Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 1983-07-01

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0049808.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0049808.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0049808-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0049808-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0049808-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0049808-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0049808-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0049808-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0049808-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0049808.ris

Full Text

 Di^cORDeR
¥A guide to CITR tm 102
& CABLE 100
VOL. I No. 6
.# im®
JULY, 1983
m to* BUs, ffl-OU
in the air DlScORDER
tA guide to CITR fm 102
U2-
MORE THAN JUST ABC
Sukhvmder Johal Learns the Irish Language with U2's drummer
Larry Mullen
A popular band, this one. In
more ways than one. Popular
with music fans who fought the
War (shouldn't that be bought?
— ED)., and popular with the
critics — who love to ridicule
the band's efforts.
"IT's just hard rock disguised
as progressive post-punk," they
sneer. "And the lyrics ar a bit
naive," they add. Perhaps, but
we weren't all born reciting
ambiguous prose to a backbeat
of clever-dick "music."
Anyway, U2 aren't embarrassed. Drummer Larry Mullen's
red face when I spoke to him on
the day of their gig here in
Vancouver was due to three
days of sailing in the sunshine.
Little was Larry to know that he
was merely being softened up
for a notorious CITR interrogation.
Don't you feel that the same
producer album after album
gives you a definite sound
which you can't get out of?
Yeah, it's possible that that
happens; I don't think it's true in
the case of U2, I think the three
albums are different both in
style and in sound. Steve
Lillywhite wants to move on the
same way we did, we didn't got
on with the same attitude as we
went in to record the previous
album. I agree to a certain
extent, I think for a lot of bands
it can be like that; take for
instance the Eagles, they were
using the same producer all the
time and it sounds the same
constantly. I don't think that
that's a fair criticism of U2.
So you feel there has been
ample progress in the U2
sound?
Yeah, both in production and
in the band. I think Steve
Lillywhite has been moving
with us....
So you can see yourselves
sticking with the Steve Lilly-
white sound?
No, no....I don't think so. I
don't think we could continue
doing it because then, you
know, it might become slightly
stereotyped. I think we will
move on — new producers, new
ideas and all that.
Speaking of which, I hear
you've been messing around
with drum machines and
synthesizers....
Yeah, we got interested in a
ballet soundtrack and through
that we started working with
Fairlight synthesizers and drum
machines. It's been a really,
really interesting experience.
How do you as a drummer
feel about drum machines,
which are very much in vogue
these days?)
I don't like them to be honest,
I mean, I suppose that's very
obvious for a drummer —
there's no feel, they keep better
time than most drummers do,
but there's very little you can
actually do with them except
keep a beat. I think it's good for
other musicians, but I don't
think they should be on record
or anything! (laughs)
It's often been quoted in
interviews that U2 are without
shame a political band. The
politics are quite obvious to
anybody who studies the lyrics
and has read the interviews. Is it
a politics that's shared by all
four members of the band?
Tell me first hat you consider
to be the politic of U2?
Well, very much concerned
with humanity, under a huge
Yeah, it's the politics of
people, you know, it really is,
it's very, very much that. A lot of
people try to pin on us, you
know with the War album, er,
you know 'polities', Northern
Ireland or nuclear war or
whatever, and say, 'Which side
are you on? "We're not
interested in sides, we're
interested in the individual....
people are suffering and dying,
that's what is important.
Mullen's concern is genuine,
not least because  U2's base,
Dublin is uncomfortably close
to the Ulster border. However,
he cites their insistence on
remaining in Ireland as
beneficial to the band:
If we want to join a circus we
can get on a plane and come to
many countries and join that
circus. At the moment we feel
really good about having a base
in Dublin where we do a lot of
recording, photo sessions, all
our videos are done by Irish
people. It's a good feeling.
/ feel glad that Mullen
introduces the topic of videos
because, despite the obvious
ideological sincerity of the
band in terms of their own
music and their attitude
towards the music business, U2
doing videos looks suspiciously like leaping into a
prevalent trend. Mullen
disagrees:
I've watched MTV and I've
seen the quality of some of the
videos....and as far as I'm
concerned U2 videos stand out
a million miles from any of
them; we've got very, very few
effects, they're very realist.
They show the four members of
the band, they also make a
point. It's not glossy... I'm really
worried for video. When I see
video on MTV I see all these
glossy videos with girls in them,
I say where's it going, where is it
leading, you know, and will it be
like everything else, will it be a
fad and fall away in a couple of
year's time? I think videos are a
good medium which U2 have
used very well, we're not
eploiting anybody or anything,
just the four members of the
band	
A million miles? Considerably less, I think to myself but
decide not to push him on it, if
only because I share his
contempt for the juvenile
nonsense that pervades the
video scene. I'm more
interested in knowing if the
third album stage in a band's
career is as difficult as it's
reputed to be.
Our second album, October,
was done under a lot more
pressure than War was.
October was a very difficult
album and I really like it, I'm
very proud of it. We had a lot
longer to make War but as far as
making statements is concerned, yes, that was the album
we thought most about. We
actually had to sit down and
think about Sunday Bloody
Sunday, or things like New
Year's Day because they
brought the whole Solidarity /
Polish thing. These are things
we had to sit down and think
about and obviously record
company people were invited
over to hear them and some of
the words to some of the songs,
after playing them to a number
of people, we decided we had to
change them because they
were just a little bit too strong. It
was cutting off our nose to spite
our face.
By now I've become
somewhat taken with Mullen's
innocent but earnest dedication to the band's beliefs.
However, I can't resist asking
him his views on the current
popularity of U2.
Popularity? It's great, it's
what we're here for. We've got
something to say....right the
way from Boy to October and
War...and the more people
who hear it the better. I think
there are a lot of blippety-bop
bands going around, you know
like snap-crackle-pop, synthesizers and all that. U2 are a real
band with real people.
With staying power, yeah.
Bono, sometimes on stage he
says, We're not just another
English fashion band passing
through. First of all, we're Irish,
and we're here to stay'. And we
mean it, we are here to stay.
He says this without a trace of
conceit. Refreshing....As a
member of U2, what criticism of
U2 would you make?
(Thoughtful pause) It's a very
difficult question. I know we're
very hard on ourselves, we
criticize ourselves all the time.
We know that we're not fully
there musically....things like
gigs, we've got to pull up our
socks    sometimes....from    an
outside point of view I dont
know....(you) can tell (me). I
can't really tell you, but I know
from inside the band, we keep
on churning things out — it's a
bit like the way we write songs,
it's like a block and it'schipping
away all the time trying to get
perfection, you know; we fall
down all the time, we make
mistakes, we come on stage
and go over the top, instead of
relaxing we're hyper out there.
A one and a half hour set
finishes in one hour, coz we're
sort of rushing — I suppose the
criticism that comes to mind is
that we try too hard, he
concludes sardonically.
That is one of the more
poignant remarks about U2 I
have ever heard. Ironic that it
should come from a band
member. Watching the gig that
night, I reflect on Larry Mullen's
criticism and find it hard to
disagree. Although it is an
enjoyable show, given the lack
of participation by Vancouver-
of participation by Vancouver's
passive audiences (i it uncool to
dance these days?). I find some
of Bono's show antics a mite
embarrassing. However, he's
done well to develop the art of
exhibitionism while still
remaining humble. U2 — can
overcome your shortcomings...
Sukhvinder Johal DISCORDER    July, 1983
DiScORDER
fffllOS Cable 100
Editors:
Jennifer Fahrni
Mike Mines
Features Editor
Michael Shea
Reviews Editor:
Jeff Kearney
Layout:
Jennifer Fahrni
Harry Hertscheg
Contributors:
Chris Dafoe
Carol Harvie
Sukvindher Johal
Jeff Kearney
Mike Mines
Mark Mushet
Dean Pelkey
Steve Robertson
Distribution:
Harry Hertscheg
For copies of any photographs contact CITR at 228-3017.
letters
to the
airhead
Dear Airhead;
Regarding June's issue of
Discorder, it was good to seee
some of the results. Shows you
where some of these people are
coming from. But I wouldn't
take a lot of that shit. Stay the
way you are to keep your sanity
and (dub "alternative") name.
Glad you now have extended
broadcast hours til the wee
hours of the morning. So you
can patent my idea of CITR
coffee mugs; then "let me make
breakfast for you."
Never Say Never
N.S.N, (pronounced Anicin)
p.s. Who does the artwork for
Zulu Records ads? I'd like to get
some copies if possible.
Zulu Records design their own
ads so you should get in touch
with them. They're in the book.
Dear hAelaRd;
CITR, UBC Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 2A5
over 500 ft. high! If you guys are
thinking they're just another
arena rock band, think again.
These guys are the planet rock
band. They orbit a planet in
their instrument ship and
bounce the signals off this
planet to the planet where the
concert actually is. The best
place to listen is inside a
concrete bunker exactly 37
miles from the speaker banks
(That's what the hearing
experts say — we like to be right
next to the stage). So, come on
and get with it, guys and start
playing Disaster Area right
now!
Amazingly yours,
Zaphod Beebelbrox,
Ford Prefect,
Arthur, Trillian,
Slartibarfast, and Marvin,
the paranoid android (who
doesn't give a fuck at all)
I thought we were destroyed by
the vogons.
the spaceship "Heart of Gold"
(a super-hoopy guy named
Douglas Adams can explain
that for you) to all of you dull,
lifeless nerdlingers stuck way
out on that two-byte planet
Earth. As boring as we find your
planet — (hey, your whole solar
system is dullsville!) we must
admit that (with one problem),
your radio station is the closest
thing to actual energy within 25
light years of Earth.
Yup, as soon as me and Ford
get back to Betelgeuse 5, we're
gonna tell everyone to check
out the only intelligent life on
Earth, namely, CITR (what does
it stand for? (crazed intellectuals terrorize radio, perhaps?).
You guys are almost hoopy
(and you're light years ahead of
that pile of Arcturan Megadon-
key-shit, CFOX. They ought to
be exposed to the total
perspective vortex for their
airwave pollution!)
The one problem is that you
guys never seem to have heard
of the greatest band of them all,
Disaster Area. They are so
absolutely hoopy, it's amazing.
I mean, they fly a spaceship into
a sun! Right straight into a
million-degree, natural fusion
furnace! It's fantastic. Their
lead singer, Hotblack Deiato,
once spent a year dead for tax
purposes. And they're loud,
too! Oh sure, you have DOA,
the Pistols, the D.K.'s, etc; but
they aren't loud like Disaster
Area. D.A.'s speaker banks are
PAGE 2
Dear Airhead;
Dick Clark, spare us the
clutter. Do us all a favor and
continue to play those top ten
disco smash hits that has kept
you on the air all these years.
Leave the likes of Echo and the
Bunnymen to CITR and any
other alternative music stations
with taste. Giving a song such
as The Cutter to your toe-
tapping teens to rate from 35 to
98 is like giving ice cream to the
(white) devil or a balloon to a
porcupine to play with. I'm
afraid, Dick, that there isn't any
room on AB for it. So Mr. Clark,
next time you give your boys
and girls a gun, make sure it is
not loaded.
Signed,
Concerned for today's
groovy teens
6TH
ANNUAL
& Denis LePage
July 15, 16, 17
Jericho Beach Park
Tickets available at all VTC & CBO outlets (687-1818); at Black
Sxan Records, 2936 W. 4th (734-2828) and Octopus Books East.
1146 Commercial Dr. (253-0931). Further Information and mail
orders from Vancouver Folk Musk Festival. 3271 Main Street Vancouver, V5V 3M6. Tel. 879-2931.
Why Isn't there any room for It?
Personally, I think it's great that
Dick is making an attempt
(feeble though it may be) to
recognize that there is life after
the billboard top 100
"alternative" radio stations like
CITR exist to propogate, not
Insulate. At least that's the way
it should be....
My Dearest Airhead;
Mr. Mushet may be going
Fast Forward but he's going
nowhere with it. The music you
feed us with, ol'boy, isn't as
bizarre as you'd have us
believe; we all listen to that sort
of stuff, only we don't make an
issue out of it and flaunt it. You
show a naive ignorance in your
ideology of popular music
when you accuse the Jam and
the Clash of no longer being
new just because they've been
around for many years. If
you've had half an ear to what's
been going you'd know that
Combat Rock is considerably
different to their first album,
and The Gift is totally different
to In The City. It's not how long
a band's been around that
dictates their newness, it's the
extent to which their music
evolves. Anyway, your fallen
deities, Throbbing Gristle, were
around for at least six or seven
years....What the hell is
industrial music? Who's pretentious? And stop whining about
the limited extent of your
record collection, you're not a
martyr. I must say, the fresh and
innovative sounds of, Wall and
Voodoo, Yello and Eyeless on
Gaza don't really attack my
conception of music and/or art.
Nice, obscure names though,
and we're all really impressed
that you know of artists with
such smugly obscure names as
Maurizio Biancho and Bernard
Xolotl. Pure, juvenile elitism,
contradicted only by your
interest in that sickly, syrupy,
megadinasour of AM radio,
Roxy Music.
Yours, etc.,
Christopher Cosey
•   ELVIS* BOWIE* SINATRA* SKA •
We Pay Top Prices for Rare,
Clean Records
COLLECTOR'S RPM
Rock Videos
Soundtrack & Broadway LP's
Beatles' Memorabilia
876-8321
4470 Main
685-8841
456 Seymour
P
I
N
K
F
L
O
Y
D
•
J
A
Z
• ELLINGTON ^COUNTRY & WESTERN Z
LIFE IN THE MODERN WORLD
Stan Woodvine
?*Slll£Swaf^
^^^r^^r^S
|£jj
^^^^^^^; CALGARY, EDMONTON, WINNIPEG
PRAIRIE WHEAT WAVE
ON A ROLL
The idea of a feature on the
local new music scenes in the
three largest Prairie cities was
met with more than just a few
snickers and guffaws when
discussed at the monthly
Discorder brainstormers.
Calgary? Edmonton! Winni-
peg?!....who could possibly be
interested in what goes on there
even if anything did!?
This attitude is an unfortunate side-affect of living in a
city where most people have
convinced themselves that
nothing more is needed to
enhance their well-being.
Smug? Indeed....and not
absolutely correct, either.
Contrary to popular belief here,
Vancouver is not the center of
the universe, and yes, there is
life after the Rockies.
The following is a brief guide
for those intrepid new music
voyageurs who may find
themselves faced with a
journey east this summer and
beyond. Any incorrect
information can be wholly
attributeed to our sources,
reliable or otherwise.
First, to Calgary — the largest
city to grace the prairie
landscape. Country-rock and
western bands notwithstanding, Calgary is the home of a
host of other musicians intent
on exploring the wide spectrum
of modern popular music.
The Golden Calgarians, the
Ripchords, and Herald Nix
(now residing in Vancouver)
are the three most notable
bands perhaps because of the
high profiles they've attained
there and elsewhere during the
past year, if for no other reason.
Up and coming bands include
The Will (soon to be heard on
CITR), Misfits on Parade, and
The Nexxed — a strong, young
band featuring a double-bass
team. Other remarkable local
grouips, as suggested by Nick
Karem (the music director of
the University of Calgary radio
station CJSW), include the R &
B Keepers, and a one-man
synthesizer outfit that goes by
the name of Midnight News.
Karem claims that the major
obstacle to obtaining proper
exposure for local new music in
Calgary is the lack of venues,
suitable or otherwise. The city
does    possess    its    own
underground club (this week
known as Ten Foot Henry's)
that often showcases local
talent. The Long Bar at Be's
Eatery is the only other
establishment that regularly
promotes new music; elsewhere, one can occasionally
see something of interest at the
University of Calgary's student
pub, The Den, and at The
Ranchmen's, which in the past
has hosted the Dub Rifles and
The Reds.
Karem feels that the situation
is becoming healthier, and he
adds that CJSW is in the
process of obtaining its low-
power FM licence which will
further promote the cause of
new local music. But he also
warns that Calgary is still very
much a heavy metal shlock-
rock fortress and advises
visitors to avoid the city during
Stampede, when there are more
cowboys, urban or genuine,
than one could shake a bull-
whip at.
Next, a few hours drive to the
north lies Edmonton — slightly
colder in climate and
definately more reserved in
character. New music here
faces many of the same
obstacles as it does in Calgary
— a small audience, few
suitable venues, and a lack of
co-operation between the
groups involved in the local
scene, or so claims Vincent
Evans, a former resident of
Edmonton now living in
Vancouver.
It is not a situation that can
afford to be hurt by petty
squabblings which has often
been the case in the past, says
Evans. He moved to Edmonton
in 1978 and finally surfaced
three years later as a vocalist
and guitarist in the group
Office. The band made their
public debut in March 1982
where they stole the show at the
Baker's Dozen new music
festival at the Ambassador
Hotel, and later went on to
achieve status as fne new music
band in Edmonton.
Office has since reported a
three-song EP on their own
label, Switch — which is
available in Vancouver and
includes a searing version of
Olivia Newton-John's AM hit
Physical    (which    recently
reached #15 on the CITR
singles report). The group as it
wa has now disbanded with
Evans moving to Vancouver,
where he hopes to re-form
Office with their drummer and
'crack' the scene here.
But what can one expect out
of a visit to Edmonton? Well,
not too much it seems....there
are only two venues that
consistently feature new bands
— Scandals, a club-discotheque that primarily brings in
out of town acts, and Krieg, a
legal afterhours establishment.
Both these places, Evans
contends, cater more to the
fashion-conscious than to
those who are really interested
in hearing new music.
The local bands that do have
a chance to play live gigs
represent a wide range of tastes
and styles. These include a
strong power-pop outfit with
commercial potential called
Backstreet (known as Misfits on
Parade in Calgary), the Malibu
Kens (the name says it all:
tongue-in-cheek surf punk.
Check their single Be My
Barbie, The Graggnetts (rockabilly), Face Crimes, Bastille
(glam-rock?!), and a token
hard-core band, Society NFU.
Several of these groups have
recorded tracks at the
Woodbend studio in Devon,
and they will appear on West-
watch, a compilation album of
Edmontonian talent to be
released hopefully in September. For more information,
please write Switch Records,
Box 126, #21k-10405, Jasper
Ave., Edmonton, AB, T5J 3S2.
And finally, to Winnipeg....
the city, through the Guess
Who, Neil Young, et al, might be
thought of as having had a
musical heritage in the past
only. Now, the humus recently
being lifted off Canada's first
international rock 'superstars'
needn't make us think that the
decay is complete and
thorough. Oh, but how new
growth was once shovelled
under the mold; for years
Winnipeg fed off the fruits of
early plantings. Midwestern
conservatism made no sense of
reworking productive (whatever that could be) fields.
CJUM, a lonely university-
based   alternative   FM   station
DISCORDER     July, 1983
THE SAFE WAY
to stay alert without
harmful stimulants
LUV-A-FAIR    keeps    you Next time monotony makes you
stimulated with great tunes and feel like throwing your arms in
exciting   visuals   six   nights   a the air with despair, or work has
week yet is not habit forming, got you down, do as millions
LAF   is   faster,   handier,   more do....perk    up    with    a    safe,
reliable and is definitely not as effective dose of LUV-A-FAIR.
expensive.
1275 Seymour Street. Tel: 685-3288
managed to enrich the
scene and was conscientiously
uprooted behind everyone's
back. But the taste of the fresh
fruit endures on the tongue and
in the ears.
Helping to fill the hole left by
CJUM, a number of fanzines
have surfaced — possibly due
to the 15 minutes of fame
ascribed to the groundbreaking effort by aptly named
So Alone. Pages of Rage,
Transmission, Midcontinental,
and Dog City are among those
papers that provide, at least, an
alternative dialogue.
Winnipeg bands most
familiar to Vancouverites
through CITR airplay and
pilgramages to the Lotusland,
are the Dub Rifles and
Personality Crisis. The Dub
Rifles have released two singles
on their own label (the last
being Stand, enjoying its third
month of airplay here at CITR)
and are a strong draw both here
and there. Their label Notown
nurtured Monuments Galore's
reggae-pop dance single, and
Personality Crisis has recorded
its hardcore LP here on the
coast.
But, the sun rises in the
East....Toronto, Montreal, and
New York are sometimes the
preferred destinations for
Winnipeg bands. The Dub
Rifles are currently touring the
Canadian and American east,
while One Life recently backed
David Lindley in New York after
their reggae-pop single
chartered in the Big Apple.
The inevitable tranplanting of
ideas and ideals from touring —
so necessary because of the
restrinctingly few venues and
the small audience in Winnipeg
— provides quite a mixed crop.
Varieties present and identifiable include hard core (Stretch
Marks, Unwanted, Think Tank),
punk (Raggedy Annes, Some
Weird Sin, Sudden Death,
Society's Grudge), electronic
pop (Vienna), reggae-pop and
various hybrids.
The 'creative crowd' seems to
have grafted art onto the
musical realm; band members
often moonlight as guerilla
artists. Progressive and well-
rooted galleries act as venues
for these exhibitions. An even
higher level of collaboration is
evidenced by the neo-
romanticist New Man Celebration doing a musical score for
the Winnipeg Contemporary
Dancers. And the art media of
the masses, television, lends its
acknowledgement on Channel
Thirteen's programme. Alternate Rock Stand.
While lacking any discspinning dance houses with a
new music policy (Wellington's
special nights exempted), the
Royal Albert has been, at least,
a long-time farmer of the scene,
if not a bit inconsistent. A new
venue, Triple A Doghouse
promotes the hard-core, and an
even newer Lithium Cafe
waters it down, to make it
profitable, for the trendies.
So, give Winnipeg a little
time, thingsare growing — after
all, this is the heartland.
disorder
AD   SPACE
 228-3Q17
PAGE 3 DISCORDER    July, 1983
SPEAKING IN
TONGUES
Talking Heads (WEA)
Glossalalia: ecstatic utterances; the gift of tongues;
speaking in tongues....chat-
tering, crying, ululating, the
forbidden transformed cryptically to nonsense, dragged
from the crypt, stolen and
shouted the shuddering of it,
the fear, the breaking, the
release, the grieving....
It's ironic that this Ip
compared to Remain In Light
and Fear of Music least
warrants its title. Speaking In
Tongues is the most earthly,
simple Ip the Heads have made
since their first. Gone, for the
most part, are the other wordly
sounds, both lyrically and
musically, which made
Remain In Light particularly
evocative of that wild trance
inducing fervour of a seedy
tabernacle or some mystical
tribal ritual space: the pure
speaking in tongues. Speaking
In Tongues has no Once In A
Lifetime no Houses In Motion,
nor especially a Listening Wind.
But, if Speaking In Tongues
does not advance the Heads
cause beyond the peaks of
Remain In Light, it nevertheless is a strong and consistently
enjoyable Ip. The sound is
warm and danceable. Mixing by
Alex Sadkin (Grace Jones, Sly
and Robbie) accents the
rhythm section without overwhelming us with "funk" or
"disco". Tina Weymouth's
liquid basslines invite and
soothe. Otherwise, the sound is
far more spacious, fewer instruments, fewer people on each
track. The pace is more
consistent — no frenetic rifting
(see; The Great Curve)
nothing too sombre (see; The
Overload). Lyrically, it's David
Byrne as usual, always
interesting, never too obscure
or pedantic but this time an
awful lot more playful and
closer to home.
God Help Us/Help us loose
our minds/These slippery
people help us understand.
The song titles give it all away.
Making Flippy-Floppy, I Get
Wild, Swamp, Girlfriend Is
Better, Slippery People. A top
place goes to Burning Down
The House second cousin to
Houses In Motion- There's your
ticket/Pack your bag/Time for
jumpin' overboard/Transportation is here/Close enough but
not too far/Maybe you know
where you are/Fightin' fire with
fire/All wet/Hey! You might
need a raincoat . My fave
happens to be the Ip's one pure
love song, This Must Be The
Place which features an
absolutely insidious melody.
Wistful, upful. Play that naive
melody again....and again!
This Ip will be one of the
year's best. Although reflecting
a wish for something more
simple, personal and Dance-
able on the part of the band, the
truth is that the Talking Heads
simplicity and danceability is
ultimately more challening and
engaging than almost any
others I can think of. The
Talking Heads — Speaking In
■Tongues (minor refrain) —
enough to seduce and entrance
until you speak in the real
tongue.
I'm just an animal looking for
a home/Share the same space
for a minute or two/And you
love me until my heart
stops/Love me till I'm
dead/Eyes that light up, eyes
look through you/Cover up the
blank spots/Hit me on the
head/Ah Ooh.
No. 1
PETER GABRIEL PLAYS LIVE
Peter Gabriel (WEA)
Four sides, sixteen songs.
Two from the first album, two
from the second, six from the
third, five from the most recent
Security and one brand new
song. Peter Gabriel and band
(Larry Fast, keyboards
computers and such; Tony
Levin, bass and stick; David
Rhodes, guitar; Jerry Marotta,
drums and sundry other things
that get hit) captured live on
their last North American tour.
Sixteen superlative performances, superlatively produced
and packaged.
If you're like me and the
reason you're going to be in the
Bill Bennett Memorial Fish
Bowl on August 9th is to see Mr.
Gabriel, you should pick it up
for insurance. Chances are,
you'll get a lot closer to the
heart of what's going on
through listening to this than
you will from your spot on the
floor five hundred yards from
the   stage.
HI-LITES. Too many to deal
with in any depth so I'll be
selective. First, the new song, /
Go Swimming. "This is for
those whose minds are as
healthy as their bodies." is how
Gabriel introduces it. A funky
bass riff starts things off and
then it's a headlong dive into as
strong, as forceful, as positive
and as fun a rock'n roll dance
tune as I've heard since a
previous lifetime. Add its
catchy melody and you've got
lots of radio airplay. We'll all
probably be sick of it before the
summer's out, but for now, it's
as fresh and exhilirating as
taking a dive into the ocean.
San Jacinto from the latest
album Security is extended by a
good two minutes over the
studio version, and it's all in
added atmosphere; epic-like, it
uses its eight minute length to
build to a powerful emotional
climax. And three cheers forthe
audience on this track which
didn't find it necessary to
scream and babble through
the quiet bits.
OTHER HI-LITES. You name
it. Solsbury Hill, On the Air, The
Intruder, Family Snapshot, DIY.
A lot of what makes this
particular live album work isthe
way it goes against conventional form. It is not a collection of Gabriel's most popular
tunes (witness the absence of
Games Without Frontiers and
the inclusion of The Family and
the Fishing Net the weirdest,
least commercial tune we've yet
heard from Gabriel), nor are all
the selections raunched up and
rowdied out. Indeed, more
often than not, the songs are
slowed down a touch as if to
bring more attention to their
inherent subtleties. No Self-
Control, one of the most
intense songs of a very intense
career, is given an easy, almost
Caribbean, arrangement, and
it's a better song for it.
LOW-LITES. I'm being picky
here, but the conclusion of
Rhythm of the Heat is noticably
less thunderous with the
absence of the Royal Burundi
Drums who accompanied it on
the studio version. And Pete
Hammil's backing vocals are
equally missed at certain
moments in The Family and the
Fishing Net. My only other
complaint should be addressed
personally to Mr. Gabriel.
Where's Millgram's37and Bully
For You? Both songs were
performed live on the 1980
North American tour, and
deserve inclusion on some
legitimate    (non-bootleg)
Peter Gabriel Plays Live is
what a live album should be. It
comes as something more than
an afterthought. Here is an
artist using the medium to
expand on and re-evaluate his
past material. Not only is the
intention commendable, but
the results are often stunning.
Gerald Bostock
Report:
Albums
ARTIST
1 NEW ORDER
2 VIOLENT FEMMES
3 SPEAR OF DESTINY
4 HEAVEN 17
5 YELLO
6 BILL NELSON
7 PYLON
8 GUN CLUB
9 CLINT EASTWOOD &
GENERAL SAINT
10 SHRIEKBACK
11 TALKING HEADS
12 THE CREATURES
13 THE BLASTERS
ALBUM
Power, Corruption &
Violent Femmes
Grapes of Wrath
The Luxury Gap
You Gotta Say Yes...
Chimera
Chomp
Death Party EP
Stop That Train
Care
Speaking in Tongues
Feast
Non-Fiction
LABEL
POLYGRAM
WEA
CBS (UK)
POLYGRAM
STIFF (UK)
PHONOGRAM (UK)
DB (US)
ANIMAL (UK)
GREENSLEEVES (UK)
WEA
WEA
WONDERLAND (UK)
WEA
fv'R*
CfO    837 Gr?4tfVfl£jf 5TJ
14
15
16
R.E.M.
DANIELLE DAX
RIP RIG & PANIC
Murmur
Pop-Eyes
Attitude
A&M
INITIAL (UK)
VIRGIN (UK)
17
HUNTERS & COLLECTORS
Hunters & Collectors
VIRGIN (UK)
i
18
MALCOLM McLAREN
Duck Rock
CHARISMA (UK)
llRlVatl^I&
19
HERALD NIX
One Night Only
RECORD
C^y
i *^^flrw^^^
20
CLOCK DVA
Advantage
POLYDOR (UK)
feV^I
21
THE MEMBERS
Uprhythm, Downbeat
ARISTA (US)
22
THE UNDERTONES
The Sin Of Pride
EMI (UK)
ivvS^
Xf*'
23
EDDY GRANT
Killer on the Rampage
CBS
-TJ
24
AZTEC CAMERA
High Land, Hard Rain
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
( &>
MA'v              1
25
BLANCMANGE
Happy Families
POLYGRAM
P      f>
'IjT
'     *           "        *m     C- -J~/V    j*            aH
26
SZAJNER
Brute reason
ISLAND (UK)
H     Aj£
■C$0ffl& 1
27
VARIOUS
Pillows & Prayers
CHERRY RED (UK)
•       f®
28
THE GO-BETWEENS
Before Hollywood
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
(c   €T
8   J*
\&ir\y l>   '                     ■
29
JAPAN
Oil on Canvas
POLYGRAM
|7c
aC' FoRTfre     ■
30
PALAIS SCHAUMBURG
Hockey EP
PHONOGRAM (BRD)
k.;^X
31
SOUTHERN DEATH CULT
Southern Death Cult
B.B. (U.K.)
7    M\
32
PETER GABRIEL
Plays Live
WEA
ff
33
TONES ON TAIL
Burning Skies EP
SITUATION (UK)
7    Y>
ffilllr 1
34
XTC
Great Fire EP
VIRGIN (UK)
__>a^
35
DEAD KENNEDYS
Plastit Surgery Disasters
FRINGE
A.               ~"
36
PHIL SMITH
The Phil Smith Album
ZULU
1 .
37
B-52k's
Whammy!
WEA
^^■a^^rLwir        "^   ^H
38
VARIOUS
Seattle Syndrome 2
ENGRAM (US)
^lF.
35) TJM
^^9   '       flR                                Lada^aai
39
BOB MARLEY & THE WAILERS
CRASS
Confrontation
Yes, Sir, I Will
WEA
CRASS (UK) DISCORDER  July, 1983
*/rV|/vVay
ONE NIGHT ONLY
Herald Nix (Record)
So, it's come to this has it?
The editor locks me in the
listening room with nothing for
company but three cans of beer
and the new Herald Nix ep. She
wants me to review this? Hell,
you don't review Herald Nix
product, you see the man live
(something which I still haven't
done).
The ep's called One Night
Only and I slowly drink my beer
and stare at the cover, a bold
shock of red and blue triangles
forming a picture that inevitably
becomes permanently etched
on the human cornea. If Doug
Bennett drew covers like thi for
his own albums he'd be a
wealthy man. After listening to
the ep itself and watching my
beer disappear one name
comes to mind; Carl Perkins.
What has Carl Perkins got to
do with Herald Nix? Both
everything and nothing. Carl
Perkins records sound like they
were recorded on one of those
portable cassette things, the
sound's all tinny but the guitars
scream just the same and old
Carl warbles his way through
whatever footstompin' old
hillbilly chant he happens to be
buzzing on at the time, usually
whipping whatever crowd is
listening into a spastic frenzy.
And that's the way this ep
soundsto me. I have this feeling
that if the labels were peeled off
and someone played it for me
and said, "This is a rare Jimmy
Joe Bob Kalmash original Sun
recording," I'd probably believe
him.
Herald has passed on all the
high-tech studio wizardry of
today and gone for a lean basic
sound that's straight from his
roots. This is the real thing, not
a recycled fad out of Britain.
And even though no one song
off the ep immediately stuck in
my mind my foot kept tapping
to the beat through the whole
record and I guess that's all that
really matters (although the
bluesy / Don't Love Nobody
had me thinking about a girl I
never knew).
The most obvious thing
about this record aside from its
feeling of authenticity is the
way in hich the beer just
seemed to flow naturally along
with the music. All of which
makes me want to see Herald
Nix do this stuff in a live setting
all the more. I guess I have to
conclude that this ep isn't going
to spawn Herald a big hit single
or garner mega-hours of radio
play. But it is the kind of thing
people will play when they want
to kick their parties into high
gear and that, along with
Herald live dates, may just
make him a legend anyway, not
to mention a few bucks. Now, if
the editor will just let me out of
this damn room.. D<?an Pe|key
MURMER
R.E.M. (A & M)
To those who make the study
of sleep their lifework R.E.M.
stands for Rapid Eye
Movement, a physical phenomenon that accompanies the
dream state of sleep. This leads
us to an interesting question: Is
an album by a band called
R.E.M. going to put us to sleep
or take us to a fantastic dreamlike world? Are we going to nod
off two songs into the LP, or will
we be enraptured by a
magnificent surreal world
brought to us by guitar, bass
and drums.
In the case of this band called
R.E.M. we get neither of these
two    extremes.    R.E.M.'s
popsense is too strong to even
consider sleep, and their
common sense too strong for
them to play pop Dali's. Instead,
the music on Murmur gives one
the uneasy feeling one gets
when awakened in the middle
of one of those thousands (you
have five or six every night)
indistinct dreams. You know,
where you wake up, knowing
you were dreaming, and of
something important, but you
can't put your finger on exactly
what it was. It is a dream world
of the ordinary, twisted just
enough to disorient without
indicating the source of the
confusion.
Musically the band's sound
recalls the folk-rock (what an
awful term) of the mid-60's, all
jangling guitar and harmonies.
The color and light of these
roots, however, are severely
tempered by a solid '80's
sensibility. While guitarist Pete
Buck's guitar often speaks in
ringing tones, he can all of a
sudden twist of discord that
would do Andy Gill proud. The
rather morbid image that
occured to me when first
confronted by the sound of
R.E.M. was the Byrds emerging
after being buried in compost
for about fifteen years, Time
having bleached the color and
lightness out of the sound and
added a healthy touch of
cynicism. The mixture of the
ethereal and the nastily
ordinary is a quietly unnverving
one.
Equally unnerving is R.E.M.'s
lyrical and vocal approach. The
songs sound like pop songs,
complete with hooks and
almost sing-a-long choruses.
Yet like the hypothetical
disinterred Byrds the pop
structure has decayed, the
verse-chorus-verse format
being replaced by grey / brown
narratives brought into vivid
relief by catchy, yearning
refrains.    The    words    are
delivered by singer Michael
Stipe in an undistinctive voice,
yet a voice, that in its attempt to
escape its very ordinaries
achieved a kind of soul, a sense
of real emotion and determination that is often missing in pop
music. Behind him bassist Mike
Mills and drummer Bill Berry
provide harmonies that, often
as not, obscure rather than
escape its very ordinariness
dream-like atmosphere of
Murmur.
Murmur has a subtle mystical
quality to it; the feeling of
dreams set in a muted everyday
world. While this subtlety
diminishes the initial impact of
the album the long-term result
is very satisfying. Over a few
listens Murmer reveals itself as
a quietly powerful L.P. Give it a
chance.
And pleasant dreams.
CD
ClflRepOrt: Singles
ARTIST
1 PETE SHELLEY
2 BEVERLY SISTERS
3 BOBMARLEY&THEWAILERS
4 YAZOO
5 BAUHAUS
6 ANIMAL SLAVES
7 GRANDMASTER FLASH
8 CHRIS & COSEY
9 BIG COUNTRY
10 THE MAISONETTES
11 STYLE COUNCIL
12 JAH WOBBLE
13 THE MONOCHROME SET
14 COCTEAU TWINS
15 BIG COUNTRY
16 THE THE
17 COOK DA BOOKS
18 ACTIONAUTS
19 A CAST OF THOUSANDS
20 MONSOON
21 DUB RIFLES
22 CULTURE SHOCK
23 FARMERS BOYS
24 THE IMPOSTER
25 THE CREATURES
26 SHRIEKBACK
27 PUNILUX
28 ROBYN HITCHCOCK
29 ORANGE JUICE
30 PETER & THE TEST-TUBE
BABIES
31 THE MILKSHAKES
32 FUTURA 2000 & THE CLASH
33 BEAST
34 FELT
35 TUXEDOMOON
36 EYELESS IN GAZA
37 NEW ORDER
38 ORANGE JUICE
39 MONTY CANSTIN
40 SISTERS OF MERCY
TITLE
No One Like You
Talk Talk Talk/Downtown Fools
Buffalo Soldier
State Farm
She's in Parties
Eye of the Hurricane
New York New York
October (A Love Song)
In a Big Country
Heartache Avenue
Money Go Round
Invaders of the Heart
The Jet Set Junta
Peppermint Pig
Fields of Fire
Dumb as Death's Head
Low Profile
Hash Assassin
On the Q.T./ln for the Kill
Wings of Dawn
Stand
Forever and Ever
Muck It Out
Pills and Soap
Miss The Girl
Working on the Ground
Golden Corsets
Kingdom of Love
Flesh of My Flesh
Zombie Creeping Flesh
Red Monkey/Seven Days
The Escapades of Futura 2000
Love in a Dying World
Penelope Tree
The Cage
Ne Risen
Blue Monday
Rip It Up
Catastronics
Alice
LABEL
GENETIC (UK)
**DEMO TAPE"
ISLAND
SIRE
B.B. (UK)
"DEMO TAPE"
SUGARHILL (US)
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
PHONOGRAM (UK)
QUALITY
RESPOND (UK)
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
CHERRY RED (UK)
4AD (UK)
PHONOGRAM (UK)
CHERRY RED (UK)
KITESTREET (UK)
"DEMO TAPE"
"DEMO TAPE"
PHONOGRAM (UK)
NOTOWN
BIG DUMMY
EMI (UK)
IMP (UK)
WONDERLAND (UK)
Y(UK)
RHINO (UK)
ALBION (UK)
POLYDOR (UK)
TRAPPER (UK)
WALL CITY (BRD)
CELLULOID (UK)
AMBDUSIAS (US)
CHERRY RED (UK)
CREPUSCULES(US)
CHERRY RED (UK)
POLYGRAM
POLYDOR (UK)
YUL
BRAIN EATER (UK)
POP-EYES
Danielle Dax (Initial-UK)
To fully appreciate this album
one should first have some idea
of the artists' past achievements in the world of unusual
music. Danielle Dax and Karl
Blake were, at one time, known
as the Lemon Kittens, a
relatively obscure duo whose
main claim to fame was being
the saving grace of the United
Dairies label, a normally quite
nasty outfit that caters to the
rather harsh, industrial music
end of the market. The Lemon
Kittens put out two L.P.s and
two E.P.s before disintegrating
in late 1981, and as Danielle's
voice was really the duo's
hallmark, and as the Lemon
Kitten sound maintains a
degree of continuinty throughout this album, I'll do my bestto
describe their effect on the
ears. The instrumentation is
minimal, yet effective, with Karl
and Danielle proficient at ome
devices and clever, though
useless, at others. The overall
effect is one of an aural collage
of disjointed rhythms with
smatterings of perverted urban
noise, Danielle's voice
sounding, at one turn, shrill and
annoying, or soothing and
ethereal at another. She sang
on Robert Fripp's "League of
Gentlemen" album ("Minor
Man") and did the cover art for
that, and another Fripp album;
"Let the Power Fall."
Pop Eyes sounds to me like
the end result of mating the
Lemon Kittens with a group of
Scottish Highland folk singers!
No, really! A track like "Here
come   the   Harvest   Buns"   is
proof enough. "Harvest Buns"
should give birth to a new
dance; The Industrial Jig! The
L.P., in true Lemon Kitten style,
was entirely composed, played,
produced, and recorded by
Danielle, all on her todd. She
uses a variety of weapons
including bass, tenor and
soprano saxes, flute, keyboards, squeeze box, penny
whistle and a selection of
children's toy instruments. The
layering and dubbing techniques used to mesh the variety
of resulting sounds is brilliant,
to say the least, and not since
Eyeless in Gaza has anyone
used children's toys to such
charming effect on vinyl. The
electronic rhythm that forms
the base of one song, "The
Wheeled Wagon," sounds a bit
like Throbbing Gristle, circa
Heathen Earth.
Although this disc may not be
for everyone, it is comparatively
accessible and should hold a
great deal of interest for those
of you who appreciate fresh
and innovative new sounds,
especially seeing a "alternative
music," these days, seems to
refer to trendy, boring,
discothudbeat muck. The final
summation? It's excellent. Buy
or die! If it so happens that you
don't like the music, then you
can always staple the cover to
your front door for the purpose
of keeping the dogs away....or
attracting them, as the case
may be! You'll understand
when you see it. Ah, the things
some people do in the name of
art. Beautiful!        Mark Mu8he,
PAGE 5 DISCORDER      July, 1983
IMPROVE YOUR RECEPTION
WITH CABLE
One of the most popular
complaints about CITR is the
quality of its signal. Our recent
Listeners' Survey (April
Discorder) really drove home
this point. We learned that a full
71% of respondents have
trouble picking upCITRforone
reason or another. One person
commented, "If I walk around
the room I sometimes can't get
the station," while another said
he would willingly pay an
annual fee to accomplish
higher power and stereo
reception.
Well, we recently appreciate
all the concern (and we'd
appreciate the money for that
matter!) but realistically, a
power increase is something
that won't come for awhile due
to various CRTC rules and
regulations. Until CITR is able
to secure a higher power broad-
casting licence and the
necessary equipment to put the
signal in the air, our listeners
will have to make do with a
weak and sometimes elusive
radio signal. Despite the
problems with our Low Power
FM signal it is, possible to listen
to CITR almost anywhere in the
Lower Mainland if you try hard
enough.
There are basically two ways
to get CITR. The first is by
tuning your FM radio to
precisely 101.9, and the second
is by tuning to cable FM 100.1.
The trouble with both methods
is that sometimes CITR is just
not there. In the first case the
problem is probably due to the
lack of a good antenna. The
problems with cable FM reception are either that the system is
not properly hooked up, or that
the listener lives in a district
whose cable company doesn't
carry the station.
^^^^^*w-
VsSB
XSZg
r— ^0
^~^a»
m-'f^
im
Ly^"—■—  ^^
jr\
«
g     p.„.M,
CITR is carried by cable and
is available in Vancouver, North
and West Vancouver, Burnaby,
Richmond, Coquitlam, Maple
Ridge, and all the way east to
Mission. CITR is nor available
on cable FM in Surrey, Delta,
New Westminster, Langley, or
White Rock, although we're
working on it. Remember to
tune to FM 100.1
The fact is, because of CITR's
Low Power status, you have to
be a bit of a technician to get the
station. To listen on cable
you've got to be able to connect
a cable from your FM antenna
to some screws on the back of
your cablevision powered TV.
To find out which screws call
your cable company.
If you want to listen to CITR
on regular FM just like a real
radio station (and 70% of our
listeners do), you'll most likely
find it imposssible without an
antenna. For stereo receivers
all you have to do is connect
any sort of wire or cable to the
"FM antenna" terminals on the
back of your unit. Tune to FM
101.9 and move the wire around
until the signal comes in. Most
of the time you'll be successful
in harnessing the sound,
especially if you live close to
our UBC transmitter, i.e. Point
Grey, the West End, downtown
and parts of the North Shore.
The key is to spend some time
moving your antenna around to
find just the right place.
Automobile reception of
CITR leaves much to be
desired, but you can pick upthe
station in your car downtown,
or UBC areas because this is
where our signal is strongest.
One CITR listener recently
urged us to go for more watts
and radiating power. This
indeed is in the works, but in the
meantime we'd like to remind
people that CITR is really not
that elusive once you know how
to tune it in. Before we go off
and sell our souls to
technology, remember that we
are only a phone call away at
228-2487. We give individual
counselling to people with
reception problems. M|ke Mines
•ELECTRONIC VIDEO
•5 PIN BOWLING
•PINBALL
• BILLIARDS
AND        REDEEM YOUR COCA-COLA
FUN CAPS
AT
SUB GAMES ROOM
Downstairs Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
Open: Monday to Saturday 8am -12:45 at night
Sunday 10am - 11:30pm
Any Advanced Bookings — Please call
SUB GAMES ROOM 228-3692
1869 West 4th Avenue
738-3232
FINAL VINYL FEATURES
CLASSIC ALBUMS
01  JULY BRIAN ENO-TAKING TIGER MOUNTAIN
08 JULY JOY DIVISION-CLOSER
15 JULY PETER GABRIEL-DEBUT ALBUM
29 JULY DAVID BOWIE-STATION TO STATION
NEGLECTED ALBUMS
03 JULY CLOCK DVA-WHITE SOULS IN BLACK SUITS
10 JULY KEVIN HARRISON-INSCRUTABLY OBVIOUS
17 JULY DOME-DOME 3
24 JULY 23 SKIDDO-7 SONGS
HIGH PROFILE
FRI
SAT
1
2
WAR MUSIC
ZE RECORD LABEL
MON
4
PRINCE
TUES
WED
5
6
XTC
RANK AND FILE
THURS
FRI
SAT
7
8
9
L.A. PUNK
DEATH MUSIC
CONTEMPORARY VANCOUVER
MON
11
SMALL FACES
TUES
WED
12
13
VANCOUVER COMPILED - VANCOUVER
COMPILATION ALBUMS
PETER TOSH
THURS
FRI
SAT
14
15
16
CHRON GEN
TRAIN MUSIC
CLINT EASTWOOD AND GENERAL SAINT
MON ...
.   17
NEW ORDER
TUES ..
.  19
SEATTLE SYNDROME
WED ...
.  20
TOM VERLAINE
THURS.
. 21
THE RESIDENTS
FRI	
. 22
RAIN MUSIC
SAT ....
. 23
SPIZZ — ALL INCARNATIONS
MON
TUES
25
26
KENNY AND THE KASUALS
ROBERT WYATT
WED
27
PETER GABRIEL
THURS
FRI
28
29
THE RUTLES
FOOD MUSIC
SAT
30
JAPAN DISCORDER        July, 1983
.^M#MMt ^wl^6#
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
MONDAY....AMNESTY ACTION
A community access program which provides a forum for human
rights issues of concern to Amnesty International.
July 4:   The effectiveness of the Amnesty International
Tech-night in Getting Prisoners of Conscience
Released
11:   Abuses in Namibia
18:   Human Rights Violations in Uganda
Tuesday...UBC ON TAP
July 5:   "The Risks and Benefits of Contraceptives," with
Dr. Percival Smith
12:    "A New President: What Difference Does It Make?"
with UBC President George Pedersen
19:    "Life of Brian: Stornoway or Sussex Drive?" with
UBC political science professor Don Blake.
Wednesday.
July 6:
SPEAKER'S CHOICE
MOBILE
SOUND
• PARTIES
•GRADS
•WEDDINGS
• BARMITZVAHS
Call and ask about
our LOW RATES
228-3017
•We spin to suit*
Canadian Security Intelligence Service: An Effective
Security in a Democratic Society? with Solicitor
General Robert Kaplan.
13:    Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms with
Justice Thomas Berger.
20:    Where Are Computers Going? with Paul Gilmore,
head of UBC's computer science department.
Thursday ...CROSS CURRENTS
July 7:    Canadian Security Intelligence Service: The
Ultimate Threat in a Democratic Society with the
B.C. Law Union
14:   The Vancouver Five, The Trial So Far
21:   Stop the Trident: Success or Failure?
Friday....DATELINE INTERNATIONAL
July 8:   The Prospects of Japanese Military and Security
Policies with McMaster University professor Klaus
Pringsheim.
15:   The Nature of China's Military Modernization with
SFU president William Saywell.
22: Sino-Soviet Relations Today with Peggy Falkenheim
of the Joint Centre for the Study of Modern East Asia
Monday through Friday from July 25 to August 12....CITR Public
Affairs preempts its regular programs with the following special
presentation: COUNTER FORCE at 8:30 a.m.
A community access program providing coverage of the Sixth
General Assembly of the World Council of Churches and the
Ploughshares Peace and Justice Coffeehouse being held at UBC
from July 24 to August 10.
DANCE MARATHON
BROADCAST
"I could have danced all night...."
On July 8th, the Paula Ross Dance Company will be sponsoring their second
annual dance marathon.
CITR will be supplying the music and broadcasting this meritorius event with live
remotes from the Paula Ross Studio on Broadway. The times of these remotes will
be from 7:00 to 7:15 p.m. on Friday evening then every hour we will cut in for five
minutes to see how the competitors are doing.
For the final wrap up we will go straight from the CITR Saturday Magazine to
broadcasting the final half hour of the marathon.
In keeping with today's "see-saw" economy, this revival from the 1930's will offer
luxurious prizes for the sake of Dance.
The jitterbug, the samba, the hoky poky, the Fonzie Waltz, the tango, the black
bottom — it doesn't matter what form of dance you do as long as you begin
sometime between 7:00 p.m. July 8th and 7:00 p.m. the following day. Every half
hour there will be 5 lovely minutes for rest and refreshments; every hour, a prize will
be awarded to an energetic competitor. The gifts will range from a case of Perrier, to
a pair of symphony tickets, to a Japanese dinner for two. And of course, all proceeds
will be directed to the very deserving Paula Ross Dance Company.
Labelled as one of the most innovative and thrilling artists in the Canadian dance
scene, Paula Ross dances, teaches and choreographs. In 1965, she founded her
company of 6-9 dancers who dedicate their talents to educating the public in the art
of expression. Aside from school performances throughout B.C., the company
tours nationally with its extremely expressive and boldly visdual repertoire. This
Fall, they will be opening in Toronto at the Ontario Contact '83 Showcase which will
hopefully lead to their long-awaited Eastern tour. Other plans include a week at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre, a B.C. Tour, and varied performances during
Vancouver Dance week. As an innovative and developing organization, the Paula
Ross Dance Company is always looking for volunteers, refreshing ideas and
financial assistance. Fundraising events, such as the above mentioned dance
marathon, help pay the bills as well as promote publicity for the company. So, grab
an entry form and dance your feet off.
j      SUNOAY             MONDAY
TU
ESDAY          WEDNESDAY       THURSDAY             FRIDAY            SATURDAY
7,m
8 am
9am
OUffTrME
,._
FOLK
STe'SKS
TcNt'SnV
SCHaCES      I      cu=r°enSts
■.-'■■■:,■'-,.
MUSIC
OUR TIME
Noon
IruSch
RsiE
1pm
■'" '
2pm
3 pm
PLAYLIST
W.THoJa
4 pm
5 pm
6 pm
—
=^r=^=:
"
.pm
SNIGHATY
H,OHPROF,LE
H,CHPROF,LE
H,GHPROF,LE
H,CHPROF,LE
H,c™LE
HlGHPROF,LE
9 pm
FORWARD
SHOW
10Pm
11 pm
vinyl
vlSvt
Z*[
SXSvt
vinyl"
VINYL
V,NAL
FORWARD
c3J?d
Midnight
1,m
?      "
2.m
j
3 am
'              f_
CITR PROGRAM PROFILE :
Mini Concert — HIGH PROFILE
Mini-concerts have been a
standard feature of the CITR
on-air programming format for
several years and, if the recent
listeners' survey is any
indication, one of the most
popular. Of the 200 or so of you
who had anything at all to say
about our mini-concerts, less
than 3% claimed to dislike the
feature.
Unfortunately, the tag "mini-
concert" is something of a
misnomer. This has been
brought to our attention in the
past by listener queries asking
how on earth we manage to
obtain so many recorded live
concerts. Well it is all sitting
here in our record library.
Mini-concerts, though they
may be short, are no more alive
than a pressed disc of vinyl. The
term was initially devised to
describe the format of
providing 40 to 50 minutes
devoted to one artist or group
that is of particular interest to
CITR listeners. To provide the
suitable material, CITR's record
library is scourged and if that
proves to be a barren wasteland
(as it can be occasionally), then
it becomes quite acceptable to
beg, borrow or steal.
Yet, Mini-concerts are much
more than a slap and dash
combination of tracks
celebrating a particular artist's
or group's virtuosity (or
ineptness, whatever the case
may be); they also endeavour to
provide a spoken profile of the
subject matter. These profiles
entail, depending of course on
the zeal of the announcer who
co-ordinates the particular
feature, a history and
discography of the artist or
group, complemented by any
constructive criticism and juicy
morsels of superfluous information culled from various
sources.
In the past though, Mini-
concerts have highlighted the
music of an amazingly wide
range of artistic talents — a
range that should increase
proportionately to the planned
growth of the CITR record
library that we anticipate to take
place over the next year. With
more material available
combined with a hoped for zeal
for progressive innovation on
the part of the announcers
involved, less well-known
artists will be featured along
with unusual combinations
under thematic headings....
(how many of you had your
curiosity piqued by the mini-
concert: various rock stars
coming to untimely deaths of
one sort or another?
Expect more of that in the
future on the feature, now
known as High Profile — heard
Monday to Saturday, each
night at 8 p.m. And if it is an
actual live concert you want,
then tune in Sunday evenings
for Sunday Night Live. TH*
PIT PUB
Rttf
>\31
5^sll^
HtfE**1
vjeeV-e-
tvd
DANCE TO MUSIC BY
^
CITR-
WEDNESDAY thru SATURDAY
9:30 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.
)
1
with 50's, 60's & 70's Rock & Roll
E::
Every Friday Night!
i
COVER CHARGES AT 7 P.M.
X
Wed
Thurs
1.00
1.00
Fri 1.00 2.00
Sat 100 2.00
DOWNSTAIRS STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
IHIIIHIHHHIIIIIB
J

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0049808/manifest

Comment

Related Items