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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 1984-01-01

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  ■A guide to CITR fm 102
"The Only Free Cheese Is In The Trap"
Why Braineater, you ask?
Because from every bunch of
starry-eyed money-grubbing,
young capitalistic music machine "artists," there is (or
has to be) one artist who
thrives solely on the act of
creation. And this artist
should exist and produce independently of outside influences and pressures such as
record companies and big
radio stations. I do not mean
to suggest that the artist
under question, I Braineater,
exists autonomously, but I
suggest that his work is just
that - his. He originated the
Braineaters back in the late
seventies and has held his
ideals firmly in place through
the various incarnations that
went under the Braineaters
name. And today he is still in
full swing, actually on the
upswing- a sell-out show of his
paintings and sculptures at
the Unit/Pitt gallery last
month; a well received album
of his music reaching no. 1 at
CITR; and many future plans
which include some upcoming
live gigs.
I Braineater (aka Jim Cum)
has proliferated equally in his
music and his artwork. Art
displayed in his shows is
accompanied by his music,
and the music on his record is
accompanied by his artwork
on the cover. The relationship
between the two does not stop
there however; listen to the
record and you will visualize
his images, and vice versa.
"Basically I find the underlying elements that drive a
person are the same in either
one. You discover that a lot of
underlying techniques, the
approach, the way you piece it
together, turn out to be the
same, too."
Speaking about technique,
it is interesting to note that
Jim's album / here, where you
was recorded by himself on a
four-track recorder. He played
all the instruments, did all the
vocals, and worked all the
production. And to top it all
off, it was recorded in an
empty room at his mom's
house in East Van. Even the
original pressing was mastered by Jim, with the mass
pressing made by some outside firm for a small fee. All of
this helped to keep the cost of
the disc down, thus the $5 - $6
price it is being offered at in
local shops. This is all part of
the idea behind doing it
yourself and keeping control
of your own product. But what
if a corporate ear is perked
and takes an interest in I
Braineater's music? What sort
of reaction would this bring
up?
"No particular interest. I
don't think those people
would be interested in what
I'm doing anyway. If it ever
starts to make any money,
then maybe I'll think about it.
On top of all that, they'll want
someone else to do production
and mix it for you, and I think
- I don't let anyone produce
my paintings or mix the colors
for me. When I paint I do
everything from top to bottom, beginning to end, and
that attitude spills over for me
into the music thing."
Once again the link between
his music and his art work
arises. This seems natural; if
you have two activities that
you put all your energies into,
they will both carry influences
of the other. But are people
aware when they see an I
Braineater art piece that it is
the work of the same artist as
the record that they hear on
CITR and see in their favorite
shops?
"They may or may not. I
think people are getting this
mysterious bare bones thing
i that just walks in and goes this
is the way it is. And for those
that can appreciate it, that's
really good. But I'm going to
put some more detail into the
cover, maybe add some para-
phenalia, so those who didn't
understand it can now enjoy it
too."
Look for a possible 'comic
book' sort of package with
words to the songs included in
the upcoming pressings.
One thing that is most
enjoyableaboutjim'salbum is
the local feeling to it. By local,
I don't mean the down home
type, but a reflection of ideas
and attitudes that are shared
by some who live in this wet
budding city. Don't look for
obvious generalizations about
west coast living though,
these are ideas and attitudes
about ideas and attitudes.
"I think that the songs are
all quite sincere. I tried not to
say things I did not believe in,
I tried to say things in the way
that I believed them, and not
to go along with the group
thought, or peer thought
Davie Street was my impression of all the kid hookers on
Davie Street, the way I see
them, not the way they are
written up in the Province, or
in some social redeeming
paper, I see them in the song.
That's the mood, the feeling
from them, that's my reality,
that's my painting of them."
It is not an ominous impression though, it doesn't carry
the 'end of the world but we
can change it' attitude that
certain other bands carry. You
can listen and judge for yourself.
"I would like to be thought
of as the person who sits there
and is thinking about the
subject of state of the world a
little longer, someone who is
more of a diplomat. One who
is not so ready to take sides
but rather more interested in
explaining them. I'm not interested in saying this is the
way it is or that's that. Every
band loves to get up there and
say 'this is the way life is,' and
I just think I don't know guys.
"I used to look to groups to
personify my feelings, seeing
who there was in an avenue
that has a chance to say a lot.
But its frustrating, I see a lot
of tunnelvision going on,
bands acting the way they
think the kids want them to
act. But with the Braineater
thing I don't want to do that."
The Braineater 'thing' as he
put it will include some upcoming live gigs, with a few
extra people brought in who
share a basis of ideas in
relation to Jim's. Possibly
they will interpret these ideas
through their own experience
and alter the Braineater
'sound.'
"I think the basic thing I'll
put together is a simple
doctrine, with these rules,
with these directions, and
then leave the rest open to
them. I just want a few
guidelines, in terms of production simplicity so we can
get it out before we get tired
of it. That was the problem
before ... too much practise
and the excitement and meaning of why you are doing it
becomes lost. This new band
is going to be almost improv,
it will not necessarily be
decided what's going to
happen on stage. Songs will
not start and stop, they will be
rapped around the feel of the
audience."
Just when you thought you
were beginning to catch on, it
changes again. First it's on
form, then it's onto another ...
constantly changing ... adapting ... growing. New ideas
come in and they don't have to
be shot down because they
don't fit the format, all you
have to do is change the
format. Music and art are
constantly changing forms
and if artists do not act
likewise they will be left
behind.
I Braineater is an artist who
thrives on unpredictability.
His original ideas may always
be present, but they represent
the change itself. And in order
to have the ability to change,
adapt and create, the artist
must have complete control
over his work. This is the
result of taking care of business (as another local put it
once) in every way. For this up
and coming Vancouver artist
and musician, art and music
are forms of expression and
not solely a capitalist enterprise. The creation is the
purpose - the commerce is a
reaction.
— Robert Shea
page 1
 DISCORDER Jan 1984
EDITOR:
Michael Shea
LAYOUT:
Dave Ball
Chris Dafoe
Sue Redfern
Michael Shea
ADVERTISING:
Harry Hertscheg
Dave Ball
DISTRIBUTION: '
Vijay Sondhi
Harry Hertscheg
CONTRIBUTORS:
I, Braineater
Robert Shea
Chris Dafoe
Steve Robertson
Gord Badanic
Michael Shea
Les Davis
Elspeth Robinson
Joe Naylor
Mark Mushet
Jason Grant
Sukhvinder Johal
Hilary Russell
DISCORDER is a monthly publication
brought to you by the student Radio
Society of the Univeristy of British
Columbia. DISCORDER provides a
guide to CITR Radio, which broadcasts
throughout the Vancouver area at FM
101.9. CITR is also available in
Mission, Maple Ridge, Coquitlam,
Port Coquitlam, Richmond, Burnaby,
North Vancouver, West Vancouver and
Vancouver on FM cable at 100.0. CITR
transmits its signal with a power of 49
watts from the Gage Towers on the
UBC campus.
DISCORDER is distributed throughout the Vancouver area at over 130
locations. If you would like to distribute free copies of DISCORDER at
your place of business or if you are
interested in obtaining any information
about advertising in DISCORDER,
contact Harry Hertscheg at 228-3017.
General business enquiries concerning
CITR or information about renting the
CITR Mobile Sound System is also
available at 228-3017. The request line
is 228-2487 or 228-CITR.
DISCORDER   is   distributed   at   the
following business locations:
Point Grey
Charles Bogle Phonograph Dispensary
Duthie Books
Frank's Records
University Pharmacy
Video Stop
The Video Store
KUsilano
Black Swan Records
Broadway Video & Sound
Deluxe Junk
Hollywood Theatre
Natural Foods
Octopus Books
Ridge Theatre
Scorpio Records
Soft Rock Cafe
Videomatica
Zulu Records
West End
The Bay Theatre
Benjamin's Funky Cafe
Benjamin's II
Camfari's
Denman Market
Downtown Disc Distributors
English Bay Books
Manhattan Books
Rentertainment Rent-a-Record
Downtown
A&A Recoros
Arts Club on Seymour
Black Market
Collectors RPM Records
Concert Box Offices
Duthie Books
Gandydancer
Kelly's Records
Luv-A-Fair
Towne Cinema
Vancouver Ticket Centre
liastown
be-8op Beatwear
Cabbages & Kinx
Deluxe Junk
Golden Era Clothing
Lux  Theatre
Smilin' Buddha Cabaret
Ya-Ya's
North Short
A&A Records
Kelly's Records
Rave Records
Sam the Record Man
DISCORDER is also distributed
throughout the UBC campus and other
Lower Mainland campuses, as well as
various community centres and Vancouver public libraries.
Letters from/to the Airhead
Well kids, after a wait of 35
years it's finally here: 1984.
And what is Discorder going
to do about it? Look back on
1983.
It's not fear of the future,
the terror of Orwell's scenario
that directs our eyes to the
past. 1983 was an important
year for alternative music and
for CITR.
1983 saw the appearance of
the paper you hold in your
hands. Unlike the folks in
commercial radio we can't
afford big bus ads or billboards. Being non-commercial it would be silly for us to
send pricey pollsters around
to your houses. Discorder was
a way to let people know that,
with a little effort they could
listen to a radio station that
offered something different. It
hasn't been an easy year but
Discorder has come through
as a success. We'd like to
thank all those who helped out
- readers, writers and advertisers.
1983 was also the year that
commercial radio discovered
that it wasn't 1975 anymore
and that "New Music" (yes, I
know it's a term that's starting to become as meaningful
as New Wave) was not only
hip, but profitable. Since
CITR had developed something of a reputation for being
the first to play "New Music"
this increased interest on the
part of commercial radio left
us in a curious position.
The period it took radio
programmers to figure out
that the music played on
alternative radio could also
work for them was reduced
drastically. It only took four
months for the other stations
to figure that Big Country
made stirring, inspirational
music. I know it's still a third
of a year after you heard it on
CITR but that's a blink when
compared to some other bands
that now stand as the darlings
of the commercial "New
Music": U2 (three years) Jam
(5 years) Simple Minds (2
years) PeteShelley(5 years, if
you count the Buzzcocks)
Talking Heads (a mere year
and a half).
To put it simply, commercial radio's increased interest
in an area that had before
been the sole property of CITR
made us wonder: had we
become complacent? Perhaps
we had.
In any case, 1983 saw CITR
delve deeper into a musical
avenue that deserved further
exploration: the booming independent scene. The search
ventured far afield and close
to home with very positive
results. Abroad we managed
to find music that transcended
the malaise suffered by the
British pop scene in 1983 (can
anyone really care about the
FIXX?) 1983 saw increased
exposure for independent
American records. And close
to home CITR brought you the
best in local music, not only on
record but through tape releases only available on CITR.
If all this sounds like we're
blowing   our  own   horn,
section. If the mailbox is
empty each month, leave it
that way. I presume you write
most of those letters yourselves because it has been my
experience that C.I.T.R. listeners though somewhat apathetic when it comes to writing
letters,  at  least  posess  (sic)
because   we   are.   Since   we   average levels of inteligence
appeared on the FM airwaves
in 1981 CITR has strived to
bring you the best in alternative music, to break out of the
numbing conformity that
seems to plague commercial
media in these times.
If you've been listening to
us, thank you for your support. If you haven't, take a
chance on a radio station that
thinks enough of you not to
play the same 60 songs three
times a day, every day. We're
at 102 on your FM dial, 100.1
on cable.
And don't forget to write!
The Airhead wants YOU!
The Airhead
c/oCITR
6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C. V6T2A5
Dear Airhead:
Pee Pee, Pooh Pooh, Bum,
Dink, Fart. There. That
should fit in perfectly with the
rest of that infantile excrement you pass off as a letters
|.
CITR CHRISTMAS PLAYLIST
Love Will Tear Us Apart
Holiday In Cambodia
Going Underground
(sic). The December issues
letters section was particularly
insulting and served only to
discredit C.I.T.R. and
cheapen the rest of the material in Discorder. Please don't
let this happen again, not only
for our sake but for yours as
well. Thank you.
Tony Beavis
Au contraire, Tony, you
presume wrong. I assure you
that none of the letters that
appear in this column are
written by me. Besides, who
the hell are you to pass
judgement on the average
intelligence level of C.I.T.R.
listeners. I seriously doubt
that you know enough of them
to make an educated guess.
Regardless, I appreciate your
concern, and I hope to hear
something from you in the
near future - something truly
meaningful, no doubt. But
watch the spelling, Tony,
people might think you were
dumb or something.
Nemoto's
Nemoto's: a 22-seat cafe on
Thurlow Street just off Rob-
sonstrasse. Two amateur bicycle racers, Jimmy and Mike,
are chefs at a major hotel at
night, by day they create
perfectly prepared North
American breakfasts. They
are open from 7 in the
morning to 3 in the afternoon.
Jimmy is the waiter,, Mike is
the cook. The wake-up atmosphere is created by the eclectic blend of hair commandos,
downtown residents and office
staff who frequent 'motes.
The food is consistently
good. Eggs scrambled into
tiny beads, or perfectly
poached, accompanied by
plenty of standard breakfast
meat for $2.45. Other notable
fare includes the clubhouse or
the chicken omelette.
Service is another story.
The ever-humble Jimmy
polishes your table with flair
amidst the clutter of up to a
photo by Jim Main
dozen different condiments.
Twenty-two seats are plenty
for Jimmy to attend to, so
when the opportunity to order
presents itself, grab it. Second
chances take time.
Decor is circa 1958. Four
black vinyl booths occupy one
side of the cafe. On the other
side there are six counter-
stools for those in a hurry.
Prices definitely dictate decor.
Nemoto's lukewarm ambience melts down the conspicuous social pretentions that
bond cliques. Often booths
occupied by singles are invaded by vaguely familiar
faces hungry for brekkies.
Overheard conversations have
ranged from basic anarchy to
the latest in hangover cures.
The only drawback is the
line-up for a table - one can
wait up to an hour. But if you
have three hours for breakfast, and only three bucks to
spend, Nemoto's fits the bill.
— Les Davis
1 JOY DIVISION
2 DEAD KENNEDYS
3 THE JAM
4 NEW ORDER
5 SEX PISTOLS
6 PUBLIC IMAGE LTD
7 STIFF LITTLE FINGERS
8 STIFF LITTLE FINGERS
9 DAVID BOWIE
10 U2
11 U2
12 PUBLIC IMAGE LTD
13 THE CRAMPS
14 JOY DIVISION
15 ECHO   &   THE   BUNNYMEN
16 THE CLASH
17 THE CRAMPS
18 ULTRAVOX
19 THE CLASH
20 THE CURE
21 SIOUXSIE & THE
BANSHEES
22 THE THE
23 ULTRAVOX
24 BUZZCOCKS
25 THE CRAMPS
26 THEATRE OF HATE
27 BAUHAUS
28 DAVID BOWIE
29 SEX PISTOLS
30 THE JAM
31 NEW ORDER
32 DEAD KENNEDYS
33 NEW ORDER
24 STYLE COUNCIL
35 THE JAM
36 DAVID BOWIE
37 SIOUXSIE & THE
BANSHEES
38 FUN BOY 3
39 BAUHAUS
40 JOY DIVISION
41 SID VICIOUS/SEX
PISTOLS
42 DEAD KENNEDYS
43 STIFF LITTLE FINGERS
44 WAH!
45 PETER GABRIEL
46 GUN CLUB
47 LAURIE ANDERSON
48 BLACK FLAG
49 MELODY PIMPS
50 DAVID BOWIE
Blue Monday
Anarchy In the U.K.
Public Image
Suspect Device
Alternative Ulster
Space Oddity
I Will Follow
Out Of Control
This Is Not A Love Song
Human   Fly
Decades
The Cutter
White Riot
Surfin' Bird
The Wild, The Beautiful &
The Damned
Complete Control
A Forest
Arabian Knights
Perfect
Vienna
What Do I Get
Goo Goo Muck
Westworld
Bela Lugosi's Dead
Ziggy Stardust
God Save The Queen
In The City
Everything's Gone Green
California Uber Alles
Ceremony
Money Go Round
That's Entertainment
Heroes
Hong Kong Garden
The  Lunatics  Have Taken
Over The Asylum
Kick In The Eye
Dead Souls
My Way
Nazi Punks Fuck Off
Johnny Was
Somesay
Biko
Sexbeat
O Superman
Six Pack
You Freak [Me Out]
Young Americans
 DISCORDER Jan 1984
1983 Doesn't Remember You Either
So here we go again. Another year is on the books - and
what of it?
It seems that every year in
December people look back on
the year that was, and the
general feeling is "Boy, what
a boring year that was!" We
all do it, and certainly, sometimes it's justified, but more
often than not we've simply
forgotten what happened in
the nether regions of January
through April. This is especially true of music. "Stardom
is a fleeting thing" said the
jaded old teen idol, waving a
fistful of unsold independent
singles. So, in order to help
you to remember some of the
local musical moments of
1983, we've compiled a brief
retrospective calendar of
events for the year gone by. It
is inevitable that we've forgotten to include certain events
that might be regarded as key,
and we would now like to jump
the gun and apologize for any
oversights that will almost
certainly crop up.
JANUARY
The year kicked off in a big
way with record releases from
local yokels DOA, Modernettes, Los Popularos, and the
Scissors. All good records, but
DOA's War on 45 had to be
one of the best overall releases  (never mind   local)  of
ALBUM OF THE MONTH
Siousxieand the Banshees -
A Kiss in the Dreamhouse.
SINGLE OF THE MONTH
Elvis   Costello   -   Head
Toe.
MARCH
4 - Rank and File play
UBC's Sub Ballroom with
guests the Melody Pimps. An
outstanding show, one of the
best of the year. Certainly the
hottest to hit the usually
antiseptic SUB Ballroom.
10 - The Blasters fry the
Commodore.
11 - DOA, Los Popularos
and the Braineaters at SUB
Ballroom. Poor attendance
and a generally lacklustre
performance combine to make
for a sedentary evening.
27 - An evening of self-
congratulation at the West
Coast Music Awards. Many
extremely deserving backs go
unpatted.
JUNE
27 - New Order stink out the
Commodore. Angst is displaced by anger as the machines, which are, for all
intents and purposes, doing
the performing, take an unscheduled break. Lots of haircuts start to grow out.
- demo tape from Cast of
Thousands hits the CITR airwaves and makes a big splash.
- Herald Nix release their
debut EP One Night Only. An
excellent record.
ALBUM OF THE MONTH
Spear of Destiny - Grapes of
Wrath
SINGLE OF THE MONTH
Pete Shelley - No One like
you.
SEPTEMBER ALBUM OF THE MONTH
6- King Sunny Ade and his       X - More Fun in the New
African   Beats   mesmerize   a    World.
total  of  2400   people  at   the   SINGLE OF THE MONTH
Commodore. A night of pop       Kevin Zed - Saigon Orders
music Nigerian style.
9-Actionauts, Enigmas and
A Cast of Thousands play to
about 10 diehards at the SUB
Ballroom.
10 - Corsage and the Modernettes perform a show that
more people should have attended. Cameo voice appearance by Pat Burns.
11/12 - Everybody who
didn't see the Actionauts and
Corsage goes to the Pacific
Coliseum to be on TV (Pay, of
course) with David Bowie.
Reputed to be a great show.
Mary Jo of
the Modernettes
APRIL
1 - CITR celebrates one year
on the FM Band. There is
much drunken radio debauchery. As well, rockabilly
heart-throb Buddy Selfish
calls it quits.
27 - Lene Lovich screeches
at the Commodore Ballroom.
23 - Hardcore extravaganza
at SUB Ballroom with Dead
Kennedys, 10 Minute Warning and the Neos.
29/30 - Stranglers sneer to
music over two nights at the
Commodore. Actually, the fellows were very well behaved
and rather benign.
- the Phil Smith album is
released and immediately
shoots to the top of the CITR
charts.
Actionauts Hash Assasin
demo received at CITR.
FEBRUARY
1 - CITR's Discorder is
born.
4 - Jock rock made new
inroads as CITR presented
Rockabilly Ice Fallies with
Herald Nix and Buddy Selfish
at the Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre.
76/77 - Iggy Pop sledge
hammers the Commodore
Ballroom with help from DOA.
Lots of ear damage.
79 - The Enigmas play City
Space with Fatal K.O. Their
first big gig. It marks the
beginning of their rise to
prominence in the local scene.
February also saw the release (in America, ironically)
of Maurice and the Cliches'
album C'est La Vie, Soft Core
is a minor hit.
"From New York to L.A. ..."
- Bush Tetras at Luv a Fair.
MAY
5 - B.C. Provincial election
goes awry. Wolves begin to
blow little pigs' houses down.
6- Ramones return to town.
Play Commodore with the red
hot Actionauts.
9 - Someone old, someone
new, something borrowed,
something blue. Roxy Music
at the Coliseum with Images
in Vogue.
25 - Choirboys U2 visit the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
Bono displays his not inconsiderable tumbling skills.
Opening act Dream Syndicate
are hampered by lack of
soundcheck and, thus, fail to
impress.
ALBUM OF THE MONTH
Undertones - Sin of Pride
SINGLE OF THE MONTH
Actionauts - Hash Assassin
JULY
8 - CITR sponsors the Paula
Ross Dance Marathon and
Epsom salt merchants applaud and encourage "more of
this sort of thing."
29 - CITR swampdogs and
other willing reptiles booze
and crooze up and down
Burrard Inlet to the tunes of A
Cast of Thousands and the
Debutantes.
ALBUM OF THE MONTH
Talking Heads - Speaking in
Tongues
SINGLE OF THE MONTH
Big   Country   -   In   a   Big
Country
AUGUST
8- "From L.A. to New York
..." California hardcore head-
bangers Black Flag thrash and
bash the New York Theatre.
9- An intimate soiree at the
lounge to end all lounges.
David Bowie, Peter Gabriel
and the Tubes have a musical
heart to heart with 60,000
pilgrims at Hot Cross Palace.
74 - Peter Tosh does a
yawner at the War Memorial
Gym.
18 - Blasters refry the
Commodore.
26 - New York's Three
Teens Kill Four play City-
space with Moral Lepers and
The Courage of Lassie.
28 - CH3 at Stalag 13 with
Judas Goat and the Generics.
- August also saw the
release of the Enigmas EP and
the posthumous release of the
Subhumans album No
Wishes, No Prayers.
OCTOBER
3 - Los Popularos anniversary party and souvenir stand
at John Barley's.
14 - DOA does all ages gig
at SUB Ballroom with Moral
Lepers and Billy Shears.
26 - Violent Femmes with
guests A Cast of Thousands at
SUB Ballroom. Great show,
poor turnout.
37 - Hallowe'en - Enigmas
at the Railway Club - Beverly
Sisters at John Barley's
- Cinebar release debut
single Another Fine Day with
B side, a cover version of
Shocking Blue's Venus.
- Actionauts release Vaga-
bond/Hash Assassin on vinyl.
NOVEMBER
7- Gang of Four with guests
54/40 play SUB Ballroom at
UBC behind picket lines.
Rumors have it that the band
was not informed by their
management of the picket line
until just prior to their arrival.
Boring show anyway.
8 - Big Country play two
shows at the Commodore.
Everybody likes Big Country!
27 - Lions play Argos in
Grey Cup at B.C. Place. Their
first Cup appearance since
1964. Lions lose 18-17.
- Sadly, November sees the
passing of two of Vancouver's
most enduring bands as Los
Popularos and the Modernettes call it quits.
- DOA releases General
Strike/That's Life single to
coincide with province wide
labor action at the beginning
of the month.
- I Braineater releases /
here, where you LP.
DECEMBER
3 - Talking Heads in fine
form at the Pacific Coliseum.
Fabulous performance with
hats off to oft forgotten Jerry
Harrison. There is also a brief
Tom Tom Club interlude.
5-70 - A couple of dozen
bands including the Actionauts and the Debutantes perform in the week long Wet
Coast Music Fest at the
Waterfront.
9 - DOA are searing hot at
the Commodore Ballroom.
They are supported by solid
performances from the Actionauts and Shanghai Dog.
DOA's set is capped off by a
positively chugging version of
BTO's Taking care of business
- DOA release retrospective
album Bloodied but Unbowed.
It contains some of their finest
moments over the last several
years.
ALBUM OF THE MONTH
The The - Soul Mining
SINGLE OF THE MONTH
The Assembly - Never
Never
Mike Davies of
the Enigmas
If you think of anything that
we've missed that we should
have included, please let us
know. Our address is 6138
SUB Blvd., UBC, Vancouver,
B.C., V6T2A5.
— Steve Robertson
— Gord Badanic
photos by Dave Jacklin
page 3
 DISORDER Jan 1984
"the im
1983 was not a banner year
in alternative music by any
stretch of the imagination.
Nonetheless, the task of picking ten records from the past
year remains one of narrowing
down a larger list. The records
selected here represent a
paring down from a larger list
of around 30 discs. The attentive will notice that none of the
"hot product" of 1983 -
Thriller, Let's Dance, Synch-
ronicity - are represented
herein. Rather than argue
whether they are deserving of
inclusion, let's just say
they've -been left off because
I'd lose my lunch if I heard
another mention of Messrs
Jackson, Bowie or the Police
this year. Besides Michael,
David, and Sting are-going to
show up in the year-end issues
of everyone from Georgia
Straight to Rolling Stone. I
don't think they'll resent me
ignoring them.
The records in this top ten
are listed in no particular
order, and are based on
nothing so specific as airplay,
sales, or who did the best
video. Rather they represent a
personal selection. Take it or
leave it.
Dead Kennedys      -   Plastic
Surgery Disasters
A return to the muckraking
sarcasm of Fresh Fruit after
the thrash antics of In God We
Trust, the DK's come out in
fine form as we head toward
1984. They may pick obvious
targets for their barbs at times
- preppies, Ronald Reagan,
etc. - but even when they're
shooting fish in a barrel they
do it with such cutting wit as
to make the whole effort
worthwhile. Jello Biafra for
President in 1984?
Replacements - Hootenanny
A product of Minneapolis,
the Replacements combine
the strengths of the two
populist forms of American
music - folk and punk. What
emerges is not a cliche "folk-
punk" but a record that
marries the spontaneity of a
hootenanny - (the album was
recorded in a warehouse "in
some godawful suburb north
of Minneapolis") and the
energy of punk, resulting in
an LP that pays homage to a
broad range of musics. Hootenanny covers everything
from Heavy Metal to psychedelia to art rock, all performed
with humor and vitality.
Violent Femmes     -   Violent
Femmes
Yet another band that got
pigeon-holed as "folk-punk"
(love those hyphens). Truth of
the matter is that they owe
more to Jonathon Richman
and the early Talking Heads
than Woody Guthrie or Joey
Ramone. Without a doubt this
is the teen angst record of the
year. Gordon Gano's sometimes ascerbic, sometimes
confessional lyrics meld perfectly with music that recognises the simplicity of great
rock and roll while exploring
the complexity and the range
page 4
000
of emotion that becomes possible with free jazz.
r
SINGLES 1983
"I
Wall of Voodoo  - Call of the
West
As the two previous records
might indicate 1983 was a year
when American bands explored that country's vast and
rich musical past. Wall of
Voodoo draw on the honesty of
good country music, mixed
with synthesizers, guitar and
some great percussion, to
come up with a record for the
New Frontier - (sure Captain
Kirk). Mexican Radio must
rank as one of the most
unlikely hit singles of 1983.
Alas Wall of Voodoo have
gone the way of many bands
in 1983 - they split up. Singer
Stan Ridgeway was last seen
with Stewart (my brother
owns the label) Copeland
plugging their Rumblefish
soundtrack on MTV. An interview with Martha Quinn - is
this the price of stardom? Poor
Stan.
Blasters  - Non-Fiction
While we're on the topic of
exploring the roots of American music, let's talk about the
Blasters. The Alvin Brothers
and company bring the power
of American musics of all
kinds into the 80's. Makes you
wish the record-buying public
had enough sense to listen to
these guys instead of the
inanities of the Stray Cats
(may Brian Setzer and the
boys be drowned in a pool of
Brylcreem).
Phil Smith - The Phil Smith
Album
Excuse me while I rave
about this record. Those wise
enough to listen to CITR heard
the tracks from Blanche Whitman and Corsage in 1982 but
it was not until 1983 that Phil
(with the help of Zulu Records) made them available to
the public. Tracks from Corsage make up the bulk of the
record, but there's also appearances from Wasted Lives
and the inimitable, if only
because the real Jimbo's dead
Jimbo and the Lizard Kinds.
Jonathon Richman - Jonathon Sings
For some reason a large
portion of the population hate
JR with a passion. Fortunately, a smaller, but more devoted, part of the population
can't get enough of him. I
must confess to belonging in
the latter category. Jonathon
combines the innocence that is
required of rock and roll with
the insight that is necessary to
make it good. This, and other
JR records, are among the few
pieces of vinyl that actually
improve  the  quality  of   life.
******************.***.****.
H    ARTIST
TITLE
LABEL
1 THE THE
Perfect
CBS
2 NEW ORDER
Blue Monday
POLYGRAM
3 BIG COUNTRY
In A Big Country
PHONOGRAM (UK)
4 BAUHAUS
She's In Parties
BB (UK)
5 PETE SHELLEY
No One Like You
GENETIC (UK)
6 KRAFTWERK
Tour De France
EMI (UK)
7 CAST OF THOUSANDS
On the QT/ln For the Kill
"DEMOTAPE**
8 ACTIONAUTS
Hash Assassin
ZULU
9   ECHO   &   THE   BUNNY
Never Stop
KOROVA (UK)
MEN
10 BEVERLY SISTERS
Talk Talk Talk/Downtown
Fools
**DEMOTAPE**
11 HOWARD DEVOTO
Rainy Season
VIRGIN (UK)
12 ACTIONAUTS
Vagabond
ZULU
13 KEVIN ZED
Saigon Orders
**DEMOTAPE**
14 PUBLIC IMAGE LTD
This Is Not A Love Song
VIRGIN (UK)
15 TEARDROP EXPLODES
You Disappear From View
MERCURY (UK)
16 SHRIEKBACK
Working On the Ground
Y(UK)
17 SPECIAL AKA
Bright Lights/ Racist Friend
TWO-TONE (UK)
18 THE IMPOSTER
Pills and Soap
IMP (UK)
19 RED GUITARS
Good Technology
SELF-DRIVE (UK)
20 SHRIEKBACK
Lined Up
Y (UK)
21 TALKING HEADS
Swamp
SIRE
22   BOB   MARLEY   &   THE
Buffalo Soldier
ISLAND
WAILERS
23 BIG COUNTRY
Fields of Fire
PHONOGRAM (UK)
24 DOA
Burn It Down
SUDDEN DEATH
25 ROBYN HITCHCOCK
Kingdom of Love
ALBION (UK)
26 CINEBAR
Another Fine Day
RANA
27 REDRUM
Danger/Never Know Your
Name
**DEMOTAPE**
28 MALCOLM McLAREN
Soweto
CHARISMA (UK)
29 ICICLE WORKS
Birds Fly
SITUATION 2 (UK)
30 FABULON
Young Hearts Burning
**DEMOTAPE**
31 IMPLOG
Breakfast/She Creatures
LOG (US)
32 THE FALL
The  Man  Whose  Head   Expanded
Wonderland
ROUGH TRADE (UK)
33 XTC
VIRGIN (UK)
34 THE MONOCHROME SET
The Jet Set Junta
CHERRY RED (UK)
35 THE CREATURES
Right Now
WONDERLAND (UK)
36 HOUSE OF COMMONS
Way Down South/1999
**DEMOTAPE**
37 DUB RIFLES
Stand
NOTOWN
38 THE ASSEMBLY
Never Never
MUTE (UK)
39 3 TEENS KILL 4
Tell Me Something Good
POINT BLANK (US)
40 SPEAR OF DESTINY
The Flying Scotsman
CBS (UK)
David Thomas and the Pedestrians - Variations on a
Theme
Like JR and Captain Beef-
heart, David Thomas is valuable for his ability to see the
world in a way that is always
unique. With the Pedestrians
he's traded the fear and
loathing of early Pere Ubu for
a bemusement that came
across,   though  not  well,   en
Pere Ubu's final album. With
the assistance of Richard
Thompson and Anton Fier,
Thomas examines a world too
absurd to take entirely seriously.
David may be joining the
Roky Eriksen school of R'n'R
nut cases, but he's doing it
with a smile on his face.
Maybe  he knows something
The Birthday Party       -   The
Bad Seed EP
If David Thomas has become happy, he hasn't been
joined by the Birthday Party.
On The Bad Seed, The Birthday Party throw furious, jagged chunks of sound at a
listener over four compelling
tunes (is that the right word?).
These guys have gone deeper
in the woods than anyone
since Robert Johnson (look it
up) and, as a result, avoid the
comic-book decadence of
bands like Bauhaus and Specimen.
Yet another band that bit
the big one in 1983. Last I
heard, however, Nick Cave
was not doing duets with
Sting.
R.E.M.   - Murmur
This record has defied description all year. Its not a
sound that jumps out and
grabs you on the first listen,
but one that reveals more of
itself with each listen. R.E.M.
tackle the pop song at its roots
and come up with an album
that is once hook-filled and
mysterious.
HONOURABLE MENTIONS
X - More Fun In the New
World
Modernettes - View From
the Bottom
Enigmas   - EP
The The   - Soul Mining
— Chris Dafoe
 DISCORDER Jan 1984
r       ALBUMS 1983
1
#   ARTIST
1 VIOLENT FEMMES
2 KING SUNNY ADE &
HIS AFRICAN BEATS
3 ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN
4 THE MEMBERS
5 DEAD KENNEDYS
6 ENIGMAS
7 MALCOLM McLAREN
8 SPEAR OF DESTINY
9 SHRIEKBACK
10 X
11 YELLO
12 TALKING HEADS   ,
13 NEW ORDER
14 NINA HAGEN
15 PHIL SMITH
16 HOWARD DEVOTO
17 THE THE
18 RANK & FILE
19 BAUHAUS
20 ALAN VEGA
21 XTC
22 THE BIRTHDAY PARTY
23 THE UNDERTONES
24 ADRIAN BELEW
25 AZTEC CAMERA
26 HUNTERS   &   COLLECTORS
27 FAD GADGET
28 PETE SHELLEY
29 SIOUXSIE & THE
BANSHEES
30 THE CRAMPS
31 THE NEATS
32 WALL OF VOODOO
33 GUN CLUB
34 T-BONE BURNETT
35 3 TEENS KILL 4
36 THE STRANGLERS
37 BIG COUNTRY
38 THE CREATURES
39 THE REPLACEMENTS
40 JAH WOBBLE/THE
EDGE/HOLGER CZUKAY
Violent Femmes
SLASH
Synchro-System
ISLAND
Porcupine
SIRE
Uprhythm, Downbeat
ARISTA (US)
Plastic Surgery Disasters
FRINGE PRODUCT
Enigmas EP
MYSTERY
Duck Rock
POLYGRAM
Grapes of Wrath
CBS (UK)
Care
WEA
More Fun In The New World
ELEKTRA
You Gotta Say Yes ...
ELEKTRA
Speaking In Tongues
SIRE
Power, Corruption & Lies
POLYGRAM
Angstlos
CBS (NETH)
The Phil Smith Album
ZULU
Jerky Versions of the Dream
VIRGIN (UK)
Soul Mining
CBS (UK)
Sundown
SLASH
Burning From the Inside
VERTIGO
Saturn Strip
ZE
Mummer
VIRGIN
The Bad Seed EP
4AD (UK)
The Sin Of Pride
EMI (UK)
Twang Bar King
ISLAND
High Land, Hard Rain
SIRE
The Fireman's Curse
VIRGIN (UK)
Under the Flag
MUTE (UK)
XL1
POLYGRAM
A Kiss in the Dreamhouse
POLYGRAM
Smell of Female
ENIGMA (US)
The Neats
AOH (US)
Call Of The West
IRS
Death Party EP
ANIMAL (UK)
Proof Through The Night
WB
No Motive
POINT BLANK (US)
Feline
EPIC
The Crossing
POLYGRAM
Feast
WONDERLAND (UK)
Hootenanny
TWIN-TONE    (US)
Snake Charmer
ISLAND (UK)
000
mrwAS"
1983. It was not a year that
suffered from a glut of remarkable records that would send
a person faced with the prospect of culling ten of the best
into a state of frustrated
frenzy. Nor was it a year to
shake the foundations of
modern music and send it to
previously unattairted heights
of cultural significance. Just
another 12 months, 52 weeks,
365 days, 8760 hours, 525,600
minutes, 31,536,000 seconds
... (gasp)
Perhaps it is appropriate
then to begin this retrospect
with an exceptional album of
timeless quality. Drop this
one, gently, onto your turntable and it would emote the
same images whether it was
during the nuclear holocaust
or at a time when innocence
was a virtue that did not have
to be strived for.
From Gardens Where We
Feel Secure, the second effort
by ex-Ravishing Beauty Virginia Astley is an album
whose strength of emotion
and virtuousity of musicianship could easily be underestimated due to the fact that
it is totally devoid of the
technical wizardry and arcane
lyrics that many musical punters find so appealing these
fashionable days. Indeed,
there is not one word spoken
on this record - it consists of
one instrumental piece that
carries the patient listener
back to a summer's day when
the universe extended no further than the backyard fence.
Recommended for children of
all ages.
Another modest masterpiece whose charms lie in its
unpretentious display of
youthful exuberance is Aztec
Camera's debut album, High
Land, Hard Rain. Roddy
Frame, the band's lead singer
and songwriter, is a young
Scotsman who has wasted no
time at all in mastering the
finer aspects of pop sensibility. This is reflected by his
astute lyrics and beautifully
crafted acoustic arrangements. High Land, Hard Rain
is such an accomplished debut
for so young a group that one
can only hope they won't be
corrupted by the cut-throat
business they're involved in.
If not, we might look forward
to Aztec Camera producing
music such as that heard on ...
The Go-Between's   second
album, Before Hollywood.
This fine Australian band also
works within a basic pop
framework, though the arrangements are sparse and
the tone much grittier than the
lush aural landscapes of Aztec
Camera. The Go-Between's
sound is no less self-assured,
and being older and one would
think wiser their songs emote
a wistful melancholy in recalling times and friendships
past. If there ever was or
could be a quintessential Australian band, The Go-Be-
tweens are it.
If 1983 belonged to anyone,
it might as well be Matt
Johnson, the mastermind behind The The . In the past
year he has released three
excellent singles, Uncertain
Smile, Perfect, and This Is
The Day, all of which appear
on The The's second album,
Soul Mining. Occasionally
moody, always stimulating,
the accessible pop arrangements of Soul Mining belie the
nature of its content. Matt
Johnson is not a cynic, nor is
he wallowing in angst - soul
mining is exactly what he does
and no one, least of all Matt
Johnson, is foolish enough to
believe that gold is the result
of such an endeavour.
Gold was obviously what
Yello was searching for on
their third and most commercial product to date, You Gotta
Say Yes To Another txcess.
Still, this album is a good
example of their calculated
lunacy applied to a collection
of rather somber machines.
Yello has taken high technology to the jungle and has come
up with an infectious dance
disc that is high on style and
low in content - it will even
make those with leaden feet
and a head to match to shake
with spasms of mirth. This is
all the more absurd when
considering that the lunatics
who constitute Yello are from
Switzerland - one of the most
unfunny countries in the
world.
'**TrWjF
1983 may not have been a
particularly prolific year for
local releases, though the few
pieces of vinyl that surfaced
above the underground have
served well to put Vancouver
on the music map. Mr. Dafoe
has already duly included The
Phil Smith Album, so I II put
my two bits in for two bits that
deserve worthy mention.
Undoubtedly, the Enigmas surprised everyone with
their adeptness at transferring
their raw and energetic live
sound from the stage onto
static vinyl. Their 5-track EP
released on Mystery Records
is slick but not to the point
where the production technique overwhelms the vitality
of the music. Each of the five
songs is well-crafted and admirably executed - any one
who considers themselves to
be a local music afficianado
should have this disc in their
collection.
I, Braineater has also
shown considerable finesse in
transferring his stark, nihilistic image of existence from the
visual to the aural. / Here,
Where You! is a tight, well-
produced full-length album
that takes the listener a million miles away from a sunny
day in lotus land. At once
almost classical in some of the
musical arrangements and
absurdly amusing in its lyrical
tone, / Here, Where You! is
tense music for the eighties.
At last and perhaps least, is
Synchro System by King
Sunny Ade and His African
Beats The album itself may
not be particularly remarkable
(King Sunny has released fifty
others prior to this one),
though the excitement
generated by the media in
response to its North American release and summer concert tour was phenomenal
enough to deserve mention.
King Sunny Ade is a master
who plays a kind of music
whose vitality and richness
can not possibly be contained
on vinyl, though Synchro System is a worthy attempt.
When these people come to
town next, be there! then buy
the record.
Hmmm ... so only eight
records on "My Top Ten of
.1983"? Well, as I mentioned
previously, it was not an
outstanding year. Several
other releases do deserve
honourable attention, though
... Hockey by Palais
Schaumburg , Fetisch by X-
Mal Deutschland and Drawings of O. T. by Einsturzende
Neubauten are evidence
enough that Germany is once
again producing interesting
and diverse music. Who cares
if we can't understand a word
they're saying!
Single of The Year goes to
This Charming Man, the
second one from The Smiths
(Noel and Walter vote for this
one, too), with Rainy Season
by Howard Devoto and
. Strawberry Switchblade's
Trees and Flowers following
in its transcendant path. Tape
releases by .Trevor Jones
Icky Ya Ya, Animal Slaves
Eye of The Hurricane, ana
Kevin Zed Saigon Orders
will undoubtedly set the pace
in 1984. Have a Good One.
— Michael Shea
 DISCORDER Jan 1984
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6J 18
1  LOWER CONCOURSE (
introducing
NEW
Live Music
 DISCORDER Jan
A Chat With Allan Holdsworth
What will I talk to you about?
I'd like to start off with
biographical detail - the first I
know of you is your 1977
album with Alphonso Johnson
and Narada Michael Waldron,
which I believe is one of your
introductionsto Creed Taylor,
according to the album liner
notes.
But that was the worst thing
I 've ever done in my life and I
never include that on a disco-
graphy. It was an absolute
piece of shit. It wasn't to do
with the musicians 'cos they
were all great. It was the way
it was done - the guy ripped
us off. He was a total asshole.
And if you would do me a real
favour, never mention that
record in the press - that
album was just a joke. It
should never have been recorded. It took nine hours or
something like that. No one
got any sounds, that was the
problem. They just put some
mikes up and recorded it. It
turned out like a piece of shit
and they put it out and put my
name on it. Stuck me on the
top of a skyscraper like King
Kong and it's just the biggest
piece of shit there ever was so
please don't mention,it in any
article - / never include it so if
you want to start the interview
with something else, it would
be just great.
Let's talk about some of the
groups you were involved with
in England - Soft Machine,
Earlier Recordings you made
Well, Soft Machine was the
first band I played with; no
actually it was Tempest was
the first band I played with.
John H. Eisman's band. He
had a band called Coliseum.
He also had a band called
Tempest - we made an album
then I left that band and
joined Soft Machine. I played
an album with Soft Machine
and then I left that band and I
played with Tony Williams -
Lifetime, yeah. That kind ot
crumbled, not through any
fault of the band's but through
management.
He had that problem with
John McLaughlin -- when they
were forming Lifetime they
had terrible management according to John.
It's like what we're doing
now. You have to find people
who'll put up with all kinds ot
terrible shit, in order just to
play.
Everything was bad but the
music
That's right. The hassle we
have going anywhere almost
isn't worth it. I thought they
were going to send us all
home. It took us six or seven
hours just to get through the
border. That's no one's fault;
not directly. It's management.
You see, we don't have management so it screwed up.
We have someone who wants
to manage the band but as of
yet he hasn 7 been given full
reign so we can't blame him
anything that's happening
now. All the things that are
happening now are just due to
the fact that we don't really
have a manager.
And then after Tony Williams, I played with Gong. I
played on one album with
Gong, Gangus, and the rest of
the albums I played on those
without them were really terrible.   I   wasn't  part  of   the
band, I was just like a side-
man. But the album Gazus
was okay and enjoyed the
band a lot and I like a band
thing. Whereas with the other
albums they kind of stuck
people on. I didn't really like
that too much. After that, I did
the Jean Luc Ponty album
"Engimatic Ocean." And
after that I went back to Bill
Bruford's first solo album.
Then I joined U. K. and after
U. K. I formed this band which
was the biggest pain in the
world because that's when
everything fell apart when I
decided to do this.
wasn't right for him. The way
he recorded, which was in bits
and pieces was right for him.
He was amazing - he'd go in
and record all the drum parts
on his own without anybody.
To do that is pretty hard. So
I 'm not slagging a guy for that
- it's incredible. I couldn't do
that - I wouldn't just go in
and play the guitar parts and
stick everybody on. But that's
what he did. But for me it was
wrong cos I didn 't have a real
role in that band. I was kind of
like something you stick on
top like icing. I never 'felt like
an integral part of the band.
..Some people just don 7 know how to   behave at a gig!
Let's backtrack to the Bru-
ford days. You've been quoted
in the press perhaps unfairly,
slagging Bruford's group.
I've never slagged the
group. I've never slagged
anybody as far as - I 've never
slagged anyone in the band or
anyone in the bands I've
worked with. I'll slag people
like Creed Taylor coz they're
real dicks. But I'll never slag
anybody in a band like Bill.
Let me quote from the
paper -- you didn't like Bruford's group cos it was very
studio-oriented and they could
never reproduce live and
would spend hours overdub-
bing parts.
That's true but it's not slag
because that's the way he
worked best. If you put Bill in
the studio with a band like -
they recorded an album after I
left and we were going
through the stage of trying to
get everybody to do more
things live. They actually tried
that on the next record; it
didn 7 work - you should talk
to Bill about that because it's
not for me to say that it didn't
work.  But he will tell you it
The cover of the Creed
Taylor album is a metaphor
for beginning your career as I
see it. Until "I.O.U." it
seemed like you were brought
in as that icing (with U.K.,
Bruford's band, Jean Luc
Ponty) the band is carrying on
and all of a sudden there's an
Allan Holdsworth solo -- It's
An Event -- it didn't sound
like you were part of shaping
the whole band's sound as
such.
Which band?
For example with Jean Luc
Ponty?
Oh no, I wasn 7. / was just a
player. But the way Ponty
played as live -- everybody
played live, everybody played
solo. And when I played with
Tony Williams, everybody
played live, everybody played
solo. When I got with U.K.
and Bruford's band , nobody
did that. Everybody stuck on
things. When I was with U.K.,
all the guitar solos were done
before the keyboard solos.
The way things were done, we
never did anything together.
And I don't like that. It's only
a personal point of view. It's
not that it's no good. I'm not
saying that those guys don't
make good albums, that it's
not good. I'm just saying that
for me, it was wrong. I used to
get really depressed and most
of the time that I worked with
U.K. I was so bored and sick
and pissed off with what was
going on that i used to just get
drunk every night and I finished up not being able to
play and then consequently
Bill and me were fired from
the band. Bill formed his own
band and asked me if I wanted
to play in that and I said yeah,
cos I really like Bill. It was
great. Why I left Bill and was
lucky enough at that point in
time to have played with Jack
Bruce and John H. Eismann
just in a blow-out thing together and it was the first time
in about 5 years that I'd
actually played spontaneously
with people. That threw me
and as soon as I 'd played that,
that was it. I made a decision
right then and there "I'm
gonna phone Bill and tell him,
I'm not doing it anymore."
And that's exactly what I did.
And then I formed, or tried to
form this band with Gary
Husband, the original drummer. Myself and Gary worked
together; well, Gary worked
really hard -- he and myself
were responsible for the first
"IOU" thing.
It almost seems you have a
jazz sensibility, in terms of
wanting that symbiotic relationship with a band when
they're improvising live. Rock
is kind of dominated by this
piece-together approach you
are atalking about with respect to UK and Bill Bruford.
Yeah, I' ve done things like
that. We did overdubs on the
new record but not to that
extent, not to those extremes.
Could you give us any idea
of your plans for the immediate future? Do you think this
IOU group will manage to stay
solvent, despite management
difficultures and record companies?
/ have to, otherwise I'm just
going to disappear off the face
of the earth because before we
came over here, things were
so bad that I wasn 7 making a
living. For two years before
we came to the States as the
IOU band, I wasn't able to
make a living as a musician in
England. I played the guitar
once a month or less.
People form unrealistic expectations of how much you'd
make, considering you're so
visible in the music of bands
they might have heard of.
At the moment I don't
really make enough to survive
- I'm almost constantly in
debt and anytime I 've had any
money I've spent it all on
equipment. When we got the
record deal, as far as just
surviving -- I haven't got next
month's rent, if that answers
your question.
Are you diversified in your
studies? You're not just confined to your music in your
pursuits?
Only cycling. I cycle; it's the
only other interest I have.
I was trying to pin down
where your lyric inspirations
come from.
Just from everyday life and
putting up with all the bullshit
that everybody has to go
through. We keep trying.
- Joe Naylor
1984
Top 50
The fifty most played artist[s]
at CITR during December
were:
1 DOA
2 PUBLIC IMAGE LTD
3 THE CURE
4 IGGY POP (& THE
STOOGES)
5X
6 TALKING HEADS
7 THE CRAMPS
8 THE THE
9 JAH WOBBLE
10 DAVID BOWIE
11 SIMPLE MINDS
12 SIOUXSIE &THE
BANSHEES
13 HOUSE OF COMMONS
14 I, BRAINEATER
15 THE FALL
16 ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN
17 YELLO
18 GANG OF FOUR
20 THE STRANGLERS
21 T-BONE BURNETT
22 THE ASSEMBLY
23 NINA HAGEN
24 DEAD KENNEDYS
25 THE CLASH
26 TUXEDO MOON
27 THE JAM
28 KRAFTWERK
29 BAUHAUS
30 RED GUITARS
31 MAGAZINE
32 LOU REED
33 ENO
34 ACTIONAUTS
35 JOY DIVISION
36 KEVIN ZED
37 FLESHTONES
38 THE SMITHS
39 ROXY MUSIC
40 ALIEN SEX FIEND
41 COMSAT ANGELS
42 NEW ORDER
43 DER MITTLEGANG
44 ENIGMAS
45 REVILLOS
46 THE ALARM
47 KATE BUSH
48 ELVIS COSTELLO
49 KILLING JOKE
50 CHINA CRISIS
DOA, Vancouver's foremost
punk-rock hardcore unit have
emerged as the clear winners
in CITR's monthly music report. With their last three
releases, DOA is putting out
music of consistent quality
that is getting the attention if
deserves.
Public Image Ltd. drop one
spot from their top perch, but
their latest single continues to
get heavy airplay. Thei
double live release didn't
cause much excitement, since
Keith Levene's excellent gu
tar work can only be heard on
their previous studio albums.
Simple Minds, I Braineater,
The Assembly, Tuxedomoon
Magazine, Lou Reed, Ac
tionauts, Fleshtones, The
Smiths, Roxy Music, Comsat
Angels, New Order, Der
Mittlegang, Revillos, Kate
Bush and China Crisis figure
strongly this month. Simple
Minds caught on initially with
their new single, Waterfront,
which is quite a departure
from the easy-going prog-pop
of New Gold Dream. Look for
an early spring release for
their next album.
I Braineater has put out an
excellent album of light electronics and insightful lyrics.
Keep your eyes out for local
bands in this play list; they
may be playing on your street
one of these days!
— Jason Grant
page 7
 WlrF
immm\M\mm\
HIGH PROFILES FOR JAN84
Mon     9 -
PETER GABRIEL
^^■■■■w
Tubs     10
BANDS FROM SEATTLE
^M B
Wed     11 -
HANK WILLIAMS
Thurs 12 -
PAUL HAIG
m^LAAAAML
Fri         13 -
NO HIGH PROFILE DUE TO SPORTS
BROADCAST
/       1AJ**9r IA/Wtv'
Sat       14 -
ENO NEGLECTED PART I
Mon     16-
FM/NASH THE SLASH
m
Tues     17 -
AVENGERS
w
Wed    18 -
AU PAIRS
■
Thurs 19 -
COMSAT ANGELS
«4P                              ^
Fri        20 -
NO HIGH PROFILE DUE TO SPORTS
BROADCAST
^~-/.si  ^<mtm * a.   «•   «
Sat       21 -
BATCAVE SCHLOCK ROCK
llwi9M/lP^^
Mon     23 -
FUN BOY 3
^t1BmjWj<BCi^ w*mT
Tues     24 -
DOO-WAP GROUPS
Mr    •WFPHfw ^   ^ ^i^ ^"^
Wed     25
COCTEAU TWINS
Thurs 26 -
U.K. SUBS
Fri        27 -
NO HIGH PROFILE DUE TO SPORTS
BROADCAST
Sat       28 -
TV. /MOVIE THEMES
Mon     30 -
WEEKEND
Tues     31 -
'/3V2 HOUR SEPCIAL: 60'S GARAGE
ROCK PSYCHEDELIA

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