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Princess Patricia Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1984

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 illil |o:oW ii
3,7, S MID 14-DRy
TO mEXICO
From Los Angeles on Canadian Pacific's "Princess Patricia.
 You'll not want to miss the
spectacle of native divers
plunging from the dizzying
heights of the cliffs of
La Que bra da —part of the
evening show at the El Mir ad or
in Acapulco.
Any day, any time, soft sea
breezes carry you leisurely
across the quiet bays of
Mexico's lush west coast.
PORTS 01 Cfllili
.
First stop. La Paz! Sailing south from Los Angeles,
the "Princess Patricia" carries you through sunlit seas
along Baja California's scenic coastline to La Paz.
Here you'll discover secluded, serene beaches,
little-known shops and markets, and cool shady
streets, where townfolk still whisper about lost
treasures, believed nearby. Low humidity and sunny
skies make the beach a haven for sun-worshippers.
And here's your chance for big-game fishing fun, too !
(The marlin are championship-size here, and local
skippers are experts at finding them.) Fish for these
trophies while relaxed in a chair, cooled by a wind
they call "Coromuel," after a brazen English pirate
who some say still haunts these waters in search
of Spanish gold.
Next stop, Puerto Vallarta! On to beautiful
Bandera Bay, where red tile roofs and cobbled streets
accent the tropical lushness of Puerto Vallarta, movie
location of "Night of the Iguana." Here's the real
native Mexico — wide, uncrowded beaches, music,
fresh-caught seafood cooked on open fires. Fish and
wild game abound for the sportsman. And authentic
native handicrafts reward the afternoon shopper.
Fascinating, relaxed, the perfectly provincial in Mexico.
Now Acapulco! The favorite resort of fun-loving
people everywhere. Acapulco's rich, natural harbor
attracts the world's top water skiers. Warm seas and
golden beaches entice you to spend hours sailing,
fishing, skin-diving, and bronzing in the sun.
There's time to tour, shop, play on the miles of curving
beach and visit the fabulous nightclubs. Side trips to
the silver capital of Taxco, and Mexico City are easy
to arrange. And you'll not want to miss watching
Jai Alai or the spectacle of native divers plunging
from the dizzying cliffs of La Quebrada!
Finally, Mazatlan. Your last stop, Mazatlan, is one
of Mexico's major coastal cities. Sun-filled beauty,
palm-shaded relaxation and the gay carnival mood of
its huge public market call out to pleasure lovers.
You'll want to relax and play on the west coast beach
at Mazatlan, take water taxi sightseeing trips along the
town's sweeping modern waterfront hotel area, and
swim in some of the most exciting surf anywhere
in the world. The fishing and hunting are great, too!
Special stop, Ensenada! April 14, take a 3-day
vacation cruise to Ensenada, former playground of the
stars. In the 30's, movie greats came here to gamble
and loll on Ensenada's famous beaches. Those stars
are just a memory now, but their favorite resort and
its exotic beaches remain for you to enjoy.
01HRT TO BUy
During your stay in Mexico, you'll find many wonderful buys.
Here are just a few of the things to look for.
Silver. Perhaps the best place to get a wide selection of silver
is in Taxco, Mexico's silver capital, midway between Mexico City
and Acapulco. Many shops in the major resort areas also carry
good selections. Goblets, liqueur glasses, platters, candelabra
in silver are fashioned and crafted by artisans whose skill has been
passed down through the centuries. Designs are ancient or
contemporary, satisfy every taste.
Glassware. Figurines, crystal stemware, or elaborate modern
hanging lanterns and candelabra—you'll find an excellent variety of
glassware throughout Mexico. Here's the opportunity to add
a custom touch to your decor back home, and to re-kindle
memories of your cruise.
Leather goods. Always popular with visitors. You'll find
all manner of leather items, from handbags to thongs. They're
available at most shops. Baskets, homespun cloth, and native
artifacts make excellent gifts, too.
Ceramics. Brief shopping trips in the towns on your cruise
itinerary will reward you with many outstanding ceramic pieces.
Indian pottery, fascinating decorator earthenware pieces, modern
vases and jars — there's a wealth of ceramics from which to choose.
You'll find them the best buys along the way. And few gifts
hold more of the spirit of Mexico and her people.
OIHHT TO WEAR
For daytime, men and women: Plan to dress lightly, but
casually, on board ship and ashore. Cotton play clothes make you
at ease in the game areas and on deck. You'll want walking shorts
for strolling tropic beaches, and of course, a swimming suit.
For evening: Dressy casual dresses are perfect for normal
evening wear. A cocktail dress for more formal occasions or
dancing is appropriate. For most occasions, men will find light
sports jackets or blazers and slacks suitable. Pack a suit for more
formal affairs. You may wish to bring a sweater along for late
evening wear on deck. Chances are you won't need a jacket
aboard ship.
And don't forget your camera! You'll want to record
your Mexican holiday cruise on film, either colored slides or
movies. Port or starboard, on land or sea, there will be sunsets,
tropical flowers, wonderful Mexicans, the blue Pacific, and of
course, fellow passengers, to capture forever. You can bring your
own film or buy it aboard as you need it. Most camera stores
ashore also carry full lines of film and camera equipment.
Deep sea fishing is especially good in Mexico, and there are
plenty of charter boats with skilled skippers who show you how
to get the big ones.
Mexico-by-the-sea is an intriguing blend of modern luxury
and traditional charm, and everywhere, the beauty and
friendliness of the people will impress you.
Who'll blame you for spending hours on beaches like these ?
Souvenir hunting is rewarding in Mexico and prices are
extremely reasonable. Leather shoes, saddles, handbags,
thongs and decorative items — are an especially good buy.
Beautifully crafted native silver is found throughout Mexico,
and most shops carry a wide selection.
 UPPER DECK
|   41 b^ffl^i*
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OQ      SALON   BL
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"A" DECK
Accomodations Legend
[     II
Convertible Sofa Bed with Upper Folding Bed
1    II
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Single Lower Folding Bed
as;
Single Lower Folding Bed
IX
Single Bed
Double Bed
tp-Jt
Toilet and Shower
Es)
Vanity
H
Wardrobe
 ACCOMMODATIONS
BOAT DECK
LA PAZ ROOM*
Two Convertible Sofa Beds — Shower and Toilet — No. 416	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Lower Bed — Shower and Toilet**— No. 419	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Lower Bed — Shower and Toilet**— No. 409, 411, 415, 417	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Lower Bed — Shower and Toilet**— No. 406, 407, 408, 410, 412, 414	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet— No. 424, 429	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet — No. 426, 427, 428, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 441 .
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet— No. 418, 420, 421, 422, 423,425	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet— No. 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405	
CRUISE RATES PER PERSON
3-DAY
Dbl.
$190 .
185 .
180 .
175 .
165 .
160 .
150 .
150 .
PROMENADE DECK
Bed & Convertible Sofa Bed — Shower and Toilet**— No. 328, 330, 332, 333, 335, 337, 340, 345.
Convertible Sofa Bed & Lower Bed — Shower and Toilet**— No. 334, 336, 338, 339, 341, 343 . . .
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet— No. 331, 342, 347	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed— Toilet— No. 308, 309, 310, 311	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — No. 312, 314, 315, 317	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — No. 316, 318, 319, 321	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — No. 320, 322, 323, 325	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — No. 306, 307, 324, 327	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — No. 302, 303, 304, 305	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — No. 300, 301, 326, 329	
$190 .
185 .
155 .
110 .
95 .
90 .
85 .
80 .
75 .
70 .
UPPER DECK
ACAPULCO SUITES
Twin Beds— Bath, Shower & Toilet— No. 218, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 227.
$225 .
195 .
PUERTO VALLARTA DE LUXE ROOMS*
Two Convertible Sofa Beds — Shower and Toilet — No. 216, 219	
MAZATLAN HONEYMOON DE LUXE ROOMS*
Double Bed & Convertible Sofa Bed — Shower and Toilet—No. 208, 210, 215     195
Bed & Convertible Sofa Bed — Shower and Toilet**— No. 212, 229	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Lower Bed — Shower and Toilet**— No. 214	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet — No. 217	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet— No. 200, 202	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed —Shower and Toilet— No. 203, 205, 226, 228, 231, 233 .
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet— No. 204, 206, 207, 209, 211	
190 . .
180 . .
165 . .
165 . .
155 . .
145 . .
"A" DECK
Bed and Convertible Sofa Bed — Shower and Toilet**— No. 152, 155	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Lower Bed — Shower and Toilet**— No. 154, 157, 159, 161  	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet—No. 144, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 153, 1E
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet — No. 124, 126, 128, 130, 132, 134, 136	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet — No. 116, 118, 120, 122, 138, 140, 142	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet — No. 108, 110, 112, 114	
Convertible Sofa Bed & Folding Upper Bed — Shower and Toilet — No. 100, 102, 104, 106	
$180 .
180 .
. 155 .
.    140 .
135 .
130 .
125 .
4-DAY
Dbl.
$235 . .
230 . .
220
220 . .
$200 . .
195 . .
190 . .
185 . .
175..
170 . .
160 . .
160 . .
$225 . .
175
155
150 ..
145 . .
140 . .
135 . .
130 . .
$200 . .
195 . .
165 . .
120 . .
105 . .
100 . .
95 . .
90
85 . .
80 . .
$235 . .
235 . .
225 . .
215 . .
$235
205 .
205 .
200 .
190 .
175
175 .
165 .
155 .
7-DAY
Sgl.
Dbl.
  $430 . .
  410 . .
  400 . .
  385 . .
$490 . . . . 340 .
480 . . . . 330 .
460 . . . . 310 .
455 . . . . 305 .
  . . $425 .
  405 .
$475 . . . . 325 .
370 . . . . 245 .
335 225
330 . . . . 220
320 . . . . 215
315 . . . . 210 .
310 . . . . 205 .
295 . . . . 195 .
$495
485
470
450
$495 .
445 .
435 .
420 .
375 .
345 .
335 .
320 .
300 .
$225 .
210 .
205 .
205 .
195 .
$190 . .   $395 . .
190 . .   395 . .
165 ... . $465 . . . . 315 . .
150 . . . . 445 . . . . 295 . .
145 . P. 435 . . . . 290 . .
140 . . .. 430 . . . . 285 . .
135 ... . 425 . . . . 280 . .
Sgl.
Dbl.
  $550 .
  530 .
  510 .
495
$635 . .  . 440 .
625 . . . . 430 .
605  410 .
600 . . . . 405 .
$620 .
525 .
475 .
460 .
445 .
435 .
430 .
415 .
$545 .
525 .
425 .
340 .
310 .
300 .
295 .
290 .
285 .
275 .
$640 .
630 .
615 .
595 .
$640 . .
575 . .
560 . .
540 . .
485
445 . .
435 . .
420 . .
400 . .
 $510 .
  510 .
$610 . .   . . 415 .
590 . .   . . 395 .
585 . .   . . 390 .
580 . .    . . 385
575 . .   . . 380
14-DAY
Dbl.
960 .
950 .
$860
830
795
775
685
675
640
635
$975 .
785 .
725 .
710 .
695 .
680 .
665 .
645 .
$850
815
670
525
485
475
465
455
445
430
. $995 .
. 985 .
. 970 .
. 940 .
$995
895
875
840
750
. 695
. 680
. 665
. 630
$965 .
935 .
920 .
905 .
890 .
$795
795
655
625
615
605
595
•Rooms so marked are equipped with two folding upper beds to accommodate one or two additional persons. When additional persons occupy such berths,
the minimum rate for the particular cruise will apply for such additional persons.
"Rooms so marked are equipped with one folding upper bed to accommodate one additional person. When an additional person occupies this berth, the
minimum rate for the particular cruise will apply for the additional person.
Single rates as shown do not apply on the Christmas Cruise Dec. 16, the Easter School Vacation Cruise March 17 or the 3-Day Week-end Ensenada
Cruise, April 14. On these three cruises rooms may be purchased for single occupancy at twice the double rate less 10%.
Children under 12 years of age, occupying a room with two full-fare paying adults, will be carried at one-half the minimum rate. Children under 2
years of age will be carried at 10% of the minimum rate when accompanied by two full-fare paying adults. A child with one adult, occupying a
double room, will be carried at one-half the prevailing room rate.
One-way rates: Southbound from Los Angeles to Acapulco — 60% of applicable full cruise rate. Northbound from Acapulco to Los Angeles — 50% of applicable full cruise rate. Passengers may cruise south-bound or one sailing, layover for two weeks and return northbound on the next sailing at full cruise
rate plus 10%.
Conditions and General Information
Reservations: To reserve cruise accommodations, 25% of the rate must be remitted for
deposit. The balance is due no later than 60 days before cruise departure.
Cancellations: Accommodations cancelled within 30 days of sailing date, at the discretion
of the company, will be subject to a 25% cancellation charge in the event said accommodations remain unsold at sailing time.
Travel and Health Requirements: A Mexican Tourist Card is required and can be
obtained in Los Angeles from either the Mexican Consulate General, 354 South Spring
Street — Telephone 624-9604, or the Mexican Government Tourist Office, 3106 Wilshire
Boulevard — Telephone 385-6438. When applying, proof of citizenship must be produced;
the Tourist Card is free. To re-enter the United States after the completion of the cruise, a
smallpox vaccination certificate stating that such a vaccination has been taken within three
years of the re-entry date must be presented together with proof of U.S. citizenship.
(Persons of other than U.S. citizenship, please apply individually for requirements.)
Medical Services: A qualified physician is in attendance on all cruises, with dispensary
on board.
Beauty Salon: An up-to-date complete beauty parlor is available on board.
Baggage: Each cruise member is entitled to take up to 4 pieces of baggage totaling in
weight up to 200 lbs. No individual piece of baggage may exceed 314 feet in any one
dimension.
Cruise Rates Include: Round trip transportation from Los Angeles in accommodations
paid for, all meals, and entertainment on shipboard. For the full cruise, the ship is your hotel,
including accommodations and all meals.
Cruise Rates Do Not Include: Accommodations or meals taken on land in Mexico,
personal items such as gratuities, laundry, wines, spirits or other beverages not part of the
regular menu, transportation to and from Los Angeles, and any other items not specifically
stated in this list as included.
Responsibility: The attention of passengers is specifically directed to the terms and conditions as set forth in the Princess Cruises, Inc., passage contract ticket. All tickets are issued
subject to acceptance of those terms and conditions. The right is reserved to decline to
accept or to retain any person as a member of a cruise or to cancel any cruises if circumstances so demand. The schedules contained herein are subject to change without notice.
All arrangements for ship transportation are made by Princess Cruises, Inc. The payment of
the required deposit or any partial or full payment for a reservation on this cruise shall constitute consent to all provisions in this Conditions List.
Nightly dancing to a shipboard orchestra is Just one of the many activities
you'll enjoy. ■ There's delicious food, expertly served/ You'll savor the
generous and well-prepared cuisine aboard the "Princess Patricia. "Special
midnight buffet every night. ■ Adventure, new friends, breathtaking
tropical scenery — that's the romance of this fabulous cruise. ■ Tastefully
decorated outside staterooms — ranging from cozy  to elaborate.
Your choice of accommodations. ■ Your air-conditioned stateroom is
always comfortable. You adjust it through your own individual room control. ■ Get acquainted get-togethers, private parties, or Just plain relaxing
is more fun in the seven comfortable lounges aboard ship. And you'll find
it easy to get around— use the elevator! ■ Fun and entertainment aboard
ship provide some of the most memorable hours of your trip. A  full
schedule of activities is planned for your pleasure by an expert cruise
director and staff, outstanding entertainers and musicians. ■ Swimming
in the emerald pool, sunning on spacious decks, playing shuffleboard or
whatever, you'll return with a glorious tan. Don't forget to bring your
swim suit!
 «a
___■■__-__■
ENSFNADA
Music is as much a part of
Mexico as sunshine, and
you're likely to hear strolling
groups of players everywhere along the way.
Surf's up all along Mexico's
west coast the year 'round,
and you'll be able to try
your skill wherever you stop.
Skin diving and swimming
are great, too.
Some of the world's bravest
matadors perform now, the
peak of the bullfight season
in Mexico, especially at the
bullrings in Mexico City,
just 45 minutes by air
from Acapulco.
Many of Mexico's best
entertainers perform in
Acapulco at this time of
year. By day or night,
there are exciting activities
and some of the finest
beaches in the world.
 Follow the sun to Mexico this season. See
Mexico's most famous vacation resort areas —
La Paz, Puerto Vallarta, Acapulco, Mazatlan, and
Ensenada — on a leisurely cruise aboard the Canadian
Pacific liner, "Princess Patricia."* Perfect fun-filled
vacations of 3, 7, 9 or 14 days' length !
Enjoy glorious, sun-drenched days cruising from
Los Angeles along Mexico's scenic western coastline,
to exciting ports of call. You go ashore to explore
the beauties of Mexico, but your ship is your hotel
afloat. You live aboard and enjoy the good life this
tropic cruise ship has to offer— including music,
entertainment, and superb cuisine (featuring a special
midnight buffet).
Life aboard the sleek, air-conditioned "Princess
Patricia," your Canadian Pacific pleasure liner, is
lazy-leisure, or social-active, depending upon
your moods.
Experienced cruise personnel are always near, to see
to your needs. Swim in the sparkling, emerald pool;
stretch out and dream in a deck chair; or meet friends
at one of the many lounges. Join in the fun at one of
the game areas. Your days and nights are filled with
wonder and delight! Whether dining, playing, or
snug in your comfortable outside stateroom, you
follow the fun when you follow the sun on a
Princess Cruise to Mexico.
This season there are 13 scheduled Princess
Cruises to Mexico. You can select the cruise time and
length that fits your vacation schedule. This year's
Mexican fun cruises sail from Los Angeles, from
November 23 through April 14. There are also two
4-day cruises between Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Victoria, Canada—southbound November 18 and
northbound on April 17. Plan to be aboard.
*Canadian registered
 4
Nov. 18, Fri.
Victoria, Vancouver, San
Francisco, Los Angeles
9
Nov. 23, Wed.
La Paz, Mazatlan,
Puerto Vallarta
14
Dec. 2, Fri.
La Paz, Puerto Vallarta,
Acapulco, Mazatlan
14
t Dec. 1 6, Fri.
La Paz, Puerto Vallarta,
Acapulco, Mazatlan
14
f Dec. 30, Fri.
La Paz, Puerto Vallarta,
Acapulco, Mazatlan
14
Jan. 13, Fri.
La Paz, Puerto Vallarta,
Acapulco, Mazatlan
14
Jan. 27, Fri.
La Paz, Puerto Vallarta,
Acapulco, Mazatlan
14
Feb. 10, Fri.
La Paz, Puerto Vallarta,
Acapulco, Mazatlan
14
* Feb. 24, Fri.
La Paz, Puerto Vallarta,
Acapulco, Mazatlan
7
**Mar. 10, Fri.
Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan
7
tMar. 17, Fri.
Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan
14
Mar. 24, Fri.
La Paz, Puerto Vallarta,
Acapulco, Mazatlan
7
Apr. 7, Fri.
Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan
3
Apr. 14, Fri.
Ensenada
4
Apr. 17, Mon.
Los Angeles, San
Francisco, Victoria
*"Life Begins at 40 Cruise" —
One Dollar off fare for each year of age over 40 on full cruise
**Princess Cruises/ Western Outdoor News Annual Fishing Tournament
fSoid on full cruise basis only — no one-way
princess cruises, inc.
643 South Flower St., Los Angeles, Calif. 9001 7
Phone 629-1271 (Area Code 21 3)
1422 Vance Building, Seattle, Wash. 98101
Phone MA 4-1 666 (Area Code 206)
FOR RESERVATIONS, SEE YOUR TRAVEL AGENT
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FOUR SEASON
VACATION LAND
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
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 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Planning Your Trip 4
By Land, Sea and Air 5
Parks 6
Historic Sites 7
Museums 8
Special Attractions 9
Sporting Paradise 10
Come Ski, Sail, Swim and Soar
Vancouver Island
Lower Mainland Southwest
Okanagan-Similkameen
Kootenay-Boundary
Thompson-Columbia
Cariboo-Chilcotin
11
Yellowhead16
24
12
Peace-Liard
26
14
Conventions
28
16
Superb Living
29
18
Entertainment
30
20
Need More Information?
31
22
Mileage Chart
32
% OKANAGAN - §IMy.KAMEEN'
 The Coat of Arms of British Columbia
contains arms similar to the province's
flag, its motto (Splendor Sine Occasu —
Splendour Undiminished), the Imperial
crown and crowned lion, and, as supporters, a wapiti stag and a mountain
sheep ram.
British Columbia's provincial emblem
is the Pacific dogwood. The white or
greenish-white "blossoms" that appear
in spring — and sometimes in fall —
are actually bracts, four to six in
number, surrounding the small true
flowers. The dogwood is found mostly
in southwestern British Columbia.
The flag of British Columbia consists
of a Union Jack, symbolic of the province's origin as a British colony and its
continued links with the United Kingdom; a crown, representing the sovereign
power that links the Commonwealth
of Nations; and a sun setting over the
Pacific Ocean, representing British
Columbia's position as the most westerly province in Canada.
](( BRITISH COLUMBIA ))(
Four Season Vacationland
Spring, summer, fall, winter: every season of the year
is vacation time in British Columbia. In this, the most
westerly of the Canadian provinces, there are activities for
every taste and every time of year.
Early spring on the coast: the daffodils bloom and the
cherry trees are pink against the sky. Winter in the Rockies:
the skiers are deep in powder snow. Autumn in the Cariboo:
horseback riders head out across the golden hills. Summer
in the Okanagan: the sun shines down on the blue lakes.
This is British Columbia: the Four Season Vacationland.
Bounded in the south by the American states of
Washington, Idaho, and Montana; on the east by the
Canadian province of Alberta; on the north by the Northwest and Yukon territories; and on the west by the Pacific
Ocean and the Alaska Panhandle, the province contains
an incredible geographic variety.
Within its 366,255 square miles (948,596 square
kilometres), British Columbia counts a dozen different
mountain chains, four major and powerful river systems,
a host of smaller rivers, unnumbered lakes and a long and
greatly indented seacoast.
Most of British Columbia's two-and-a-half million
people live in the southern portion of the province; almost
half of them are clustered in Vancouver and the Fraser
Valley. It's this area of the province that provides most
urban recreations.
But it's not so long ago that British Columbia was true
frontier, and the further north you go, the more reminders
of this you see. Today's bush pilots and backwoodsmen
carry on a tradition established in the lusty days of the fur
trade and the gold rush, when traders and prospectors
invaded   the  territory  then   inhabited   only   by   Indians.
The gold rush came scarcely more than a century ago;
since then loggers and miners have spread out through the
province, establishing the two major industries of forestry
and mining. The region was British in its early days; the
traditions established then can still be seen. In later years,
the cultural stance of British Columbia has been greatly
widened  by  immigrants  from  every  part of the world.
The wide geographic and cultural variety that is British
Columbia means an equally wide range of activities for
the visitor. From trail breaking to sophisticated dining, from
skiing to cricket, from sailing to mountain climbing to dancing in a discotheque, it's certain that whatever you seek in
a vacation and whenever you seek it, British Columbia,
the Four Season Vacationland, can provide it for you.
 PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO Butyrl BRITISH COLUMBIA
A little advance planning will ensure that
your trip to British Columbia is a success. It's
a big province, and a few hours ahead of time
with a map and some travel literature will save
you wasted time on your holiday.
There are, of course, no border crossing
formalities for Canadians. Citizens of the United
States should bring with them proof of American
citizenship. Visitors from the Commonwealth
countries, most European countries, the
Americas and Japan need only a valid national
passport. Visitors from most other countries
require passports and visas to enter Canada.
If in doubt, contact the Canadian consulate
nearest you for further information.
Customs regulations permit visitors to bring
in their personal effects including limited
amounts of alcohol and tobacco. There are
regulations governing the import of firearms;
check with Canada Customs for further information. Dogs must have recent rabies vaccinations;
there are no restrictions on cats. Check with
Canada customs about other animals. The
import of plants, vegetables and fruits is
regulated.
Most vehicles can cross the border with few
formalities. Always carry your vehicle registrations. Separate regulations govern the entry of
boats and planes; check with Canada Customs
in advance.
British Columbia weather varies according
to season and locale. Summer weather ranges
from warm along the coast to very hot in
interior valleys. Spring and fall range from cool
to warm. Winter temperatures show a great
range, from considerably below freezing in
northern and interior mountain regions to mild,
above-freezing temperatures in the southwest
corner. Winter tourists who plan to visit the
interior of the province are advised to equip
their cars with good winter tires.
The Department of Recreation and Travel
Industry publishes a directory of accommodation
that lists all approved accommodation —
hotels, motels, resorts, trailer parks and campgrounds — in the province. It is advisable to
reserve ahead wherever possible, and especially
during the summer months, in ski areas in the
winter months and during any special festivals.
British Columbia is a casual province; there
are few occasions outside the big cities that
demand formal clothing.
-*
 BY LAND, SEA AND AIR
Despite its size, most of British Columbia is
accessible by land, by sea or by air. Your travel
agent can give you complete details on transportation; the following is only a guide.
There are nine major highways entering the
province: four from Alberta, four from the United
States (all with 24-hour-a-day customs posts), and
one, the Alaska Highway, from the Yukon Territory.
All except the Alaska Highway are first class,
paved roads.
There are also a large number of secondary
roads entering the province; check locally for
customs post hours.
A number of bus lines run regularly
scheduled service into the province; there is bus
service throughout British Columbia, including
tours of the scenic highlights.
Three rail services, Canadian National,
Canadian Pacific and Amtrak, have tracks enter
ing the province. CN, CP and British Columbia
Rail have in-province passenger services.
Major airports are Vancouver and Victoria
International Airports. There is scheduled air
service to most cities within the province. Charter services operate a wide variety of wheeled,
float-equipped and ski-equipped aircraft.
International cruise lines include Vancouver
and Victoria in their regular schedules; a number
of lines also operate cruises through the Inside
Passage along the British Columbia coast to
Alaska. There is regular ferry service between
Victoria and Washington State.
The British Columbia Ferries operate the
largest ferry fleet in the world. Ships of the fleet
provide regular service between Vancouver Island
and the Mainland; the Gulf Islands, Victoria and
Vancouver; and from Vancouver up the Inside
Passage to Prince Rupert.
 Parks
British Columbia is richly endowed with
provincial and national parks which preserve and
protect outstanding examples of the province's
natural and human history and provide almost
unlimited opportunity for outdoor recreational
activities.
From the snow-capped peaks of the Rocky
Mountains to the wind-and-wave-swept beaches
of Vancouver Island, visitors may stroll paths
originally traversed by eighteenth-century explorers, camp under the stars by a languid lake,
angle for a pan-sized trout, view exhibits of
natural and human history, swim in the warmest
ocean waters north of California, observe the
nesting of seabirds, ski downhill or cross-country,
or picnic with a view of Canada's third largest
city as a backdrop. All these and more, and all
within the more than 340 parks, recreation areas,
and wilderness conservancies that make up the
provincial system.
With a total area in excess of 11,000,000
acres (4.5 million hectares), provincial parks vary
in size from one acre (half a hectare) to the vast
2,400,000-acre (nearly a million hectares) wilderness that is Tweedsmuir.
Many of the parks have been developed for
visitor-intensive activities while others have no
development at all. Marine parks, accessible
primarily by water, have been established along
the coast and on offshore islands and on some of
the inland waterways.
There are no entrance fees to provincial
parks although most campgrounds have an overnight camping charge.
Over a million acres (445,000 hectares) of
the province have been set aside in five national
parks. Kootenay, Yoho, Glacier and Mount Revel-
stoke are in the mountainous reaches of east-
central British Columbia while Pacific Rim is on
the west coast of Vancouver Island. Recreational
opportunities in the national parks are diverse,
and facilities range from wilderness camping
areas to sophisticated hotels. A small entrance
fee is charged in national parks.
 Historic Sites
The history of British Columbia deals with
Indians, fur traders and gold prospectors, colonial
governors and immigrants from far-away places.
The more than 40 places officially designated as
historic parks and sites in the province are a
graphic recital of this history.
The Indian history is reflected in the 19
petroglyph sites scattered through the province.
These rock drawings made by unknown tribes are
among the earliest indicators of the human
presence in British Columbia.
The fur traders, explorers and early settlers
who were the first Europeans to come to British
Columbia are well-represented. Fort Defiance on
Vancouver Island, Fort St. James near Prince
George, and particularly Fort Langley, a fully
restored fur trading post on the lower Fraser,
show the progress of the fur trade. Places like
Helmcken House and Craigflower Manor and
School near Victoria demonstrate how the
earliest settlers adapted to their new land.
The prospectors for gold came next. Barker-
ville is their living memorial, a town that seems
to come right out of the 1860's Cariboo gold rush.
Fort Steele, in the Kootenays, marks the lone
incursion of the North-West Mounted Police into
British Columbia. Named for NWMP Superintendent Sam Steele, the fort re-creates a typical
Kootenay town of the 1890's, with its railway
station and small steam train, stores, houses and
various businesses, all equipped as accurately as
possible.
Vancouver's main historic site is the Gastown-
Chinatown area, in the heart of the oldest part
of Vancouver. Here, restored old brick buildings
house fashionable boutiques and curio shops; in
Chinatown, a way of life exported from the
Orient is on display.
Other historic sites in the province include
the Dewdney Trail, built to connect the Fort
Steele area to the coast, and Fort Rodd Hill, a
one-time Royal Navy preserve.
Most historic parks and sites have free
admission;   a  small   charge  applies   at  a  few.
 Museums
Almost every city and town in British
Columbia has a museum that depicts the history,
archeology and pioneer life of the area and the
province. Some of the highlights:
The British Columbia Provincial Museum,
Victoria: modern history in true-to-life reconstruction, complete with smells and sounds;
birds, animals, insects, plants of the province;
marine biology; archeology; Indian ethnology,
lectures and films.
Centennial   Museum,   Vancouver:
archeology;   collections   from   outside
Columbia, particularly in the Asian field.
Maritime   Museum,   Vancouver:
Canadian  Mounted   Police  schooner  St.
ship models, marine artifacts.
history;
British
Royal
Roch,
H.R. MacMillan Planetarium, Vancouver:
astronomy theatre with graphic re-creations of
astronomy over your head, astronomy displays
and viewing by telescope.
British Columbia Museum of Mining, Britannia Beach, and Le Roi Mine, Rossland: exhibits
on mining and tours through once-working mines.
Kootenay Doukhobor Historical Museum,
Castlegar: reconstruction of communal village,
showing the Doukhobor way of life.
British Columbia Forest Museum, near Duncan: historic logging equipment, logging tools,
short operating steam railway.
Kamloops Ranch Museum, Kamloops: early
farm and logging equipment in a modern replica
of a fur fort.
 Special Attractions
Steam trains, trained whales, bathtub racers
and competing cowboys are just a few of the
special attractions of British Columbia.
The Royal Hudson Steam Train takes steam
and nostalgia buffs on an 80-mile (130-kilometre)
trip from North Vancouver to Squamish and
return. The working steam locomotive and her
coaches operate from May to October.
'Ksan is a northwest coast Indian village
reconstructed on the banks of the Skeena River
east of Prince Rupert. Here the arts and life of
this highly cultured civilisation are shown in their
natural setting.
The Vancouver Public Aquarium presents
aquatic life from all regions of the world, with
emphasis on the area in and around British
Columbia. Featured are a performing killer whale
and trained dolphins.
The Stanley  Park Zoo  in  Vancouver,  the
Okanagan Game Farm near Penticton and the
Vancouver Game Farm near Aldergrove show
animals in both zoo and natural settings.
There is a host of special celebrations that
take place in British Columbia every year.
Examples are the Kimberley Winterfest, a
Bavarian-flavoured celebration; the Williams
Lake and Anahim stampedes (and many other
stampedes and rodeos throughout the province),
where cowboys compete in the skills of the west;
Barkerville Days in Quesnel and Overlander Days
in Kamloops, where gold rush times are recreated; the Saturna Island lamb barbecue; the
Nanaimo bathtub race where intrepid tubbers
race each other across the Strait of Georgia; and
any number of other blossom, sea, harvest and
winter festivals. Precise details are available in
the Calendars of Events published by the
Department of Recreation and Travel Industry.
 Sporting Paradise
It's an old cliche: "The Great Outdoors."
But there's no better way of describing British
Columbia. For this is truly a place that offers
every outdoor pursuit a sportsman could desire.
Taking photographs? You may never again
see so much you want to photograph. Wildlife,
mountains, rivers, lakes, wild flowers, beaches,
cities, it's all there.
Hiking or climbing? Whether it's a 20-minute
hike or a two-week climbing expedition you're
after, you'll find it in British Columbia.
Golfing? More than 125 courses — some in
the shadow of breathtaking mountains, others by
gentle rivers or the sea — where you can try your
skills.
Canoeing? There are marked circuits for
canoeists; there are also endless miles of river
with white water and calm stretches to invite you.
Want to go fishing? Fish abound in both tidal
and non-tidal waters; you can fish for salmon,
trout, halibut, cod, char, bass, grayling; hunt for
clams, oysters, crabs, prawns. There are license
and limit regulations, so check carefully before
you bring out your fishing gear.
Hunting? There are a number of game species;
check regulations carefully.
10
 Come Ski, Sail, Swim, Soar!
Is winter your season? There are ski hills
almost everywhere there are mountains and there
are mountains almost everywhere in British
Columbia. If you want comfort, there are hills
with chair lifts, T-bars, lodges, restaurants, all
modern facilities. But if you want to ski almost
alone, you can fly by helicopter or fixed-wing
aircraft to untouched slopes and ski to the
bottom of your mountain over unmarked snow.
Downhill skiing not your sport? Try crosscountry skiing on marked trails or across frozen
fields   and   lakes.   Take   to   snowshoeing,   ice-
boating, ice-fishing, snow golf, winter mountaineering, or almost any other winter sport ever
invented.
Want to go sailing? You can, year-round,
on the coastal waters, or for most of the year on
interior lakes. River rafts will take you swirling
down the river canyons; river boats help you
explore secluded waters.
Up in the air? Gliding, kiting, parachuting,
flying, air shows ....
Whatever you want, it's here, in British
Columbia's great outdoors.
11
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VANCOUVER ISLAND
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Vancouver Island is a mixture of the old and
the new, the urban and the wild. The old is best
represented in Victoria, the province's oldest
established community. Victoria still preserves
much of its British and Victorian heritage; here
you'll see red double-decker buses and enjoy tea
in the afternoon.
You'll also see the restoration of many of
Victoria's oldest and most elegant buildings. You'll
enjoy the Parliament Buildings in their turn-of-the
century style; the world-famous Butchart Gardens;
and harbours, coves and pleasant seaside drives.
Much of Vancouver Island's development is
concentrated in a corridor along the east coast
that extends as far north as the famed fishing
grounds of Campbell River. The Island Highway
winds along pleasant seacoast scenery to Kelsey
Bay, where the ferry for  Prince  Rupert docks.
Further north and along the island's west
coast lies some of the province's most beautiful
seacoast scenery. Pacific Rim National Park
includes the miles of sand of Long Beach and the
West Coast Trail, once a lifesaving, now a hiking
trail. At the north end of the island are wild Cape
Scott and the totem poles of Alert Bay.
The island mountain chain cuts through the
centre of the island, providing spectacular scenery
and facilities for hiking, climbing and skiing.
The Gulf Islands lie close to the shores of
Vancouver Island. These small isles provide gentle
scenery, protected moorages for boaters and a
peaceful refuge from the bustle of Victoria and
Vancouver. They are served by ferry from Vancouver Island and from the mainland.
12
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Vancouver is the pulse of the Lower Mainland
Southwest region of British Columbia. This metropolitan area of half a million people contains
facilities for almost every urban recreation.
Restaurants representing every corner of the
world; nightclubs, discotheques and intimate bars;
art galleries, symphony halls, theatres and movie
houses; shopping malls, boutiques and sophisticated stores; parks, beaches and walkways; hotels,
motels and resort complexes: Vancouver has
facilities of every description.
It also has one of the most beautiful settings
of any city in the world. This setting of water
ringed with mountains means that within an hour's
driving distance of the big city, the visitor can find
any number of country recreations. Sailing or
fishing in Howe Sound, skiing on Grouse Mountain
or in Cypress Bowl, hiking or climbing on Mount
14
Seymour: all these can be found close to
Vancouver.
British Columbia's greatest concentration of
convention facilities is in the Lower Mainland.
From the towering new hotels of downtown Vancouver to the hideaway of Harrison Hot Springs,
the   facilities   can   house   any   size   convention.
North from Vancouver, the Sunshine Coast
stretches out. This coast of coves, bays and
beaches has long been a favorite retreat for city
dwellers; it offers the visitor an unspoiled haven.
The farmlands of the Fraser Valley run east
from Vancouver to Hope, where the Fraser Valley
turns north into its canyon. And at the far eastern
end of the region is Manning Provincial Park,
where each season offers its special treat, from
skiing to spring flowers in the alpine meadows to
hiking the well-marked trails.
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 Okanagan-Similkameen is lake country. Blue and turquoise
lakes shimmering under the sun, bright sails summer and winter on
the water or ice, beaches and family fun.
In the spring, the Okanagan hillsides are crowded with
blossom as the fruit trees come to life; in the south, the shy flowers
of the Vaseux Lake desert area brighten the ground. By summer,
vacationers have flocked to the valleys to enjoy the warm lake
waters, the safe sandy beaches and the hot sunny summer days.
This is the time for swimming and waterskiing, sailing and sunning,
fishing and lazing.
It's also a time for side trips to explore the roads of the
Similkameen area, to visit the game farm south of Penticton or the
sternwheelers moored at Penticton and Kelowna, or to investigate
history at the restored mission near Kelowna.
Through the summer and fall, the roadside stands are
crowded with the produce of the valleys: cherries, peaches, apples,
pears, plums, tomatoes, peppers, a dozen different fruits and
vegetables. And all through the year, the wineries of the Okanagan
produce wine from grapes grown on the hillsides.
In winter, attention turns to winter sports. Several cities have
winter carnivals where competition in skiing — and less formal
event such as snow gcrlf and tire tube racing — is the order of the
day. Ski hills outside Vernon, Kelowna, Penticton and Osoyoos
provide slopes for experienced skiers and beginners, and there are
cross-country trails for the ski-tourers.
A full menu of family involvement or relaxation: that's the
Okanagan-Similkameen.
16
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Kootenay-Boundary is a land of mountains
and valleys, from the peaks of the Rockies,
Purcells and Selkirks to the long sweep of the
Arrow and Kootenay lakes and the Columbia river.
Autumn is a special time for this land. The
thousands of golden birches line the streams and
the roads and the waterfowl flock south along the
Pacific Flyway to their winter destination. Each
year, spring and fall, ducks, geese, swans and a
dozen other species choose this route along the
Creston Valley for their migration, pausing to rest
on the Creston Marshes.
By winter, most of the birds are gone — but
the skiers have arrived. There are ski slopes all
through this region, at Nakusp, Nelson and
Rossland-Trail in the West Kootenay, at Fernie,
Kimberley, Fairmont, Radium, in the east.
The famed Bugaboo peaks are in the
Kootenays. Aircraft drop skiers miles from any
road; they ski down slopes deep in untouched
powder to their next rendezvous with their plane.
18
Other aircraft convey skiers to ski the glaciers of
the Purcells and Rockies.
For sheer relaxation, nothing beats a visit to
one of the four hot springs of the Kootenays:
Fairmont, Radium, Nakusp and Ainsworth. The
first two have pools at various temperatures, golf
courses and recreational and accommodation
facilities; the latter two are under development.
High in the Purcell Mountains — the highest
city in Canada — sits Kimberley, a "Bavarian"
town where winterfest and summerfest supply
exuberant entertainment on the Platzl and through
the town.
Not far away, near Cranbrook, is Fort Steele,
the reconstruction of a nineteenth-century
Kootenay town.
At the other end of the area, in Boundary
country, is the re-creation of a communal Doukhobor village; and in the West Kootenay, the
traveller will find craftsmen hard at work creating
pottery, wood carvings, weavings and stained glass.
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GLACIER ^     »
 THOMPSON-COLUMBIA
The Thompson-Columbia region cuts a wedge-shaped piece of
British Columbia and crams it full of some of the province's most
incredible scenery.
Here you will find Mount Robson, the highest peak in the
Canadian Rockies; the icefields of Glacier National Park; the
waterfalls of Wells Gray; the seemingly endless shoreline of the
Shuswap lakes; the rolling hills of ranch land and the fishing lakes
of the high country.
You could spend your whole vacation in Thompson-Columbia
just looking at the scenery. Spring comes in with a rush of green;
autumn transforms the birches, maples and aspens to forests of
gold. Winter drapes the trees in the mountains with snow; summer
gives a special blue to the lakes and rivers.
But Thompson-Columbia provides much more than just a
treat for the eyes. Rent a houseboat that will take you poking
along through the Shuswap lakes. Or, if you're not a do-it-yourselfer,
take a trip on the unique tug-barge-paddlewheeler combination
that plies these same lakes. Hike or climb in Wells Gray or Mount
Robson provincial parks.
Travel the route of the gold rush Overlanders along the
Thompson River from the Rockies to the Fraser. Cut back through the
fishing country near Merritt, then along
the Trans-Canada Highway into the
heart of the Rockies. Try a side trip to
the Mica Dam or Mount Revelstoke
National Park.
In winter, there's helicopter skiing,
cross-country, or downhill at one of the
region's ski hills.
Try Thompson-Columbia: a treat for
the eyes and enjoyment for all of you.
20
  V ^
£   CARJBOOCHILCOTIN   3
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It's called the Big Country: the Cariboo-Chilcotin, 50,000 square
miles (130,000 square kilometres) of land stretching from the Pacific
Ocean almost to the Rockies, over a vast area of fjord, mountain, rain
forest, plateaus, river benches and wide-open ranchlands.
The Big Country offers unparallelled opportunity for family
vacations. The cowboy still rides the range here, and the vacationer can
ride through sagebrush with him, at one of the many working guest
ranches in the area. Families can holiday by the side of a Cariboo or
Chilcotin lake, staying at a lodge, fishing, swimming, riding horseback,
hiking or taking pictures. The visitor may choose to go canoeing,
perhaps at Bowron Lake Provincial Park where a round-trip circuit gives
the canoeist 73 miles (117 kilometres) of wilderness boating to test his
skills.
Vacationers may choose simply to explore some of the many back-
roads, perhaps in the fall when they may not see another car for miles.
Such a road is the Bella Coola highway that winds all the way from the
vast ranchlands to the spectacular coastal scenery of the Bella Coola
Valley.
The famed Williams Lake Stampede or the Anahim Lake Stampede, or any other of a number of rodeos, shows the visitor a variety
of hoopla and rollicking cowboy sport unmatched in the west.
Come winter, the holidayer can don cross-country skis or snow-
shoes to explore the gently rolling hills and wide flat spaces.
The Cariboo is rich in historic lore. More than a century ago, miners
swarmed north in the Cariboo gold rush to vastly accelerate the opening
up of British Columbia. When the rush died the miners left behind a
score of towns, some of them now no more than ruins, but one of them
a fully restored replica of a nineteenth century gold rush town. Barker-
ville offers a chance to try your hand at goldpanning, stop for a snack at
the Wake Up Jake or ride the stagecoach past the period buildings.
22
  The region and the highway that cuts across
it both bear the same name: Yellowhead 16,
named for a blonde trapper of a hundred years
ago. This is a slice of British Columbia from the
east to the west, from the Queen Charlotte Islands
to the Alberta border.
Start in the west with the Queen Charlottes,
the Misty Isles that promise mystery, moss-draped
trees, weathered totems, wind-swept coastline and
lonely beaches. Here you can backpack, beach-
comb, wander,  in perfect solitude if you wish.
Across Hecate Strait is Prince Rupert and the
mouth of the mighty Skeena River. Road, river and
railway lead together along the valley through
magnificent scenery. See the fishing boats at
Prince Rupert, visit the lava beds north of Terrace,
set out for adventure on the Stewart-Cassiar highway, visit the reconstructed Indian village at 'Ksan
and see Indians fashion their age-old designs in
wood and silver, investigate the fossil beds near
Smithers.
Now you're into the lakes country. Some of
these great reaches of water are easily accessible;
others are reachable only on horseback or by float
plane. This is an area for sightseeing, exploring by
pack train, rockhounding and fishing.
And now you're in Prince George, the main
city of north and central British Columbia, almost
at the geographic centre of the province. From
here, it's a beautiful drive southeast toward the
Rocky Mountains, the border with Alberta and the
eastern end of Yellowhead 16.
24
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 The lure of the Peace-Liard is the wilderness. Almost one-third
of the province, splashed across the top of the map from the
Alaska Panhandle to the Alberta border, this is frontier country
still ruled for the most part by the bush pilot and the outdoorsman.
Every year, hundreds of vacationers make their once-in-a-
lifetime trip down one of the world's most famous roads, the
Alaska Highway. Some cut back down the region's only other
north-south road, the Stewart-Cassiar, to complete a circle tour of
British Columbia's least explored area. From both, there are side
trips to spots where you get the feeling that no one has ever been
before.
The plane and the horse are kings in much of the Peace-Liard.
Fly-in tours take the vacationer to Fort St. John or Fort Nelson;
from there, small bush planes take him deep into the wilderness.
He can go by pack train to view the wildlife of the northern
Rockies: moose, elk, grizzly bears, mountain goats and sheep.
He can fly to the side of a hidden lake or river for a fishing holiday;
he can go cross-country skiing; he can riverboat down the Peace or
its tributaries; he can go river-rafting on the Stikine; he can hike
through the volcanic country of Mount Edziza Provincial Park;
he can pan for gold in the streams south of Klondike.
On a tour of a different vein, he can marvel at the power of
the Peace, the giant Portage Mountain power project where the
W.A.C. Bennett Dam now stands and a second dam will soon come
into being. Or he can travel through Peace River farms and enjoy
Peace River honey.
It's all part of British Columbia North: Peace-Liard.
26
  Conventions
Planning a convention? British
Columbia has facilities to house almost
any size gathering in any one of a great
variety of settings.
Naturally, the greatest variety of
convention facilities can be found in or
near the big cities, where hotels and
convention centres can provide theatres,
meeting rooms, specialized equipment
and accommodation to house your convention.
But you can also choose to hold
your convention somewhere away from
the city, perhaps at a resort that caters to
conventioners, with both meeting facilities and places — golf courses, ski hills,
hot springs pools — to relax after the
meeting is over.
If your convention is smaller, you
might choose to hold it on an island, at
an inn by the beach, in a hideaway lodge
or at a fishing or cross-country skiing
resort.
The British Columbia Department of
Recreation and Travel Industry and the
tourist associations in each region will be
happy to help you locate and plan your
convention. Let us know your plans; we'll
give you the facts you need.
28
 Superb Living
You've made up your mind; you're coming
to British Columbia for your holiday. Now the
question comes: where to stay? Whatever your
choice — resort, luxury hotel, simple motel,
campground, trailer park — you'll find it in
abundance in British Columbia.
There are more than 2,000 establishments
in the province that carry the Department of
Recreation and Travel Industry's approved accommodation sign. This means that each is
inspected at least once a year and each is listed
in the department's accommodation book.
At the top of the list are the luxury resorts
and hotels. Resort hideaways near Vancouver or
in the southern Rockies; big-city luxury hotels
complete with shopping malls, restaurants and
entertainment; ranches and lodges with their
own golf courses and air strips in the Cariboo:
the choice is yours.
If you're looking for simpler, more inexpensive accommodation, you'll find a wide
variety throughout the province. Many motels
provide kitchen units and family units; check
directory listings to find these.
If you want to stay at a specific place at a
special time, it's wise to make reservations in
advance.   Reservation   policies  vary  with  the
hotel or resort concerned. It's always best to
write well ahead of time to make sure your
room will be waiting for you when you arrive.
Dining out in British Columbia? Vancouver
is a gourmet's heaven: more than 1,500
restaurants, with cuisine from every corner of
the world. Dine high up on a mountain or in a
downstairs hideaway. Enjoy an eight-course
Chinese dinner; try a hearty Greek repast; seek
out a fresh seafood meal; sample native Indian
cuisine.
Outside the big cities, there are, of course,
fewer restaurants. But you'll find good food
everywhere you go: steaks and prime rib in
cattle country, seafood on the coast, local
specialties throughout the province.
29
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Night clubs, symphony concerts, art exhibitions, hockey games, rock concerts: there's a full
measure of entertainment for the traveller in
British Columbia.
If you like to paint the town red at night,
you can find night clubs, discotheques, dance
floors and movie theatres in most cities. If your
inclination is to more cultural events, the larger
cities will present you with your choice of live
theatre performances, symphony concerts, the
occasional opera, dance performances and art
exhibitions. Vancouver, of course, is in the forefront for cultural events, but local and travelling
companies ensure that no town, is without entertainment.
There's a wide variety of sports events.
Vancouver has two major league teams: the
Canucks of the National Hockey League, and the
Lions, of the Canadian Football League.
There's a hockey team in almost every city,
30
town, village and hamlet in the province. Other
sports that may catch your eye include soccer,
rugby, cricket, tennis, polo, baseball, swimming,
sailing and skiing.
The thoroughbreds race at Exhibition Park in
Vancouver through spring, summer and fall, and
thoroughbreds, harness horses and quarter horses
race at shorter meets at various tracks in the
province.
Each August, the Pacific National Exhibition
in Vancouver presents a compendium of fun fair,
exhibitions, displays, shows and sports. One of
these is a loggers' show; other logging shows
throughout British Columbia also see loggers
compete against each other in pole climbing, log
burling — where he who stays atop his log
longest wins — and similar feats.
Sailing regattas and races, fall fairs, the
Abbotsford Air Show, dog sled races: all part of
British Columbia and your vacation entertainment.
 r
^
Need More Information?
On the regions in British Columbia:                                   On non-tidal fishing, hunting and wildlife:
Vancouver Island Publicity Bureau,
Fish and Wildlife Branch,
Room 4M, 635 Humboldt Street,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Victoria, British Columbia.
V8W1A6
V8V1X4
Mainland Southwest Tourist Association,
Box 470,
7267 Pioneer Avenue,
Agassiz, British Columbia.
On tidal fishing:
V0M1A0
Fisheries and Marine Service,
Environment Canada
Okanagan-Similkameen Tourist Association,                   1Qgo We$t Render s
CJorJhe^i f86 Green       '                                                   Vancouver, British Columbia
4801 - 27th Street,                                                                   V6E 2R1     '
Vernon, British Columbia.
V1T4Z1
Kootenay-Boundary Chambers of Commerce,
Box 610,
On provincial parks:
Cranbrook, British Columbia,
Provincial Parks Branch,
V1C4J2
1019 Wharf Street,
Region E Tourist Association
Victoria, British Columbia.
(Thompson-Columbia),
V8W 2Y9
Box 289,
Sicamous, British Columbia.
VOE 2V0
On national parks:
Cariboo Tourist Association.
P.O. Box 878,                                                                         Parks Canada,
100 Mile House, British Columbia.                                     Western Regional Office,
V0K 2E0                                                                                   134-11th Avenue,
Calgary, Alberta.
Yellowhead 16 Tourist Association,                                    T9(~ nvr
Box 1659,
Prince George, British Columbia.
V2L 4V6
Peace River - Alaska Highway Tourist                        °n fernes:
Association,                                                                         British Columbia Ferries,
Box 6850,                                                                             816 Wharf Street,
Fort St. John, British Columbia.                                         Victoria, British Columbia.
V1J4J3                                                                                     V8W1T3
On special events, attractions, museums, accommodation, convention facilities or
any other travel problem; tor maps, brochures and accommodation directory:    w\
_   BRITISH
The British Columbia Department of Recreation and Travel Industry,
rarnameni ounaings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
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VA \ \7 MmmmWmmmWmmmmWmmmmmmmmmWi ■■■■■■■■
Printed in Canad
a <_^^^s> 14
 \ &
p-alaska!
Cruise the Inside Passage with Canadian Pacific this
summer. More than 2,000 miles of spectacular scenery
over Tli unforgettable days. From $560 double occupancy.
We'll show you crackling glaciers. Frolicking whales. Dancing
Northern Lights. Six wild and woolly frontier towns. And the best
time you ever had.        ^_^
Weekly departures from May 31 to September 4 from
Send now for this free folder!
i    Name	
I    Address	
City	
n
/<
_Prov._
-Postal Code_
Princess Patricia is registered in Canada.
 BUSINESS REPLY MAIL
No postage stamp necessary if mailed in Canada
Postage will be paid by:
Canadian Pacific, Alaska Cruise
c/o The Gallery
P.O. Box 488
Station A
Montreal Que.
H3C 9Z9
 :   ■    ■ ' •■ "". "•   ■'    '•

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