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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) May 1, 1983

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Full Text

 DiScORDER
TA guide to CITR tin 102
<? CABLE 100 DiScORDER
tA guide to CITR fm 102
** pari c mn
DEAD KENNEDYS SPEAK OUT
The second floor of the
Student Union Building was
already hot and stuffy when I
arrived early in the afternoon.
Requests to havethe ventilation
fans turned on were lost in a
malaise of bureaucracy. The
Peace March and the Dead
Kennedys in one day. I wonder
if my sense and sensibility can
possibly handle it.
The band isn't here yet. The
interview is rescheduled. The
equipment set up, the Dee Kays
finally arrive for a sound check.
They stand nonchalantly on the
stage, their indifference in
stinging contrast to the hard
driving sound emerging from
the speakers. Even Jello Biafra
seems almost mellow, hopping
on stage for the vocals and then
leaving momentarily to make
notes on the line up for the
show.
Talking to the road manager I
start to get a sense of the
politics, albeit music politics,
that keep this band clicking.
They are careful about who
books them. They stay away
from large promoters. They pay
their opening acts well and
interreact with them like they
are real people. They make
themselves available to fans,
though anonymously, before
the show.
The doors open. It's like a
funeral with all the black and
chrome. Ages range from seven
to fifty but most of the crowd is
from   Vancouver's   "hardcore"
Minutes before the start the
Dee Kays are backstage.
Biafra's orange juice and
Peligro's beer are in place. The
band is quietly and comfortably
dressed. Biafara moves calmly,
almost graceful. Then hits the
lights and everything changes.
His limbs jerk spastically, the
sweat begins to pour in
response to the warm saliva
welcome of the crowd jammed
at the front. His ready smile
hardens into a sneer. His voice
curls towards the crowd before
pounding into the mike.
After the show we retreat to
the studio at CITR. The band
wants an open discussion with
anyone that's around. I wince,
worrying about sound quality
and superficiality. This format
will prove to be both the
strength and weakness of the
interview. The sound quality is
horrible. The discussion
wanders, it is hard to push
beyond the self evident. Yet
there are times when the
discussion gets personal and
obvious differences in political
analyses within the band
become apparent.
Discorder: From your name to
your lyrics and music you are
essentially a political band. One
criticism of the punk scene is
that it has lost its political
fervour. Do you get frustrated
that the political element is not
absorbed bysomeof yourfans?
Biafra: Sometimes, but at the
same time I haven't felt like
giving up. I enjoy getting
people angry and getting
underneath their skin,
especially people who don't
think. So even if some punk
audiences, some of the
hardcorier than thou, give us —
you suck-you're too preachy —
go back to 1967 — we say what
we want to say anyhow.
Discorder: Do you ever feel
you're just part of a fad scene?
Peligro: One thing about
Canadian audiences — they
seem to have picked up the
English habits. They get into a
lot of spitting. You should see
Toronto.
Biafra: With some people it's a
fad scene, but with a lot of
people no. There's always
going to be people, when
anything gets morewell known,
that are going to latch onto the
superficial part and not really
absorb what's behind it. I don't
agree with turning one's back
on punk because it has lost its
meaning. I don't think it has lost
its meaning.
East    Bay    Ray:    All   these
questions are talking about the
scene.    That's    not   what's
important   any   more   —   who
hates    who,     who     is    more
politically   correct   —   the
government is creating nuclear
weapons to blow you up and
you're talking about who likes
who.
Discorder:    What    is    the
message?
Biafra: Consult the lyrics to our
records.
Klaus Flouride: If even ten per
cent, or even one person walks
out of the gig with some new
thought in their mind then it's
worth it.
Biafra:   We're   also   willing   to
learn   from    our   audience.
Sometimes we have to rethink
things, too.
Discorder:    You're    doing    a
benefit for the Five. What are
your feelings about that case?
Biafra: It seems like it might be
the biggest show trial since the
Chicago Seven. There has been
hardly any mention of the five in
the American media. There is
also   not   a   word   in   straight
American papers about acid
rain.
Discorder: Do incidents like
these help fuel the anger that
keeps you going?
Biafra: It's not ourfavourite way
of keeping things going. It's a
little too close to home. It's the
first person I've known and
been fairly close to who is
looking at life in prison on what
are basically political charges.
Ray: One of the things punks
can do isdocumentand present
things like police abuse. The
punk scene should use media.
This radio station is media. Give
people your phone number.
Like that train that carried
nuclear warheads • from
Wyoming to the Trident base in
Washington. People along the
route tried to block it. It got on
the news. You still want to keep
a democracy. Even though the
train got through they got into
the press and got other people
thinking about whether they
want nuclear weapons going
into Trident subs.
Biafra: More important. Do we
want trains full of nuclear
warheads going through our
backyards?
Ray: They made a point. People
now know about that train.
They were successful. A small
number of people went out and
sat on a track and they did
something.
Discorder: What about the use
of violence? It certainly attracts
the media and brings the issue
into public focus.
Ray: Several thousand people
in England formed a fourteen
mile human chain. That wasn't
violent and it certainly madethe
headlines.
Biafra: How many people when
they heard about the Lytton
thing immediately felt
sympathy for the poor innocent
multi-national corporation?
Fluoride: There is a danger to
be recognized in certain kinds
of action. When violence is
used as protest, some of the
people you may be trying to
impress eomthing on are not
going to be swayed to your
way of thinking. All they think
is — those goddamn maniacs.
Biafra: There's another level to
this. There are things like
walking up to the entrance of a
Bank of America branch or a
McDonalds and gluing their
locks closed, and it takes 3 or 4
hours to get their doors open.
And they lose that many
hundreds of dollars. There's a
difference between physical
property and people. Remember too, violence is the essential tool of the state.
Ray: And then there's people
like Martin Luther King.
Biafra: He was a threat because
he wasn't violent.
Fluoride: And he got blown
away for it.
Ray: His goal wasn't to save his
own life. His goal was to
achieve equal rights for blacks
in the States. And he achieved
some of that non-violently. He
lost his life in the process but
that doesn't mean he lost.
Discorder: What about
liberation struggles such as we
have seen in Nicaragua and El
Salvador?
Biafra: We aren't saying that
peaceful resistance means not
defending yourself. I personally
think self defense is important.
Ray: And often it comes back to
media. If you're going to
participate in non-violence you
have to be prepared to use the
media - better than they use
you. If you're going to sacrifice
a piece of your hide for nonviolence you have to get a
person who's not involved to
realize what you're doing. It's
communication. If there's no
communication involved, a
non-violent act is meaningless.
The media is one form of
communication.
Discorder: Are the multi- •
nationals the real criminals?
Ray: I think the real criminals
are peoples' sense of ego and
greed. Multinationals are just
an exaggeration of that.
Biafra: You have to divorce your
self from those structures asd
self from those structures as
much as possible. Everybody is
talented and if you can deny
those people your talent by
refusing to work for them. Even
when you buy food you're
feeding them. The individual
must remove themselves from
the mainstream as much as
possible to get from, getting
sucked in. I'm not saying drop
out. I'm saying build something
else.
Ray: Multinationals are just a
vehicle for the goals of
individual human begins. You
can decrease their power if you
make them remember they are
only individual human beings.
There are not two kinds of
people — those who work for
the multi-nationals and those
who don't — we're all the same
people.
The Dead Kennedys are gone
but one can only hope that
some of the anger they bring us
close to remains. As I listened
to the tapes of the interview I
found that there was a message
for Vancouverites and the
people here at CITR. We tend to
get insulated from the music we
play. We ask questions of the
Dead Kennedys that we have
yet to ask ourselves. We too
often take lyrics as just another
sound element and ignore the
very real demands that punk as
resistance would make on our
lives. For me the message is
abundantly clear — get
involved with more than your
ears — get involved with your
whole life.
—David Firman DISCORDER   May, 1983
Clnn^DiSfcORDEit
tflllOS Cable 100
Editors:
Jennifer Fahrni
Mike Mines
Features Editor:
Michael Shea
Reviews Editor:
Jeff Kearney
Distribution
Harry Hertscheg
Contributors
Rick Anderson
Gord Badanic
Murray Cahen
David Firman
Steve Hendry
Harry Hertscheg
Fiona MacKay
Joseph March
Mark Mushet
Steve Robertson
Sedro Wooley
Ian Warren
Printing:
Web Press Graphics Ltd.
For copies of any photographs contact CITR at 228-3017.
A couple hundred listener surveys from last month's issue
of DISCORDER were received by a very appreciative CITR
membership. The station's members would like to thank all
respondents for their input ("Thanks"). Those who filled out
the survey can have the satisfaction of knowing that they wil
be held partially responsible for the hopefully improved and
innovative programming changes to come about on CITR
over the next year.
A few of the interesting letters received through the survey
appear in this issue's Letters to the Airhead feature. The June
issue will have the complete results of the survey as well as a
representative sample of some of the more pertinent
comments.
Survey forms are still available at a number of places in
Vancouver: Odyssey Imports on Granville Mall; Zulu
Records on W. 4th Ave., near Burrard; Black Swan Records
on W. 4th Ave. just a block west of MacDonald; The Charles
Bogle Phonograph Dispensary located in the W. 10th Ave.
neighbourhood shopping area; and in the Student Union
Building at UBC.
So for those of you who haven't yet filled out a survey form,
there's still opportunity for you to get your input in and get
your comments published ("Publish or Perish").
Survey or no survey, CITR always invites and welcomes
listeners and non-listeners alike to forward their comments,
questions and suggestions to CITR.
For those of you who would like to address your comments
to specific departments, a list of those who get the buck
passed to are given below:
President Steve Robertson*
Vice President Jennifer Fahrni*
Business Manager Harry Hertscheg*
Station Manager Sonia Mysko*
Programme Director To be announced
Chief Engineer Rick Anderson*
Music Directors Michael Shea & Vijay Sondhi*
News Director Rob Simms
Sports Director Monte Stewart
Production Manager
(pre-recorded announcements, etc.)  Sean Gaherty
Traffic Director
(non-recorded announcements, etc.) Veronica Jorna
Promotions Director  Roxanne Heichert
Secretaries of Station  Gord Badanic & Dean Pelkey
Public Affairs Director Dave Jamieson
Record Librarian Paul Scholten
These members are open to the public abuse, but only
until March 31,1984. The asterisked (*) people will bearound
all summer to keep the CITR ship afloat.
ATTACK
The Revillos (Superville UK)
Since Jo Callis left t
Rezillos in January, 1979, the
Rezillos/Revillos have had to
depend more on energy and
excitement, rather than strong
songwriting and guitar ability.
Now in 1983, four years down
the road, the Revillos energy,
too, is beginning to wane. Their
new album Attack is an
expected disappointment.
Although Eugene Reynolds
and Fay Fife (and whoever they
are able to recruit for each
effort) are able to pour enough
enthusiasm and fun into the two
songs that comprise a single,
over the length of an LP, their
energy and originality are worn
extremely thin. Of course there
are a few outstanding tracks on
this disc (notably Man Attack,
Tell Him and Graveyard
Groove) these songs would
have fared better had they not
been released on Attack, where
they are bogged down by a
significant number of unin-
PAOE2
spired,   sluggish   tunes,   and
lifeless performances.
The album consists of a little
more than half upbeat light
songs, the remainder being mid
to slow tempo, or worse,
attempts at campy, torchy tear-
jerkers, like Bobby Come Back
and On The Beach from the first
Revillos album Rev Up!. The
songs on the new album are
very characterisically Revillo-
ish, with tinny, twangy guitars,
impossibly fast drums, and the
unparalleled "REVETTES" on
harmonies. Unless you're a
devoted Rezillos/Revillos
fanatic, don't expect to be
completely satisfied with this
record, especially since there
are no plans to release this in
North America and you can
expect to pay around $16 for
the album. Some good songs,
some bad ones. Buy the single
from the album first, then all the
other Revillos singles.
-Gord Badanic
Dear Airhead:
Just a note to say thanT?s*for
the alternative. When I tripped
down here from Deadmonton,
Dulberta a few years back I was
just a naive Led Zeppelin
listener. Now.thankstoyou, I'm
a naive new music freak. But
seriously, I write for a street
level rag and you guys really
help out some. Thanks for
being around.
--Gord Wilson
THANKS FOR BEING NAIVE
(just kiddin) -Ed.
Dear Airhead
I tune in only once a month
because I so rarely hear
something I'm even vaguely
interested in when my dial goes
by, vainly searching for
something — anything! —
listenable. I'm simply never
enticed to stop at CITR.
I'm 25, so I don't represent the
majority of either the UBC
population, or your listeners.
But I'm not one of those people
who yearn for the '60's,
dreaming of the day when we'll
hear that stuff on the radio
again. On the contrary, heaven
forbid we'd have to put up with
that drivel (mostly) —
ONWARD, GENTLEMEN!
But holy cow, guys, (and you
are mostly guys, it seems), you
are so obsessed with 'being a
head of the game'. You'll play
anything as long as it's new,
just so you can claim to know
something we don't know. I
imagine you going "nyah nyah"
when AM picks up on a band
you've been playing for awhile.
Well big deal. You wanna be
adventurous, daring, revolutionary, and (gasp!) maybe
even intelligent?! How 'bout
tJiis:
Take advantage of all those
glorious grey boxes in your
schedule to show us what's
really out there. Any so-called
'music  connoisseur'  I've ever
met claims to like all kinds of
music — rock, reggae,
classical, jazz, bluegrass, folk,
blues, gospel, r & b, African,
yodeling, choirs, Tibetan
monks, cajun, Celtic, ETC. So
why not show how much you
really KNOW, how hip you
really are, by mixing it up
fercrissake! Make me terrified
to change the station for fear of
what I'll miss. There's a big wide
world out there, you'd be
smarter to put new rock music
(i.e. what's on your "hit
parade") in a white box — what
the hey, 3 hrs 7 days a week if
you like, but please try to see
beyond the narrow limits of
BOW WOW WOW and SCRITTI
POLITTI, (whoever the hell
they are).*
*No offence. I'm glad to hear
this new stuff, but I don't want
to hear it or any one kind of
music all day! No one anywhere
is programming the way I've
suggested — this is your
chance guys! The brass ring....!
Your claim to fame....! IMMORTALITY!! Imagine the riches
that await you....
PLEASE
MIX IT UP!
CULTURE
Dear Discorder,
You're on a fair lane
With Scout Farelaine
Scout Farelaine
Is a rocket airplane
She used to be a Dishrag
Now she is a super stag.
—Charles Slade
(Charles slade)
Looks like Charles is taking up
where Napoleon XIV left off. 14
you can do worse (better?) than
this, we would certainly like to
hear from youl
-Ed.
LETTER TO THE
SNOTHEAD
To the DJ @ CITR on **** (time
and day withheld to protect the
guilty)
Dear DJ,
On this date I was listening to
your Ski Report. Between the
reports I kept hearing the very
audible sound of you sniffing
up what sounded like very thick
mucous. If you have a cold,
dear, would you, as a favour to
your listeners,who have CITR
playing on their sensitive
stereos, PLEASE STAY AT
HOME!
I enjoy your fine music
immensely but I am truly
amazed at the poor manners.
Am I going to be forced to listen
to LG73 on my clock radio?
Please listen to your
program, you'll barf!!!
—Michelle
Never Fear! We have beheaded
the D J concerned, and we hope
that this will rectify the
mucous problem. If not, we'll
have to do something drastic.
Stay tuned!
-Ed.
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rTTOK-DS MONTREAL'S Rational Youth in a recent SUB Ballroom Appearance.       photo: Kevin Fleming
©DYSSEY
IMPORTS
•Largest selection of imported
records in Western Canada
•Latest new releases
•Our selection includes new wave,
60's rock, reggae, and punk
•Rock posters & T-Shirts
866 Granville St.    Phone: 669-6644
cinnRp
MOBILE
SOUND
• PARTIES
•GRADS
•WEDDINGS
•BARMITZVAHS
Call and ask about
our LOW RATES
228-3017
•We spin
to suit*
•LIGHT ROCK •LOOSE FUSION
•ELECTRONIC •MAINSTREAM*
•FUNK •REGGAE •UPBEAT*
come to
SUB
GAMES ROOM
Downstairs Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
Hear the sounds of the group of 50
Latest electronic video games
"Truly a unique experience in audio and video manipulation.'
^oJi-^	
CITR DJ
-8 LANE 5 PIN BOWLING
-9 BILLARD TABLES
-50 ELECTRONIC VIDEO
& PINBALL GAMES
COCA-COLA
FUN CAPS
REDEEMED TIL
SEPT. 30/83
Open: Monday to Saturday 8am -12:45 at night
Sunday 10am - 11:30pm
Any Advanced Bookings — Please call
SUB GAMES ROOM 228-3692
DISCORDER   May, 1983
An Alternative to Vinyl
THE INDEPENDENT
TAPE DISTRIBUTOR
As the so-called alternative music scene becomes more and
more jaded and a new status quo of British pop groups emerge, so
increases the need for a supply of fresh blood. Fortunately, there is
a new breed of entrepreneur that is gradually coming close to
fulfilling that need; the independent tape distributor.
A relatively recent development in alternative music distribution,
these outfits are often affiliated with, or offshoots of, new music
publications (examples being: Eurock, Flowmotion, Datenver-
arbietung, etc.) and share a strong dislike for the effects the music
industry has on the natural progression of music and the
unquestionable need to break new ground. The aim is to allow
artists to go about producing music without having to compromise
in any way (so as to secure a record deal) and make that music
available to the greatest number of people at the highest level of
value and quality possible. Considering that a 40-minute long
record runs about eight dollars in this country, double that if it's a
European import, a 90-minute cassette of new music for an
average of six dollars or less (and that's from overseas) seems like
quite a nice alternative to patronizing our quickly disappearing
trendy import stores. The styles of music available run the gamut
from the heavy going industrial sounds of Throbbing Gristle,
Maurizio Bianchi, and Nocturnal Emissions, to the "just beautiful
music" of Paul Nagle, Emerald Web, or Bernard Xolotl.
As this service is only available on a mail order basis, I have listed
some of the distributors I havetried, and highly recommend, along
with a brief write-up for each. For more, make that tons, of
additional information and listings be sure to check out Alex
Douglas' Contact List of Electronic Music, the world's most
comprehensive guide to electronic music distribution. A new and
larger edition is coming out this month and is available from some
of the more progressive independent record stores in town or,
from Alex himself, at P.O. Box 86010, North Vancouver, B.C.
V7L 4J5.
FLOWMOTION TAPES: 1 Bently Grove, Meanwood, Leeds LS6
4AT, England.
Ian Dobson's label features the Tangerine Dream influenced work
of Paul Nagle, a tape and booklet by Cosey Fanni Tutti, and the re-
released series of 30 live Throbbing Gristle cassettes as well as
many other interesting tapes.
LUST VERTRIEB: Leuchte 51, 6 ffm 60, Tschormanni, Germany
Walter Truck's label carries everything from guitar oriented pop to
the accessable industrial soundtrack to Jean Paul Sarte's play
"The Flies" by "Die Fliegen."
TAGO MAGO: 52 rue de Sambre et Meuse, 75010 Paris, France
This label, run by Pascal Bussy, carries three cassette/booklet
packages featuring exclusive tracks by "This Heat," "Eyeless in
Gaza," LOI Coxhill, and Tejo Bolten. The booklets include
interviews and artwork by the bands. Future projects include a
look at some new Japanese music as well as a retrospective of '70s
German group; "Can."
•EUROCK: P.O. Box 4181, Torrance, California 90510, U.S.A.
Run by Archie Patterson, Eurock Dist. deals mainly with European
"fusion" bands such as "Magma" or "Eskaton."
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT RECORDS: Hill Cottage, Tollerton, York
Y06 2DS, England
Colin Potter distributes his own cassettes as well as a variety of
compilation tapes/records featuring some very innovative British
musicians of which Trevor Wishart is particularly outstanding.
♦ DATENVERARBIETUNG: Andreas Muller c/o Normal,
Bornhiemerstrasse 31, 5300 Bonn 1, West Germany
Dealing with the extreme side of industrial music (Nocturnal
Emmisions, M.B. et al.) Andreas has produced several excellent
compilation tapes. An open mind is a prerequisite for the
enjoyment of this kind of music. The "Sinn and Form" sampler is a
highly recommended introduction.
• MIRAGE: 614 Southmead Road, Filton, Bristol BS127RF, England
Under the direction of Martin Reed, Mirage distribution has an
excellent selection of Eurock type music and return service is
prompt.
Write for catalogues and/or more information.
"Denotes publisher of new music paper/magazine of same name.
-Mark Mushet
• ELVIS • BOWIE • SINATRA • SKA •
B
E We Pay Top Prices for Rare,
A Clean Records
I     COLLECTOR'S RPM
E      Thousands of albums on sale
S atonly49C!!!
Plus 45's 2/49C !!!
F Sunday, May 1st i
?" 12-5 p.m.
876-8321
4470 Main
685-8841
456 Seymour
• ELLINGTON ^COUNTRY & WESTERN Z DISCORDER   May, 1983
fjjHtl ^mdie$
WAR    U2   (WEA Records)
What a kick, sitting on the
Lions Gate Bridge during rush
hour, forced to listen to "that"
station when what should come
on but New Years Day. U2 never
sounded better as they cut a
clean path through the usual
fodder that passes for music
these days. Nor were the
qualities that elevate them from
the bulk of the pack ever more
pointedly evidenced. With their
intensity, freshness, and determination they breathe a sense
of life and vitality into the
sluggish state of rock. Since
their early days U2 have been
able to weave a heady mix that
combines a straight-forward,
driving sound with a very Irish
sense of the lyrical or mystical.
It's a rare, marring combination
that creates the emotion or,
better yet, the spark that is
central to U2. You can hear it on
something like Eleven O'Clock
Tick-Tock and / Will Follow,
and it comes through loud and
clear on much of War.
War is number three for U2,
and they seem to have regained
the form that was missing on
the rather lackluster October
album. As the bold cover photo
and title suggests, the boy is
growing up. No longerthesame
starry-eyed youth we first
encountered, he has taken a
good look around and seen that
all is not as it should be. If Boy
was an album that dealt with the
rites of passage and the
accompanying confusion, War
is very much one of growth and
decision. The U2 we find on
War has a greater sense of
strength and toughness.
The first track Sunday
Bloody Sunday sets the tone for
the entire album. A crisp,
military beat blends with the
bass to create an undercurrent
that is surprisingly funky. On
top of this The Edge's soaring
guitar and Bono's stirring vocals
add texture and depth to the
overall sound. The electric
violin which joins in halfway is
an effective touch. The song
itself is a cry from the heart
against the senselessness of, in
this case, a very specific
incident that took place in
Derry one January Sunday in
1972 when 13 people were
killed at a rally. It came to be
known as Bloody Sunday,
hence the song title. Safe to say
it's not your average dance
number.
The opening side is given a
strong one, two punch when
Sunday Bloody Sunday is
followed by Seconds. Once
again a martial beat is at the
base of the song, with The Edge
and Bono taking turns on lead
vocals as they succinctly sum
up the threat posed to us all by
nuclear weapons.
Strong stuff indeed! But what
comes across on the LP is not
the usual pessimistic, doom
and gloom rhetoric voiced by
so many these days. Their's is a
PLASTIC SURGERY DISASTERS
Dead Kennedys (Fringe)
America's favorite enemy-of-
the-state Jello Biafra has once
again, along with the rest of the
Dead Kennedy's, produced
another great album full of nifty
songs each of which takes a
scrape at the thin veneer
covering/protecting some of
the more unpleasant aspects of
our "democratic" and "free"
ways of life. Any band that so
rigidly adheres to its aim of
purging society of ignorance
and apathy must surely be
above criticism. Well, at least on
the level of principle. The band
must certainly be proud of the
fact that they have, almost
singlehandedly, spawned a
new generation of North
American punk bands all with
the same thing to say and the
same way of saying it. The
problem lies with the fact that,
along with these bands, the
Dead Kennedys themselves
haven't progressed beyond the
hardcore thrash of their early
days. Holiday in Cambodia, a
major breakthrough for North
American punk, has raised
people's expectations above
that which is realistic. The Dead
Kennedys   have   always   had
PAGE 4
(dare I say it?) "energy", a fast
paced, aggressive sound that
for this sort of band, as with
Vancouver's own Subhumans,
is an essential feature of the
music and is therefore somewhat limiting. That's fine by me
as long as they continue to
produce first rate songs in that
mold.
The album itself contains
their two most recent singles
Bleed For Me and Halloween.
The subject matter ranges from
the usual corporatecrimetothe
West Coast's hip-easy lifestyle
to the fact that so many of
today's college/university
students wish merely to
immerse themselves in money
and a nice safe career not
caring a damn to think about,
much less act on, our real
problems. The album also
contains a 26-page booklet of
Jello's and Winston Smith's
collages of newspaper and
magazine clippings that are
clever, sickening, and, most
importantly, thought provoking. And just think! It's all in
the name of entertainment. Buy
ItiiS album.
--MarK Mushet
much fuller picture with songs
like Sunday Bloody Sunday,
Seconds, or Surrender being
contrasted by Red Light or Like
a Song where U2's underlying
belief that there is something
more which shines through.
War is a strong, solid album
that showcases a band who
sound as if they have hit their
stride. They exude confidence
and sincerity throughout the
album. Best of all there is a
healthy sense of experimentation in evidence, especially
on side two where they play
around with the various
ingredients that make up the U2
sound. Be it in the staggered
rhythms of The Refugee or the
use of horns on Red Light,
these twists perhaps point to
some of the place U2 might be
heading to in the future.
A few off-the-cuff remarks to
wrap things up....Steve Lilly-
white's production is once
again right on the mark. He
creates a sense of depth and
space which lends itself
beautifully to the dynamics of
the band. I hope it's a five-way
split because he's much a
member of the band as the
other four....Nice to see The
Edge stepping forth for some
lead vocals on Seconds. His
clear, bright harmonies were
too often unnoticed....See the
band live. They are in town on
the 25th of May, and the fire and
excitement of U2 live is
matched by few.
-Sedro Wooley
DANCING IN HEAVEN
Walter Steding (Animal Records)
Walter Steding's debut
album, on Chris Stein's Animal
Records label, looks like the
typical New York art-scene
musician's record. Although no
big names play on the eleven
songs that make up the LP,
Walter has chosen to put on the
back cover photos of himself
with a number of artists who
one might call "personalities":
Andy Warhol, Chris Stein,
Debbie Harry, David Byrne,
Robert Fripp, even Ron Wood
and Keith Richard. Whether
displaying that you have
famous friends is a cheap
marketing ploy or a way of
showing that your talent has
been recognized by the finest in
your field, in his music
Steding's association with the
likes of Byrne and Stein has had
negative and positive results.
Walter Steding's main
instrument is the violin; he also
handles synthesizer and most
of the vocals. His violin is what
gives most of the tracks an
individual flavour. If your first
reaction is to think that Walter
must be quite an "arty" guy, you
would be absolutely right. At
his best Walter creates a sound
reminiscent of many early 70's
British bands that employed
traditionally classical instruments in a rock format —
Renaissance is an example.
Steding never displays art-rock
pretensions, however. His
songs, most of them about
three minutes long, are very
simple compositions, and the
band's basic, yet not boring,
performances never make the
music sound overblown. On
tunes like Crusade, Secret Spy
and the rather funky You Got It.
Steding has taken a lesson from
Talking Heads, especially '77,
in paring down songs so their
basic messages come across.
Where Walter's simplicity
hurts him is when he strives for
the Great Disposable Pop Song
— several tracks on Dancing in
Heaven should be disposed of
immediately. His simplistic
lyrics here wind up sounding
simple-minded; he doesn't have
the wit of David Byrne and
with the popular arrangements
there's absolutely no substance
for these songs. Walter's
"serious" violin playing just
doesn't quite fit when he's
telling us how much fun it is
when he's sitting in his room.,
One is reminded of a band from
somewhere like Finland or
Yugoslavia who can't speak
English and can play rock and
roll little better.
What rescues Dancing in
Heaven from being a candidate
for the trash compactor is the
solid playing of Steding's band,
made up of relatively unknown
musicians. They provide an
adequate yet almost always
interesting foil for Walter's
violin. All the best songs on the
album have some outstanding
instrument, be it the bass on
You Got It, synthesizer on the
title track or James White-like
saxophone on Secret Spy. *The
production on the record is
great considering that, except
for one track, Walter did the
whole record himself.
*The vocals of Karen Geniece
are terrific on Secret Spy,
toning down Walter's rather
whiny delivery.
Even though this first LP's
flaws make it unworthy of a
piece of my paycheque,
Steding's work in the future
may deserve attention. When
he has found the right type of
song to carry his very different
violin and vocal style he could
make some very memorable
records.
—Fiona MacKay
SUBTERRANEAN
JUNGLE
The Ramones
(Sire Records)
The kid had felt the gnawing
hunger all day and so it came as
no surprise when he found
himself in front of Dino's Rock
'n Roll Pizzaria. He walked
determinedly into the tiny
restaurant, sat down on one of
the wooden stools and grabbed
a menu. He looked at the pizzas,
trying to decide which would
best satisfy his hunger. The
Jam pizza was usually good but
he noticed that Dino had taken
it off the menu. Perhaps a PIL
pizza? No, it would probably
give him indigestion later, and
the Culture Club pizza wasn't
filling enough. He was just
about to settle for an Iggy Pop
pizza when an old favorite
caught his eye, the Ramones
pizza. He thought about it then
called Dino over to the table
and placed his order.
Dino looked at the kid and
shook his head. "Sorry kid, it's
too hard to make any more. The
ingredients keep having to be
changed and it just doesn't
taste the way it used to."
"What?" The kid didn't
understand.
Dino looked sad. "Have you
heard their new album kid,
Subterranean Jungle? It really
tells the whole story. A new
producer again. Third time in as
many albums. This time it's
Ritchie Cordell, same guy who
did Joan Jett. I mean the boys
must want a hit single bad. But
it doesn't work I tell you. It's like
too much cheese on the pizza.
Cordell has smothered Joey's
vocals, you can barely makeout
the words."
"But what about the guitars?"
the kid asked.
"Oh sure, they still have the
same Ramones' buzz, but
there's bloody layers of the
damn things." Dino raised his
arms in frustration. "They even
have a guitar solo on 'What Do
Ya Do?' "
But does it still taste like the
Ramones?" The kid looked
anxious.
"Well yeah, certain pieces.
Especially 'Psycho Therapy'
and 'Everytime I Eat Vegetables
I Think of You.' But in some
places, like 'Time Has Come
Today.' it tastes almost
like....like an Aerosmith pizza."
The kid appeared crestfallen.
"You see kid," Dino
continued, "it's all in the lyrics.
Ramones' songs, like the
pizzas, used to be trashy, like
Mom's leftovers, but they still
tasted good and filled you up.
Songs like 'Cretin Hop' and 'I
Wanna Be Sedated.' It was a
taste you remembered and
could take anywhere, from a
party to the beach to the car.
Now though, it's more
processed. Sorta like instant
pizza mixes. And I guess if you
eat enough of them you'll learn
to like them. I know I eventually
came to like the last two
Ramones' pizzas. It's just a
matter of time. But the old
taste? Well, I'm afraid it might
be gone for good."
The kid sighed and looked up
at Dino, a tear forming in his
eye. "What the hell," he said,
"bring me a Ramones' pizza, for
old times sake."
—The Twisted Panda DISCORDER   May, 1983
Monday through Saturday:
MINI-CONCERTS:
Music and commentary focussing on one band or musician
for about 1 hour at 8 pm.
Monday through Sunday:
FINAL VINYL:
(It's not really final, it just sounds good). Every day of the
week an album is played in its entirety beginning at 11 pm.
Monday: Jazz Album
Tuesday: New Album
Wednesday: New Album
Thursday: Import Album
Friday: Classic Album
Saturday: CITR Number One Playlist Album
Sunday: Neglected Album
Weekends:
RANDOM RADIO:
"After hours" radio until at least 4 ar
requests. Friday and Saturday nights
THE FOLK SHOW:
Folk music from around the world. 10:00 ar
CITR PLAYLIST SHOW:
Selections from CITR's weekly albui
are counted down. 3:00 pm -
LAUGHING MATTERS:
A documentary series on th<
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm. Sundays.
MUSIC OF OUR TIME:
Expose yourself to modern classical music. 8:30am - 12:15pm
SUNDAY BRUNCH: Sundays.
Prose and poetry readings. 12:15 pm - 12:45 pm
REGGAE SHOW:
The Rocker's Show 12:45 pm - 3 pm Sundays.
RABBLE WITHOUT A PAUSE:
An alternative to CITR's alternative programming. Listen for
the "unknown album feature." 3 - 6 pm Sundays
SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE AT 8:
Recordings of live concerts. 8 pm - 9 pm
Call CAT-BITS for
- 12 noon Saturdays.
ind singles playlists
6 pm. Saturdays.
i history of recorded comedy.
MAY MINI CONCERTS
MON
2
THE WALKER BROTHERS
TUES
3
JAMES WHITE/THE CONTORTIONS
WED-
4
DELROY WILSON
THURS
5
ORANGE JUICE
FRI
6
THE RAMONES
SAT
7
GODLEY AND CREME
MON
9
THE FLAMING GROOVIES
TUES
10
KATE BUSH
WED
11
NEVILLE LIVINGSTONE
THURS
12
T-REX
FRI
13
interview with ULTRAVOX
SAT
14
neglected CRAMPS trax
MON
16
BE-BOP DELUXE
TUES
17
THE THE
WED
18
LEE PERRY
THURS
19
MAGAZINE
FRI
20
THE 2-TONE LABEL
SAT
21
LINTON KWESI JOHNSON
MON
23
THE PRETTY THINGS
TUES
24
RIP RIG AND PANIC
WED
25
LESLIE KONG
THURS
26
THE BARRACUDAS
FRI
27
THE PASSIONS
SAT
28
THE CLASH'S reggae trax
MON
30
HEAVEN 17
TUES
31
various rock stars coming to untimely
deaths of one sort or another.
SU.OAY
MONDAY              TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
SATURDAY
ram
—    	
8am
|
9am
10am
THE
'■vv-,.
PUBLIC     AFFAI
R   S
-^
OF
~
Irun?h
THE
REGGAE
1pm
2pm
3pm
WITHOUT A
PLAYLIST
4 pm
5 pm
SPm
7 pm
8 pm
N|!fvET
9 pm
FAST
FORWARD
J
i,
10pm
11 pm
VINYL
vIKyl
vInyl       I       XL
FAST
FORWARD
™j™
Midnigh,
RANDOM
I
RRAD,0M
4 am
H-OFF<
IR    Listener
Request Lin
3 228-2487
I                       j   R^AR   ALTER
I |    MUSIC  PROGRAM
CITR PROGRAM
PROFILE :
Generic Review deals
generally with the mainstream
in film and theatre in
Vancouver; something different
as opposed to our musical
selection. Many say that
Generic Review should seek
out the unusual and avante
garde in the city. They feel that
this would fit our overall
outlook much better. It would
however represent a denial of
our unstated purpose which is
to deal critically with the world
all around us.
Society is reflected in its
major media. What could be
more major than a Madison
Avenue slicked up major movie
release. Using one media to
critically treat another perhaps
Generic Review
more influential media is an
effective means of learning
more about society. Much of
the music at the "Mighty R"
deals very critically with
society. It does not sit
complacently on the shelf
patting itself on the back while
accepting and condoning a
world full of garbage, violence
and stupidity. Therefore why
should Generic Review deny
itself a critical jab at the
mainstream. Hopefully films
like "An Officer and a Gentleman", "The Outsiders" or
"Spring Break" and the ideas
behind them will get what they
deserve on Generic Review.
Equally important is discussing  something   a   little  more
concrete like "Coup de
Torchon", "Diner" or "Betrayal".
The purpose behind
criticizing film is not so much to
recommend or disapprove but
to initiate a wider discussion
and assessment of the film's
ideas and values. These values
no matter how gratuitous or
banal must be recognized for
what they are if we are to
progress and improve. The
music at CITR identifies and
focuses the problems of
society. Generic Review undertakes a similar responsibility.
The cinema reproduces life.
Sometimes it is satirical,
sometimes not.
What matters to Generic
Review is not so much whether
a film is unncessaryorwrongor
"au Current." It is the why, the
foundation below that film.
Generic Review does not
concern itself just with the
surface production values of a
film. That is usually quite well-
handled bv other media in the
city. Generic Review tries to get
at the soft underbelly of the
film. To test its validity or non-
validity as a statement of reality
or necessity. After all one must
identify the symptoms before
one can treat the disease.
-Joseph Edward March
You can hear about the latest
films on Generic Review,
Monday through Friday at 11:30
a.m. and 6:45 p.m.
PAGES DISCORDER   May, 1983
FULLY LICENSED
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DINNERS—
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2946 W. Broadway, Vancouver
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owuges
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SUIT YOURSELF'
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Phonograph Dispensary
Imports
New Wave
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Children's
New & Used LP's
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Radio Shows
If you hear it on CITR you can buy
it at Charles Bogle
RECORD SALE
OU /O   Urr all used albums
Every Single Domestic LP    OaOO
*    S1.00   0FFa,,MPORTS
Fri., May 13
11 am - 9 pm
Sat., May 14
11 am - 6 pm
Sun., May 15
Noon - 5 pm
ClnnRepOrt: Albums- May 83
DISTRIBUTOR
1 PHIL SMITH
2 DEAD KENNEDYS
3 THE MEMBERS
4 THE BIRTHDAY PARTY
5 ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN
6 U2
7 RANK & FILE
8 RAMONES
9 WALL OF VOODOO
10 BLACK UHURU
11 FAD GADGET
12 VARIOUS ARTISTS
13 DOA
14 FUN BOY 3
15 THE UNDERTONES
16 THE STRANGLERS
17 SHRIEKBACK
18 SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES
19 NEW AGE STEPPERS
20 BOW WOW WOW
21 LOU REED
22 UB40
23 DAVID BOWIE
24 PIG BAG
25 THE BANGLES
26 THE SOUND
27 REVILLOS
28 GABI DELGADO
29 THE DAMNED
30 EURYTHMICS
31 JOAN ARMATRADING
32 MARIANNE FAITHFULL
33 THOMPSON TWINS
34 BAUHAUS
35 THE BARRACUDAS
36 JAH WOBBLE
37 MICHAEL SMITH
38 OMD
39 RIP RIG & PANIC
40 SPEAR OF DESTINY
The Phil Smith Album
Plastic Surgery Disasters
Uprhythm, Downbeat
The Bad Seed EP
Porcupine
War
Sundown
Subterranean Jungle
Call of the West
The Dub Factor
Under the Flag
Pillows and Prayers
War on 45
Waiting
The Sin of Pride
Feline
Care
A Kiss in the Dreamhouse
Foundation Steppers
When The Going Gets Tough...
Legendary Hearts
Live
Let's Dance
Lend An Ear
The Bangles
All Fall Down
Attack
Mistress
Strawberries '
Sweet Dreams Are Made Of This
The Key
A Child's Adventure
Side Kicks
The Sky's Gone Out
Mean Time
Bedroom Album
Mi Cyaan Believe It
Dazzle Ships
Attitude
Grapes of Wrath
ZULU
FRINGE
ARISTA (US)
4AD (UK)
WEA
WEA
WEA
WEA
A&M
MANGO (US)
MUTE (UK)
CHERRY RED (UK)
FRINGE
CHRYSALIS (UK)
EMI (UK)
CBS
Y (UK)
POLYGRAM
U-SOUND (UK)
RCA
POLYGRAM
EMI AMERICA
Y (UK)
FAULTY (US)
WEA (BRD)
SUPERVILLE (UK)
VIRGIN (UK)
BRONZE (UK)
RCA (UK)
A&M
WEA
POLYGRAM
BB (UK)
CLOSER (FR)
LAGO 3 (FR)
MANGO (US)
POLYGRAM
VIRGIN (UK)
BURNING ROME (UK)
INTERNATIONAL FILMS
COME TO VANCOUVER
4430 W.
10th Avenue,
224-0232
Vancouver, B.C.
Trying to put Vancouver on
the Canadian film map is not an
easy task. Leonard Schein,
owner of the Ridge Theatre,
believes it can be done and to
this end he is holding The 2nd
Annual Vancouver International Film Festival from May
13 until June 2. This year the
festival is featuring 62 films (as
compared to last year's 31)
from 22 nations and will be held
in two theatres, The Ridge, and
Robson Square.
The festival is honoured this
year in that it will feature several
North American premieres, as
well as many Canadian
premieres, and the world
premiere of Canadian film
maker Jack Darcy's Deserters.
The festival is currently the
largest in Western Canada and
Schein hopes to eventually
achieve the prominence of the
Toronto or Montreal festivals
(both of which are 100%
government funded whereas
the Vancouver festival is totally
private).
But the true value of any
festival can only be judged by
its films and Schein has a wide
variety with several films
definitely worth getting excited
about. Included among these
are Android (USA 1982), a sci-fi
film debut by director Aaron
Lipstadt starring Klaus
Kinski. Smithereens (USA
1982) is Susan Seidelman's film
which tells the story of a young
girl trying to break into the male
dominated world of rock music.
In a similar vein is Starstruck
(Australia) a film described as
similar to The Rocky Horror
Picture Show, it tells the story
of a struggling young band in
Australian bars. A soundtrack
album from this film is about to
be released on A&M Records.
Another type of music is
featured in Koyaanisqatsi, a
Hopi Indian word for "out of
harmony." This film has no
spoken words and attempts to
show how the white man is out
of step with his environment. It
features Hopi Indian music in
Dolby sound. This film has had
only one previous showing in
New York where it sold out
Radio City Music Hall. Also
noteable is Abel Gance's
Napoleon, also with a dolby
soundtrack, and Night of
Shooting Stars (Italy 1982)
which won first prize at the
Berlin Festival.
Music in different forms is
highlighted in several other
festival films, such as Spetters
(Holland 1982), an examination
of the Dutch music scene by
Paul Verhoven, director of
Soldier of Orange. As well there
are two British films, Kids Are
United and Listen To London,
which deal with the same theme
only in Britain. Taking Tiger
Mountain is a Welsh sci-fi film
with a soundtrack by Roxy
Music. Reggae provides the
sound for Jamaican Heartland
and the Canadian produced
Imagine the Sound focusses on
the world of jazz.
Other films which will
probably be very popular are
John Sayles' Lianna, Robert
Altman's Health, The Alternative Miss World (Britain 1982)
starring Divine and Little Nell,
and Kamikaze '89, a German
film which stars but is not
directed   by   the  late  Werner
Rainier Fassbinder. As well
political films from China and El
Salvador expect to do well.
One of the strongest areas of
the festival is its selection of
Canadian-made films. Aside
from the premiere of Deserters
the festival has Threshold, for
which Donald Sutherland won
a Genie for best actor, Sweet
Lies and Tender Oaths,and
Wild Flowers, both of which
were nominated for Genie
awards. Poetry in Motion,
Imagine the Sound, and Lucky
Star round out the Canadian
line-up with several of the films
having only been shown once
or twice in Canada so far.
By supporting the festival
Schein hopes to increase
attention directed towards
Canadian films, particularly
those made in western Canada.
As well, he would like to see
Vancouver eventually become
the film capital of Canada and
sees no reason why it couldn't
although it's a task which can
only be accomplished slowly.
Most of Canada pretends the
west coast doesn't exist. But
some of the most exciting
things in art, music, and film are
happening on the west coast.
It's a lot of hard work, just
slogging it out to show
Vancouver can do it," says
Schein.
And 80-page brochure
outlining all the films will soon
be available and advance
tickets for all the shows go on
sale at the Ridge and VTC on
May 2. Individual shows are
$4.50 and a Gold Pass can be"
bought for $49.50 (although it
doesn't guarantee admission to
all shows). —Dean Pelkey Ort: Singles- May 83
1 MALCOLM McLAREN
2 THE THE
3 NEW ORDER
4 SPEAR OF DESTINY
5 SHRIEKBACK
6 RUTS DC
7 THE TEARDROP EXPLODES
8 UB40
9 DUB RIFLES
10 ACTIONAUTS
11 REDRUM
12 SPLIFF
13 EDDY GRANT
14 STYLE COUNCIL
15 TALKING HEADS
16 IMPLOG
17 MALARIA
18 POPULAR HISTORY OF SIGNS
19 LEISURE PROCESS
20 ORANGE JUICE
21 OFFICE
22 GABI DELGADO
23 BAUHAUS
24 RIP RIG & PANIC
25 DAMMERUNG
26 BIG COUNTRY
27 SOUTHERN DEALTH CULT
28 THE CURE
29 SPECIAL AKA
30 THE CHAMELEONS
Soweto
Perfect
Blue Monday
A Flying Scotsman
Lined Up
Weak Heart
You Disappear From View
I've Got Mine
Stand
Hash Assasin
Danger/Never Know Your Name
Blick Vecht (Glance Away)
Electric Avenue
Speak Like A Child
Swamp
Breakfast/She Creatures
Your Turn To Run
Dancing With Ideas
Cashflow
Rip It Up
Physical
History Of A Kiss
She's in Parties
Beat the Beast
German Werewolf in Auschwitz
Fields on Fire
Moya
Let's Go To Bed
War Crimes
Pleasure and Pain
Charisma (UK)
SOME BIZARRE (UK)
POLYGRAM
BURNING ROME (UK)
Y(UK)
BOHEMIAN (UK)
MERCURY (UK)
DEP. INT. (UK)
BOOM
"DEMO TAPE**
**DEMOTAPE**
GEMA (BRD)
EPIC
POLYDOR (UK)
WEA
LOG (US)
JUNGLE (UK)
MELODIA (UK)
EPIC
POLYDOR (UK)
SWITCH
VIRGIN (UK)
BB (UK)
VIRGIN (UK)
"DEMO TAPE**
PHONOGRAM (UK)
SITUATION (UK)
WEA
TU TUNE (UK)
STATIK (UK)
DISCORDER   May, 1983
IN SEARCH OF A FOOL
Rabble Without A Pause's
Murray Cahen and Steve
Hendry took to the streets a
fortnight after the equinox in
search of someone just a little
bit daffier than the rest of us. A
fool was their quest and armed
with the best of CITR's technology, the boarded "Chopper
102" on the tarmac outside the
studios.
Cahen said to Sky King the
pilot, "Take us to a fool."
"Negative," he replied. "But I
can drop you with some folks
who are protesting against
one."
"That'll do," Hendry interjected.
Outside the American
Consulate at Hastings and
Bute, they encountered a
milling crowd of twenty
pacifists asking all of us to
refuse the Cruise Missile test
proposed for Cold Lake,
Alberta. The batteries in their
cassette deck running low,
Hendry and Cahen plunged
into the crowd looking for a
dictatypist. Unable to find one,
they settled for a spokesperson who was a man.
"American defence makes
me nervous!" he shouted.
"How so?" Cahen shouted
back.
"....5, 6, 7, 8 we don't want
to radiate!" came the crowd's
chant.
"You see, Ronald Reagan is
leading us to the brink of a
nuclear war. His policies are
clearly foolhardy!" said the
spokesperson.
"Foolhardy?" interrupted an
interested Hendry. "Do you
mean to say the President is a
fool?"
"His policies are foolish,
therefore....he musf be a fool",
chimed in a former law student
in the crowd.
"Well what kind of fool are
you after anyway?" the
spokesperson queried.
"We're not sure," they said as
their batteries ran down.
Turning his back on the
chanting crowd, Cahen said,
"Steve, we need a real fool, not
just someone who's foolhardy."
"Right," said Hendry, "the
more traditional type, closer to
a village idiot."
Sky King lowered two pairs of
stilts as the radio men put on
their large pointed hats and
polka dot jackets. As they
stilted into the distance with
their talking dog and pet
umbrella, Hendry and Cahen
wondered if fools weren't just a
dream from inside the walls of a
radio station.
THE PHIL SMITH STORY
The most difficult part of
artistic expression would
undoubtedly seem to be those
taxing moments leading up to
its intangible creative
inception, regardless of the
mode whether it be the written
word, music, painting, or
sculpture. If the chemistry
clicks and the interaction
between the integral components combusts, then it is likely
that the creation will propel
itself at a speed and in a
direction deemed natural by its
own power of existence....so
what? you may ask. No, this is
not the Pseuds' Corner of
Discorder, but an introduction
to a local music luminary, Phil
Smith.
Smith, a long-time catalyst in
the Vancouver music 'scene'
and instigator of the gone, but
not forgotten, Wasted Lives and
Jimbo and the Lizard Kings,
and currently Blanche Whitman
and Corsage, is not one to limit
himself or his musical projects
within the guise of a structured
master plan for popular
success.
"People are going to like you,
or they're not." It is a simple
statement made by someone
who believes that the public's
tastes, particularly in popular
music, are not dictated by
stupidity or ignorance. Smith is
an ambitious person and his
enthusiasm is aided and
abetted by his talented group of
associates who seemingly
share Smith's optimism that
things are flowing along quite
nicely, thank you. It is not a
force beyond control, but, as
stated above, one that is
motivated by its own positive
existence.
To this date, Smith has
recently released a compilation
album on Zulu Records
featuring studio tracks from
Corsage, Blanche Whitman,
Wasted Lives and one live
veritable classic from Jimbo
and the Lizard Kings recorded
at Budstock '81. The overall
sound of The Phil Smith Album
is exceptionally good, the tapes
being mastered in New York
and the vinyl manufactured in
Los Angeles. Smith celebrated
the album release with a two-
night stint at the Luv-a-Fair late
in March, featuring the current
line-up of Corsage and Blanche
Whitman, along with the
appearance of special guest
musicians.
Witnessing a live performance by Corsage more than
adequately communicates the
vigour and intensity that is
evident on vinyl, enhanced by
the added dimension of visuals.
Smith's theatrical antics and
rough-edged vocals make him
one of the most appealing and
entertaining performers to front
any local band, past or present.
And what would that be worth
without playing with some of
the best musicians in
Vancouver, a sentiment
sounded by Smith. "The songs
are only as good as the people
who play them."
It was his desire to write
songs which motivated Smith
to take up the piano at age 14,
and he currently shares the
composing responsibilities
with   Bill   Napier-Hemy.  What
kind of songs do they write and
Corsage perform? Most
definitely, the music defies
categorical description which
is further evidence of a healthy
and hybrid music scene present
in Vancouver.
Perhaps one could venture to
cite a number of comparisons,
or even influences, to the
Corsage 'sound', but such
descriptive tactics rarely do
justice to music that is able to
stand on its own without being
derivative or totally obscure.
Smith does note that he and the
other band members were avid
listeners to the 'heavy metal'
genre of music back in their
high school daze of the early
1970's, but Corsage bears little
resemblance to their adolescent tastes. Rock 'n roll,
certainly....simple and direct...
infused with an unrestrained
energy and a sense of humour.
You just know these people are
having fun.
And for Phil Smith, anyway,
that seems to be what it is all
about. He takes what he is
doing seriously, but not
himself. This attitude is perhaps
what has enabled Smith to
remain actively involved in the
Vancouver 'scene' for several
years without falling victim to a
sense of disillusionment that
has befallen many talented
persons. It is the ephemeral
nature of popular music which
appeals to Smith, and he seems
to be one to take advantage of
the rapid transitions evident in
the music industry today. This
is not to say the man is trend-
conscious no,    not   in    the
least. He is abhorred by the
immediate acceptance this side
of the Atlantic of the new
English music because of its
inextricable association with
'trendiness' and fashion. Smith
discredits much of the English
music because of this, and
claims that south of the border
is where people are much more
interested in making music for
its own sake.
Does he have his eyes set on
the Sun Belt?.... "Los Angeles is
the place I'd rather be " The
pace  is faster, the lights are
brighter....and you can buy cold
cans of beer in your corner
grocery store.
But for now, Smith is enthusiastically involved with Corsage
and making the best of
available resources. He is
currently filming a video of The
Shame I Feel, one of the
stronger songs on the album,
and has plans of recording a
Corsage EP with a tentative
June release. The group will
appear on the CKVU Vancouver
Show May 26, and follow
their television appearance
with a gig at the Soft
Rock venue May 27. Further
live dates are in the
offing to coincide with their
summer record release, but
Smith is wary of over-exposing
Corsage to the point of
saturation. Hopefully though,
just as the flicker of the flame
ignites into a great ball of fire,
Vancouver will be seeing and
hearing a lot more of Phil Smith
and Corsage.
--Michael Shea
VANCOUVER'S:
L :
> #1 Sound in i
Modern Music;
1275 Seymour       Phone 685-3288     :
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