Digital Himalaya Journals

Nation Weekly January 30, 2005, Volume 1, Number 41 Upadhyay, Akhilesh 2005-01-30

Item Metadata

Download

Media
dhimjournal-1.0365036.pdf
Metadata
JSON: dhimjournal-1.0365036.json
JSON-LD: dhimjournal-1.0365036-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): dhimjournal-1.0365036-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: dhimjournal-1.0365036-rdf.json
Turtle: dhimjournal-1.0365036-turtle.txt
N-Triples: dhimjournal-1.0365036-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: dhimjournal-1.0365036-source.json
Full Text
dhimjournal-1.0365036-fulltext.txt
Citation
dhimjournal-1.0365036.ris

Full Text

 NEPALIS IN DILLI HAAT I THE POLITICS OF OIL I FAST FOOD FAD
1
WEEKLY
•£-:
W
/-
FOR
RS. 30      ISSN 1811-721X
GURKHAS
AT     LAST?
Britain goes for an
all-encompassing review
 Call
Your
Doctor
Get Telephonic
Opinion Free
24 hours / 7 days
Medicover
Consultancy
Your Health Plan Advisor
FREE EMERGENCY SERVICE
Sponsored by Lions Club of Kathmandu Bag Durbar at Life Care Hospital, Tel: 4255330
Note : This is for First Aid purpose and works as advisor. However for treatment one will have to visit health service provider (clinic / hospital).
*This service may be chargeable and valid for Kathmandu valley only.
 LT
At the BRITISH COUNCIL
General English
Significantly improve all of your English skills
- reading, writing, listening and speaking
- from beginner to advanced levels.
Conversation Skills
Greatly improve your spoken fluency and
pronunciation
Expand the vocabulary of your spoken English.
Business English
Develop your English skills for the world of modern
international business.
GCE 'AS' Level General Paper
Quickly team the skills and techniques you need
to excel in this exam.
These courses are 36 hours long.
Classes are for one hour a day starting Monday
31 January
IELTS Preparation
The only IELTS course in Nepal taught by qualified
IELTS examiners.
This course is 40 hours iong.
Classes are for 2 hours a day starting on Monday
31 January and Wednesday 2 March
Registration, level testing and meeting teachers is open
from 8.30am until 5.00pm from Tuesday 25 January
until Sunday 30 January. Free course for lucky draw
winner! For more information, call us on 4410798 or
mail us at general.enquiry@britishcouncii.org.np
Public Speaking
>ow to improve your presentation skills and
make a strong impression on your audience.
Creative Writing
Develop your ability to write fiction in an imaginative,
beautiful and accurate way.
Grammar Busters
Have fun getting your grammar right!
These courses are 18 hours long.
Classes are for one hour a day starting on
Monday 31 January and Monday 28 February
Young Learner Courses
Make sure your kids have excellent English by
enrolling them in one of our classes.
Our young learner specialists know how to
v create a fun, relaxed environment which
motivates kids to learn.
Our young learner general English course is 20
hours long. Classes are for two and a haff hours
and run on Saturday mornings. Our young learner
spoken English course is 12 hours long. Classes
are for one and a half hours and run on Saturday
afternoons. Classes start on Saturday 5 February.
BRITISH
COUNCIL
British Council, Lainchaur {next to the British Embassy) Kathmandu. www.britishcouncil.org/nepal
 ace
mm\
■ n ■    ..!   4\<HI lU tUSIMESS *CUAIN3S<K^TltJ« DLCRtf
Revive your
career.
A successful career is nurtured, not neglected.
It comes from making the right choices at the
right time. The Ace EMBA degree could be the
timely boost.
It is an intensive MBA programme for working
people that allows you to learn and work
together without having to compromise on either.
The only EMBA programme in its 6th year with
100+ graduates and 100+ students enrolled.
ADMISSION INFORMATION
SPRING 2005 (12th Intake)
Classes: Monday to Friday, 17:30 - 20:30
Upon Completion:      Awarded the Masters Degree in Business
Administration
Eligibility: Bachelors Degree in any discipline with 2
years of work experience
Application deadline: Friday, 11 February 2005
Enlrance test: Sunday, 13 February, 2005 /
•imw^--- '■■■■.
■
ace
EMBA
pgOPLE WITH INTELLECT. EXP8
ANC A BURNING AMBITION TO 5t*
tfARiWW
WAV CAUSE DRAMATIC
GROWTH TO YOUR CAREER
I
ace institute
OF MANAGEMENT
Call us For further details. Naya Baneshwor, Kathmandu.
Ph: 4474712, 4462042, 4469019, email: aim@aim.edij.np
 Parity at Last? 22
BYJOHN NARAYAN PARAJULI
Will Gurkhas finally receive equal treatment? Britain has promised a 'wide-ranging review' by October that will make it
'legally and morally irreproachable.'
REPORTS
BUSINESS
Testing Times
BY KOSH RAJ KOIRALA
The Royal Nepal Army has made a name
for itself as UN peacekeepers. But its
questionable human rights record is now
stirring concerns about its long-term
participation in the peace missions.
20    As Oil Prices Boil 37
BY BIPUL NARAYAN
The government of a rural country like
Nepal cannot afford to subsidize petroleum products, which are mainly consumed in urban areas and by the middle
and the upper classes.
COLUMNS
Costs and Benefits,
BY SUMAN PRADHAN
The Final Push	
BYADITYA ADHIKARI
Kaindrops Keep railing.
BY KUNAL LAMA
DEPARTMENTS
Flavors of India,
Made by Nepal...
 27
BY PURNA BASNET AND BELA MALM IN NEW DELHI
Nepalis cook most ofthe food in the 25
eateries, representing the different states
ofthe Indian union, at Dilli Haat
The Fishermen
and the Sea
30
BY PRADEEP SILWALIN DEVAN1MPATTINUM
The tsunami waves have long gone. But
the fishermen arc just too afraid to go
back to the sea.
20
27
LIFESTYLE
Happy Campers 40
BY KUMUD NEPAL
Busy parents and bored students are
driving a ne trend—activities camps for
kids
Fast-Food lad 42
BY BISWAS BARAL
Fast-food is tasty, convenient and definitely "in." But is it healthy?
37
LETTERS	
WEEK IN PICTURES	
PICTURE OF THE WEEK
CAPSULES	
MILESTONE	
BIZ BUZZ	
CITY PAGE	
SNAPSHOTS	
KHULA MANCH	
BOOKS	
LAST PAGE	
42
11
32
40
.6
..9
10
.12
.15
15
.34
.44
48
.49
50
m.^j,^rLri
 Betters
CC It is the responsibility
of the security forces,
not human rights
workers, to 'come out
in the open' ++
BRYAN NEWMAN
Flawed argument
AS A FOREIGN VOLUNTEER AT
Collective Campaign for Peace, the human rights organization in the spotlight
in Kosh Raj Koirala's piece, ("Human
Rights Muddle," Jan. 16), I was extremely disturbed by the condescending and bitter tone with which the reporter portrayed some human rights activists in Kathmandu. The underlying assumption of Koirala's article, that human rights defenders must publicly substantiate threats on their lives, is severely
Ttmg
flawed, if not absurd. Anyone with even
a basic knowledge of Nepal's current
situation knows the vast impunity under which the security forces operate
and also the ineffectiveness of the
country's legal system. The recent
alarming statements by Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and the
United Nations regarding threats on
rights workers are further indicators of
the gravity of the situation. To assume
that in such an environment, that those
faced with threats on their lives can or
should "come out in the open" and confront their harassers is ridiculous. One
can only "come out," if those in power
create a safe enough space for such openness to occur, something that is certainly
yet to happen.
Contrary to Koirala's assertions, it is
the responsibility of the security forces,
not human rights workers, to "come out
in the open" and "clear the air of confusion." They could begin by reviewing
their practices of illegal detention and
forced disappearances. It is very possible
that such an action would build enough
confidence in human rights defenders
to then come out and "tell their side of
the story."
BRYAN NEWMAN
KATHMANDU
Shame!
I THINK IT'S A SHAME TO DENY
someone a position despite his competence ("Lame-duck Argument," Legal Eye, by Jogendra Ghimire, Jan. 23).
To stop Yubaraj Khatiwada from being the governor on grounds that he is
not a deputy governor is plain nonsense.
NAME WITHHELD
VIAEMAIL
Language barrier
I AGREE WITH ADITYA ADHIKARI
that Nepalis who become intellectually
mature in the west find it difficult to
represent Nepal in their writings ("The
Limits of Language," The Essay, Dec. 19).
JANUARY 30, 2005 | NATION WEEKLY
 However, many Nepalis leave Nepal after completing their undergraduate studies and are well acquainted with local
and national issues. Though Adhikari's
analysis of writers based in the west who
seem to have trouble dealing with their
native cultures is thought-provoking,
one cannot generalize that all writers
based in the west whose origins are elsewhere have trouble writing about their
native lands. Salman Rushdie and Edward Said have written with remarkable
clarity about Anglo-Indian and Palestinian issues, for example. This, however,
does not negate the fact that the more
you stay away from your native land, the
more difficult it gets to understand the
native culture.
Regarding translations, there is no
doubt that the emotions and ethos inherent in the native language cannot be
reflected in a foreign one. This is quite
evident when you compare "Muna
Madan" in Nepali and English. Besides
the problem of translating "direct conversations" and onomatopoeic words is
immensely problematic. Nonetheless,
translation is important as it gives writings a wider audience. Translators should
be aware of their audience and should
make their works compatible with the
reader's understanding. The translation
should be as faithful to the original text
as is possible.
It is also essential that writers have a
solid grasp of pertinent issues. Most
Nepalis who write in English seem to
lack an understanding of their culture.
Here, they would do well to learn from
foreign scholars who spend a long time
to understand us. The writings of Mark
Turin and Sara Shneiderman on
Dolakha's Thami community are a good
example of this kind of scholarship.
GANESH KHANIYA
MIN BHAWAN
Tourism talk
NEPAL HAS NOSE-DIVED 17
notches in the list ofthe world's top tourist destinations, compiled by
iExplore.com, a leading international
tourist company; thanks to the ongoing
conflict ("Risky Business," by John
Narayan Parajuli, Jan. 23).
Such statements have become a daily
nuisance; they arc repetitious and offer a
distorted theory. We have consistently
complained about the state of affairs and
blamed the internal conflict for the downward spiral in tourism. Although we must
admit that the conflict is part ofthe problem, it is not the entire problem.
As a nation, what is our perception of
tourism? It can mean a lot of different
things to different people. Tourism
started as an enlightening idea, introduced by western mountaineers; an entrepreneurial gesture that brought international attention to this country's radiant beauty. Today it has turned into a dire
necessity.
The government needs to have realistic aspirations for tourism and so must
the public. The goals set by the tourism
sector need to be realistic rather than Utopian. Tourism in this country has far too
long been portrayed as a cure for all economic ills. The concept of tourism has to
involve a sense of realism, awareness and
responsibility. Instead of being overtly
concerned about our top ten or bottom
ten listings, we should be pay more attention to infrastructure development with
a long-term objective. The perception that
we have become a dollar-hungry
serapheap must be eradicated. Tourism is
as much about cultural awareness and insight, as it is about bringing in foreign
exchange.
Through advertising campaigns and
direct marketing, the ministry of tourism can project its own perception of
tourism in its target market. As much as
wc need to show bank statements, ownership of property, etc., while traveling
abroad, the same should be applicable for
those coming into this country, albeit to a
lesser degree. This kind of control will
eventually lead to quality tourism. The
government must understand that providing services to the local population has
a sustainable future, on the basis of which
tourism will flourish. Since we've taken
it upon ourselves to live and die by the
sword of tourism, we must begin to concentrate on long-term objectives.
The tourism industry is always in a
state of flux, and its ups and downs are
quite frequent anywhere in the world.
For a country of our stature, the blame
game is dangerous and it makes us lose
focus on what we should be doing instead.
SHTVENDHA THAPA
LALITPUR
nation
Nation Weekly, The Media House, Tripureshor,
Kathmandu, Nepal (Reed. 1657059-060).
Tel: 2111102. 42 29825, 426 JS31,4263098
EDITOR: Akhilesh Upadhyay
adltDrial@naliDn.CDni.np
CONTRIBUTING EDfTOR: Suman Pradhan
COPY EDITOR: John Chllit
SENIOR STAFF WRITERS: Sushma Joshi, Satish Jung Shahi,
Tiku Gauchan
STAFF WRITER: John Narayan Parajuli
PHOTWOURNAUSTS: Sagar Shrestha, Das Bahadur Maharjan
DESIGNER: Raj Shrestha
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS: 1 nd ra Adhikari, Yashas Va idya
AD 4 CIRCULATION DIRECTOR: Krishna Shrestha
ASST. MARKETING MANAGER: Ramashwor Ghimire
MARKETING EXECUTIVE: Bljendra Piadhan
ad@natlon.com.np
SUBSCRIPTION OFFICER: Akshaya Shrestha
subscriptlon@natlon.com .np
ASST. SUBSCRIPTION OFFICER: Jeshna Karmacharya
DISTRIBUTION: Angsras Manandhar
MARKETING CONSULTANT: Kreepa Shrestha
CREATIVE DIRECTOR: N ripen dra Karmacharya
PUBLISHER: The Mirror Media Pvt. Ltd
AD ENQUIRIES; Tel, 4229825,428183142S3098
COLOR SEPARATION: ScanPro, PuSchowk, 5548861 5552335
PRINTING: NPTC Limited 4476228,4481745
DISTRlBLrTION; H.B. News, 4232784,4244879
Nation Weekly is published eveiy Monday by The Msrrof Media Pvt. Ltd.
All flights Reserved. The reproduction of r,he contents ot this
publication, in whole or in part. Is strictly prohibited wrthout the
phtM consent of the publisher.
Veil. L No. 41. For the week January 2+JU, 2W6, released on January 24
CONTACT
www.nation.com.np
nation
We prefer to receive letters via e-mail, without
attachments. Writers should disclose any connection
or relationship with the subject oftheir comments.
All letters must include an address and daytime and
evening phone numbers. We reserve the right to edit
letters for clarity and space.
E-mail: editorial@nation.cQm.rip
Fax: 4216281
Mail: NationWeekly
The Media House, GPO 8975, EPC 5620
Tripureshor, Kathmandu, Nepal.
SUBSCRIPTION
E-mail: subscription@nati on.com. np
Nation Weekly, The Media House, GPO 8975
EPC 5620, Tripureshor, Kathmandu, Nepal
Tel: 2111102, 4229825, 4261831, 4263098
Fax: 4216281
nation
iubsDription@natiQn.ooni.np
2111102
JANUARY 30. 2005 | NATIONWEEKLY
 The Only Lifestyle/Culture Magazine in Nepal,
... probably the most admired too.
QoloM til Um/C^IaXh
Nepali society has been enriched by the diversity of cultures, physical
characteristics and religious practices of the people, which make this
country such a fascinating tourist destination.
www.ecs.com.np
25%
DISCOUNT
For One Year
Subscription
Rs. 675 for 12 issues
of full color magazine
More than 110 pages
Also: Avuiiahlc at major
bookstands and
Departmental stores.
TO SUBSCRIBE. CALL SUBSCRIPTION AT 2111103 OR E-MAIL AT SU8SCRIPTiOKigECS.COM.NP
 WEEK IN PICTURES
JANUARY 30,2005 | NATIONWEEKLY
 PICTURE OF THE WEEK
MAN, CHILD AND CHILD: The
good old bicycle comes in
bandy for this shopper at
Soaltee Mode in Kathmandu
nation weekly/Sagar Shrestha
?l\
J—<*.
Wl. >.
r
 MEANWHILE ^
Costs and Benefits
The prime minister will deserve the blame if he indeed
pushes the nation to an eleetion that no one is prepared
for. But the largest share of the blame should go to our
Maoist comrades.
BY SUMAN PRADHAN
Let's admit it: The
option to revive
Parliament is getting nowhere.
With Prime Minister Sher
Bahadur Deuba constantly
shooting it down, the Supreme
t '.aim shying away and the Pal-
acc showing no inclination,
the 1999 Parliament appears,
well, as dissolved as ever. Does
this mean that you and me will
soon be dodging Maoist bullets and bombs and lining up
fearfully to cast our ballots? I
don't know. It's almost certain
that the government will announce elections, but uncertain whether those elections
w'ill be held. Even the government realizes that holding elections in several phases is not as
easy as it sounds.
But if Deuba has his way—despite howls of protest from
coalition partners, opposition and civil society groups, not to
speak of most donors who fear a bloodbath—he will push
hard for new parliamentary elections. It's a pity that the motive is not "let's resolve our problems through elections" but
rather "no elections mean I get sacked." Had a statesman been
at the helm right now, he would probably have told the Palace: "I tried to meet the mandate given to me, but unfortunately the Maoists are not willing to listen. So rather than call
a violent election and ignite a bloodbath, I tender my resignation. 1 don't want blood on my hands." Bur ... s igh.
The prime minister will deserve the blame if he indeed
pushes the nation to an election that no one is prepared for.
But the largest share ofthe blame should go to our Maoist
comrades. It is they who want a roundtable conference, an
interim govemment and constituent assembly elections. But
when the government is prepared to discuss all these issues at
the negotiating tabic, they slam the door shut.
What's more? The rebels have also vowed to disrupt new
elections until their demands are met. Under such circumstances, what option other than new elections or resignation
docs the prime minister have? Practically none. Resigning, as
we know, is not his preferred option.
"The next prime minister will face similar problems," says a senior politician.
"What good does it serve other than to
give the Palace another opportunity to
dabble in politics?" True,
but what purpose does a
new election serve? Will it
answer any of the underlying political and constitutional questions at the heart
of this three-way conflict? A
new Parliament, in theory,
may have enough political
will for constitutional reforms. After all, almost all the
political parties have accepted the need to address
constitutional deficiencies to
resolve the conflict. If these
parties get a chance to sit
down in the Parliament and
discuss the various options,
then they might agree on
major changes to the Constitution. But that is unlikely
to satisfy the Maoists because
the new Parliament will certainly not make any changes
in the preamble—the prime
bone of contention.
Then there is the political conflict between the parties and
the Palace. A new Parliament could in theory cut down many
of the powers the Palace currently exercises. But there is no
guarantee the Palace will agree to it either. After all, any amendments will need the Palace's stamp to come into effect. A new
election, therefore, could exacerbate the conflict by precipitating confrontation between the three sides. While confrontation is not necessarily bad, the high costs involved in this
case—from the initial violence to a protracted confrontation—
can make it very bad indeed.
But the strongest argument against new elections is
that there is nothing the new Parliament can do which
the old one cannot, provided it is revived of course. Unfortunately, that is not happening, and it won't happen
until the prime minister and the Palace are made to realize the potential costs of new elections. Please set aside
the legalese for once and think of the political benefits
of House revival. There is even a precedent for it: The
previous royalist governiments staffed VDCs and DDCs
in 2003-04 with formerly elected and unclccted officials
even though they had been disbanded more than a year
ago after their tenure expired. If it can be done once, it
can be done again. □
JANUARY 30. 2005 | NATION WEEKLY
11
 Dhonduv UGianqsar
[ A N D I C R A
FT   CENTER
s§?
Tridevi Marg, Thamel • Opp, of Sanchayakosh Building
Tel: 4416483, 4417295 • E-mail: wapema@wlink.com.np
FINE  CARPETS  &  DECORATIVE   ARTS
:!.i:1
 BIZ BUZZ
MAZDA DEALER
Kedia International has been awarded the
dealership of Swaraj Mazda vehicles in Nepal.
Swaraj Mazda is the second vehicle company after Change Pickup ofthe Changhe
Aircraft Industries, China, to have given the
dealership to the Kedia group. Swaraj Mazda
Vehicles Company, which specializes in
manufacturing buses and trucks, is established in India in collaboration with Mazda
Motor Corporation, Japan. Swaraj Mazda's
plans include introducing other range of vehicles—ambulances, police vans, trippers,
dumpers and bottle carriers—in the Nepali
market.
TOYOTA MARATHON
Vaidya Organization of Industries and Trading
Houses will sponsor the "Toyota Kathmandu
Marathon," slated for Feb. 18. This road run is
the only marathon in Nepal that has been sanctioned by the Association of International Runners and Road
Racers. The marathon will aim at creating awareness
about the need for
charity medical care.
people with an easy excess to the government policies.
VAT INCREASE
The Finance Ordinance 2061 the government issued on Jan. 12 has increased the
Value Added Tax on commodities to 13 percent from 10 percent. The increase in revenues is expected to raise an additional Rs
2.10 billion duringthe remaining six months
of the current fiscal year that ends in mid-
July. The government has also decided to
increase the total expenditure by Rs.3.5 billion for the ongoing fiscal year. The government has attributed this increase to the growing security expenditure as well as its decision to give 20 percent of basic salary as
monthly dearness allowance to 400,000 |
government employees.
DVD PLAYERS
Hansraj Hulaschand &Co., an authorized dealer
of Samsung electronics,
has launched a new line       .,   .,
NCCB OFFER
Nepal Credit and
Commercial Bank
has introduced a new scheme for its
account holders. The customers can now pay
their telephone bills directly thro ugh the bank.
The bank has inked an agreement with Nepal
Telecom to that effect. Customers will now be
able to pay telephone charges through their
individual bank accounts.
NEW WEBSITE
A new site to inform about the government
activities was launched on Wednesday, Jan.
19. The site, www.nepalhmg.gov.np, was
launched following the government's decision to update the activities ofthe ministries. The government also aims to foster
the concept of e-governance through its
new venture. The site includes information
about the structure ofthe government and
its three organs---the executive, thejudiciary and the legislative. The site contains
the details of the government policies,
projects, advertisements and holidays. Additional features include separate contact
and feedback pages. The government expects the new website to help make its activities more transparent and to provide
of DVD audio
players. The players include different versions like the DJ 750, MAX DJ 550, MAX DJS
and MM-DS80. Small in sizes, the players cost
anywhere between Rs.19,000 and
Rs.33,500. New features such as the DivX
and Qmp compatibility have also been added.
Available at all Samsung outlets, there is a one-
year warranty on all new audio systems.
DUTCH FAIR
Nepal participated in 35,n edition of the
Vakentiebeurs, a six-day tourism fair held
in Utrecht in the Netherlands, from Jan, 11
to Jan. 16. Around 7,500 people visited
the stall set up by Nepal. An estimated
145,000 visitors had attended the fair.
There were 1,600 exhibitors from 106
countries. Nepal Tourism Board led the
Nepali delegation. Other representatives
from Nepal included Nature Trail Trekking
and Expedition, Village Tours and Travels,
Explore Nepal and Richa Tours and Travels.
Nepal also screened a documentary film
on Manang during the fair.
Former chairman ofthe Rastriya Sabha
and noted freedom fighter in thesaat
saalko andolan, Beni Bahadur Karki,
passed away on Jan. 13. He was 75. Karki
died of a heart attack at the Norvic-Escorts
Health Care and Research Centre in
Thapathali. He had been admitted there due
to respiratory problems but was also plagued
by diabetes and hypertension.
After the restoration of democracy in
1990, Karki was the chairman ofthe Rastriya
Sabha for two straight four-year terms. Born
at Melungin Dolakha, he joined politics in
1948. Karki became the co-general
secretary ofthe Gorkha Parishad in 1950.
In 1960, Karki was elected to the
Parliament in the first multi-party general
elections. Following the royal takeover in
1961, his party merged with the Nepali
Congress. Karki then became a central
committee member of the NC.
"He was a man of integrity," says
Narahari Acharya, central committee member
of the NC. "it was not easy to run the first
elected House after almost three decades
of party-less rule, but he rose up to the
challenge." Karki's powers of persuasion
were perhaps his greatest asset, says
Acharya.
Karki is survived by two sons and a
daughter. Q
JANUARY 30. 2005 | NATIONWEEKLY
15
 YETI AIRLINES
(COVERING REMOTE SECTORS)
EFFECTIVE FROM 01 JAN - 28 FEB 2005
FROM
10
FLIGHT
N10.
DAYS OF
OPERATION
DEP
TIME
ARR.
TIME
RUPEE TARIFF
ONEWAY
DOLLARTAR1FF
ONEWAY
REMARKS
KATHMANDU
LUKLA
YA 111
YA101
YA103
DAILY
DAILY  '"
0700
0735
1665
91
DHC-6/300
LUKLA
0705
0740
1665
91
9!
DHC-6/300
DHC-6/300
" D'U'C-6/300
LUKLA
DAILY
0710
0745
0750
1665
1665
LUKLA
YA105
DAILY
071S
91
LUKLA
LUKLA
YA107
YAH 3
DAILY
DAILY
0340
0915
1665
1665
91
 '91	
DHC-6/3O0
DHC-6/3O0"
0845
0920
LUKLA
YA109
DAILY
0850
0925
1665
91
DHC-6/300
"DHC-4/30'0
LUKLA
YA. 115
DAILY
08S5
0930
1645
91
LUKLA
YAH 7
DAILY
1020
1055
1665
91
DHC-6/300
LUKLA
TAPLllUNG	
YAH 9
1,2,4,5,4,7
1025
1100
16(5
91
DHC-4/300
DHC-6/300'
YA901
3
1025
113S
2695
164
PHAPLU
YA181
1,3,5
1030
1105
1430
35
DHC-4/300
RUMJATAR
YA221
w
1030
1030
1105
1130
1245
61
DHC-6/300
MANANG
"'" MEGHAULY"
YA601
6
2995
122
DHC-4/300
YA171
DAILY
1130
12O0
1340
79
DHC-4/30O
BHARAIPUR
YA 173
DAILY
1200
■    1225
1425
1160
61
DHC-4/300
DHC-6/300
BHARATPUR
YA 175
DAILY
1400
1160
61
SIMARA
YA201
DAILY
0825
0845
970
55
SAAB 340/8
 - ™       ■
SIMARA
SIMARA
YA141
DAILY
1330
1355
970
970
55
DHC-6/300
YA 143
DAILY
1500
1525
55
DHC-6/300
SAAB 340B
SAA8 340B
KATHMANDU
KATHMANDU
YA301
DAILY
O70O
0300
4300
109
KATHMANDU
VA 302
DAILY
0700
0300
4300
109
BIRATNAGAR
YA151
DAILY
1000
104O
2585
85
5AAB 3403
■■■   — 	
BIRATNAGAR
YA153
DAILY
1210
1250
258S
85
SAAB340B
BIRATNAGAR
YA1S5
DAILY
1700
1740
2585
B5
SAA8 340B
SAAB 3406
POKHARA
YA131
YA137
DAILY
0825
0850
1710
67
POKHARA
DAILY
1000
1025
1710
47
SAAB 340B
POKHARA
BHAIRAHAWA
YA135
ft 163
DAILY
DAILY
1410
1435
1710
47
SAAB 3408
1550
1625
2220
79
SAAB 340B
8HADRAPUR
YA121
DAILY
1140
1230
2950
109
SAAB 3408
SAAB "3408
NEPALGUNJ
YA 177
YAI52
DAILY
1415
1515
3500
109
BIRATNAGAR
BIRAOGAK
BIRATNAGAR
POKHARA
POKHARA
KATHMANDU
DAILY
1100
1140
2535
85
SAAB 3408
KATHMANDU
KATHMANDU
YA154
YA1S4
DAILY
1310
1350
2585
85
SAAB 3408
SAAB 340B'
SAAB 340B
DAILY
1300
1840
2535
85
KATHMANDU
KATHMANDU
YA132
DAUY
0910
0935
1710
1710
47
YAI38
DAILY
1045
1110
47
SAAB 340G
POKHARA
BHAIRAHAWA
BHADRAPUR
KATHMANDU
KATHMANDU
YA134
DAILY
1455
1520
1710
2220
67
SAAB 340B
SAAB 340B
YA 164
DAILY
IMS
1720
79
KATHMANDU
YA 122
DAILY
1250
1535
1340
2950
109
SAAB 340B
NEPALGUNJ
KATHMANDU
YA178
DAILY
' DAILY
1635
3500
109
SAAB 340B
LUKLA
KATHMANDU
YAlli
YA102
0750
0325
1645
1645
a
DHC-fV300
KATHMANDU
KATHMANDU
KATHMANDU
DAILY
0755
OB30
91
DHC-6/300
YA 104
ft 104
DAILY
0800
083S
1645
91
91
DHC-4/300
DHC-4/300'
DAILY
0805
0340
1645
1465'
KATHMANDU
YA 108
DAILY
0930
1005
91
DHC-4/300
KATHMANDU
YA114
DAILY
0935
1010
1645
1445
91
DHC-4/300
DHC-4/300
KATHMANDU
KATHMANDU"
KATHMANDU
ft 110
DAILY
0940
1025
91
YA114
ya ne
DAILY
0945
1020
1665
91
91
DHC-4/300
DHC-6/300
DAILY
1110     *.
1145
1465
KATHMANDU
YA 120
1,2,4,5,6,7
1115
1120
1150
1155
1465
HBO
91
85
DHC-4/300
DHC-6/30O
PHAPLU
KATHMANDU
YA182
1,3,5
IrlEffiAULY
RUMJATAR
KATHMANDU
YA172
DAILY
2,4,7
1215
1120
1245
1155
1340
1245
79
DHC-6/300
KATHMANDU
YA222
79
DHC-6/300
MANANG
TAPLEJUNG
fiHARATPUR
KATHMANDU
KATHMANDU
YA402
YA 902
6
1145
1245
1300
2995
122
DHC-6/300
DHC-6/300
3
DAILY'
1150
2695
144
KATHMANDU
YA 174
1240
1305
1160
41
DHC-6/300
KATHMANDU
YA 176
DAILY
1440
1505
1160
41
DHC-6/300
SAAB 3408
SIMARA
KATHMANDU
YA 20?
DAILY
0905
1410
0925
1435
970
55
KATHMANDU
YA142
DAILY
970
55
DHC-6/300
KATHMANDU
YA144
DAILY
1540
1605
970
55
DHC-6/300
SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTICE.
MONDAY l.TUESDAY 2, WEDNESDAY 3, THURSDAY 4, FRIDAY 5, SATURDAY 4, S0NDAY7
CORPORATE OFFICE
LAZIMPAT, KATHMANDU
PH. NO. 4411912 (HUNT. LINE)
Fax:977-1-4420766
RKEBVAUQhLS
4421215(HUNT.UNE)
FAX;977-l-4420766
EMAIL: RESERVATIONS@YETIAIR.WUNK.COM.NP
TRIBHUVAN AIRPORT OFFICE
4493901,4493428
NOTE:
OUTSTATION'S TELEPHONE NUMBERS
BIRATNAGAR: 021-536612/536613 (CITY SALES OFFICE)
: 021-523838 (AIRPORT)
POKHARA     : 061 -530016 (CITY SALES OFFICE)
:06T-532217(AIRFORT]
NEPALGUNJ : 081-526556/526557 (CITY SALES OFFICE)
:081-550637 (AIRPORT)
SIMARA :051 -525389 (CITY SALES OFFICE)
:053-52O518 (AIRPORT)
BHAIRAHWA:071 -527527 (CITY SALES OFFICE)
071-527528 (AIRPORT)
SHADRAPUR :023-522232 [CITY SALES OFFICE)
023-522242
BHARATPUR :056-523136 (CITY SALES OFFICE)
056-523559 (AIRPOT)
INSURANCE SURCHARGE AND FUEL SURCHARGE WILL BE APPLICABLE IN ADDITION TO THE ABOVE FARE.
 Piece
McOuay   <H^
mamma   S5RSWSS
NCC Bank
GULP    AIR
colour   your   sky
jjUr itf ifMr ttwtt nai*..
Himautan Genual ImtLniAKi co. ltm
YOUR SECURITY. OUR CONCERN
Hotel
~/t'i m-Ars-4 Aaj-jxasr* frnpfisfy Sfmtnit far trat irtttttittl/ pfttlHIM V E S TA B L I
.ISHEO  tt»»*
anet
communication
I
Siddhartha Hospital Ltd.
nation
"The Notion ot Nationhood."
o/ANNA
Your Cud* Id LMng In Nepal
^
Nc|Ml 'For the fttpflriftnce Dfyaurlrfi tkiw"
&s@£8©
"On or WW*1
'c/es/gn
 r^H
Km
2Yr Free Spareparts Replacement
Guarantee I Upto 90% Financing I Free
Cassette Stereo I 3 Yr Warranty I 3 Yr
Free Servicing I Buy Back Guarantee.
At heart, you've always wanted a SUV, but your rational mind objected. Its
too big. Its too expensive. Its too much to maintain. Not anymore. TUCSON
is perfectlty balance between the economy of a cor and the ability of a SUV.
At last, your heart and mind agree.
AVCO INTERNATIONAL
Sole distributor ot Hyundai vehicle! tor Nepal
Direct line: 4425538. 4414634,4428679,4414281,4410394,4419690, 4412181, 4445831,
4443158. Nagpokhari, Naxal 2004070,2004170,9851047600 (Rablndra), 9851026M6 (Aamir)
DEALERS: Kathmandu: CAR MART: Ph: 4230008 Pokharo: Jonchhen Traders: Ph: 061-528589/539173. Butwal: Mally Auto Distributors; Ph: 071-540648.
071-550500. Narayanghaf: United Motors: Ph: 056-526562. Biratnagar: Auto Centre: Ph: 021-530301 - Fox: 021-535501. Birgunj: Ro[ Trading: Ph: 051-
528876.   SUBDEALERS:Nepalgunj:   Multimedia   Supplier:   Ph/Fax:   081-523423.   Janakpur:    Paras   Traders;   Ph:   041-525962.
 I
 UN PEACEKEEPERS
TESTING TIMES
The Royal Nepal Army has made a name for itself as UN
peacekeepers. But its questionable human rights record
is now stirring concerns about its long-term participation
in the peace missions.
KOSH RAJ KOIRALA
THE ROYAL NEPAL ARMY IS
in the headlines again. This
time the news is about its ca-
pacity to carry out the
United Nations Peacekeeping missions judiciously. The underlying argument: How can the Army, with a
questionable human rights record in
handling conflict at home, administer
conflicts elsewhere? The next question: Will the United Nations then reconsider the Army's involvement in its
peace missions on grounds of its poor
rights records and thus deny the RNA
personnel lucrative overseas assignments?
The U.N. Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances
had given Nepal government until Jan.
20 to respond to its report, which has
documented more disappearances in
Nepal than anywhere in the world. The
Army is allegedly responsible for 217
disappearances.
"Ifthe annual meeting ofthe Office
of the High Commissioner for Human
Rights endorses the report [ofthe working group] later this year, the United
Nations will be bound to follow it," says
a senior government official. "That will
certainly put a lot of pressure on the
U.N. peacekeeping officials to give a
second thought to the deployment ofthe
Army in U.N. peacekeeping missions."
Should that happen, the Army would
be a big loser. The United Nations and
the RNA have worked closely on peacekeeping missions in some ofthe world's
most volatile conflict over the years.
Starting in Lebanon in 1958, some 46,000
RNA soldiers have donned the Blue
Beret serving in 29 missions in different
parts ofthe world.
Each mission lasts for six months and
on average, a peacekeeping soldier receives $700 to $800 a month. RNA missions have contributed significantly to
the national coffers—more than $30 million each year since the early 70s.
Presently, there are 12 RNA missions
around the world, including in Congo,
Sierra Leone, Liberia and the Ivory
Coast. Nepal is among the top four
troop-contributing nations to U.N.
peace missions.
RNA officials stoutly defend their
human rights record and dismiss suggestions that the United Nations will
give it a short shrift. "We have excellent
human rights records in the [U.N.]
peacekeeping missions," says the Army
spokesman, Deepak Gurung, 'We want
to maintain the same at home as well."
W. fl
 mmmw^^BBBSmmmmwmSe^BBwamaa^MmHmamWmmBWMmum
The Army, he says, is committed to improving its rights records.
The Army also dismisses suggestions
that contributing 3,000 troops from close
to 90,000-strong force will harm the
counter-insurgency operation at home.
The thinking is that peacekeeping missions not only provide the poor RNA
soldiers an opportunity to make some
money but also a welcome breather from
the grueling battle at home. And if they
learn innovative ways to police conflicts
under qualified foreign commanders, so
much the better.
Some government officials warn not
to read too much in the U.N. group's
report. To them, it is a "customary report" and will have little effect on Army's
peace missions. "It is naive to assume
that the report is an end in itself," says
the Foreign Ministry spokesman, Durga
Prasad Bhattarai, reacting to the U.N.
working group's displeasure with the
security force's questionable human
rights records. "The report is only a preliminary one and the Nepal government
will have its say."
While government officials continue to play down the significance of
the working group's report, it is a fact
that Nepal's fast-deteriorating human
rights situation is under U.N. scrutiny.
The United Nations High Commis
sioner for Human Rights Luise Arbour
arrives in Kathmandu on Sunday, Jan.
23 for a four-day visit. Arbour is among
the highest-ranking U.N. officials to
visit Nepal since the insurgency started
in 1996. Such visits will no doubt put
more pressure on the Army to right its
wrongs.
The numbers are telling, if contested.
Out of the 217 disappearances in state
custody cited by the U.N. working
group, the RNA says only 85 were arrested before its deployment in 2001. And
the 40 of those arrested were released
after investigations, and 16 were handed
to the local administration.
Meanwhile, the pressure continues
to mount on Nepal to do something
about its poor human rights record.
Two leading human rights groups—
Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International—have put their advocacy
campaign on Nepal on a high gear. After an appeal to the Maoist supremo
Prachanda to stop abductions and killings of civilians on Jan. 10, Amnesty
International last week, on Jan. 20,
again drew the world's attention to the
growing number of illegal killings in
Nepal. "Both the security forces and
the Maoists are deliberately executing
civilians and unarmed Lighters," says
Ingrid Massage, the Asia director at
Amnesty International.
"What is
most chilling is that
these killings are go
ing completely unpunished, despite
numerous promises by the government
and Maoist leaders to uphold human
rights."
The report, "Nepal: Killing With
Impunity," gives details about the unlawful killings by both sides to the conflict
since the breakdown of the ceasefire in
August 2003. The report documents an
increasing sophistication among security-
forces in hiding these abuses, including
by burying bodies and forcing local
people to sign false witness statements,
as well as a continued rehictanee to punish those responsible.
Even those responsible for the most
serious and high-profile abuses, such as
the illegal execution of 19 unarmed
Maoists in Doramba village, Rarnechhap
in August 2003, have not been brought to
justice, Amnesty says,
"These unlawful killings are part of a
terrible spectrum of human rights abuses.
The Nepali people are living amid daily
torture, rape, 'disappearances' and arbitrary arrests," says Massage. "International
pressure can make a difference. Last year,
it helped produce a drop in reports of
'disappearances' in Nepal. Now it is time
the same level of attention is given to unlawful killings and other human rights
abuses," says Massage,
The next few months will be crucial
for RNA and indeed for Nepal, and the
date to watch out for: April 25-29, when
the U.N. Working Group on Enforced
or Involuntary Disappearances sits for its
75,h session in Geneva. For the second
straight year, Nepal wili be high on the
United Nations' human rights roster, n
 .<
PARITY AT L
22
JANUARY 30, 2005 | NATION WEEKLY
 ——      POPULARJOKEOUTOF
1ft       the Falklands War that
m ^^k       was fought in 1982
M        K       like this: How did the
At****^—\       Argentine
M ^^k       know the
rtfl^s      Mflrft^i Gurkhas had come
to fight? Answer: In the morning when
they woke up, their heads fell off.
Valor on the battlefield is the
Gurkha's hallmark, but their perseverance off the battlefield is remarkable. For
14 years, retired Gurkhas have protested
unequal pay and pension rules that make
them second-class soldiers in the British Army. Their struggle may finally have
paid off. The British government has put
aside a longstanding policy of revising
minor aspects of its policy regarding the
Gurkhas; something that retired soldiers, now activists, say was a cynical attempt to avoid major revisions. On Jan.
12, British secretary of state for defence,
Geoffrey Hoon, made an announcement
in the House of Commons: Britain will
conduct a wide-ranging review ofthe
Gurkhas' grievances.
Prem Bahadur Bega joined the British Army in 1984 and was given compulsory retirement in 1999 after 15 years of
service. A British colleague who was
recruited in the same year as Bega was
allowed to serve for seven more years
before his retirement. The Briton earned
several thousand pounds more in a year
than Bega and receives far more in pension—625 pounds a month compared to
Bega's 91 pounds. Bega's wife and children were allowed to accompany him
for only 18 months out of his 15 years of
service: The family of his British counterpart accompanied him throughout his
service. "This is gross injustice," says
Bega. Many other Gurkha veterans agree.
The Gurkhas want parity with their
British colleagues in pay and pension,
and also on the prickly issue of promotion. There seems to be a glass ceiling
UST?
Will Gurkhas finally receive equal treatment?
Britain has promised a 'wide-ranging review'
by October that will make it 'legally and morally irreproachable.'
BYJOHN NARAYAN PARAJULI
JANUARY 30.2005 | NATION WEEKLY
23
 COVER STORY
on Nepalis rising to higher ranks. Only
three have been promoted to the rank of
lieutenant colonel, and only one has
commanded a Gurkha battalion. Beyond
this, the Gurkhas argue, the terms of service should be equal. Only 25 percent of
Gurkhas arc entitled to married housing, and the length of time that Gurkha
families can stay with soldiers and noncommissioned officers is limited. The
grievances of pay, pension, promotion
and terms of service form the bulk of
the Gurkhas' discrimination case against the British government. For
years the British refused
hear their pleas. "The
British government even didn't bother
to respond to our petitions," says Gopal
Siwakoti, popularly known as Chintan.
a lawyer who acts on behalf of the Gurkha
Army Ex-Servicemen's Organization, the
GAESO.
But after the Royal Courts of Justice
in London cleared the way in May 2002
for the Gurkhas to sue the British Ministry of Defence, the British government
Cm
vJCC
Last Page, 50
found itself on the legal and moral low
road. It has now for the first time conceded that fact. On Jan. 12, Defence Secretary Hoon announced that the government would conduct a "wiLie-ranging
review" ofthe Gurkhas' pay and pensions. Hoon said that he wants to ensure
thai the Ministry of Defence is beyond
reproach both legally and morally.
Hoon's concession raises a few obvious
questions: Why did the ministry decide
to conduct the review now, and will the
proposed review end the unequal treatment regime to the satisfaction of all?
"An ultimatum from us," says Krishna
Rai, vice president of GAESO,
"prompted the MoD to make the new
announcement." GAESO, which is fighting court-battles against the ministry
over its unequal treatment, sent the ministry a legal notice on Nov. 19 asking it
to address all their grievances within a
month or face court action. The Gurkhas
see Hoon's announcement as a major
victoiy GAESO's legal advisers say that
their case was strong and that they had
collected new evidence that would have
brought them a victory in court. The
ministry must have found the new
evidence damaging, say
observers, because
it responded by
askine GAESO
to wait until January for a major
announcement
regarding
Gurkha pay and
pensions.
In a written
ministerial statement to the House of
Commons Hoon said, "As the House will
be aware, our policy is to keep the Brigade of Gurkhas' terms and conditions
of service under review', to ensure that
they are fair and that any difference from
the wider Army are reasonable and justifiable."
As happy as Gurkha activists are with
the British action, they are also taking
the new announcement with a pinch of
salt. They have demanded that the British government make all aspects ofthe
announcement public. In reply Lieutenant Colonel G.R. Harnby. chief of staff
of British Gurkhas Nepal, says: "It will
be a comprehensive review. It will look
into all aspects [and be] sensitive to the
Nepali dimension.''
A British Embassy statement says that
the examination ot the terms and conditions of service will be all-embracing
and look into the present terms of service for Gurkhas. The review is likely
to include their career profiles; length
of structures within
 TECIIfllEDM HOUSE Pvl. lid.
This week we explore about
Master of Tourism Studies
in Nepal
NEQlBMnifl
The 1st I.T.-based T.V. Program of Nepal
Kathmandu Academy of Tourism & Hospitality
^^l^lj^pn^alimati, KTM. Ph.No: 4275261
Only on Nepal Television
Everv Tuesdai
Repeat Telecast on Image
Everv Sundav at 2:00 PM
Contact:
iahouse Pvt, Ltd,
o.: 21685, KTM, Nepal
..jo.: 9851063178/9841321276
email: info@techmediahouse.com,ir
websites: www.techmediahouse.cGm.
the Brigade of Gurkhas; pay and pensions; allowances; personal support for
soldiers and their families, including
pastoral care, education for children,
medical provisions and leave arrangements. The Nepali government has already been informed ofthe review. Hoon
told British MPs the review would look
at whether differences between the
Gurkhas' conditions and those of British soldiers were "absolutely justifiable."
But the Gurkhas have warned the Ministry of Defence not to try to justify any
disparity. "We want complete equality,"
says Chintan. "There can be no justification for any kind of discrimination."
Is British policy racial discrimination? Britain says it's not, but an increasing number of Britons including the wife
of current Prime Minister Tony Blair,
Cherie Booth Blair, argue that it is a clear
case of racial discrimination and a human rights violation.
The argument has merit. Nepalis are
treated differently than other foreign
nationals serving in the British military.
JANUARY30,2005] NATIONWEEKLY
Fijians whom the Ministry of Defence
recruits enjoy the same conditions as
British troops.
Even the British government's Commission for Racial Equality has supported individual cases filed by some
Gurkhas. In the case of Hari Thapa, a
retired lance corporal, the commission
said that the ministry's responsibilities
under the Race Relations Act of 1976
outweigh the terms of the tripartite
agreement (see Box Story, Page 26).
 'COVER STORY
THE TRIPARTITE FACTOR
For more than 50 years, the
British government found
justification for treating the GurWias
differently in the Tripartite
Agreement (TPA) between Nepal,
Britain and India, signed in
February 1947.
The agreement is a complex
series of documents comprising a
memorandum, various annexes
and a series of trilateral and
bilateral exchanges between the
three governments. It was
negotiated shortly after Indian
independence to redefine the role
of Nepali soldiers in the armies of
other countries. Under the
agreement seven Gurkha
regiments continued to serve in
the Indian Army; four were
transferred to the British Army and
became the Brigade of Gurkhas.
Crucially for the future of the
Gurkhas, pay scales for all Nepali
regiments in both the armies were
pegged to the Indian army's pay.
More than half a century later the
Gurkhas are challenging both the
relevance and legality of the
agreement.
The arrangement results in a
huge disparity between British
soldiers and the Gurkhas. As a
result, say activists, more than
30,000 men retired from the
British Gurkha service with little or
no pension and were forced to
live in poverty, Gurkhas
who do receive pensions 4?
receive between one-sixth
and one-eighth of what
British pensionaries get
under the rules ofthe TPA.
The lower the rank, the
higher the disparity,
Britain says that
any major change
to the present
system would
raise awkward
questions
between the
three
governments
by breaching the
TPA,   There   are
additional implications for bi-lateral
relations with Brunei, where
23 percent of the Gurkhas are
stationed. Despite announcing a
review of the Gurkhas' demands,
the British will stick to the status
quo as long as possible. "Until
such time [as] the review
concludes [otherwise],"
says Lieutenant
Colonel Harnby,
chief of staff of
British Gurkhas
Nepal, "the TPA
Thapa, who lives in Wales, filed a racial
discrimination case against the Ministry
of Defence in an industrial tribunal after
he was given an early discharge from the
Army five years ago. During his 15 years
in military service, he wras paid 43,000
pounds less than his British counterparts.
Growing support among British political parties parallels the court support
for the Gurkhas. Opposition Liberal
Democrat defense spokesman, Paul
Keetch, said that the ministry must recognize that it cannot "treat 21 "-century
soldiers like 19lh-century conscripts."
Even the British public seems to care
about the Gurkhas. A demonstration of
more than 400 retired Gurkhas in
Liverpool caught the eye ofthe press, and
the Daily Express ran a campaign supporting the Gurkhas. In a poll of 16,000
people conducted by the newspaper, 99
percent supported the Gurkhas' demand.
In October, British Prime Minister Tony
Blair agreed to grant conditional citizenship to Gurkhas.
Gurkhas aren't going to be satisfied
with conditions any more. They have
called for complete equality with the
British soldiers. There is another outstanding issue: more than 10,000 veterans and widows who are without any pension or compensation. In one example,
in 1969 some 10,000 Gurkhas were made
redundant under a retrenchment scheme.
Their British counterparts who were also
laid off under the scheme were handsomely compensated; Gurkhas were paid
150pounds and sent home. In 1986, 111
Gurkhas soldiers on training in Hawaii
were disciplined and dismissed en masse
for mutinous behavior. Gurkhas said they
will firmly be in place."
Gurkha activists say that until
the discriminatory provisions ofthe
agreement are nullified, they will
continue to press their case. The
Gurkhas have been pursuing the
case under the Human Rights Act
1998 and the European Human
Rights Convention. Both ban
discrimination on the basis of race,
color or nationality. GAESO lawyers
say that the London High Court
ruled in their favor in February
2003 in a case that hinged on
challenging the validity of one of
the clauses of the TPA. The court
said then that 1947*$
discriminatory policies couldn't be
practised in 2003, the tripartite
agreement is dead except for
recruitment purposes, according to
the GAESO.
The British may eventually
have to give up the TB*\. The Indian
government has said clearly that it
wants to see the Gurkhas treated
equally. So far Nepal has kept
mum. o
were sent home without compensation
or the right to appeal. When asked ifthe
review would include these two issues, a
British official in Nepal says that the review will be forward looking, although
he quickly adds that he hopes the reviewers will look into the past and the future
before reaching any conclusions.
Some Gurkhas are optimistic that the
review will get them equal treatment. "Let's
hope the Ministry of Defence will end tlie
discrimination," says retired Lance Corporal D B Bomjon, who receives 71 pounds a
month, about Rs.9,000, as pension while his
British counterparts receive 475 pounds.
Tlie money is a big issue, and it is perhaps the reason the British have tried to avoid
a full review. Full parity could cost the British government more than 2 billon pounds
in total. It may finally be worth the cost to
shake-off one ofthe last bits ofthe colonial
liangover. And if complete parity isn't forthcoming, the Gurkhas say they are ready to
prove their mettle in tlie courtroom, just as
they have in the battlefields.   Q
JANUARY 30.2005 | NATION WEEKLY
 DIASPORA
FLAVORS OF INDIA,
MADE BY NEPAL
t
i        The food in the 25 stalls at Dilli Haat representing 25 states
in the Indian union are all cooked and served by Nepalis
BY PURNA BASNET AND
BELA MALIK IN NEW DELHI
TAKE SOMEONE OUT TO
dinner. Come stimulate
your appetite in a typical ambience. Savor specialties of
different states. The makki ki rotiandsarson
dasaag of Punjab ... dal-bati choorma from
Raj as than .., srikhatid,pao-bh<iji and pu ran
poll of Maharashtra ... macher jhol from
Bengal ... are all available under one
roof."
The brochure ofthe Dilli Haat could
have added one more line, "all cooked
and served by Nepalis." And it could
have added yet another, "momos,
chowmein, soup and thukpa available in
almost all the state stalls." The waiters
give the order to the cooks in Nepali,
the cook talks to the helpers in Nepali;
the Assam stall plays Nepali and
Assamese music in turns. The ambience
ofthe food stalls in Dilli Haat has a special something about it.
According to the manager ofthe Haat,
Zakir Ali, more than 10 million visitors
have entered Dilli Haat for its 25 food
stalls and 200 craft stalls since its inauguration in 1994, The 25 food stalls represent each state ofthe Indian union, and
the idea was to promote foods from each
region.
There have been Nepalis from the
beginning. They set themselves up, and
JANUARY 30.2005 | NATION WEEKLY
27
 DIASPORA
M
then moved on, but in the process the
pioneer Nepalis had installed other
Nepalis in each stall, now adding up to
between 150 and 200 in the 25 stalls. Most
of the Nepalis employed in Dilli Haat
are from two districts; Jhapa and
Pyuthan. The ethnic spectrum is varied
and includes Magars, Bahuns, Tharus,
Chhetris, Tamangs, Rais and Limbus.
Zakir Ali does not know the number of
Nepalis working in the stalls; "There are
some Nepalis in the stalls of Northeast
India since their food is momo and
chowmein." The traditional food of the
people of the Northeast is not momo
and chowmein, anymore than it is the
food of the people of Nepal.
Raj Subba, 15, has spent a few months
in Delhi. He came with his "dai" from
his village in Jhapa to "roam." Now he is
a helper in the Manipur food stall. Everyone we spoke to came through a "dai"
or a "bhai" or a "kaka" from the village.
They in turn brought other young persons along with them.
The journey is not easy even for a
veteran. Nepalis arc troubled in the train
and on the border. The TTE, the traveling ticket examiner, in the train, especially in Bihar, extorts extra money on
the allegation that their tickets are invalid. The police on the trains who are
meant for passengers' security threaten
and loot them. And when they return to
Nepal, the Indian security at the border
opens their bags, pulls everything down,
and takes bribes from them.
Sometimes they lose all their money
on the way and don't eat anything for days
until they reach their destination. Bhim
Singh from Pyuthan says that he could
not have made it on his own the first
time.
In Delhi, the Nepalis in the food
business in Dilli Haat and Chanakya, the
other "momo-chowmcin" hotspot, live
in Pilanji, a slum behind the Sarojini
Nagar market. Living in Delhi is not
easy. There is a water problem in their
locality. Few Nepalis dare to argue with
their landlords, since they have no
backup. Language poses another problem. The working hours are long, from
8 a.m., when they come in to ready the
hundred and more dishes on the menu,
to 11 p.m., after the last guest has left
The grind continues seven days a week,
barring Holi, the only day on which Dilli
I
GOOD OLD NEPALI-PAN: Most
ofthe Nepali workers are from
Jliapa and Pyuthan
Haat is shut. Walking back alone at night
is not advisable. There have been incidents involving local gangs and the Delhi
police, both of which harass and loot.
There are an estimated 600,000 Nepalis
in Delhi but there arc no records as to
what they do and how they survive.
The wage rate for work in Dilli Haat
remains fixed over the years. Cooks get
up to Indian Rs.4,000. Helpers make a
maximum of Rs.l,000, and waiters
Rs.l,500 a month. You begin as a cleaner
and slowly move up to being a chef or a
cook, but that requires quick learning.
There is no insurance, bonus or any
other rights. If someone falls ill, the oth
ers in the community take care of the
invalid.
Deepak was removed from service.
No one backed him. He had not heard
ofthe Prabhashi Nepali Sangh (Bharat),
a mass organization of Nepalis that
works especially with waiters and helpers, or any of the mass organizations of
other parties in Nepal— Ekta Samaj,
Nepali Jan Adkhikar Suraksha Samhiti
and Nepali Jan Samparg Samhiti—but
was keen to contact them. Deepak says
it is common for Nepalis to get exploited in Delhi. The owners do not pay
for months, and when the worker asks
for the payment, the owner slaps a false
1?°» wi
«^TT
28
 r'
charge of theft and it becomes a police
case. The owner has the law and influence on his side. The Nepali does not
even have a union on his.
Deepak and his friends, Govinda and
Krishna, are bitter about life as workers
in Delhi, They say that the people in
power in Nepal get dollops of dollar as
aid money, which is all eaten up. There
are no jobs. There is a conflict. They
can't return due to that. If there were
jobs in Nepal, who would come to Delhi
to wash dishes in a restaurant?
The manager, Zakir Ali, says that the
stalls were contracted to the state tourist corporations, who then leased the
kitchens to private contractors or ran it
themselves. Any complaints have to go
EVERYBODY'S FAVORITE: Momos,
chowmein and thirkpa are available
in almost all stalls
to the corporations through the contractors. It was not possible.
The long hours, no paid leave, low
pay and the arduous journey make going
home difficult. Some of the workers
have not met their families for years.
Communication is maintained through
letters and phone calls. They do not read
the papers. New entrants in the labor
community bring news from home.
There is no time to watch TV. Sometimes this lack of communication creates trouble.
"Dai, what is your name?''
"Tara Thapa"
"Which Thapa?"
He grinned and said that he is a "Rai
Thapa."    The    owner    of   his    stall
(Jharkliand) re-christened him and the
new title stuck,
Tara Rai's wife at home left with another man leaving his parents with their
two children. He felt bad. He had to
leave for Delhi to feed his family and
this is what he did.
Nepalis are popular with the managers and owners. Zakir Ali says that as
manager he has no complaints: "Nepalis
are brave and hardworking." R.K.
Cbandro Singh, manager of the
Manipur food stall, says that all his staff
are Nepali. "They are very nice boys.
They work well and are smart and quick
on their feet. Best of all, they laugh and
joke." The boys and he communicate
in broken Hindi.
How do Nepalis learn how to cook
chicken xacuti,$evpari, chicken in tare's nest,
akhumi, attishe, maser tenga and crombn'i
Someone from the state comes for a bit
and teaches some basics. For the rest, it
isa lot of imagination and experimentation with food that is unfamiliar. Bikram
Poudel Sharma, manager ofthe Goa stall,
says. "Goan food is very easy. You just
take coconut and mix it with masala. The
more the masala ferments, the tastier the
food. We use masala that is kept for
weeks." Mrs. Mendonza, any comments?
But the customers don't complain.
The stalls are thronged by hungry visitors through the day. Dolly -\rora. a
smart-looking woman in her early 30s.
beams. "I like eating here. The service is
good, the price reasonable. And I get
the extraordinary experience of tasting
food from ail the states of India." Her
favorite food in Dilli Haat? "Momos and
chowmein."  □
29
 TSUNAMI
fl
THE FISHERMEN A
The tsunami waves have long gone. But the fishermen
are just too afraid to go back to the sea.
BY PRADEEP SILWAL
IN DEVANIMPATTINUM
PEOPLE LIVING IN THE
coastal fishing hamlets of
Tamil Nadu arc gradually picking up the pieces oftheir splintered lives tossed away by the tsunami
waves. Thanks to the combined, if somewhat chaotic early on, relief efforts of
the government, NGOs and individuals.
Bulldozers are busy leveling the
ground. Disinfectants have been spread
on the both sides ofthe dusty road. Everyday the fishermen get to sec hordes
of visiting aid workers who take their
pictures and listen to their stories. People
have started to move back into the places
where their mud and thatched houses
once stood. Children straddle the overturned boats and pose for photographs
even grandmas arc eager to oblige the
cameramen with their toothless smiles.
Some semblance of a normal life is
emerging in the chaos, though the villagers realize it's going to be a long hard
struggle. On the morning of Jan. 15,
three weeks after the disaster that
claimed around 3,000 lives in Tamil
Nadu and more than 9,400 all over India, a group of fishermen from
Devanimpattinum village in
Cuddalore district, some 200 kilometers south of Chennai, faced the sea
with their repaired boats. The eternal
provider served yet another raw dish
on their plates: only two fishes. On a
normal day before the tsunamis, the
group of four would have netted at least
150 fish in two hours. "I put the net
into the sea but I could hardly get
much. All I got are these two," says
Augammuthu, 33, one ofthe four fish
ermen who had ventured out to sea,
pointing at a meager catch.
Tsunami waves have deposited tons
of sand on the shallow waters, disturbing the marine environment near coastal
A MEAGER CATCH: That's [ill
these fishermen got
areas. The news of disappearances ofthe
fish has heightened the distress level of
the fishermen who have already lost
boats and fishing nets. Many of them lost
homes and loved ones too. The media
speculates that 85 percent ofthe affected
are poor fishermen living near the sea.
Before the tsunamis came, these fishermen would earn on an average Rs.3,000
every month. When a group went out to
¥  ffl
30
 ND THE SEA
sea—sometimes for as long as a week—
they would make Rs. 1,000 from a single
excursion. It is a different story now.
On the coast, the tsunamis have left
behind tattered fishing nets, and small
wooden boats called valiants have been
crushed to pieces. Boats and damaged
fishing nets remain scattered in places
that were once fishermen's lawns. Further inland, fiber boats are lying upside
down, almost all of them in irreparable
condition. The fishermen neither seem
to have the will nor the resources to get
them back in shape or to take them
ashore. The authorities have requisitioned heavy-duty cranes from the Madras Port Trust to lift the boats.
The logistics and the money needed
to buy new boats and nets aside, the fishermen arc simply too afraid to go to the
sea.
"The waves have damaged our boats,"
says Mailvanan, a fisherman and father
of three children. "Some are in useless
condition. We need new nets. We arc
waiting for the government to provide
us those things."
"But all of us arc waiting. No one
wants to be the first to go to sea. Everybody is afraid," adds his friend
Dcvanathan, 40, who has three daughters. Both of these fishermen lost all of
their belongings but at least have their
families intact.
The Tamil Nadu government provided Rs.4,000 as immediate relief to each
of them. The feelingamong the displaced
fishermen is that "the government will
take care of us,"
All along these coastal villages, fishermen have started to repair their homes
and some have already returned to the
patches of land where their thatched mud
house once stood. In Sonagappam,
Shivaraj, 25, and his wife Kalaiselvi, 22,
have just finished putting a corrugated
iron sheet roof over their temporary
house with the construction materials
they received from World Vision India
Tsunami Relief Program—which has
PICKING UP THE PIECES: Cranes
being used for relief work
helped 500 families in Cuddalore build
temporary shelters. Some ofthe houses
have already been banded over to those
people by Dean Hirsh, international
president of World Vision, during his
visit to the affected areas.
"These temporary houses arc meant
for a year, until these [people] will be
able to build their own houses," says
Jayanth Vincent of World Vision India.
The Would Vision India relief team
plans to wind up its immediate relief
program by Jan. 26. So far it has provided food, clothing, utensils and clean
drinking water to 40,000 families in 10
affected sites in four states in India.
"To help the fishermen start their life
once again, we are looking at the possibility of starting a micro-finance program to lend money to buy fishing equipment," says Vincent.
These fishermen lost just about everything. But they still have their pride
intact and realize that relief efforts won't
take them too far in earning their livelihood. One after another, people who
came to receive relief packets say that
they are not poor people. "We had color
TV, grinder, and fridge. Floods washed
everything away."
Says Vathani, a fisherman's wife and
mother of three children, "This packet
will help our family for 10 more days.
But it is the government that must help
us out in the long run." The
Pondicherry government has announced a fresh package of Rs.432.9
million for the fishermen to purchase
boats and fishing nets.
Here in the coastal villages of Tamil
Nadu, heavy-duty cranes are busy lifting
the boats and what remains of them. The
people who rushed in with food and relief materials are slowly beginning to leave.
The fishermen realize they will have to
fend for themselves; they will not have
the liberty to stand on the beach and watch
the sea forever. The question that haunts
the relief workers the most: Ifthe fishermen arc afraid to go to sea, what are they
going to eat? □
(Silwal, with Wyrld Vision Nepal, was recently in
Tamil Nadu assisting the World Vision Indus tsunami
relief team)
JANUARY 30. 2005 | NATIONWEEKLY
31
 mBmsmmmwnwtmhmWm
THE ESSAY
':-,
THE FINAL PUSH
The support the Maoists
have among the populations in the countryside
they operate in is tenuous
and liable to erode as their
guerilla tactics intensify
BYADITYA ADHIKARI
THE MAOIST DECLARATION
of strategic offensive is supposed to signify a dramatic
change in their tactics. Any i
uprising that uses the tactics of guerilla
war—blockades, bandas, ambushes on
military convoys—has found sooner or
later that these tactics ultimately have
only limited success. The state cannot
be taken over by guerilla tactics alone.
What guerilla warfare has done historically, however, in China for instance, is
that it has gained time for the development of conventional forces. The declaration of strategic offensive, in theory at
least, signifies a great confidence in the
rebel leaders about their capability to
fight the security forces on their own
terms. Guerilla warfare, by its very nature, is strategically defensive. Strategic
offensive means a complete change in
the methods of war.
To go beyond guerilla warfare is extremely difficult for any rebel group. The
historian Eric Hobsbawm has written:
"It is comparatively easy for a widely-
backed guerilla movement to eliminate
official power from the countryside, except for the strong points actually physically occupied by armed forces. The
real problem is to get beyond that
point."
So the Maoist declaration of strategic offensive in Nepal is unconvincing.
They may have stepped up the intensity
oftheir attacks, but they are still guerilla
attacks. The last blockade they enforced
was well-heeded because ofthe fright
they instilled in everyone by burning IS
ttucks, but that blockade did not reveal
any increase in their ability in becoming
strategically aggressive.
The other crucial factor necessary
for a guerilla army to embark on the
offensive is to have gained the support—active or passive—of the local
populations among whom, or close to
whom, they engage in their activities.
Toward this end, textbooks of such
warfare always emphasize the need to
inspire the "oppressed population"
with revolutionary ideals, but inspiring non-military populations to support and condone guerilla operations
is especially difficult in countries like
Nepal, where there is no foreign
power to fight against. It is easier to
gain full-fledged support against "foreign imperialists" than it is against a
"class enemy" for the simple reason
that the former is easier to identity. A
ruling class that looks different and
speaks a foreign language will arouse
more hatred than one who looks and
talks the same as everyone else.
Nevertheless, despite the civilian
uprisings in Dailekh. the Maoists seem
to have had some success in gaining
the passive support ot populations. This
mostly means that villagers in many
places are not willing to inform the Army
about Maoist activities, and that the "donations" the Maoists ask for are provided
somewhat ungrudgingly, almost as a routine activity that needs to be borne with.
The key to this support has been to intimidate villagers by demonstrating
force, but not to the degree that it would
antagonize them. The villagers have to
be assured their safety if they don't say
or do anything against the Maoists.
The following observations are based
on a recent visit to a few villages in
Dolakha district, where the rebels tread
the fine line between intimidating and
but not amagoni7ing the populations:
where a local shopkeeper said that "ifthe
Maoists demand more of us, then the villagers here will revolt against them like
the people of Dailekh." Yet, the sank
shopkeeper also said, "No one here will
32
JANUARY 30. 2005 | NATION WEEKL*
|_LU
 reveal anything about Maoist activities to
the Army. But there are a few who reveal
Army activities to the Maoists."
How, then, have the rebels been able
to gain this kind of passive support?
To begin with the simplest reason:
The Maoists pay for everything they buy
at the local shops and never give the impression of living better than the villagers. They are not averse to visiting villages alone to buy the small day-to-day
goods they need. While this helps to
humanize the Maoists in the minds of
the population, it is also flattering to the
villagers that even the powerful rebels
are dependent on them in some ways.
In contrast, although soldiers of the
Royal Nepal Army too pay for the small
things they buy, they come to villages in
groups, armed and uniformed, and appear mostly self-sufficient, with little
need to buy goods from the village shops.
Besides occasionally harassing the villagers for information, they mostly keep
to themselves. Their intimidating appearance and their apparent self-sufficiency has earned them the reputation
of being high-handed and arrogant.
Maoist methods of identifying and
"eliminating" their enemies are seen as
cold, efficient and precise; the Army's as
belligerent and inaccurate. "The Army visits our village, yells at some people, sometimes beats someone up and then leaves,"
said a villager. "But when the Maoists are
looking for someone who has informed
on them, they make sure they have the
right person before killing him."
As for convincing villagers ofthe
Maoist cause, the rebels seem to have
had little success. The implementation
ofthe most important rule of guerilla
warfare as far as gaining the support of
villagers goes—to bring land, justice
and schools wherever the rebels go—
has been severely limited both by Maoist
capabilities and the desires ofthe villagers. This is partially so because this guerilla war, despite what Maoist rhetoric
states, is not directed upon "foreign oppressors", and there is not much "lifting
of oppression" that can be done without
antagonizing people. This is because
very few in these rural communities are
actually perceived as oppressors, and the
"rich oppressors" ofthe capital are too
far away to arouse hatred.
So no land has been redistributed
among the disenfranchised, because the
Maoists don't have adequate control over
the villages and also because they cannot
risk the anger of villagers whose ways of
life would be unsettled with any redistribution of property. As for bringing
schools and education, the
propaganda camps that hundreds of abducted students
arc forced to attend simply
do not qualify as an education. There have been reports that the
rebels are preparing a curriculum that
includes military studies, Marxism and
Leninism, economics, culture and even
something called "socialist aesthetics,"
but it is clear that they do not have the
resources to create and disseminate anything close to a decent education. Most
rural populations are aware that a replacement ofthe government curriculum with
a Maoist one can only be a serious blow
to whatever achievements that have been
made by our educational system in the
past half-century.
The problem of bringing justice to the
people is the most interesting of all. The
only way in which the rebels can be said to
have brought justice is by killing or forcing to flee various officials and schoolteachers who supposedly appropriated
public funds for private use. Among most
ofthe villagers I met in Dolakha it was an
unquestioned truth that those who were
"punished" were guilty of the crimes they
had been accused of and their punishment
was seen to be justified. It was however
difficult to ascertain whether the "guilty"
officials were considered to be guilty by
the villagers before they were punished,
or whether the villagers simply accepted
The state cannot
be taken over by
guerilla tactics
their guilt after the fact. One villager even
demonstrated pleasure in describing how
the Maoists had publicly humiliated a government official before killing him. His
story ended with a gleeful laugh, an indication ofthe thrill he felt at this extreme act
and his awe ofthe rebels.
This may appear as justice to some,
but it is justice of a most primitive nature and cannot have any lasting value.
Many people living in rural areas under direct or indirect Maoist control are
willing to accept powers
over themselves as long as
they feel they are indirectly a part of that
power. As long as the Maoists are perceived to be powerful and as long as they
punish people who are perceived to be
"different" from the rest of the population, there will be those who consider
them to be just. This is mostly a case of
people equating power with justice.
All this is to say that, if the Maoists
have been able to gain support in much
of the countryside, this support doesn't
exactly translate into a whole-hearted
backing. There are those, no doubt, who
feel awe and admiration toward the
Maoists, but this admiration is mostly
for their power, not for their ideals. This
makes the support the rebels have quite
tenuous. Application of more power
onto the villagers, by extortion or by
other demands made upon them, will
make communities withdraw even passive support. An increase in guerilla activities—planting of bombs in public
places, the enforcement of blockades—
will have the same effect, as these too
threaten and inconvenience the general
population. On the other hand, as whatever support the rebels have is based
mainly on the awe that power inspires,
any intimation that people have of a decrease in Maoist power will also lead to
a withdrawal in support.
What the consequences ofthe strategic offensive will be arc yet to be seen.
But an intensification ofthe kind of guerilla warfare we have become familiar
with will only mean a further alienation
of the population on whom the Maoists
depend. □
There are those who feel awe and admiration toward the Maoists,
but this admiration is mostly for their power, not for their ideals.
JANUARY 30. 2005 | NATION WEEKLY
33
 ii
■tj
CITY ThisWeek
EXHIBITION
The "Buddha Gallery," in partnership with "Gallery 9," presents
50 paintings by Kang Chan-Mo. Among the 50 paintings, 25 will
be exhibited at the Buddha Gallery in Thamel and 25 at Gallery
9 in Lazimpat. The Korean artist Chan-Mo uses few colors in
his experimental approach. For this exhibition, Chan-Mo has
derived inspiration from a recent trek amidst the natural
splendor ofthe Himalaya in the
Khumbu region of Everest. The
paintings are simple figures that
depict his imagination of Buddha, various landscapes and
people. Born in 1949, Chan-
Mo got his Bachelor's degn
in fine art from Joong Ang
University. This is his 12'1'
solo exhibition till date. Date:
Jan. 20 to Jan 26. For information: 444-1689, 442
8694.
The Cafe at the Hyatt Regency presents the Grand Dosa Festival. It's going to be a full meal with a variety of delectable vegetarian and non-vegetarian fillings to suit different taste buds.
From an anytime snack of crisp paper-thin wafers to a filling
meal widi wholesome stuffing served with chutneys and a dollop
: of butter, the dosa is versatile. For non-vegetarians, on offer are
mutton keetna vatuvai dosa, chittinadu chicken dosa, egg and
chicken keema dosa. For vegetarians there is the paneer dosa, the
paper dosa and more. The cafe, located at the lower lobby overlooking the poolside, is set amidst a tranquil environment of
traditional Newari architecture. It comprises of indoor and outdoor seating offering panoramic views ofthe Boudhanath Stupa,
landscaped gardens and the poolside areas. Be a part ofthe Grand
Dosa Festival. Till Jan. 30. Time: 6:30 p.m. onwards. For further information: 449-1234.
Martini Mania
Hotel Yak and Yeti presents
Martini Mania at the Pub. Date:
Jan. 21 - Feb. 5. Time: 12 a.m. -
12 p.m. For information: 424-
8999.
Seafood Festival
TJie Sea has always offered
a variety of exquisite and
diverse range of exotic
seafood. The Signature
Restaurant at the Rox
presents palate-
tantalizingfricd jumbo
batter-fried ruby rocky mountain crab, white oats fried sea
fishes and other delicious seafood
cuisine duringthe seafood festival. An array of wines will also
U        B
I
H
District Development PROFILE of NEPAL 2004
District Section iitcludes-
Dislticl Maps /Development Indicators of Each District /VDC data on
Population & Infrastructure /District wise database on-
Topographt Demography Household Characteristics, Economic Activities, Social Characteristics,
Agriculture, Irrigation, Forest, Co-operatives, NGO's, Transportation, Communication, Energy
$*/stent, Education, Health, Drinking. Woler, Gender, Children and many mora
Basic Information on oil 58 Municipalities
Available at Renowned Bookstores in Town
COVERAGE
Divided mainly on three parts,
the publication covers
i. National ii. Districts Iii. Municipalities
1130 Pages
informal Sectoi Research & Study Centei{ISRSC}: Kamladi, Kathmandu, Hepal/Ph: 4429324/ Email: mformni@ntc.net.np/ Website: http://www.isrsc.Otg
34
JANUARY 30. 2005 | NATION WEEkl
 For insertions: 2111102 or
citypage@ nation.com.rip
CITY PAGE
be available alongside the food.
Date: Jan. 12 -Jan. 26. Time: 6
p.m. onwards. For information:
449-1234.
Trip of all Times
For just Rs.5999 for Nepalis
and $199 for expatriates, the
Jomsom Mountain Resort
provides two nights and three
days accommodations. The
price will also include roundabout airfare from Pokhara to
Jomsom, daily buffet breakfast
and dinner, pickups and drops
from the airport to the resort
and vice versa and a tour ofthe
Marpha village in Jomsom. For
information: 449-7569.
Malaysia Dream Holiday
Marcopolo Travels presents enchanting and affordable holidays. State-of-the-art metropolis, sun kissed beaches, bargain
brand name shopping, theme
parks, fusion cuisine and much
more. For information: 201-
2345.
Margarita Night
Dwarika's Hotel presents the
Margarita Night serving
Churasqueria BBQ, Latin
American Delicados and refreshing margaritas. Also enjoy the
Latin beats by Abhaya and the
Steam Injuns. Date: Jan. 28.
Price: Rs.799. Time: 7p.m. onwards, Happy hours from 4p.m.
- 7p.m. everyday at Fusion Bar.
For information: 447-9488.
Kickin' Up Dust
Siddhartha An Gallery features the
Australian Contemporary Indig-
Taste of Thailand
The Rox Restaurant features diverse range of popular dishes of
Thailand. The herbs, spices and
market fresh ingredients vvill make
a difference in your culinary experience. Thai buffet lunch every
Fridays and Saturdays. Time:
12:30 p.m. - 3 p.m. For information: 4491-234.
Seasons Special
Exotic Thai, sizzlingtandoori, traditional Nepali and Italian encounter daily for lunch at the
Shambala Garden Cafe, Hotel
Shangri-la. Price: Rs.450 including a bottle of soft drink or
mineral water. For information:
441-2999.
Krishnarpan
The Nepali specialty restaurant
at Dwarika's Hotel offers fine
diningceremonial cuisine. Four
to 16 course ceremonial
cnous Cultural Festival, with
exhibition of photographs of
tlie country's aboriginal Jiabi-
tats and their culture. Date:
Till Jan. 31. For information:
421-8048.
Masquerade Night
Hyatt presents the Masquerade night featuring models
from dreams unlimited, various pop stars with DJ's
Rupesh& Raju. Date:Jan. 29.
Price 400 nett.Time 8 p.m onwards.
meal. Open for lunch and dinner, For information: 4479-
488.
Fusion Night
The Rox Bar welcomes everyone
to be a part of the Fusion Night.
The rhythmic and harmonic
p.m. onwards. For information:
449-1234.
Winter Splash
Want to sweat in the winter? Go
and experience Shahahshah's
indoor heated pool and relax in
the steam and sauna. Price:
Rs.350 per person. Exclusive ladies' day on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Time: 7 a.m. - 7 p.m.
beats of the eastern and the
western instruments—a treat for
the senses. Enjoy the sarangi
played by Bharat Nepali with a
well-blended mix of western
tunes played by The Cloud Walkers. Every Wednesday. Time: 6
Radisson Delicacy
Hotel Radisson features an array of stunning new BBQ combinations. BBQ Dinner every
Wednesday and Friday with
happy hours from 6-
8p.m. Also BBQ Lunch every
Saturday and Sunday with happy
hours from 12- 3p.m. Special offer: Drinks, buy one get one free.
Jukebox Experience
The jukebox experience with
Pooja Gurung and The Cloud
Walkers every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday at Rox Bar. For
information: 449-1234.
JANUARY 30. 2005 | NATION WEEKLY
35
 g
Freedom is a state of mind. Express it the way you
think it. Freedom is a precious gift. Cherish it. Freedom
Jives within you. Unleash its spirit.
The Himalayan Times is all about freedom. Freedom of
thought and expression. Freedom of knowledge and
information. Freedom without mental boundaries. Freedom
.V
<L
■
M
The Himalayan
A    GREAT    NEWSPAPER
 BUSINESS
POLITICS OF OIL
The government of a rural
country like Nepal cannot
afford to subsidize petroleum products, which are
mainly consumed in urban
areas and by the middle and
the upper classes
BY BIPUL NARAYAN
After tolerating losses amounting to Rs.400 to Rs.600 million
every month for more than a
year, the government has finally
taken the inevitable plunge. It increased
prices of petrol and diesel by 11 percent
and 17 percent, respectively; LP gas prices
by more than 13 percent; and kerosene
prices by 29 percent. Prices are now
closer to those in India; the higher prices
will also allow the Nepal Oil Corporation, the NOC, to recoup its losses
amounting to more than Rs.5 billion.
The widespread protests after the price
hike have again put the NOC in the eye of
the storm. Most people would not mind
paying higher prices for petroleum products, if they were convinced that price hikes
were solely the result of a rise in international prices. But they are not. They think
that the NOC is inefficient and corrupt;
and that they are just being made victims of
greed in high places. So much vvas made
clear in television interviews of common
people right after the
price hike.
No government could have continued
with such huge losses for long. The amount
of money under consideration was just too
big—about 1.5 percent ofthe Gross Domestic Product every year. Moreover, the
spending had no economic rationale. The
government of a poor and rural counuy like
Nepal cannot afford to subsidize petroleum
products, which arc mainly consumed in
urban areas and by the middle and the up
per classes. Government moneyr is much
more productive if it is spent for building
more schools, health posts and roads, which
the country so badly needs. Also subsidies
create distortions in the market; people no
longer look for cheaper alternatives and end
up consuming much more ofthe product
than is good for the economy
Tlie government could have, however,
done a lot more to make the distribution of
petroleum products more efficient and
transparent. This would have uotonly made
petroleum prices lower and created much
less resentment when the prices were raised.
For too long, the NOC has been a classic example of a poorly run public enterprise. The corporation is a monopoly; overstaffed; rife with corruption; routinely tinkered with by the government ofthe day; its
bosses band dole-out to political parties
during elections. It is lacking in^ initiative
and dynamism, and proper audits arc seldom carried out. All this means the operational costs of the NOC are much higher
than they should be. In normal times, the
NOC has survived on
government grants or by
overcharging customers.
But these are no longer normal times.
First, international petroleum prices have
reached record levels over the last year. The
war in Iraq; political and other instabilities
in oil producing countries such as Nigeria,
Russia and Venezuela; and high demand
from China has fueled the growth in petroleum prices. Tlie prices arc likely to stay at
their cunent high levels in the near future.
The NOC can no longer overcharge cus
tomers without inviting their ire. Second,
the country is in the midst of an unprecedented political and military conflict. At a
time when Maoists arc bent on capitalizing
people's discontent, the government cannot continue to be insensitive to the concerns ofthe people.
The good thing is that the government is working to change things. The
government has started reforms, which
if implemented properly and quickly will
go a long way in changing the way petroleum products are sold in Nepal. By
the end of 2005, an automatic pricing
mechanism built by the Petroleum Price
Fixing and Monitoring Committee is
expected to be in place.
This will help bring an end to some
confusion regarding petroleum prices but
will not solve the whole problem. The government also intends to adopt the Petroleum Products Sale and Distribution Ordinance this year to allow private sector
participation in oil imports and distribution. This should make the petroleum
market more competitive; the NOC will
have to either measure up to the increased
competition or quit. Moreover, petroleum
products will no longer be politically explosive. With some luck, they will be just
like any other commodity whose prices
go up and down depending on the market
situation. And people will seldom have
doubts about the prices.
But as all of us know: government intentions are just government intentions. There
are many other important diings on which
the government has failed to deliver. Let's
wait and hope that this is not one of them, p
JANUARY 30. 2005 J NATION WFEKIY
37
 NO LAUGHING MATTER
Raindrops Keep Falling ...
You can't stop the banda by complaining, so enjoy yourself
BY KUNAL LAMA
What a tawdry start to last week: banda on Monday; westerly winter rains on Tuesday. For those
of us fond of excessively extended weekends, it
was godsend—for homebodies, bliss. Of course,
there are lots of people who rage, rail and rant at the news of
yet another banda AND when the first raindrops fall on their
heads. It's easy to understand their feeling, especially when it
comes to bandas. Usually called at the flimsiest of excuses, it
appears that anyone can call a banda for whatever reason suits
them. Tike this classic case for example:
On January 1, 2005,1 woke up to a Thamel that was shut, I
thought, perhaps, the shopkeepers, like mc, had had a heavy
night of "furC-making and, consequently, had decided to roll
up their noisy shutters later in the morning of a brand new
year. The truth was different. Thamel had witnessed two "street
festivals" on two consecutive days: the first, on December
30'1', in honor ofthe Crown Prince's birthday and the second,
on the 31", on account of New Year's Eve, of course. On the
31" evening, one ofthe stages set up in the middle ofthe street
apparently played music beyond 10 p.m., the agreed upon time
between the police and the local organizers. The story then
gets a bit murky: the police asked the organizers to stop the
music; the band played on;
the police climbed up on the
stage to forcibly shut it ;_... ' ?
down, but when the music
still played on, they arrested
the organizers. When an official from the Thamel
Tourism Development
Committee (TTDC) went
to the Durbar Marg police
station to negotiate a release,
he was manhandled and also
thrown into the clink. To
protest this—voila!—
Thamel was shut down on
New Year's Day. This was
the same committee that
had gone around Thamel
last year asking the shops to open up when a local gang lord,
protesting inaction from the police against his rival who bad
attacked him outside Jai Nepal Cinema, had mobilized his
goons to shut down Thamel in protest—or else. It was difficult to understand, therefore, the T'TDC's chosen form of
protest against—if correct—the police's mishandling ofthe
situation. I felt sorry for all the tourists, having flown miles,
ambling about, facing a wasted day and ignorant ofthe closure,
probably thinking that the Maoists were involved, on what
was, if I remember correctly, not exactly a cheerful, sunny day.
"Namaste. but no thanks," is what I would have said, and then
left Nepal.
Bandas have come to symbolize all that is wrong with the
free and selfish interpretation of democracy, they underline,
at the same time, the near total collapse of law and order in
Nepal. Until this situation is addressed and the citizens ofthe
country feci empowered enough to oppose it, expect more of
the same.
The best course of action, therefore, is to take advantage of
the situation. House cleaning, laundry, lunch with friends, a
family card session, catch up with the reading (I always have
books that I haven't read lying around for years) and check out
DVDs. I love going on long walks around the city, streets finally
empty of traffic, noise and dust. I then realize how small
Kathmandu really is and wonder why we even get into cars to
travel from A to B, getting stuck in almighty traffic snarls, shouting at motorcyclists who suddenly appear out of nowhere and
giving the middle finger to motorists who change lanes right in
front ofthe traffic lights, raising our blood pressure to perilous
levels unnecessarily. It's also a delight to discover forgotten
bahals, lanes, old houses and temples, full of character and charm.
One of my favorite pastimes is people watching. Giggling girls
and bashful boys seemingly circling each other aimlessly; old
men lounging in the sun.
deep in deliberate conversations; curious shopper^
flipping over stacks ot
clothes selling cheap; hun-
gty pant puri lovers stuffing
their dripping mouths; and
little kids intent on a mod.
match of cricket.
The rain on Tuesda\
kept me inside the house tht
whole day. There was no
point in going out to get
wet, cold and dirty. And tht
rains were a blessing in
many ways. My well suddenly sprung more water
the dusty roofs got a cleaning; the plants in the garden looked fresh and greener. Holec
up inside with the lights and the expensive gas-fed heatc
on, I wondered if Nature too was in on the banda conspiracy. And why not? Indian actors malign Nepal: nationwide banda. A seriior-but-no-longcr-rclcvant politician isn':
allowed to drive up to the airport terminal: Nepal band,;
Western Command Maoist leaders are killed: Narayan:
Lumbini and Bheri banda. Petroleum product prices ar.
raised: the Monday banda. Winter rains: Valley banda!  D
38
JANUARY 30.2005 | NATION WEEK
 Comfort •  Safety • Reliability
We are second to none when it comes to comfortable journey,
punctual operation and high quality service. Our friendly staff are
always at your service.
Buddha Air is the first and only private airline in Nepal to operate
brand-new, straigbt-out-of-the-factory and currently in production
Beech 1900Ds, each worth US$5 million.
Beech 1900D
i
Cl.
<
41
Buddha Air
Sales Hattisar: Ph# (977-1) 4436033,4437677 Fax# (977-1) 4437025, Reservation : 5 542494 Fax# (977-1) 5537726
Email: buddhaair@buddhaair.com -Website: http://www.buddhaair.com
 LIFESTYLE
Happy Campers
Busy parents and bored students are driving a new trend
activities camps for kids
BY KUMUD NEPAL
What more could students
want than a month-long
winter break? After hectic
schooldays and extra
classes to make up for time lost to the
usual bandas, students should be craving
a lazy month of sleeping long hours and
hibernating in a quilt to watch movies
or the test series between Australia and
Pakistan on Star Sports.
Some students want a lot more,
and winter camps for kids are the hot
new thing. They allow students to
keep themselves busy during the
break, and they give busy parents a
welcome hiatus too. Camps can be
academically oriented: "English Language Courses for Students at Break"
read one ofthe advertisements in the
major dailies and other magazines;
another promised a "Life Skills
Camp." Some camps are more about
good fun, offering light games, educational tours or coaching in sports,
music or dance.
Sonam Tshering, a 14-year-old from
Dhalko, is happy to have learned some
new basketball tricks at the Godavari
Alumni Association's month-long bas
ketball camp, which concluded on Jan.
22. It was raining on a chilly morning a
week before the end of the camp, but
the campers didn't seem bothered by
the weather. Dressed in jerseys, thin T-
shirts and light trousers, they were all
dribbling hard and shooting hoops. "If
I just stayed idly at home, I would be
wasting my time as well as my talent,"
says Tshering.
The camp's coach Krishna
Maharjan says that the camp
helped students to develop
both team and individual
skills.   When   they
played and
trained with
other    students    they
didn't know,
he says, they
learned about
cooperation
and team spirit.
"Some came to
have     fun,"says
Maharjan, "others
for serious skill development."    According to the GAA, it had to reject
students because of ^higher number of
 registrants than expected; it ran the camp
in two shifts.
Part of the high demand for these
winter camps comes from parents. Parents who have to work need a safe
place for their children during long
school breaks. Others want to stimulate their children. Rashmila Adhikari
didn't want her 12-year-old son,
Rajat, watching cricket the whole day,
so she sent him to a cricket camp last
winter. "I don't even remember the
name ofthe camp," says Rashmila, "1
just wanted to get Rajat off his TV addiction." She says Rajat was more than
happy to do something that interested
him, and she was happy that he was
active.
A wide variety of camps have
started up to cater to the demand.
Sangita Niraula runs Om Boarding, a
girls' hostel at Dhobighat. She and her
friend Geeta Kcshavan organized a
two-week-long culture and arts camp
this year for 49 campers from various
schools. Niraula says the kids liked
skating, music and dance the most.
She rented the Aroma Sports Outer
at Sanepa for the activities and for cre
ative courses like clay modeling. The
program also included tours to Fun
World, the video game arcade at the
Soaltee Crowne Plaza, and the Patan
Museum.
Banjara Restaurant and Party Place
in Buatbhateni also organized a camp
for children between 10 and 15, "Our
primary business is the restaurant,"
says Narayan Prasad Gautam, the manager ofthe winter program. They saw
the demand for winter camps and decided to join in. The camp set up by
Banjara offered to drive away the winter blues with talent shows, music
classes, magic sessions, dance training, yoga instruction and educational
tours. The tour package included trips
to museums, the zoo and Nepal Television. According to Gautam, the
campers enjoyed the tour to the TV
station's offices at Singha Durbar the
most, because they got to see how
shows were broadcast to their television screens.
The British Council's winter offerings arc educational: It has been hosting
winter English language classes for the
last eight years. Children between the
ages of 8 and 13 came in large numbers
for all eight sessions, council staff say
These courses are intended to strengthen
students' English skills.
Some camps are very different. Rato
Bangala School in Patan tookabout40 students from grade nine and from their O-
levels program to the I limalayan Mountaineering Institute in Darjeeling. There
they learned rock climbing, ran crosscountry and tackled obstacle courses.
Sunniv Rajbhandari, who participated in
the camp in Darjeeling three years ago,
says that program came with a high price
tag of Rs. 14,000. But the money was well
spent, he believes.
Costs for the camps vary widely. The
GAA basketball camp cost Rs.500;
Niruala's was Rs.3,800, both exclusive of
transportation. The British Council's
winter courses cost Rs.4,300. "Parents are
willing to pay if their children are learning new skills," says Banjara's Gautam.
Expect the number and variety of
camps to soar even higher next winter.
"This trend will only increase," says the
GAA's Maharjan, "with the growing demand for such retreats both from the children and their busy parents." q
 EATING OUT
Fast-Food Fad
Fast-food is convenient and definitely "in." But how
healthy is it?
BY BISWAS BARAL
Sailaja Rajbhandari is a fast-food
junkie who loves her pizzas and
burgers. It was hardly a surprise,
then, that we caught her eating
out. She said she couldn't imagine doing without fast-food. "When you have
little money and less time, fast-food
serves you the best," she says. "Who cares
about health when you're starving!"
Rajbhandari is one of a growing
number of people who depend on fast
and junk food instead of a regular meal
during the course ofthe day. "Office
goers, especially the ones with long
shifts, are our main customers," says
Kumar Shrestha, the manager ofthe Fast
Food Cafe in Tripureshwore. The
dishes that sell best at the cafe are
momos, chowmein and pizzas, all fast
food.
There is no hard and fast definition
of fast-food, says Ashis Sharma of Real
Fast Food in Jawalakhel. But he says that
everything his restaurant sells is fast food.
"1 named the shop Fast Food Restaurant
to attract customers," he says. It was a
good move, because fast food is universally popular.
Fast-food started in the early 19'1' century, during the Industrial Revolution.
Longer work hours meant shorter lunch
breaks. Workers couldn't go home for
lunch, and enterprising shops and street
vendors started to produce meals for the
workers. The variety of food is amazing,
but all fast foods share three things: The\
are quick to prepare, cheap and convenient. The typical fast food item take^
anywhere from three to 10 minutes, says
Fast Food Cafe's Shrestha. Most fasi
foods can be eaten as "finger food" and
arc typically served in use-and-throv
utensils.
It's easy to like fast-food, but toe
much of a good thing isn't good at all
Most fast-food is prepared from refinec
wheat flour, maida. Refining strips the
42
JANUARY 30, 2005 | NATION WEEK:
 —
flour of most the major nutrients and
fibers: The result is that it has little nutritional value.
The grain or kernel of wheat is made-
up of three layers: the outer bran, which
contains anti-oxidants, B vitamins and
fiber; the germ, stocked with B vitamins,
proteins, minerals and healthful fats; and
the endosperm, the grain's food supply
and the largest portion of kernel, containing starchy carbohydrate, proteins
and small amounts of vitamins and minerals.
During refining the outer two coats,
the bran and the germ, are removed, taking away most ofthe essential nutrients
with them. Due to the missing fiber, the
wheat flour lacks coarseness; the consumption of maida in large amounts
causes constipation and acidity. Most
fast-food is fatty too, worsening the
health problems and adding to the calorie content. Our bodies can't consume
high-calorie foods all at once, so the food
is stored as fat.
Eating fast-food habitually turns the
problem into a dangerous cycle. Because these foods lack fiber, we tend
to overeat before we feci full; fast-
foods are aptly called stomach fillers.
They often contain a large amounts of
salt, dangerous for people with high
blood pressure. Failing to eat enough
fruits and vegetables drains our bodies of vital vitamins and the trace elements necessary for healthy growth
and development.
Long-term consumption of fast-food
and the resulting obesity leads to other
problems. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stomach and intestinal cancer, and
HEALTHIER FAST FOOD DINING
+     Don't overeat. Decide what to order
before you go to the restaurant.
+    Eat at restaurants where you can sit
down,
preferably in a relaxed atmosphere.
+    Don't eat the same kind of fast food
every day.
+    Choose low-fat options like vegetable
momos.
■*■    Drink lots of liquid with your meal, but
not caffeinated or alcoholic drinks.
+   Supplement fast food with other meals
containing milk products, fruits, vegetables
and whole grains.
3*-r^
fWAl
FAST POOD |
CAFJ
1
ismesssshs
mniiMMii
 J
QUICK BITE: Fast-food j.
like these are popular
high blood pressure are called the diseases of civilization. In the past 20 years,
there has been a six-fold rise in heart
diseases in Nepal, according to the
Nepal Heart Foundation: Ten percent
or more ofthe population may be afflicted with heart problems. "Modern
lifestyles with the lack of exercise, smoking and eating unhygienic foods are the
major culprits," says Dr. Arun Sayami,
the head ofthe Department of Cardiology at the Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital.
Not long ago most heart-patients in
Nepal were above 50. Now people in
their 30s throng the heart centers in the
Valley. "A girl of 24 was brought to our
hospital the other day after a heart-attack," says Teaching Hospital's Sayami.
Nutritionists recommend three
servings of wholegrain food each day
for health. Whole-grains are unrefined
grains, the entire seed or the kernel of
the plant with all the nutrients intact.
Oatmeal, granola, grape-nuts, shredded
wheat, amaranth, barley, buckwheat,
millet and popcorn are the example of
nourishing whole-grain products. Unrefined wheat flour, beans, nuts, seeds,
fruits and vegetables should also be in
our daily diet.
According to Rcshma Dhital, a dietician at the Medicare Hospital in
Chabahil, 95 percent of Nepalis don't
know about the possible health risks of a
bad diet. Those who do know don't seem
to care.
"1 am not changing my eating habits
anytime soon," says Rajbhandari. For her,
the pizzas and momos are too much to
resist. She says she may think about controlling her appetite when she's in her
40s. "For now, I'll continue to have my
fast-foods binges." ■
JANUARY 30. 2005| NATIONWEEKLY
 <
0
z
■4-1
c
<x
u
(0
3
d «
0
gir
(0
i_
CO
H flB
(fl
a
3 fi-
CD
£ <
0
D 2
U
CO
< CO
(0
n
z ^
< *
Q 3
^
<
GO
3
tu°
1-
<
s
0
ss
</>Ui
hfi=
~r-
-T<
Ik CO
UJ
O
H
SNA!
)TS BY DHRITI BHATTA
It Runs in the Family ...
)\VA
Eleven-year-old DINESH KAFLE,
broke a record at the recent Hits FM
Music Awards when he became the
youngest singer ever to win a top prize
at the annual event. His 22-minute-duet
with Gitadevi, "Runchau Aama," bagged
the award for best folk song. Kafle said
he was proud of his achievement; his
father, Dinesh Kafle, must be proud too.
The winning song was from the elder
Kafle's latest album "Bhaunu Nabhako."
The elder Kafle is a prominent folk
singer with more than 300 songs to his
credit. Like father, like son.
Part T\
\7f\
Nearly five years ago. SAM PA DA MALLA. now
IS. wrote a movie review ofthe acclaimed film
"Caravan" for Kantipur's weekly supplement,
e week, Malla has continued to wnle as
for huh English and Nepali uewspa-
is   I lu- I-1th-grader who now works lor
luriiep.il. .in e-zine, recently look another step
ward. I hi firsl book, "Auav.ts Ekdili," .1 collec-
ii ul l-l slum stories, came out lasi week.  Flic
»ries, says Malla, are a reflection o) how she sees
iciv 1 lus is another case of a talented youngster
nt Ashesh Malla, a pioneer pi
She is the i
hooks of stories. i>l.
Veteran Winner
NIRPHA DHOJ KHADKA is a 46-year-old
senior instructor at Pulchowk Engineering
Campus. He's also an amateur photographer
who has taken pictures of hundreds of
Insects and plants from the outskirts of the
Valley; Godhavarl, Nagarjuna,
Budhanilkantha and Chobar. Recently the
veteran of 20 years of field trips entered
one of his photos In the Amateur Wildlife
Photography Competition organized by
Wildlife Conservation Nepal. Most of the
other entrants were much younger. "At
times I felt my participation might have been
unfair to the youngsters," says Khadka, He
was right: He won the top prize.
JANUARY 30.2005 | NATION WEEKL'
 JOBS
0
ANS CREATION PVT. LTD. is the leading communication partner of Corporate and Social sector
of Nepal. Due to the expansion of its clientele base, ANS is looking for young, energetic and
innovative candidates for the following positions.
capabilities m prob,em solving
Effective mnr^?V'r0nment-
■■Hi
, V1SUAU2ER
Education       : Graduate J Diploma in commercial/
communication /fine arts from a recognized
institute.
Desired Skills : Visualisation and pure graphic skills.
Versatile in visualizing communication materials
• for social and corporate clients.
Adequate knowledge of design related software..
)
4KHPfflta-5S5% «* adequate Tr« I.
deliveries. +
Hllurw»J
Education
Desired Skills
Desired Skiffs'
■s ■■* ^„
GRAPH 1C DESIGNEE __
Education       :  Graduate I Diploma in commercial /
communication arts from a recognized institute, a
Excellent graphic skills along with a good sense'
of colour and design.
Knowledge of Corel Draw, Freehand, Photoshop,
2+ years of experience In graphic designing.
Desired Skills
Education      ; Masters in English Literature or Mass
Communication
Exceptional writing skills
Minimum 2 yrs. of copy writing experience
Adequate knowledge of Advertising Business
JrimWJ-J— w
Education
Desired Skills''.
3+ years of hands-™, T     tlng'
re,«ion, protect m"^Jfxperience *n puPfc
^l^onsLTmaS/mer,f' m™*
^ency environrnen?' "^Wt or
Personality and Z1 5™ ari Agoing
^s an^d Se :?nfadd^^ for media
Sat,ateWth---(ectronl,andpftnt
Desired SfciJfe
A
Eligible candidates please apply with your recent curriculum
vitae and photograph within 7 days to:
HR Manager
ANS CREATION PVT. LTD.
GPO BOX: 4260, Kathmandu, Nepal
Or Email to: ans@enet.com.np
JANUARY30.2005 | NATION'WEEKLY
45
 ^ PO. Box: 13142, KPC 590
j| Ph: 4-411064,2002159
01 Pulalisadak, kathmandu (Way lo IHllibazar)
E-mail: accurate@cnel.com.np
USA
Intake: May
CANADA
Intake: May
GERMANY
Intake: March
Dolphin Education Consultancy Centre Pvt. Ltd.
Putalisadak, Laxmi Plaza 2nd Floor.Kathmandu
Tel. 4429523, 4432812, Email: spdolphin@wlink.com.np
K)
IANUARY 30, 2005 | NATION WEEK!
 Tel: 2111102
To advertise contact nation weekly or  ACCIET'C T""\
, 4229825, Email: ad@nation.com.np  LLAjMrltU
kathmandu kitchen Pvt. Ltd
Fines! Nepali Cuisine in Town
5£10 DURBAR, amttt MUG RO.B0X WI?, IISTH WiCU  .   PHONE: 4223S50
rut: *mm
The Couture House
r 'JiJj'/lU   trffc-fto   L '   ( rtDlfj
Sdction: Silk, Cotton, Wool, Cashmere &
Manymore
Satisfaction Guaranteed
THAMEL, KATHMAMDU i PHONE: 47(1133. «S2767. (Z5I195
EHAIL 1heraururehcuH@ta1nniir'.[om
	
S.M. Trading Centre
MANASLU PASHMINA
OVEN PASHMINA GOODS
NOW    HMTSQDUONG    n.ft   J]XCLUJi-VE    RANGE    OF    5>M£S
SHOWROOM: # 351. Thin) floor Bhhnl Bnnr. New Rao*
ffii.977-1-^2^2258 J fax:97M-4Z23344J4l3K17
 mono jIjj iffipaihrni IMJ inlapm.np	
right Future Institute
Remember us for:
*Tuiliorifera!licfetstiitdtlaiits:{8,9,+2,IA,I,COM,I.ED.
l.SC, BA, BBS, B.ED, B.SQ BBA, MBS, MA)
.IELTS, TOEFL BLa^iageOases
(NEAR COMMUHITV HOSPITAL). BYPASS. BALAJLI-lt, HTHWdLll)
PHONE: 43SI8M EMAIL: kuTor_njHBtr@lraliiiiiil.lom
Dimensionalcint
Remember for:
TOEFL, IELTS
GRE.GMAT.S"
English, Spoken
R eport & P rofessiona I Wrftin gs
Other Languages on demand (Japanese,
French etc.)
Abroad Studies:
U.K., U.S.A., Japan, Singapore
CyprilS- Visa Guranleed
(20-50% Scholarship for 2005)
Phi 4252015, «iaS11,(lct1§wlinlt.com.np
Thapathali (Between Blue Bird a Holel Site) Tnpuresrwur, KTM
KISHOR
V A  S T  H A
PHOTO CLUB ©9B51052778
AMBIENCE
1 rthfllplrir dfcor ihop far yam homt whtT* W* thfrwcjue J
Wide nnge ot quiliIv prodL(h diUludLrtjJ rii-ytLi, mjHwu.
dootnuU, irfnftlin blind* Uld [Lncn. Yam tunnc mJ1«tt pwtr
pc: i-A-i J.111 r - y,t tirlpyrju tiTritc lhr Ltni^r ;n>_ dnIIT.
T^Ambience life style r ltd.
House erf Fumlshtng
Ambience     **** ^»mk ftp* Bazmr, n^pmnnsu.. wtMi
T*i»phOW: 4TB1371. 47B1073. 4161871
Fk 5535122 E-fMi. •nHbm^tttlAakmiv
KATHrWiNDU; Borabon Show Room, ProdorshanlMoro, 1233483, KG
Shoe Center. Rolnopark, 331485 PAWN: lolrt Shoe Center, Lacjonkhel
Buspcrrk, 55MAW, United Shoe Certer, Monsobonir, 5533761, Family
Shoe Center, MongalEjOEOr
JANUARY 30, 2005 j NATION WEEKLY
47
 KHULA MANCH
Of Bars, Booze and
Bartenders
their own drinks. Lama's stint in the hospitality industry started in 1995 as a waiter
at the Hyatt Regency in Delhi where he
soon found himself behind the Polo
Lounge Bar. After four and a half years at
the Hyatt, he decided to move on. Besides the school, he now also runs a mobile bartending unit with 25 permanent
bartenders. His unit now conducts parties throughout the year and at times as
many as six in a day. Last week. Lama was
in Kathmandu conducting a workshop
"Bars and Beverages," organized by
Smirnoff on, what else, bartending.
Yashas Vaidya talked to Lama about bars,
bartenders and the booze.
Why is it important for people
to know their drink?
You want to enjoy your drink. Ifyou
drink to get drunk, that's another story.
But say you're out to drink with your
friends and looking for a good time, you
need to know what you are drinking. And
you've got to know what you like. Tastes
are very individualistic. As in food,
people have specific taste profiles in
drinks.
Can taste profiles be generalized—for
example, what kinds of drinks do South
Asians like?
Yes. Much depends on our food habits;
the way palate develops over the years.
In this part of the world, we prefer full-
bodied flavors, much like our traditional
foods that have quite a bit of spices. Likewise, in drinks we prefer something
that's heavy. A martini is a very old classic cocktail—gin and dry vermouth, a
fortified wine. Westerners like it because
it's very delicate in its flavor. Whenever
I do a martini here, it's mostly the flavored ones that arc preferred more, like
say, a coffee martini or a fruit martini.
You need to know your
drink, if you want to
enjoy it
What are people drinking in
Kathmandu? You had the chance to interact with quite a few bartenders during the workshop ...
Here it's mostly straight drinks, not too
many cocktails. That'sbecause people don't
really know their drinks. They keep it
simple—things like the whiskey and soda.
But it's also because people don't trust the
bartenders, as even the bartenders don't
know much about cocktails. They're called
bartenders just because they stand behind
the bars. I had a couple of nights out in
Kathmandu. I went to what was supposed
to be the best bar in town. Not only was
the experience not good, it was terrible.
What happened?
First 1 had to wait 20 minutes for the drink.
And when the drink was brought, it was
served wrong. I had ordered a Black Russian. Now the world over, the Black Russian is served on the rocks. Here it was
brought as a shot.
So the bartenders here lack cocktail etiquette...
It's more than that. You can pick a guy
off the street and teach him to make 10
•
Yangdup Lama is a bartender who's passionate
about "cocktail etiquette," a term he frequently ^
uses in his conversations and classrooms. He
runs a bar and beverages management school,
Cocktails & Dreams, in Delhi, which trains aspiring
bartenders. He also conducts short-term courses for
amateurs who want do some home bartending and mix
cocktails, and he'll do it. But here the
bartender doesn't even have a smile
on his face. I saw bartenders who
didn't want to talk, much less smile.
Good bartenders get to know your
name, the drink you had last time.
What you've got to realise as a bartender is that you're not just selling
the drink, you're selling the experience.
Why do you think such
a problem exists?
More than the bartenders or managers who provide the services, the customers are responsible. The managers tend to relax when they don't have
to work too hard.
What about the bartenders themselves?
I found the bartenders willing to learn.
It's just that the management needs to
train their employees properly. I run
a mobile bartending unit with 25 permanent bartenders. If I have a bartender whose English is not up to the
mark, I hire an English tutor to train
him. Investing in your employee is not
a waste.
Do you think Kathmandu is over
rated as a tourist destination?
No. It's not that. People in this pan
of the world have that warmth. And
the smiles arc natural too. All we need
to do is polish them and present them
better. In the end, bartending is all
about making the customer happy. For
that all you really need is to be a good!
human being, q
48
JANUARY 30,2005 | NATION WEEK!
I
 BOOKS
The Worldly Buddha
In a strange combination of autobiography, history,
philosophy and travelogue, Pankaj Mishra explains the
continuing relevance of the Buddha's teachings
BYADITYA ADHIKARI
When he graduated from col
lege in 1992, 23-year-old
Pankaj Mishra moved to
Mashobra, a remote hill station near
Simla, with the intention of spending
his days preparing to become a writer.
Over the next few years he spent reading and dreaming, he conceived the
idea of writing a historical novel based
on the Buddha's life. But procrastination and the realization that he hadn't
adequately understood the life and the
message of the Buddha delayed the
writing of the book for many years.
When Mishra finally decided to write
the book, what emerged was not a
novel, but something much more ambitious: a sometimes rambling, often
exhilarating, combination of autobiography, history, philosophy and travelogue.
Part ofthe great charm of Mishra's
book is the unique way in which he
approaches a theme that thousands of
writers have tackled over the past thousands of years. Unlike the new age gurus who interpret the Buddha's teaching for a mass public, Mishra did not
grow up in a monastery. He is not even
Buddhist himself. There is none ofthe
soporific didacticism and cultivated
unworldliness that characterize the
hundreds of volumes on Buddhism
that litter Thamel's bookstores.
In his own way Mishra is very much
a man ofthe world. Early in the book
he ruminates on how strange it was,
considering his great interest in the
modern world, that he should feel an
attraction towards the Buddha. "I had
little interest in Indian philosophy or
spirituality," he writes, "which, if I
thought of them at all, seemed to me to
belong to India's pointlessly long, sterile and largely unrecorded past. I didn't
see how they could add to the store of
knowledge—science and technology—and the spirit of rational enquiry
and curiosity that had made the modern world."
So Mishra's mind is well stocked
with Marx, Nietzsche, Proust and the
ideas of other writers who have shaped
the modern world. I le has traveled on
journalistic assignments to Pakistan and
An End to Suffering: The Buddha
in the World
by Pankaj Mishra
Picador, 2004 (Hardcover)
PAGES: 422
PRICE: Rs.792
California, Afghanistan and London. And
it is with the "spirit of rational enquiry
and curiosity" that Mishra looks at the
life, times and teachings of the Buddha.
The historical conditions of North
Indian society during Buddha's time are
described in some detail. This was a time
of massive urbanization. Money became
the new measure of value, and merchants
enjoyed unprecedented power. Political power shifted from small tribal
city-states to the much larger centralized monarchies. "The end of smaller
political units [meant] the growing
subjection of human beings to the remote authority of the bureaucratic
state."
As North India in the fifth century
B.C. became more and more complex,
it was inevitable that the rigid morality and social structure of the Vedic
Aryans would come to appear as inadequate and obsolete to many.
Mishra describes these changes
and explains that the teachings of the
Buddha were a response to the widespread uncertainty and anxiety of the
time. Interspersed with this historical analysis and philosophical ruminations are reflections on more modern themes: the India where Mishra
grew up, thevarious people he has met
and the various places he has traveled
to, 9/11 and Islamic fundamentalism.
Slowly the reader realizes these observations are meant to demonstrate
that the condition of the world now
is very similar to the conditions during the time ofthe Buddha. And this
is done to lend force to his final thesis: That the Buddha's teachings are
as relevant today as they were during
his time.
Mishra's final belief—that a dose of
introspection of the Buddhist kind will
work as an antidote to the destructive
passions for power that dominate history—is not very convincing. But the
book is, in its way, a fine guide to the
Buddha.
As a work of history too, the book
has its merits. "The western idea of history can be so seductive," Mishra writes,
"with its promise of adding an extra emotional and spiritual dimension and validation to our limited life; with its ability to brighten the future and the past. To
have faith in one's history is to infuse
hope into the most inert landscape and a
glimmer of possibility into even the
most adverse circumstances." Though in
some ways a failure, this book is an admirable attempt by an Indian to infuse
life into an Indian historical figure and
so to brighten the Indian past—a past that
the writer thought of a long time ago as
"pointless and sterile." f]
JANUARY 30. 2005 | NATION WEEKLY
49
 vr
SM
Nk»I, !tJ:)27J54t(!lei)^bil8:VS5lC3I!6f.
Onrotrr Morgo S M trim Margiifcgrtoi MhH W: 4Z705U,
/n every purchase of KLUDJ products    v'
Lucky Draw Coupon for the Print* Jre -
•Ivftin -Irjw)mCeiiunrtr*"rtfcjf».iTnsnn*Sdiin(kmi»i>ij[HKi
• JfriESLri - Ow itt Itiic-r
• iii Prur • D» id tram SinBiyntt
for ctttoilr £teow cottKl. — —
*ir£^ BAJRAAND BAJRACHARYA ENTERPRISES
bwriM tMwi ofc»> i vmt». K1WW
tM*wrnaaj ;+-wti*tw,*.reuus
6^»<D^<s):+-JASSIO,3Jta0l«»       	
Nepal Pashmina Industry
SoffosCiourj"
B
TACT-   DAr.t j^
And Justice for Gurkhas...
DISCRIMINATION AGAINST
Nepalis in the British Army is
nothing less than an ugly scar on
the face of British democracy. It's clearly
a vestige of Britain's colonial past to regard some of its servicemen as less equal
than others. The treatment of Gurkhas,
who have been part of British history
and Britain's triumphs for 150 years, is a
measure of British justice.
Happily, the grand anachronism is
finally being righted. British Defence
Secretary Geoffrey Hoon has pledged a
"wide-ranging review" of the Gurkhas'
longstanding grievances against Her
Majesty's Government. He wants to see
that Britain is "legally and morally irreproachable."
We welcome the announcement. It
is a most positive step, though cruelly
belated. Hoon, in a written statement,
told the House of Commons in London
that his government is gearing up for an
all-embracing review of Gurkhas' pay
and pensions.
Far away in the plains and mountains of Nepal, Hoon's statement has
brought some cheer and hope. The review will indeed make life easier for
tens of thousands of Gurkhas and their
dependents, many of whom are living
in penury. In so doing, Britain will have
delivered a strong statement—that it is
keen to bury the imperial hatchet.
But some issues still remain unclear.
Does the Hoon announcement include
the 10,000-plus "redundants," the unfortunate group of Gurkhas—on whom the
axe of retrenchment fell in the 60s and
80s—who were discharged from duty
without adequate compensation? We
certainly hope so.
While welcoming the proposed review, we would like to single out
GAESO for much-deserved praise. Not
many gave the organization of ex-
Gurkhas, ably led by Padam Singh
Gurung and counseled by Yubaraj
Sangraula, a smart young lawyer, much
chance when it started out in 1990.
GAESO was the first organized effort
to shame the British establishment.
A number of successful lawsuits
against the British government in the
courts have certainly proved that the
Gurkhas have a case. The public interest
surrounding the legal battles also
showed that the British people are most
anxious to see the Gurkhas put on a level-
playing field. In a Daily Express poll of
16,000 Britons, 99 percent said they supported the Gurkha cause. More than anytime before, London perhaps feels that
the Gurkha issue needs a permanent solution, not piecemeal action. No democracy can go against the opinion of its
people,  not for long.   ————
Hoon rightly talks of  SeeCoverSti
"public unease" over the     JfcwtoM
Gurkha issue. ^^ i
But successive governments in Britain have taken refuge in the Tripartite
Agreement signed between Britain,
Nepal and India in 1947 to justify the pay
and pension disparity. We understand the
treaty was a historical imperative, signed
after Indian independence to provide a
much-needed framework for the continuing recruitment of Gurkhas into the
British and the Indian armies. The treaty,
insist British officials, binds Britain to
peg Gurkha pay to that of the Indian
Army so as not to adversely affect the
Nepali recruitment into the Indian
Army.
That is understandable. What is not
is that the 1947 treaty should continue
to be the cornerstone of Gurkha recruitment more than 50 years later.
New Delhi has already said that the
recruitment of Nepalis into the British Army is a bilateral issue between
London and Kathmandu. More importantly, New Delhi does not have a two-
tier pay system. Britain we hope has
taken the cue. Mr. Hoon should follow up on his pledge to compensate
the Gurkhas without delay; indeed,
they should have been given their dues
all along.
Akhilesh Upadhyay, Editor
50
JANUARY 30.2005 | NATION WEEKLY
 Laying without Floor Glue - By the
unique installation system, the
laminated Floor from Berry Floor can
installed without the use of glue.
Totally Creak-Free - the specific
structure of the BERRYLOC system
excludes all risk of creaking and
assures optimum comfort in the
use of your floor.
Transferable - Total absence of glue,
the Berry Floor can be removed and
reinstalled as many times as you
wish,
rUp to five times stronger - The
BerryLoc system has a tensile
strength that is upto five times greater
than thot of other system.
Resistance
to Abrasion
Resistant to        Stain resistant   Resistance household   Fade resistanrt    Suitable for use wffit       Pressure
burning ashes chemical floor heating Resistant
We do have Interior Designer
as well as paints & texture
coating from Japan
iBEXTERIORlNTERIOR
"■  "The designer & Coating Specialist"
Hattisar Road, Kamal Pokhari Chowk, Kathmandu, Nepal
CONTACT; prakash Ghimire Tel: 4435419, 4436876 Mobile: 9851026588
 x**?z&
i v

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.dhimjournal.1-0365036/manifest

Comment

Related Items