos and
inflections, spine-tingling bass-
lines and heated percussion
rhythms.
Accretions, the first song on
side two, lives up to its title; it is
a growth of sound from without.
It begins with athumping dance
beat interspersed with hand
claps. An understated vocal
projects from the background
but soon claims the front in a
searing and soaring instant.
The frenetic pace of
Accretions, and like it Sex-
Think-One and A Kind of
Fascination on side one,
dispels into the slower, even
more tense-touch mood of All
The Greekboys (Do the
Handwork), Methloop, and
Here Comes My Handclap. It is
an exciting mix of the
danceable and the demented....
....but wait! The attraction
does not cease. My Spine is the
Bassline, backed with Tiny
Birds and Feelers, a single
release in November 1982,
continues in the Shriekback
tradition of bringing the
sensuality, the texture, the
FEEL back into amusicthat has
been bludgeoned by the
repetitive numbing banality of
most new dance-beat bands.
"No guts, no blood, no brains
at   all "   goes   the   chorus,
describing   the   man   with
the sensititvity of a gear box
and the spine of a bass-line.
CONT'D ON PAGE 4
D E P E C HjE   MODE
SHADES OF LIFE
March 28 • 8:30 PM • Commodore Ballroom
TICKETS: VTC, CBO, Ealon's & Woodward's. INFORMATION: 6874444
|Csfc&ERC/£L SUOyDry^l DISCORDER, March, 1983
#^f#^
Echo and the Bunnymen
Porcupine (Korona)
L«cho and the Bunny-
men's third lip., Porcupine, is an
uneven effort, and, although
the "sound" of the Bunnymen
has changed somewhat, the Ip.
does not demonstrate an
advance. The principal
problem, in fact, lies with this
shift in sound. Singer Ian
McCulloch said, recently, the
Bunnymen had hoped for a
simply recorded raw chords Ip.
and many of the songs reflect a
need for a simple approach.
The Bunnymen, unfortunately, lost sight of this aim, for the
Ip. demonstrates excess rather
than restraint with its densely
recorded guitar parts all too
prevalent.
The Ip. is very much more
guitar oriented than either
Heaven Up Here or Crocodiles.
The intense Ripeness, for
instance, gives us a guitar
ringing    guitar   in   each   ear,
one traditional, one very Asian
in texture. Their mad
strumming gives way only
occasionally to a simple
structure of forward moving
handclaps and ringing piano
chords. The song succeeds
because it remains simple
without overwhelming instrumentation. Heads Will Roll
partly fails because, at times, it
simplicity gives way to an
incredibly dense "eastern"
guitar sound reminiscent of the
Rolling Stones' Satanic
Majesties. Only Mac's soaring
voice and the songs entrancing
guitar figure re-enter to save
the song in the nick of time.
Elsewhere, In Bluer Skies is
similarly neutered. With its
hypnotic rhythmic base
supporting Mac's half-sung,
half-spoken vocal, the song
initially succeeds in conveying
its image of moving from
darkness into light, of hope in a
time of depression. But, rather
than allowing the song to
unfold in this fashion the
Bunnymen choose to weigh
the song under with a wall of
madly strumming guitars.
Essential simplicity is lost
again. Moreover, this "sound" is
by now far too predictable.
Nevertheless, Heads Will
Roll, Ripeness, and In Bluer
Skies are more successful than
not although none reach the
peak of the Ip.'s finest effort The
Back of Love. Riding a relentless riff, the song seems to go
someplace while a song like
Gods Will Be Gods puts us on a
loop, meaningless journey to
nowhere. The Back of Love
displays a fine melody and a
turn of phrase that proves far
more dynamic than most others
on the Ip.
Generally, the guitar
orientation of the Ip. has come
at the sacrifice of Pattinson's
bass and deFreitas' drums. The
two are given far less room to
manouever than on, say, the
opening trio of songs on
Heaven Up Here, — With A Hip,
Show of Strength, and Over the
Wall. The Asian influence in the
guitar styling is interesting if, at
times, cliched. Mac's voice has
changed little, to his detriment,
since, as he recently noted, he
is unable to satisfactorily
convey the meaning and
humour of various segments of
the Bunnymen sound. Much
more clarity must be seen
as a positive step although the
final mix leaves many of the
songs overwhelmed by their
own weight.
The album, then, is
somewhat of a disappointment
given the promise implied by
their only '82 release, The Back
of Love. Somewhere in
Porcupine is a good album
struggling to get out. Although
not a good introduction to the
band, get Porcupine if you've
got the other two and listen
until their next release. But let's
hope that next time the
Bunnymen stick to their wish
for simplicity both in writing
and recording.
-No. 1
Eurythmlcs Sweet Dreams
are Made of This (Sire UK)
The reviewer woke up,
surrounded in blackness with a
constant throbbing noise
reverberating around him.
"Where am I?" he asked.
"In our record." The voice
came from a petite, shapely
female with short red hair.
"Who are you?" the reviewer
asked.
"We're the Eurythmics," she
answered while gesturing to
herself and her sullen male
companion. "I'm Anne Lennox
and he's Dave Stewart. We used
to be in a band called the
Tourists but it split. This is our
new record, do you like it?"
"What? This constant
buzzing and thumping?"
"Yes."
"It sounds familiar," the
reviewer said as he scratched
his head.
"Of course it does silly," Anne
replied. "It's supposed to. That
way people know what to
expect."
"Is that why it reminds me of
Yaz meets Pat Benatar?"
"Oh no. We're totally
different. We play effervescent,
grandiose, synthesized pop
music that's perfect for
dancing."
"Nice words for boring."
"Not really. It's all recorded
on our own 8 track studio you
know."
"I'll admit the sound quality
isn't bad. I guess all the critics
love you?"
"Not really." She looked
pensive. "I don't -*tiow why.
We're trying to be part of that
modern dance scene which is
so popular now. You like us,
don't you?"
page 4
"Uh...well..."
"But what about our new
single, 'Sweet Dreams Are
Made of This'?"
"Can I go back to sleep now?"
the reviewer asked yawning.
"That's what all the other
critics always say," she said
pouting.
—Dean Pelkey
Feline, the Stranglers 8th I.p.
will doubtless win the band a
few new fans but for long term
Stranglers fans the I.p. offers
Previous Stranglers l.p.'s
always gave the listener a song
or two to really hate or, in the
case of the Meninblack, the
entire I.p. Feline gives one
nothing to hate and precious
little to admire.
"Midnight Summer Dream,"
the first tune, sets the pattern
for the rest. Drums recorded to
the sound electronic, lightly
styled synthesizer embellishments, half-spoken vocals, all
taken at a fairly slow tempo,
combine to make Feline their
easiest disc to listen to. Easy
listening, however, has never
been the Stranglers strong suit.
On occasion they could turn in
great ballads such as their
recent Strange Little Girl, but it
was always sonic assaults like
Toiler On The Sea that gave
Stranglers fans things to cheer
about. That track is, perhaps,
indicative of the band at their
best: fast, solid drumming,
terrific keyboard work, angry
vocals and some of the most
powerful bass guitar ever
recorded. Nowadays, the group
seems content to languish in its
own brand of electrobeat.
There are some interesting
moments here but only Blue
Sister shows some real promise
with its hints at past Stranglers
sound, but even this breaks
down after the first verse.
Otherwise, the only redeeming
feature is Hugh Cornwell's
singing. Even though he sings
quietly now, he still retains a
sarcastic edge. This edge,
though, is dulled when applied
to the album's lyrics. Any
strong sense of metaphor is
abandoned on Feline, and the
I.p. suffers for it.
Feline seems to be the
culmination of a sound they
have been working on since as
far back as The Raven. I, for
one, don't see this as much of
an accomplishment.
—Norm Baldwin
CONT'D FROM PAGE 3
Is this, again, the start of
something new?....evidently so!
Early in January, Shriekback
was featured in a series of
showcase concerts presenting
musical artists that were judged
to be innovative enough by the
London non-established press
to set the trend for 1983 and
beyond. Shriekback at the top
of the pop charts? Hardly....
but then again, didn't we once
say the same about the Human
League? -Michael Shea
MONDAYS at JOHN BARLEY'S
Face Ditch/
Mar    Red Dress
7  $3M
Up Chuck/
Mar    Trevor 2000
14 5300
Beat Pagodas/
Mar & Special
21 Guests $350
JuncoRun/
Mar Sausage
28 RePub,ic$35o;
23 W.Cordova St., 669-1771
liMtiiiiiiiiiiaaii
Direct From
LONDON
ENGLAND
"CREATIVELY
FLUID"
Only
ONE
PERFORMANCE
WEDNESDAY
MARCH 16
8 PM
COMMODORE
BALLROOM
CuitureOub
MS: VTC/CBO, Woodward's, Eaton's, Info Centres, A & B Sound
Produced by Isle of Mao
Jah Wobble's Bedroom Album
(Lago 3 France)
The bedroom is a place of
peace and solitude regardless
of what one does, or would like
to, while enclosed within its
four walls. Some people see it
as a'black hole'in which to hide
their fear and anguish, others
see it as a sanctuary of dreams.
Jah Wobble obviously saw it as
an appropriate place to record
an album of music —onethat is
shaded alternately by the
virtues of darkness and light.
His Bedroom Album is a very
personal    collection    of
instrumental and vocal songs
written and played entirely by'
Mr. Wobble himself, occasionally aided and abetted by his
friend and associate, Animal.
Side 1 of the Bedroom Album
is the 'black hole'; Wobble's
voice is particularly morose and
the backing instrumental casts
a moody, yet majestic, air to
Wobble's woes regarding the
state of the globe, past and
present.
Side 2 is the sanctuary;
whatever dire aspects of earthly
existence previously emoted by
Wobble are remedied by the
'whirling-dervish-like' ecstasy
of the opening track, Invaders
of the Heart. From there, the
listener is taken on a tour to
exotic locales by way of
Wobble's masterful musicianship.
It is music to inspire dreams,
and in the words of Juan
Fernandez Jr., to antidote the
"Western cancer music". Heed
his advice, and listen to it in the
privacy of your own sanctuary,
but don't smoke in bed!
Available as an import on
Lago 3, France.
-Michael Shea
-Black Jeans $22
-Zipper T-Shirts
-Rock T-Shirts
-Rock Buttons
-Studded Wristbands * Belts
-Everything new from
planet Mars
837 Granville St.        Phone 687-8207 DISCORDER, March, 1983
PROGRAM   FEATURES
MARCH FINYL VINYL FEATURES
CLASSIC LPS:
4 March — Raw Power, Iggy Pop
11 March - Talking Heads -'77, Talking Heads
18 March — Drama of Exile, Nico
25 March - Black Vinyl, Shoes
NEGLECTED LPS:
6 March - Mutwell Hillbillies, The Kinks
A strong LP in the Klassic Kinks style from a time when the Kinks were
almost virtually ignored. It has been deleted in Canada for many
years (1971).
13 March — Night Beat, Sam Cooke
A superb but long forgotten LP. This disc is his most purely R&B styled
album without the slick production of his hits. Guest keyboardist
include Ray Charles and Billy Preston. (1963)
20 March - The Real Kids, The Real Kids
Led by ex-original Modern Lover (of Jonathan Richman fame) John
Felice. American punk rock with roots in the '60s garage bands. Great
songs and powerhouse playing. (1978).
27 March — Surfln' With the Astronauts, The Astronauts
A Denver based instrumental group. This is their best record and a
masterpiece of the surf music genre. Their versions of surf standards
such as "Pipeline" and "Miseriou" surpass the originals. (1964).
MARCH MINI-CONCERTS
Tuesday 1 March Captain Beefheart
Wednesday 2 March Penetration
Thursday 3 March Tome "The Man" Jones Live at Caesar's Palace
Friday 4 March Grand Master Flush and the Flaccid Five
Saturday 5 March Frank Zappa
Monday 7 March DAF
Tuesday 8 March The Blasters
Wednesday 9 March Funkadelic
Thursday 10 March DOA
Friday 11 March Rip, Rig and Panic
Saturday 12 March The Rezillos/Revillos
Monday 14 March The Cure
Tuesday 15 March The DBs
Wednesday 16 March The Easybeats
Thursday 17 March Au Pairs
■ Friday 18 March UK Dekay
Saturday 19 March Klaus Noml
Monday 21 March The Associates
Tuesday 22 March The Dead Kennedys
Wednesday 23 March Doll by Doll
Thursday 24 March The Skids
Friday 25 March The New York Dolls
Saturday 26 March The Special AKA
Monday 28 March The Comsat Angels
Tuesday 29 March Kid Creole and the Coconuts
Wednesday 30 March Television
Thursday 31 March Chris Spedding
SUNDAY
MONDAY       !
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
l      ran,
Ban,
OUR TIME
9an,
,.«.
FOLK
TcNTiSnV
nan,
OF
Noon
FAST
FORWARD
:.a";-.:'':
REGGAE
pl_
3pn,
wEr
wSma
"EST
|      4pn,
5pn,
Spn,
MAgT^NF
;;;,'. ;;?;;'
I     7pn,
Pspn,
"lmT
9Pn,
THE
,1pn.
mSvi:
CSvi-
mm.
VINYL
vInyl
vInyL
JAZZ
M,onlgh,
1.m
I
1     RANDOM
■f—
<an,
_____
	
!	
1
I        1 I
IDEOLOGY  TO  THE  BEAT
W,
I hether the music be
good, bad, or average, the
Western tradition (in the
political sense) did not until
recently lay down its beliefs in
song with a heavy hand. For
example, Carol Burnett, who
sang about one prominent U.S.
personality, put romanticism
ahead of ideology in her 1957
hit tune / Made a Fool of Myself
Over John Foster Dulles.
Similarly, Tom Lehrer's 1965
song George Murphy is more a
"fun" piece than one which
seeks to send the masses into
fits of political agitation.
The secondary use of
ideology is also true of songs
from those countries which lie
behind the Iron (or Bamboo)
Curtain. The English band
Gang of Four was predated by
the song Down with Madame
Chiang's Gang of Four which,
with its emphasis on personality, replaced the earlier #1
song on the charts of the
People's Republic, How I Love
To Carry Manure Up The
Mountainside to the Commune.
In fact, several contemporary
Western groups have borrowed
from the East. The compilation
album Propaganda has a jacket
which features the proletarian
masses swining to the magic
beat of the guitar of Mao Tse-
Tung and a trio of back-up
vocalists. Does this represent a
nph    of
igur
ideology? Only time will tell.
If you were to turn
on the radio in the Soviet Union,
you'd probably be greeted with
the latest version of a
Tschaikowsky overture — a
tribute to Russian greatness,
but hardly an exercise in
Socialism Realism. From what
Western sources have learned,
certain quasi-sanctioned
groups have had bootleg
cassettes made which are
exchanged among those who
frequent the black market. Note
that I say "quasi-sanctioned";
the government turns its back
on the capitalistic exercise as
long as the music isn't too
subversive. In the event that
things go too far, the tapes
become a musical version of
the type of underground
literature known as "samizdat."
In the satellite countries
things are a little more attuned
to the West; either records are
surreptitiously brought in from
Western Europe, or bands
sometimes have the privilege of
coming in to play gigs on their
own. Poland now has at least
one punk rock group which
frequents one of the larger
universities. This band is
sufficiently anarchistic to satisfy
the demands of Polish youth.
Not suppressed so far, the
theme of rebellion against
authority may actually defuse
activism so far at Warsaw U.
that the civilian police won't
have to worry about riots or
strikes among the golden youth
— for a while, at least.
The "glorious Soviet Union"
has some bands which carry
the official seal of approval —
but even those are, as B.B.
Gabor puts it in Moscow Drug
Club, "ten years behind the
Western fads". In an attempt to
imitate the Soviet style, a
Belgian group called Telex
recently put out a song called
Moskow Diskow (what else?)
whose lyrics ran, "Moskow
Diskow/Diskow Moskow/Dis-
kow Moskow/Moskow/Dis-
kow". That sort of ampheta-
minte-induced babble is bad
enough to sound like a late-70's
capitalist hit. I don't know what
the Soviets or the Chinese
think...but personally, I find it
all culturally revolting!
-Ethan Minovitz
EVERY FRIDAY • ALWAYS FREE
BJ0
* FEATURING •
%
ENTERTAINMENT LISTINGS
.   2110 W. 4th Ave., Vane, B.C., V6V 1N6  .:;;
(604) 734-5520
••••••
• • •••
•• •••• DISCORDER, March, 1983	
CITR & BUD LUXFORD
PRESENTS
FROM AUSTIN TEXAS
RANK & FILE
SCISSORS & MELODY PIMPS
FRIDAY, MARCH 4th
$6.50 ADVANCE
NO MINERS
SUB BALLROOM, UBC
$7.50 DOOR
The Charles Bogle
Phonograph Dispensary
Imports
New Wave
Punk-Rock
Blues-Folk
Classical
Children's
4430 W.
10th Avenue,
New & Used LP's
Rare Records
Collectibles
Sound Tracks
I   Comedy & Old
Radio Shows
224-0232
Vancouver, B.C.
If you hear it on CITR you can buy
it at Charles Bogle
Pyramids shaking
the rockabilly tomb
i\
he Shakin' Pyramids
may appear to be just another
Anglo neo-rockabilly revival
band riding on the coat-tails of
the Stray Cats' success, but the
comparison is an incorrect one.
The Pyramids' foray into Celtic
rockabilly is a logical
progression from their days as
street buskers in Glasgow,
Paris and London. Their brand
of rockabilly is refreshingly
different. It is not business to
them, it is a wink, a drink and a
laugh knowing they're still
young, brash and good. Here's
a few words from lead guitarist
James G. Creighton of the
Pyramids.
Jim: The first album we done,
Skin 'Em Up, was recorded in 55
hours, and it sounds like it when
you listen to it cuz there's not a
lot in it. But the second album
we tried to go for something a
bit more. Well if you've listened
to it there's a lot of different
feels in the album, different
feels and different types of
songs, a lot different from the
first one.
Discorder: The first LP seemed
to be a release of material that
had built up over time, like
exercizing the influences as is
the case with most groups,
getting those first feelings on
vinyl.
Jim: Yeah, and the next one's
sorta downhill. Well that was
the opposite for us cuz the song
the opposite for us cuz the
songs that we did on the first album were songs that were just
played anyway cuz we
just started off buskin'.
Those were songs that
we did in our buskin' set when
we played in the street y'know.
So it was a chance to well,
what we did was we done the
backin' tracks, we knew them
off by heart anyway. They were
all first take jobs and then
somebody handed me an
page 6
electric guitar and said play me
some lead bits, just straight off
the cuff. They weren't
"rehearsed" lead breaks. We
added things like more drums
and harmonies. But the second
album was basically songs that
we'd written especially for the
album. It was a lot more ideas.
Discorder: It seemed much
more of a "band" album.
Jim: Yeah I know what you
mean, it was. While you say
that, we've even changed our
live performances now so it's
more of a band whereas it used
to be just a couple of acoustics
and drums and stuff. Now it's
bass and drums and two
guitars, electric guitar as well so
we are changing. The third
album will be different as well.
It's no good, anybody can set
about and play rockabilly I
think, so we'd like to do stuff
like Reeferbilly Polka, Quit and
Split and stuff. It's got that
rockabilly backbeat but it's like,
something else added to it. I'm
not a rockabilly fanatic anyway,
I'd rather play something else
y'know. I like what I play in this
band, but we don't just play
down-and-out rockabilly.
Discorder: Who's idea was the
rockabilly slant?
Jim: Well I like rockabilly, I
mean I like listenin' to it, but
when we started out buskin',
well everybody who was
buskin' was like Bob Dylan with
fuckin' flared jeans. I'm not
slaggin' those guys, but that's
what people usually think of as
a busker so we tried to do
something a bit wilder. So we
were doing rockabilly, that sort
of frantic beat — we call it
reeferbilly. There was nothing
like that on the streets. I think
the Shakin Pyramids opened up
a few doors — there's a lot of
real trendy buskers now.
Discorder: The thing I liked
about that first LP was its fresh
albums - march 1983
DISTRIBUTOR
Music Director — Noel Baker
1 SIOUXSIE & THE
BANSHEES
2 D.O.A.
3 STRANGLERS
4 DEAD KENNEDYS
5 RANK & FILE
6 IGGY POP
7 BAUHAUS
8 FAD GADGET
9 WALL OF VOODOO
10 MISSION OF BURMA
11 THE SOUND
12 JAH WOBBLE
13 GRACE JONES
14 ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN
15 T.S.O.L.
16 PSYCHEDELIC FURS
17 THE DAMNED
18 GEZA X
19 EURYTHMICS
RICHARD HELL & THE
20 VOIDOIDS
21 BANGLES
22 PATRIK FITZGERALD
23 MORAL LEPERS
24 STIFF LITTLE FINGERS
25 MATERIAL
26 THE FALL
27 THE JAM
28 THE GUN CLUB
29 SCRITTI POLITTI
30 LENE LOVICH
31 LOS POPULAROS
32 MODERNETTES
33 THE PASSAGE
34 THE BEAT
35 BLACK UHURU
36 ADRIAN BELEW
37 MAURICES THE CLICHES
38 THOMAS DOLBY
39 SHAKIN' PYRAMIDS
40 P/GBAG
A KISS IN THE DREAMHOUSE
WAR ON 45
FELINE
PLASTIC SURGERY DISASTERS
SUNDOWN
ZOMBIE BIRDHOUSE
THE SKY'S GONE OUT
UNDER THE FLAG
CALL OF THE WEST
VS.
ALL FALL DOWN
BEDROOM ALBUM
LIVING MY LIFE
PORCUPINE
BENEATH THE SHADOWS
FOREVER NOW
STRAWBERRIES
YOU GODDAM KIDS
SWEET DREAMS ARE MADE OF THIS
DESTINY STREET
BANGLES
GIFTS AND TELEGRAMS
TURN TO STONE
NOW THEN....
ONE DOWN
A PART OF AMERICA, THEREIN
DIG THE NEW BREED
MIAMI
SONGS TO REMEMBER
NO MAN'S LAND
BORN FREE
VIEW FROM THE BOTTOM
DEGENERATES
SPECIAL BEAT SERVICE
CHILL OUT
LONE RHINO
C'EST LA VIE
BLINDED WITH SILENCE
****NEW ADDITIONS****
POLYGRAM
FRINGE PRODUCT
EPIC (UK)
FRINGE PRODUCT
SLASH (US)
CAPITOL
POLYGRAM
MUTE (UK)
I.R.S. (US)
ACE OF HEARTS
WEA (UK)
LAGO 3 (FRANCE)
WEA
KOROVA (UK)
ALT. TENTACLES
BRONZE (UK)
FINAL GEAR (US)
RCA (UK)
RED STAR (US)
FAULTY (US)
RED FLAME (UK)
MO DA MU
CHRYSALIS (UK)
WEA
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
POLYGRAM
CAPITOL
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
CBS
GP
VOX DESPERATUM
CHERRY RED (UK)
A&M
WEA
WEA
RMS (US)
CAPITOL
POLYGRAM
Y (UK)
primitiveness. Very basic but
very musical, too.
Jim: Well with the punk thing,
it's good that they were sparse,
but they couldn't play all that
well — we play pretty well. I
think that helps even though it's
still pretty sparse and basic, we
do try and play it well. We know
our guitars, that helps. If we do
a third album I'd like to get back
to that sparseness again.
Discorder: The criticism about
Celts and Cobras was that it
was overproduced.
Jim: Well I've read things about
the album that British guys
have written, and I don't pay
heed to them cuz they're all
assholes. They like to think
they're trendsetters — one
minute the Shakin' Pyramids
are hip because rockabilly's
hip. The next minute it's not hip,
and they think "I can't write
about that, I might blow my
cool." I don't give a shit what
these people write cuz it's a
good album, not a great album,
but it's okay. Look at the
Polecats, what happened to
them? Their album was pretty
bland. If they'd had a second
album it would have sounded
exactly like the first. Lookatthe
Stray Cats — I think Stray Cats
are great, but their albums tend
to be pretty much the same
structure. But we're not, we try
to be different. We've used
things like Celtic instruments
on the second album, bodhrans
and stuff.
Discorder: I like that approach.
The music has a rockabilly
sensibility, but it's not apeing
old rockabilly like, say, Crazy
Cavan.
BLACK SWAN is one of the city's original alternative
shops. Initially specializing in jazz, folk and blues, the f(
expanded providing a carefully selected, yet
representation of current domestic and imported i
20th Century classical and ethnic music streams
A generous exchange program enables us to pi
best used record selections in Vancouver. We a
publications and carry tickets for many li
2936 W. 4th Ave.
.ck,elec
We also stock n
1 concert product
Scottish and Irish traditional
music, and I think that a lot of
the stuff that we try to write just
now has got that tradtional feel
and a good rocking beat.
Discorder: That seems to be
popular now. Richard Jobson
(ex-Skids) tried that.
Jim: Actually Davey played
bodhran on Richard's last
album. Jobson's really good,
it's just a shame, I don't think
that he was appreciated
enough. He was going for that
very traditional, out-in-the-
fields Celtic approach, and he
almost got it — I don't know
what went wrong.
Discorder: Same with Dexy's
Irish sound, it's a long way from
American style soul.
Jim: I like what Dexys do now.
Before I didn't like them much,
but what they do now is really
good I think.
Discorder: It looks as though,
two years after the "rockabilly
revival" happened in Britain,
the same thing may be starting
to happen here. Several such
groups have done well on the
local bar circuit.
Jim: Well that's excellent. Thing
is with the rockabilly thing in
Britain — in Britain music
doesn't stand a chance,
everything's too faddish.
Discorder: Do you still tour
Britain?
Jim: No, I'm fed up doing
Britain. It's the same clubs,
faces, attitude. I'd rather play
over here, be based here.
Vancouver's a lovely place.
--Duffy McPerkins
228-3017 DISCORDER, March, 1983
Il\v©p0rt!   singles - march 1983
1 REDRUM
2 THOMAS DOLBY
3 THE THE
4 SPEACIAL AKA
5 THOMAS LEER
6 BEAST
7 U2
8 ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN
9 ELVIS COSTELLO
10 PATRIK FITZGERALD
11 EGGHEAD
12 BAUHAUS
13 THE JAM
14 ANDROID SISTERS
15 MALCOLM McLAREN
16 THE CURE
17 ANTI-NOWHERE LEAGUE
18 SOUTHERN DEATH CULT
19 54-40
20 JUNCO RUN
21 IMPLOG
22 HOWIE & THE MEEKERS
23 THEATRE OF HATE
24 POP-O-PIES
25 FELT
26 DEXY'S MIDNIGHT
RUNNERS
27 LEISURE PROCESS
28 TEARS FOR FEARS
29 HEAVEN 17
30 FLIPPER
Music Director — Noel Baker
DANGER/NEVER KNOW YOUR NAME
SHE BLINDED ME WITH SCIENCE
UNCERTAIN SMILE
WAR CRIMES
ALL ABOUT YOU
POSSESSED
NEW YEAR'S DAY
THE CUTTER
HEAD TO TOE
PERSONAL LOSS
PROFESSIONAL PERSONALITIES
LAGARTIJA NICK
BEAT SURRENDER
UNAUTHORIZED VIDEO
BUFFALO GALS
LET'S GO TO BED
FOR YOU
MOYA
SOUND OF TRUTH
NO MORE
BREAK FAST
ROCKY HOCKEY
EASTWORLD
TRUCKIN'
MY FACE IS ON FIRE
LET'S GET THIS STRAIGHT
CASH FLOW
CHANGE
LET ME GO
GET AWAY
DEMO TAPE**
CAPITOL
WEA (UK)
TWO TONE (UK)
CHERRY RED (UK)
AMDUSIAS (US)
WEA
KOROVA (UK)
F BEAT (UK)
RED FLAME (UK)
DEMO TAPE**
BEGGAR'S BANQUET
POLYDOR (UK)
DEMO TAPE**
POLYGRAM
FICTION (UK)
XYZ (UK)
SITUATION (UK)
MO DA MU
MO DA MU
LOG (US)
DEMO TAPE**
BURNING ROME(UK)
415 (US)
CHERRY RED (UK)
MERCURY (UK)
EPIC (UK)
MERCURY (UK)
VIRGIN (UK)
SUBTERRANEAN (UK)
Rabble without a
HIGHLIFE
RECORDS & MUSIC
FOLK,ROCK,BUJES*JAZZ, ETHNIC,
WOMENS,VINTAGE,8lUEGRASS,
CHILDRENS,NEW,USED,TRADES
AND
VANCOUVER^ FINEST SELECTION
REGGAE&AFRO-CARIBBEAN
MUSIC
WE SEU
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS ON
CONSIGNMENT
TUES.-SAT.11-6 FRI. TIL7 SUN. 12-5
251-6964
IHrJH-l.T.KHWIiTWiVilM
As
s we wander through
our lives we are faced with
edicts and people who pontificate.
In this way, Life is not unlike
the radio dial. If one wanders far
enough or opens a new
window, one may find that radio
is not so serious after all.
Marconi himself said, "Havel
created a monster? If I could
only give radio a heart?"
Jack Haley of "The Wizard of
Oz" fame, echoed these
sentiments when upon his
deathbed thirsting for oil, he
spoke of picking up radio
transmissions through the
funnel which served as his
skull, "If only a heart....but I'd
settle for a scotch."
DON'T   FRET! There  is  a
pulse on your dial. Each day,
from high atop the student
dorm, CITR beams an airwave
in the Marconi tradition, using
his ideas and his original
equipment. So don't dropout....
TUNE IN. Expect the unexpected. You may even hear the
strains of Jack Haley singing "If
I Only Had A Heart On The
Rocks."
Here   follows   one   slice   of
CITR's   world Band  Banter:
Look for a new local band to
emerge from their basement (or
maybe yours) calling themselves Wall of Hate Division...
The Jam guitarist Paul Weller is
moving on to join the circus as a
juggler. Says Weller, "I prefer a
young audience and I always
fancied myself with red hair
"...Free agent keyboardist
Patrick Moraz is rumoured to be
on the trading block, but The
Moody Blues player-coach
Justin Hayward denies talking
with Procol Harum concerning
any deals....in other swaps:
Carmen Appice was dealt for
Vinnie Appice, Pick Withers of
Dire Straits has been traded for
a drum machine, and Rick
Wakeman has been hired asthe
organist for the New Jersey
Devils home qames.
Rabble around the world:
Yuri Andropov, newly appointed leader of the Soviet Union,
had an illustrious college
career at the University of
Leningrad. He lettered in four
©DYSSEY
IMPORTS
•Largest selection of imported
records in Western Canada
•Latest new releases
•Our selection includes new wave,
60's rock, reggae, and punk
•Rock posters & T-Shirts
866 Granville St.    Phone: 669-6644
1275 Seymour       Phone 685-3288
rfo^ TheREDS
\©u     from Philadelphia March 22 and 231
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New 25 ft. Video Screen
sports and captained the U of L
Generators hockey team. Later,
as head of the KGB, Andropov
led a crackdown on abstract
poetry and icing.
Canadianarama: Let's roam
at home in our own back
yard....Detroit, Michigan is
known as "The Motor City". Its
sister city, Windsor, Ontario, is
known   as   "The   Gateway   to
Guelph" Twenty-seven
Canadians have played major-
leage baseball. Of these, Sam
"The Stump" Weidman had the
longest career. For 22 seasons
from 1925-46, he prowled the
outfields in 13 Big League
cities. Sam is perhaps most
famous for being on deck when
Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia..
....Canadians are the world's
largest per capita consumers of
melba toast.
Quote of the Month: Terry
Quinn of Quinn Productions, in
conversation with Rabble
Without A Pause: "Esperanto is
the Universal Language and
was first written in 1887 by....um
...ah....I'm going to have to read
this "
This concludes this month's
slice of CITR if it's the whole
pie you're after, you know what
oven to look into.
-Murray Cahen
—Steve Hendry 1
mm:
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1M
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iP'iilll"!
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■■"■■
frnioa
MOBILE SOUND
•We spin to suit*
LOW RATES 228-3017
1869 WEST 4th AVE.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
738-3232
A' ^  ft    CTf
*
UK
Ih

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