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Princess Patricia Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1989

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MAJESTY
Originators
and
Manufacturers
of
Electro  Plate
ELK1NCTON
(£s_& Company, Limite p.<mj)
■■(e) Newhall Street,.6)
Bl RMINOHAM.
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STY
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TELEPHONE:      CENTRAL     S
telegrams:  "ELKI
code: A.B.
Goldsmiths, Silversmiths,
•Jewellers-
Wholesale A
NGTON,  BIRMINGHAM'.'  Ij*    ,_      __«     T\ i _
c.sweomoN. tLxport Department
16th December,1911*
Case No.l    Saloon.
L
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doz.
table Knives,
10
ft
Cheese       "
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ft
Fruit Knives &
Forks,
IS
ft
Table Forks,
IS
ft
Dessert    w
1
ft
Pickle       w
IS
ft
Dessert Spoons
10
ft
Table              n
*•*■
24
ft
Tea                  "
5
W
Egg
5
tt
Coffee           "
2
tt
Jam Spades
2
tt
Butter Knives ,
6
only Bar %>ocns    large
6
tt
"          n        smaLl
2
w
Ice Tongs
20
tt
Sugar  "
,
12
tt
Nutcrackers
IS
tt
Mustard Spoons
4
tt
Cheese  Scdops.
 2.
Gaaa.Jia^2 Saloon.
12 Oval  Cracker trays
12 Cake Baskets
12 Nut 8e P.asin Dishes
8 Water Pitcheas
25 Finger BowL s,  gold lined,
1 Bar Pitcher, with tray
1  Champagne Tap
36 Oval Entree Dishes, wilh Covers & handle s.
Case No,  3        Saloon.
20 Cream Ewers       2-g- pint set
20  Sugar Bowls        1~^    " n
50 Tea Pots -jjr pint
12 Sugar Dredgers,
2 Champagne Buckets
C_    12 Double Jam Stabds, no  Covers
12 extra Glasses for same.
8 Syrup Jugs,
12 Mustard'Pots,
6 extra Glasses for same.
Case No.4        §*io_i_iL_
12 Bread TBHys
12 Fruit Stands
20 Butter Di-hes & Drainers
L_
 3.
GA.-&JL{--.5 Aaa.cicfin.-Bac-.-
2 Cocktail  Shakers
2 Strainers
1-4 compartment  Stand for Coffee Betns
1 Ice  Slice
6 Bitters Corks
4 Straw Holders
6 Sugar Crushers
1  Sugar Basin
Q_._fi--.2s-_-*        Qfficers^_Mess._
3 doz.  Dinner Knives,
4 "      Cheese n
2 "     Dinner Folks
3 ■      Dessert    "
L.        2    B      Table  spoons
3    n     Dessert    "
5 "      Te a "    " ,P
2 Double Jam Stands    No  Covers -
2 Sugar Bowls      5 gill  set.
2 Milk Jugs          6       "         w
1 Syrup jug
2-6 bottle  Cruets
2 extra Vinegar Bottle s for  same.
2       "      Mustard » w        «
2      "      Pepper          * *        n
2 Butter DiJhes with Drainefrs
IS Napkin Rings.
\	
 CANADIAN
TO NANAIMO
by the fast
T V n B I Jf E    STEAMSHIP
"PRINCESS PATRICIA"
SATTJBDAY  EXCURSIONS
$1.50 FOR ROUND TRIP
The abov^ special rate will be In effect  on  Saturdays only.
Tickets good going on morning: trip
of steamer at 10 a. m., returning- same
day.
Tickets will be on sale at Vancouver
City and Depot Ticket offices.
H. W. BRODIB,   G. P. A., C. P. It.
TERMINAL.   STEAM  NAVIGATION   CO.
HOWE   SOUND   ROUTE.
g, s, Baramba leaves Evans-Coleman
dock every morning at 9:15. for
Squamish, calling at Caulfields, Lar-
sens, Bowen Island, Invereraig, Anvil
Island, Porteau, Britannia Mine, Mill
Creek and Newport. Thursdays boat
calls at Prazer & Macaulay's camp,
PotlatGh Creek and McDonald's camp
on way up.
Sunday boat leaves at 10:30 a. m.,
calling at Caulfields, Bowen Island,
Anvil Island, Porteau, Britannia Mine,
Newport, Mill Creek, arriving back in
Vancouver every evening at 7:30 p. m.
Evans, Coleman & Evans, agents.
Phone, Sey.  298$.
\ Tuesday, May 28, 1912.
 VICTORIA DAILY
Flint
MADE BY PATRICIA
FIRST TRIP SAIURDAY
MARKED WITH SUCCESS
lew Princess Showed Remarkable Speed—Carried Many
People Across Gulf
After making a jecord run from Victoria the magnificent ' ferry'" steamer
Princess Patricia, Capt. Ritchie,; glided
into the harbor at Nanaimo at about
S o'clock on Saturday morning, and
when Capt. :Troup placed his hand on
the whistle cord and- blew the signal
of the C. P. Rp fleet it was a sign for
all the steam_eraft in the harbor, the
locomotives in the railroad yards and
the various mills and plants in the
town to tie their whistles down. For
many   minutes   the   whistles   screeched
knots, and she made this with her
steam pressure at 140 pounds. Despite
the pace at which she was being driven
there was not the slightest sign of vibration. She moved along -steadily, and
although'she is 270 feet in length and
drawing but six feet of; water . forward and seven feet aft, whenever a
big waye confronted her she did hot
climb over it, but drove her nose right
through it.
■I It was 4.15 o'clock on 'Saturday morning when the r-Patricia moved; put- of
the Victoria harbor, and when off
Brotchie Ledge she started to pick up
her speed. She averaged 19 knots an
hour to Active Pass against an ebb
tide, but with slack water ■ from the
Pass* to Entrance Island light she
piled up an average of 2iy2 knots'. At
times. after; getting through the .-Pass
the Patricia was travelling at 22 knots
an hour, but that was not her limit, as
Engineer Anderson did not give- the
engine all the steam the .boiler produced. The-exact time recorded in the
log for the. run from Brotchie Ledge,
where the full speed bell was rung,
until Entrance Island light was passed,
where she was slowed down, was 3.34
hours, a new record for the distance.
s 'The people in Nanaimo were not expecting to see the new ferry boat in
before 9 o'clock, but she crept in an
hour ahead of that time. The brewery
whistle whnch was to announce the
arrival, of?. the steamer, commenced to
blow as soon as the vessel entered the
harbor, ancl men, women and children
began to stream down the streets leading to the docks to catch a glimpse of
the fas. turbine steamer. At 9.30 o'clock
the members of the Nanaimo Board of
Trade commenced to board the
isteamer.
The Presentation.
After the members of the Nanaimo
Board of Trade had boarded the steamer and just before the mooring lines
were cast off the presentation of a
beautiful silver shield to the Princess
Patricia was made by Mayor Shaw of
the Coal City. On the dock were several hundred residents of Nanaimo,
who had gathered to see the vessel
which is to link up more closely that
naimo, a city destined to have a great
future, and we feel that the most sanguine hopes that were conceived in the
niinds of Capt. Troup shall be. fully
realised and that the venture shall not
be in vain.
"Or citizens have deemed it only ^fitting-that the initial trip of this splendid craft,should be commemorated, and
so have assembled at this present moment to pay tribute to the efforts of the
C. P. S. S. through their energetic representative, CaptP Troup, and on behalf of the citizens of Nanaimo I present to the S. S. Princess Patricia this
shield and hope that this steamer may
see long service in our waters, and that
the benefits may be mutual."
In accepting the shield Capt. Troup
said  that on  behalf  of  the  officers  of
CAPT.  RITCHIE
This big, genial skipper of the C. P.
R. fleet, is receiving congratulations
from his many friends, upon his appointment to commander of the fastest boat on the Pacific.
PRINCESS  PATRICIA   LYING AT THE NANAIMO DOCK
 _* ;	
forth their notes of welcome, and then
up went a cheer from the large number of persons gathered on the waterfront. Saturday was without a doubt
an epochal day in the history of Nanaimo, and the residents of that enterprising city saw fit to celebrate the
great event of the arrival of the new
turbine-triple screw steamer in a most
elaborate   and   fitting   manner.
Every offiical of the C. P. R. who
spent the day aboard the Patricia was
gratified at the way in which the people of Nanaimo had welcomed the new
steamer to her home port, and also the
spirit shown by the Vancouver citizens. At the Terminal City about two
thousand people lined up oh the dock
to see the fastest steamer on the Pacific. Her beautiful lines attracted
words of the highest praise, and" it is
doubtful if a vessel built on such speed
lines has ever before passed
through the Narrows at Vancouver. On
several occasions during the day the
new ferry steamer demonstrated her
remarkable speed and everyone concedes that the Princess Victoria must
yield the speed honor.
When travelling with her engines
wide open and driving through the
water at 22 knots, the Patricia leaves
practically no wake. The way in which
she sheers off at the stern does not
permit her dragging any water with
her, such as is the case with most of
the steamers here. Her knife-like bow
sliced the sea so gracefully that the
water fell away without stirring up
any kind of a sea. The best speed of
the   steamer   during  the   day    was    22
town with Vancouver, and they cheered vociferously when the shield was
presented. The gift was a most costly
one and the work on it was done in an
artistic manner. The shield was mounted on a large ebony shield and contained a design of the old Nanaimo
Bastion and engravings of Maple Leafs
and other national emblems. The inscription on the shield was: "Presented
by the citizens of Nanaimo to the
Princess Patricia on the occasion of her
initial trip between Vancouver and Nanaimo.    May, 1912."
Mayor Shaw spoke as follows: "Capt.
Troup and officers of the Princess Patricia: On behalf of the citizens of
Nanaimo, we wish to welcome you and
this fine craft into our pOrt. We are
particularly gratified to know that the
fleetest passenger boat on the Pacific
coast, and perhaps the whole Pacific
ocean, has her home in the port of
Nanaimo, and that she will form the
cord that binds our fair cit}' to Vancouver, only forty miles away, and
now about to make a two-hour run.
"It is well within the memory of
many present when the little steam
packet Ada, about 40 feet long, plied*
across the Gulf, between Nanaimo and
the Mainland once in two weeks and
whose speed was not more than seven
miles an hour. Behold the change. In
this short space of time we have a
boat with a carrying capacity of 1,000
passengers and a speed of 25 miles an
hour. We welcome this event as an
epoch in the history of Nanaimo, this
year, 1912,  the birth of a Greater Na-
MEMBERS OF THE NANAIMO BOAR D OF TRADE EMBARKING ON THE
PATRICIA
the Princess Patricia and the C. P. R
he wished to thank the citizens of Nanaimo for their kind expressions and
souvenir. He only hoped that the Patricia would prove worthy of the recognition. "While serving on the
Clyde," said the captain," she gave entire satisfaction and was one of the
finest boats there. In placing such a
vessel on this run wTe may be ambitious, but the people of the west are
ambitious and I hope that we have not
overstepped the mark. After purchasing the boat we made -many alterations,
providing additional shelter and equipping lier with 611P. There IsP no doubt
that she is a better vessel how than
when running on the Clyde as the
Queen Alexandra. As a tourist city
Victoria was not discovered until the
Princess Victoria was brought out from
England about eight years ago. I hope
that Ave shall do the same for Nanaimo
as we have done for Victoria, and hope
that this summer we will bring many
people over to your city."
On her initial trip across the Gulf to
Vancouver the Patricia made the run
from dock to dock in exactly two hours.
After a stop of two hours in Vancouver the steamer sailed for Nanaimo at
2 o'clock in the afternoon with the
Vancouver Board of Trade, mayor and
and headed by the band paraded
through the streets of the Coal City.
After spending two hours in Nanaimo,
during which time the Vancouver aldermen seized the wagon which was
delivering the beer and other beverages to the saloons of the town,- and
also forced a farmer at the point of
a^camera to dismount and hand his
cart over to them to have a joy-ride
around the town, the guests returned
to the steamer to cross back to Vancouver.
It was evident from Saturday's demonstration that the relations between
the two towns are of a most friendly
nature. As the steamer was leaving
the Coal City on her second trip those
on the Patricia gave gave three cheers
for Nanaimo, and in return the Nanaimo people thundered out three rousing ones for the Terminal City. On
each trip the Patricia made more, attention was paid to the turbines of the
flyer than to anything else aboard.
Very few had ever before seen turbine engines and much interest was
taken in them. Although the turbines
took up very little room and none of
the  mechanism  could   be  seen,    being
CROWD   AT   THE   NANAIMO   DOCK   AS THE  PATRICIA  LEFT ON   HER
FIRST TRIP TO VANCOUVER
council and the heads of all the transportation companies in the province.
There were 740 persons on the vessel
when she backed out of the Mainland
port. About five minutes ahead of her
the Princess Adelaide and the Charmer
left their berths and the Patricia at
once commenced to overhaul them. The
Vancouver Yacht Club was, out on its
Saturday afternoon cruise and just as
the flyer was picking up her speed the
craft commenced to cross her bow. It
was necessary to stop three times* but
when she had a clear course she was
opened out. The Adelaide was then a
good mile in the lead, but by- the time
Point Grey bell buoy, where the single-
funnel steamer changes her course, the
Patricia was almost abreast of her. It
is certain that there is not a vessel in
the B. C. Coast Service that can touch
the Patricia and as Chief Engineer An^
derson said: "The Victoria can paint
that blue ribbon off her sides now. We
will have a golden cock placed on our
masthead."
Upon her return from Vancouver the
Patricia was given, a greater welcome
than on her first visit. The Nanaimo
band played many familiar tunes as
the ship glided up to the dock and the
hundreds of spectators on the^ docks
and shore sent out a volley of cheers
at the spic and span craft. The guests
of  the G.  P.  R.   filed  off  the  steamer
enclosed in iron forms resembling
large barrels, the guests of the C. P.
R. spent much time in the engine room
listening to the humming of the rapidly revolving machinery. The Patricia
has five engines, three of which were
driven ahead and two astern. When
doing her best time Saturday the centre propeller was making 600 revolutions a minute and the two outsiders
were turning over at the rate of 740
revolutions,    p
John Thompson, one of Nanaimo's
oldest pioneers, crossed the Gulf on
the Patricia en route to England. He
came around the Horn 55 years ago in
the sailing ship Princess Royal and
took the old steamer Beaver from
Victoria to Nanaimo. When they
wanted to cross to the mainland it
was necessary to \ go in canoes and
sometimes it ;took two days. Now it
took but two .hours. Later a windjammer startec! to operate between the
towns and it was nothing for her to
be three days on the forty-mile trip.
The Forward was'the first steamer to
enter the service, starting in 1887. He
has travelled on every vessel which
has operated across from Vancouver
to Nanaimo and he thinks the Patricia
is about the finest craft that he has
ever seen. He was born in Scotland
(Concluded  on  page  11.)

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