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Princess Marguerite and Princess Patricia drawings of propulsion equipment Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1958

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INSTRUCTION   BOOK  No. 9189
S "
TURBO-ELECTRIC
SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS
Nos. 32 and 33
Supplied to
The Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Ltd.
Ship Nos. 729 and 730
Twin-Screw Passenger Vessels
T.E.V.   "PRINCESS  MARGUERITE" and T.E.V.   "PRINCESS  PATRICIA
for
The Canadian Pacific Railway Company
BTH Contract No. 300215
THE
BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON
COMPANY, LIMITED
Rugby, England.
1949
 I.B.9I89
THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
Fig. I.   T.E.V. "Princess Marguerite.'
( >
Fig. 2.    Engine   room   of T.E.V.  " Princess   Marguerite,"   looking   aft
between the two BTH   turbo-alternators towards  the control panel.
Page 2
(     V
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos.   32 AND 33
I.B.9I89
CONTENTS
Page
Page
Schedule of equipment
5
Protective Devices
.      21
Approximate weights
5
Temperature alarm
Fault protection
.      21
.      21
Introduction
6
Earth leakage protection
Reversing and main field contactors
.      21
.      21
DESCRIPTION   OF   EQUIPMENT
Reversing contactors
Main field contactors
.      21
.      21
Steam Turbines
7
Exciter field circuits
.      22
Control of speed, 3150 r.p.m. down to 788 r.p.m
7
Contactors
.      22
Governor
7
Boost circuits
.      22
Steam admission valves and servo-motoi
r
Boost switches
.      22
mechanism
8
Rheostats
.      22
Main pilot valve mechanism
8
Exciter changeover switches
.      22
Operation for speeds 788 r.p.m. to dead slow
8
D.C. excitation panel
.      23
Emergency governor and tripping device .
9
Heating switches
.      23
Tripping speed
9
Sliding doors—interlocking
.      23
Combined emergency trip and stop valve .
9
Trials—power measurement
.      23
Main bearings
11
Set-up switches
.      23
1
Thrust bearings
11
Main blades
.      23
Shaft packings
11
Field blades
.      23
Diaphragms and packing
12
Auxiliary contacts ..         ..
.      23
Electrical tachometer
12
Interlocking
.      24
Back-pressure   trip   and   atmospheric  relie
valve
f
12
Propeller Motors
.      24
Steam sealing of shaft packings
13
Ventilation and cooling system
.      24
Drain piping and drains
13
Automatic shaft packing pressure regulatoi
-      13
OPERATION   OF  EQUIPMENT
Gland-steam condenser
13
cfl
Lubricating and operating oil system
13
Turbo-alternator Sets
.      25
Oil   supply   for   governor  gear,   and   foi
:
Conditions for starting
Lubrication
25
journal lubrication
15
25
Oil coolers
15
Steam from steam-admission valve and stof
>-
Alternators
16
valve spindles
Steam to shaft gland packings
.      25
.      25
Stator winding
16
Before starting
.      26
Thermo-couples
16
Starting the turbines
.      26
Rotor
16
Preparing to take load
.      26
Rotor body and shaft
16
Lubricating system
.      26
Rotor winding
16
Oil supply
.      26
Retaining rings
17
Oil regulating valves
.      26
Balancing of rotor
17
Return oil boxes
.      26
Slip-rings
17
Oil temperatures
.      27
Rotor connections   ..         ..         ......
17
Vacuum
.      27
Excitation
17
Alternator air cooler
.      27
Endshields        ..
17
Testing emergency governor..
.      27
Ventilation
17
Shutting down
.      27
Exciters
18
Propulsion Equipment
.      28
Control Equipment
18
Standby
.      28
Operating levers
18
Manoeuvring
.      29
Contactor cubicle
19
Starting
.      29
Instruments, meters and indicators
19
Stopping
.      29
Tachometers
19
Reversing
.      29
Stability indicators
20
Finished with engines
.      29
Temperature indicators
20
Full-away operation
.      30
Indicating lamps
20
Propulsion circuits
.      30
Bells	
20
Temperature and earth alarms   ..
.      30
Control switches
20
Temperature readings
.      30
Push-buttons
20
Turbine operation in heavy seaway
.      30
Page
3
 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
Prolonged runs
Emergency stop valve
Pressure gauges
Emergency running and location of faults
" Cape to corner " running
Main contactors and levers
Exciter field contactors
Tachometers
Phase balance relay (24)
Earth relays
Alternator air coolers
MAINTENANCE   OF   EQUIPMENT
Steam Turbines
Removing top half casing
Taking out steam rotor
Replacing steam rotor
Replacing top half casing
Setting of variable-speed governor
Alternators
Stator
Withdrawal of rotor  . .
Rotor winding
Slip-rings and brushgear
Alternator bearing pedestal insulation
Bearing pedestal dowels
Faults in stator winding
Location of earth fault in stator winding
Re-winding a portion of the stator winding
Faults in rotor windings
Repair to rotor winding
Procedure to locate an earth fault in rotor
winding
Air cooler
Temperature alarm
Exciters
Control Gear
Inspection
General care and maintenance
Contactors
Reversing contactors—1, 2, 4, and 5
Arc chutes
Operating coils
Fitting new contacts etc.
Page
31
31
31
31
31
31
31
31
32
32
32
32
32
33
33
33
34
35
35
35
36
36
37
37
37
37
37
38
38
38
38
38
39
39
39
40
40
40
41
41
41
Alternator and motor field contactors (6, 7,
and 38)	
Exciter field,  earthing,  and temperature
alarm contactors
Controllers (9 and 10)
Contactor and controller sequences
Field contactors
Cam and controller sequences
Reversing contactors
Cam and controller sequences
Lubrication
Camshafts and lever gear
Camshafts
Controllers (9 and 10)
Operating rods
Earth leakage protection (25 and 30)
Temperature indicator
Instruments and meters
Rheostats and resistances
Instrument transformers
Miscellaneous
Indicating lamps
Potential transformer fuses
Schedule of contactors and relays
Starters for lubricating oil pump and pro
peller motor fan motors    . .
Propeller Motors
Lubrication
Measurement of bearing wear
Fitting a new bearing liner
Measurement of the air gap
Magnetic centre indicator
Brushgear
Care of windings in service ..
Stator windings
Electrical breakdown of stator
Cutting out defective coils
Removing end beams
Rotor windings
To replace a field coil
Air coolers
Schedule   of   brushes   and   ball   and   roller
bearings
Routine Insulation Tests ..
Log recommended for I.R. readings
Page
43
43
43
43
44
45
45
45
45
45
45
46
46
46
47
47
47
47
47
47
48
48
48
49
49
50
50
50
50
52
52
52
52
53
53
53
55
55
56
ILLUSTRATIONS
Turbo-alternator Sets
Fig-
3 Sectional arrangement of turbine
4 Governor and control gear ....
5 Emergency-trip and stop valve
6 Shaft packing. High-pressure end
7 Shaft packing. Exhaust end    ...
8 Arrangement of turbine drains
9 Sealing-pressure regulator
10 Diagram of lubrication system
18 Arrangement of lifting gear ....
27, 28, 29, 30    Rotor clearance records
11 Alternator stator winding
12 Alternator rotor winding
13 Alternator ventilation
At back
At back
Page  10
At back
At back
At back
Page  14
At back
At back
At back
At back
At back
At back
Propeller Motors
Fig-
16 Prop, motor, stator connections
17 Prop, motor, stator winding diagram
23 Removing prop, motor bearings, etc.
24 Defective stator coil   	
25 Arrangement of brushgear   	
26 Diagram of rotor winding    	
Control Gear
14 Key diagram of connections ....
15 Control gear connection diagram
19, 20, 21     Reversing  contactors,
contact pressures     	
22    Lubrication of control gear ....
Page 51
At back
At back
Page 51
Page 54
Page 54
At back
At back
Page 42
At back
(')
( >
Page 4
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33
I.B.9I89
SCHEDULE   OF  EQUIPMENT
The electric propulsion equipment of each vessel comprises the following items :—
Two 6000 kW, 3150 r.p.m., 12-stage, 250 lb. per sq. in. gauge, 800°F steam turbines.
Two 6000 kVA, 3200 volt, 3-phase, 52*5 cycle, unity power factor alternators.
Two 7750 s.h.p., 225 r.p.m., 3200 volt, 3-phase, 52*5 cycle, unity power factor synchronous
motors.
Control cubicle.
Set of port and starboard control levers
Two 50 kW, 1000 r.p.m., alternator exciters.
Two sets of alternator set-up switches.
Four D.C. motor-driven fans with starters for ventilating the propulsion motors.
Four D.C. motor-driven oil pumps with starters for lubrication of the turbo-alternator
sets.
(   '
APPROXIMATE WEIGHTS
Top half of. turbine
Bottom half of turbine
Turbine rotor
Stop valve
Total weight of each turbine, including governor, pedestal, etc
Alternator stator
Alternator rotor
Air cooler and flume .. ..
Total weight of each alternator, including soleplate etc.,
Propulsion motor stator
Propulsion motor rotor
Propulsion motor end beams, each
Propulsion motor endshields, each
Total weight of each motor, including fans, etc.
Control—Lever gear
—Cubicle
—Set-up switches, each    ..
Tons
7
Cwt.
10
11
10
3
10
1
14
28J tons
12
0
3
15
1
8
18| tons
24
0
21
4
1
15
9
521 tons
—
13
7
14
7
Page 5
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
INTRODUCTION
THIS INSTRUCTION BOOK has been prepared with the object of giving the Engineers in charge of
the propulsion equipment all information necessary for obtaining the best results from it, and to
ensure that all parts are kept in proper condition.
BTH Turbo-electric equipment has established a long record of reliable and trouble-free service, and
repairs and renewals should rarely be necessary, but it is essential that every part should be maintained
so as to function properly. For this reason, particular attention is directed to those points which require
regular inspection.
These twin-screw vessels are powered by two impulse steam turbines, each direct coupled to an alternator. The alternators independently drive two propulsion motors, each coupled to a propeller shaft.
The alternators and motors, in effect, act as 14 to 1 reduction gears between the turbines and propellers
enabling both to operate at their optimum speeds. This speed ratio is fixed between quarter and full speed ;
it may also be maintained down to a lower speed if a " dead slow " condition is required.
When starting or reversing, the turbo-alternators operate at the " quarter speed " condition. The
propulsion motors are brought up to a near-synchronous speed as induction motors ; they can, therefore,
at starting, operate momentarily as if there were a slipping clutch in the system. Motor acceleration, up
to the " quarter speed " condition, can, if necessary, be increased by applying 200% normal alternator
excitation. At " quarter speed " the motor fields are excited bringing the motors into synchronism.
The turbines each have a long range governor to keep the turbine r.p.m. within pre-set limits, in
addition to an overspeed governor to cut off steam in an emergency.
Although the port and starboard drives are normally entirely independent, provision is made in the
switchgear allowing either turbo-alternator set to be connected to both port and starboard motors for
reduced speed running. Under this condition both motors operate at the same speed under power ; they
may, however, rotate in the same or in opposite directions, or one or both may be without power.
Reversal of a propeller is obtained at the control platform by changing over two of the electrical connections to the motor, the turbine being uni-directional.
With both turbo-alternators in service the speed and direction of either propeller may be varied
independently under either the normal condition with two exciters in service or the emergency condition
with both alternators excited by a single machine.
This ship is controlled by port and starboard sets of three control levers each, viz." Direction "
" Starting " and " Speed."
The " Direction " levers have " Ahead," " Stop," and " Astern " positions ; the " Starting "
levers apply alternator and motor excitation.
With the motors synchronized, speed of the propellers is controlled by the " Speed " levers only.
Mechanical interlocking ensures that these levers cannot be operated other than in their correct
sequence.
Fuller details of each item of equipment are given in the appropriate section of this Instruction Book.
Page 6
 (
BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
DESCRIPTION   OF   EQUIPMENT
STEAM  TURBINES (See Fig. 3)
THE turbines are of the BTH impulse type, having 12 stages with a double row velocity wheel in the
first stage, and single row wheels in the remaining stages.
The steam rotor is of the built-up type, the first five forged steel wheels subjected to higher temperature
being fitted with steel bushes, contained by radial pins, to preserve the tightness of fit on the shaft ; the
remaining wheels are shrunk and keyed direct on to the shaft.
The turbine casing consists of a high-pressure end with integral valve chest, and an exhaust casing.
These are bolted together with a vertical joint located at the fifth stage. Both casings are split at the horizontal centre-line so that the steam rotor can be lifted out for examination or cleaning without disturbing
the alignment of the bearings.
Steam from the valve chest is admitted to the first-stage nozzle plate through six cored passages,
each passage being under the control of a poppet valve.
The spindle of each valve extends upwards through a stuffing box (steam sealing type) and is secured
to a lever one end of which is pivoted to a link attached to the valve chest, the other end being connected
to a cam mechanism (see Fig. 4).
The valve operating cams are mounted on a shaft which is hydraulically rotated and controlled, and the
cams are so arranged that they cause the steam admission valves to open or close in a certain definite
order in accordance with load requirements. The cam casing, which is bolted to the valve chest, is divided
vertically and the front cover can be removed without disturbing any working parts. This allows the
operation of the gear to be observed if the servo-motor is rotated by hand.
The steam rotor is supported in two babbited bearings, spherically seated and self-aligning. Oil deflectors and guards confine the lubricant to the bearing housings.
Leakage of steam or air through the openings in the turbine casing where the shaft passes through,
and also the flow of steam between stages through the shaft openings in the diaphragms, is prevented
by spring-backed internally grooved metallic packing rings that fit with small clearance around the shaft.
An opening for the extraction of steam is provided at the fourth stage in the turbine casing for feed
heating.
A back-pressure trip device and 4-inch atmospheric relief valve set for 5-lb. sq. in. gauge, is provided
on the exhaust casing (see Fig. 4).
The governor gear (Fig. 4) is of special design to meet the variable-speed requirements of this equipment and instructions for maintenance and adjustment are given later. The turbo-alternator speed is
controlled by means of one lever, half the total travel of which operates the governor mechanism to give
speeds between full and J speed, the other half travel operates the gear to give speeds between J speed
and dead slow.
CONTROL OF SPEED from 3150 r.p.m. down to approximately 788 r.p.m.
Governor (see Fig. 4)
Speed control is effected by means of a centrifugal governor consisting of two rotating weights (3),
which are carried on a crosshead (4) mounted on the vertical spindle (5) and caused to rotate by means
of the worm (6), driven from the main turbine shaft and wormwheel (7). With the weights in the closed
position all steam admission valves are open ; with angular movement outwards of the weights admission
valves become closed. A spring (8) acts on a lever (9) which is keyed to a lay-shaft and transmits its load
through the forked lever (10) on to the governor sleeve (11), and then to the weights (3). The tension on
the spring is varied by means of spring carrier (12) which travels along fixed quadrants (13). As the spring
carrier is caused to move downwards, the speed of the turbine will rise due to the increased centrifugal
force required from the governor weights to balance the increased tension on the main spring. The spring
carrier is traversed by means of a hydraulic cylinder (14), the piston of which (15) is connected through
rod (16) to lever (17), the latter being pivoted at its right-hand end. Pressure oil is used to operate the
cylinder and is admitted by pilot valve (18). This valve is raised or lowered by the lever (19) which is
connected at its right-hand end to an operating rod (20). With the downward movement of this rod the
pilot valve is lowered, thereby admitting pressure oil through the ports in a fixed sleeve (21) to the underside of piston (15). This causes the piston to move upwards until the pilot valve has again been restored
to its central position through the medium of lever (19). The lower end of the operating rod is connected
by a system of rods and levers (22) to speed-controlling lever (1).
Page 7
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
To ensure that a too-rapid acceleration of the turbine shall not take place when the speed lever (1)
is moved too quickly to the full-speed position, a selective valve (2) is fitted on the oil passage to servo-
cylinder (14). The function of this is to give a restrictive flow, since the oil has to pass through the small
hole in the valve, when oil is admitted by pilot valve (18) to the upper port ; the lift of the valve is adjustable to control the flow in the opposite direction. Piston (15) will accordingly descend at a relatively
slow rate. This action in no way precludes a rapid upward movement of the piston (15) since the oil discharging from the upper side merely lifts the selective valve (2) against a light spring.
When operating at any speed up to the normal full speed, the lever (17) and stop (61) are in the position
indicated. If, however, it is desired to run above normal full speed, the retaining pins fitted in the stop
and resting on guide-rails (13) should be closed together permitting the stop to swing out of action. The
object of this device is to provide a margin for adjusting the normal full speed setting of the governor as
established in service.
Steam admission valves and servo-motor mechanism (See Fig. 4)
Steam admission valves (23) are raised or lowered by the horizontal lever (24) ; the left-hand end is
the fulcrum and the right-hand end is connected through links (25) to rocker (26). With the rotary movement of the cam shaft (27) roller (28) comes into contact with the rocker, imparting to it angular movement,
thereby raising or lowering steam valves. A servo-motor is employed to produce the rotary movement
and consists of a cylinder (29) in which rotates a vane (30). Oil pressure acting on the vane causes it to
move, the oil being carried up to the cylinder by means of pipes (31). A rack (32) and pinion (33) cause
rack rod (34) to move up or down when the servo-motor comes into operation.
Main pilot valve mechanism (See Fig. 4)
This pilot valve controls the oil flow to the rotary servo-motor. An outer casing (35) carries a sleeve
(36) in which oil ports are cut. The pilot valve (37) is a sliding fit in the sleeve, and when in its central
position covers the ports which admit oil to the servo-motor. High-pressure oil is led through the branch
as indicated, and by means of small holes in the valve, enters the lower chamber underneath the bottom
piston. The upward pressure so exerted is balanced by the spring (38). A sleeve (39), free to move on the
pilot valve, has a port cut in it corresponding to a similar port cut in the upper end of the pilot valve.
Upward movement of the sleeve throttles the oil escape, thereby causing the pilot valve to rise due to
increased oil pressure under its lower piston. The reverse of the foregoing operation is effected by lowering
sleeve (39).
When reducing speed, the action of the governor gear, in so far as it has been described, would be
as follows :—
With the movement of speed controlling lever (1) the pilot valve (18) is lowered, pressure oil will be
admitted to the underside of piston (15) which will rise. Lever (17) will move in a clockwise direction
taking with it spring carrier (12). The tension of spring (8) is therefore reduced and in turn reduces, through
lever (9) lay-shaft and fork lever (10), the downward force on the governor sleeve (11). The governor weights
will accordingly move outwards to their extreme position, at the same time lowering the left-hand end of
the fork lever which carries a link (40) and floating lever (41). The main pilot valve accordingly moves
downwards and permits pressure oil to flow through the lower port, thus causing the moving vane contained
in the servo-motor cylinder to rotate in a clockwise direction. Through the medium of the cam shaft rockers,
and levers, the steam admission valves become seated. The speed of the turbine will fall until, in accordance with the new setting, the governor again comes into action. The weights (3) will start to close in and
will continue to close until a sufficient number of valves are opened to maintain the required load at the
new speed. It will be observed that in all cases when the governor alters its position, thereby raising or
lowering the pilot valve, the action of the rack and pinion automatically restores the pilot valve to its
central position when a sufficient number of valves have been opened or closed to deal with the new conditions of load on the turbine.
OPERATION   FOR  SPEEDS from approximately 788 r.p.m. to "DEAD SLOW" (See Fig. 4)
Driven from the main governor spindle is a small oil pump (48) of the gear type. This circulates oil,
at bearing pressure, through pipe (49) to a needle control valve (50). When running above the speed of
78$ r.p.m., the needle (51) is fully open as shown, allowing the oil to discharge through the port in the lower
chamber to the bearing supply. To reduce the turbine speed below 788 r.p.m., lever (1) is moved over,
clutch faces indicated at (52) come into contact, and lever (53) transmits its motion to the vertical rod (54).
The downward motion of this rod through connecting lever (55) causes the needle to fall. This has the effect
of throttling the oil discharge to the low-pressure system and bringing up the pressure in chamber and on
the underside of pilot valve sleeve (36).
Page 8
i    )
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
Under this influence pilot valve sleeve (36) will ascend, compressing spring (59) and permitting pressure
oil to flow through the lower port in the sleeve to servo-motor cylinder (29) causing steam admission valves
to be further closed. With operating lever (1) set in any position, and therefore any fixed needle valve
position, the turbo-alternator speed will be kept constant within limits, for the following reasons :—
Suppose the turbine speed rises, then the oil pressure from pump (48) will also rise ; this in turn increases the pressure underneath the pilot valve sleeve (36) which will rise, and, through the levers etc.
(all previously described) effect partial closure of the steam admission valves. The reverse of the
foregoing operation takes place with falling turbine speed.
EMERGENCY  GOVERNOR  and  TRIPPING   DEVICE
The speed of a steam turbine can rise very quickly, and as an increase in speed is not easily perceptible
a speed limiting device is necessary which will operate in any emergency should the oil operated governing
mechanism be at fault. The emergency governor (see Fig. 4) is located at the high-pressure end of the turbine
and consists of an unbalanced steel ring mounted on the turbine shaft, with its outer periphery held concentric with the shaft by means of a spring. The spring is carried on a bolt, which passes through the shaft
and is screwed into the ring at one side. When the speed reaches the predetermined limit, centrifugal force
overcomes the spring, the ring flies out so that its periphery becomes eccentric to the shaft. In this position
the ring strikes a lever and disengages the trigger from the recess in the trip rod. One end of the tripping
spindle is formed as a piston valve, working in a chamber, which is normally in oil communication with
the high-pressure delivery from the oil pump to the emergency stop valve oil cylinder.
When the trip lever is struck by the ring, the tripping spindle is released and is moved outwards, by
the force of the spring, with the result that the oil supply to the chamber is cut off and the oil pressure
cylinder of the emergency stop valve is now in free communication with the interior of the bearing housing,
thus releasing the oil pressure on the emergency stop valve and allowing it to close.
Tripping Speed
This is the speed at which the emergency governor (just described) operates to close the emergency
stop valve and should be between 3460 and 3500 r.p.m.
COMBINED   EMERGENCY TRIP  and  STOP  VALVE
At the steam inlet to the turbine and bolted direct to the steam chest, a combined emergency-trip
and stop valve (see Fig. 5, page 10) is provided, and arranged for operation from the platform level.
The valve is of the single-seated balanced type normally opened and closed by handwheel.
The screw thread on an extension of the valve spindle engages with a sliding nut, which can move
up and down within a cylinder below the valve casing. This nut has a disc at its lower end slightly smaller
in diameter than the cylinder in which it works, and arranged to seat itself against a shoulder at the top
of the cylinder.
A connection from the oil pump delivery is led to the cylinder and the oil pressure holds the disc
against the shoulder in opposition to a compression spring above the disc.
When the valve is opened by the handwheel the spindle screws up into the sliding nut, but when the
oil pressure is released by the agency of the emergency governor the sliding nut is released, thus allowing
the compression spring to close the valve. Immediately the disc leaves the shoulder of the oil cylinder
the space between the outside of the disc and the bore of the cylinder allows oil to pass freely from the
bottom to the top of the disc without retarding the closing of the valve.
When the valve has been automatically closed, the disc of the sliding nut is brought back to its normal
position engaging the shoulder of the oil cylinder by turning the handwheel in the direction for closing
the valve. When this has been done, and the oil pressure is re-established, the valve is opened again by
turning the handwheel in the normal anti-clockwise direction for opening the valve.
A strainer is fitted in the valve body to prevent foreign matter passing through into the turbine.
The valve head is attached to a piston which slides in a cylinder fixed to the casing, and the valve is
balanced by means of a central by-pass valve, which opens before the main valve and allows the passage
of steam for warming up and equalizing the pressure on the main valve.
The packing for the valve spindle consists of a Nitralloy-steel sleeve, with a leak-off pipe to the high-
pressure gland sealing chamber.
The valve spindle must move freely when the valve is closed by the force of the compression spring,
without steam pressure in the valve body.
In addition to the arrangement whereby the oil pressure is released through the agency of the emergency governor, causing the emergency trip and stop valve to close, as just described, a device is fitted
which automatically closes the stop valve in case of excessive back pressure.
Page 9
 I.B 9189
THE   BRITISH  THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
K
BALANCE
PISTON
GLAND  SEALING
• STEAM   SUPPLY
THIS   SPACE
IS    FILLED   WITH
GRAPHITE PASTE
OIL
CYLINDER
    OIL
PRESSURE
CONNECTION
\
Fig. 5.    Section through combined emergency trip and stop
valve.
< '
10
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
Temporary gauze for strainer. In the initial stages of running, an additional stainless steel wire
gauze is accommodated within the strainer. This should not be removed until after completion of the
trials.
MAIN   BEARINGS
The two turbine shaft bearings are spherically seated and self-aligning and consist of a white metal
bearing in a cast iron shell. Each bearing is split horizontally, the halves being spigoted and bolted together.
The bearings are slightly larger in the bore than the diameter of the journal by 0-0015 in. per inch
diameter. Too tight a bearing will result in over heating, and too slack a bearing is likely to cause
vibration.
The oil passes through slots or holes provided in the bottom half bearings, thence to the well of the
housing and return oil boxes. Oil throwers are provided, surmounted by scraper rings to restrict the flow
along the shaft. The bearings are lubricated with oil under pressure of from 5 lb. to 10 lb. per sq. in. gauge.
THRUST  BEARING
An extension of the spherically-seated governor-end bearing carries the thrust block designed to keep
the successive rows of moving blades on the rotor in correct relative axial position with the diaphragm
or stationary blades in the casing.
The thrust block is the multi-collar type in which a number of collars lined with white metal engage
with collars machined on the turbine shaft.
The thrust block is held axially in position by means of a screw thread cut on the outside of the block
and its position is adjusted by rotating it by means of a worm and worm wheel. After the correct axial
clearances have been set the adjusting gear should be padlocked to prevent unauthorized interference
with it.
SHAFT  PACKINGS
Labyrinth-type shaft packings are provided at the openings where the shaft passes through the
turbine casing. These form the seal against the leakage of steam to atmosphere and of air into the turbine.
Both the high-pressure and low-pressure packings (Figs. 6 and 7) consist of a number of grooved
metallic rings which are supported on shoulders in the packing housings and have a radial clearance of
0-015 in. at the shaft. These rings are of the step-toothed construction.
Each packing ring consists of four segments which butt together. There is, however, a circumferential
clearance at one joint of 0-081 in. for high-pressure packings and 0-105 in. for low-pressure packings when
the ring is assembled. Four springs hold the ring against the shoulder. The clearance is an allowance for
differential expansion between rings and shaft. Both the packing rings and the springs are prevented from
rotating with the shaft by means of stop pins.
A leak-off pipe from the high-pressure-end packings disposes of any steam leaking past the packing
rings and this steam is led into the eighth stage through a valve which is hand operated to meet the requirements of steam flow according to the registration of pressure on the gauges.
Means are also provided for supplying sealing steam to the high-pressure and low-pressure shaft
packing groups to prevent leakage of air into the turbine.
Since the turbine is a condensing unit, a vacuum will exist in the turbine chamber during periods of
starting and stopping, and when operating at low-load ; it is during such times that sealing steam is required
to prevent air entering the turbine.
When operating at normal full-load, however, the steam pressure at the high-pressure end is considerably above atmosphere, and under these conditions the steam leaking out at the high-pressure end is
by-passed to a lower stage on the turbine.
At the low-pressure end the internal pressure is below atmosphere, and, therefore, sealing steam is
continuously supplied to prevent air entering the turbine at this point.
When undue leakage is indicated, and on examination the labyrinth rings are not distorted, broken,
or unduly worn, and the springs are in good condition, a sufficient thickness of shim must be placed under
the lugs, on the back of the rings, which bear on the shoulder in the grooves, to allow the rings to close
into such a smaller diameter as is required to give a radial clearance of 0-015 in. between the points of
serrations and the shaft.
Page 11
(
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH  THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
DIAPHRAGMS  and   PACKING
The diaphragms which separate the stages are made in halves with a tongue and groove steam-tight
joint running transversely, and dowelled—thereby locating the halves in correct relation to each other.
They are located radially in the top and bottom half casings by shoulders inside the casings, and
are located axially by locating pins which fit into holes in the diaphragms on the inlet side, near the
periphery. The pins are a close fit against the side of the grooves in the casing ; the clearance between
the pins and the casing should not exceed 0-002 in.
The top half of diaphragms of stages 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 are held in the top half casings by resting
on tubular washers held by screws inserted upwards, with the heads recessed into the horizontal joint
of the casing.
The 7th, 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th stage top half diaphragms are held by screws passing through the
casing from outside. When the top half casing is lowered, these screws are slacked off sufficiently to ensure
that the top half diaphragms rest tightly on the bottom halves.
The diaphragms are held concentric in the casing by radial crushing pins, which project slightly
beyond the periphery of the diaphragm and bear on the inside of the casing.
The crushing pins are of such a shape and size, that in the event of any undue expansion of a diaphragm from heat or otherwise they will compress slightly and avoid any excessive bursting stresses on
the casing.
The diaphragm packing rings are similar to those employed at the high-pressure and low-pressure
ends of the turbine, excepting that the teeth are of equal length and not of the step-toothed type.
The designed radial clearance is the same, namely 0-015 in. ; but the circumferential clearance at one
joint with the segments butting together is as follows, for the respective stages :—
2nd stage
3rd stage
4th stage
5th stage
6th  stage
0-058 in. 7th stage . . 0-034 in.
0-054 in. 8th stage .. 0-032 in.
0-048 in. 9th stage . . 0-018 in.
0-045 in. 10th stage .. 0-013 in.
0-039 in. 11th stage .. 0-009 in.
12th stage .. 0-005 in.
Should the radial clearance between the packing rings and the shaft be found greater than 0-015 in.,
it may be reduced by assembling the segments of ring together and re-fitting the projections which rest
on the shoulders.
ELECTRICAL  TACHOMETER
An electrical tachometer of the permanent-magnet generator type is provided and driven through
worm and worm wheel off the turbine rotor. The speed of the drive at service rating is 750 r.p.m., which
corresponds to 3150 revolutions per minute of the turbine.
The armature of the generator should on no account be withdrawn.
BACK-PRESSURE TRIP AND ATMOSPHERIC RELIEF VALVE
This device (see Fig. 4) is mounted on the exhaust casing of the turbine and is provided to indicate,
by a momentary discharge of steam, that condenser vacuum has been lost and a back pressure is building up.
The pressure at which the valve operates is adjustable, but is normally set at 5 lb. per sq. in. gauge. The
operation of this valve also closes the main stop valve.
The mechanism consists of a spring-loaded valve (71) with a removable seat (72) and is water sealed
against vacuum. The valve component when raised against the force of the spring (73) disengages the trigger
(74) and releases the piston valve (75) which moves sharply upwards by the force of its spring (76). The oil
supply to the emergency stop-valve is led through port (A) thence through port (B) to the pressure cylinder
of the stop-valve. The closing of port (A) through the upward movement of the piston valve cuts off the
supply and releases the oil pressure in the emergency and stop-valve cylinder- by allowing the oil to flow
back through port (B) and through (C) to drain, the emergency stop-valve thus closing promptly.
To break the vacuum or to relieve pressure in the exhaust casing, and at the same time closing the
emergency stop valve, the relief valve can be manually operated by exerting a downward pressure on lever
(79). Means are also provided to hand trip the emergency stop-valve without interfering with the exhaust
steam conditions, by turning handle (78) through approximately 120°.
To re-set the trigger after it has been tripped, raise lever (77) which forces the piston valve downwards until the trigger can re-engage, but see that handle (78) is in set position.
Page 12
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
STEAM   SEALING   OF  SHAFT  PACKINGS
When starting up or running on low loads the pressure in the first stage is sub-atmospheric, the exhaust
end being under vacuum.
The inward leakage of air during this period is prevented by partially opening the high-pressure and
low-pressure gland sealing steam valves, the high-pressure gland sealing regulator being closed, and the
auxiliary high-pressure gland leak-off valve slightly open to the condenser. This ensures that any water
drains to the exhaust and cannot be blown into the rotating low-pressure wheel blades. .
As load increases, the valve controlling the live steam supply to the high-pressure gland can be closed
a little but still kept sufficiently open to maintain slight positive steam pressure on the gland pressure
gauge or vent pipe. When the turbine is hot the automatic sealing steam pressure regulator is brought
into operation, and the auxiliary leak-off valve closed. Under hot conditions any surplus high-pressure
gland leakage is thus passed into the low-pressure stages to do useful work.
The sealing steam supply to the exhaust-end gland will rarely require adjustment unless there is
considerable change in steam pressure or vacuum. Both glands are effectively sealed when slight positive
pressure is shown on the gland sealing pressure gauges, or a slight breath of steam issues from the vent
pipes.
The cocks fitted in the vent pipes are provided to check the degree of leakage steam from the vent pipes
relative to the gland pressure gauge reading. After making this check tests these cocks are closed.
DRAIN   PIPING  and   DRAINS
To reduce the number of drain connections to a minimum, the dirty water drains are interconnected
for ease of dispersal in the piping layout ; the clean water connections are similarly connected.
For diagrammatic arrangement of turbine drains see Fig. 8.
AUTOMATIC  SHAFT  PACKING   PRESSURE   REGULATOR
This automatic sealing-pressure regulator (Fig. 9, page 14) consists of an equilibrium valve, to the spindle
of which is attached a piston exposed on one side to the leakage steam pressure and on the other side to
atmosphere. If the steam pressure rises the valve opens and allows the surplus steam to pass into the eighth
stage of the turbine. The pressure at which the valve operates may be adjusted by altering the compression
of the spring beneath the valve by rotating the spindle with the cross handle at the top. Clockwise rotation
will increase the pressure and vice versa. The handwheel should normally be disconnected from the spindle,
but if it is desired to operate the valve by hand, this can be effected by securing the handwheel to the
flange on the spindle immediately above the handwheel boss. A dashpot is fitted to prevent violent oscillation, and being attached to the bottom of the valve casing, will keep full of water.
The regulator should be cleaned and the spring examined at reasonable intervals. Care must be taken
to see that all parts are in line and work freely.
In addition to the regulator, a drain valve connected to the exhaust is provided. It may be necessary
to open this drain valve on heavy overload if the H-P. packings are in bad condition and the regulator
not able to deal with all the leakage. This drain valve should also always be opened when warming up and
shutting down, to get rid of any water.
GLAND-STEAM   CONDENSER (WEIR)
To prevent leakage of steam from the shaft gland packings into the engine room, the steam is diverted
to a gland steam condenser of the steam jet operated type. The unit consists of a gland condenser, air
ejector, and ejector condenser.
A slight vacuum is maintained at the turbine glands and consequently a certain quantity of air enters
the annulus of the glands. This air and gland steam is drawn into the gland condenser which condenses
out the steam. The non-condensable gases are drawn by the air ejector into the ejector condenser, and
discharged to atmosphere ; this portion of the unit condenses out the operating steam.
The drains from the ejector condenser pass into the gland condenser through a barometric pipe. The
combined drain is led from the gland condenser to the feed tank.
On the condensate side, the arrangement is single-flow utilizing a common inlet and a common outlet
for the two condenser portions.
The ejector steam jet should be examined periodically.
LUBRICATING   and   OPERATING   OIL  SYSTEM (See Fig.  10)
Four motor-driven oil pumps are provided, each of sufficient capacity to supply one turbo-alternator
set. Thus, in normal service, one pump on each set will be isolated affording 100% standby.
Page 13
 I.B.9I89
THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
AUXILIARY
LEAK-OFF TO
CONDENSER
THROUGH
HAND CONTROLLED
VALVE
WATER -FILLED
DASHPOT
SCREW  FOR
CONVERSION
TO MANUAL
CONTROL
OUTLET TO
ATMOSPHERE
OUTLET TO
INTERMEDIATE
STAGE
mm RESTRICTED  ORIFICE
DRAIN TO
CONDENSER
Fig. 9.   Section through automatic seal-
ing-pressure regulator for shaft packings.
<
Page 14
 p
BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
The pumps are of the positive displacement type provided with relief valves which operate if the
pump is started up against closed discharge. A " Duplex " strainer is connected in the suction line, one
element of which can be taken out and cleaned without shutting down. The pumps of each set discharge
through a single oil cooler and thence to an " Auto-Klean " strainer in each turbine supply line.
Oil supply to the turbine proper for governor gear operation and journal bearing lubrication
The oil is delivered to the turbine at a pressure of about 70/80 lb. per sq. in. gauge. A pressure of from
5 to 10 lb. per sq. in. gauge is, however, sufficient for lubricating purposes and the servo-motor, which
actuates the control valve gear, is operated by the pressure difference between the oil pump pressure and
the lubricating oil pressure. The delivery pressure is limited by a by-pass valve and the lubricating system
pressure is determined by the static head from the gravity tank.
The oil is supplied direct to the high-pressure by-pass valve which is adjusted to open when the oil
builds up to a pressure of 70 lb. per sq. in. gauge.
So long as the pressure is maintained above this the valve allows the excess oil, not required for governing, to pass through to the low-pressure oil chamber in the base via exhaust passage of pilot valve to
bearing lubricating system ; this line is also in open communication with a check valve in the line to the
gravity tank.
The design of this check valve is such that the oil can, at any time, pass up to the gravity tank but
cannot flow back unless the high-pressure oil fails. In the event of the latter condition, the pressure on top
of the piston is released and the piston, under the influence of its spring loading, raises the check valve
and permits the gravity tank to feed the bearing lubricating system. Failure of high-pressure oil will cause
the emergency tripping of the main stop valve, cutting off steam to the turbine. Sufficient oil for safeguarding
the turbo-alternator bearings during shutting down is available in the overhead gravity tank.
Excess high-pressure oil, after passing through the high-pressure by-pass valve, also passes to the slow-
running governing oil pump (48) (Fig. 4), which is driven from the main turbine and only comes into service when speeds below 25% of normal are required. The pump is continually discharging low-pressure
oil to a chamber located beneath the main pilot valve sleeve, and discharges back to the low-pressure
system through a needle valve (51). For operating speeds below 25% the needle valve is moved by the main
control lever. This valve then partly closes and builds up a pressure which raises the pilot valve sleeve
(36) and so controls the setting of the main servo-motor (29), to obtain the desired slow speed. Any variation in the turbine speed will cause a variation in slow-speed governing pump output and delivery
pressure for a given needle valve setting, and this in turn will function to adjust the sleeve, thereby operating
the servo-motor and resulting in the required speed being maintained.
A safety relief valve is provided in the discharge line from the governor oil pump, set to relieve at 60/70
lb. per sq. in.
Regulating valves are provided at each main bearing, extension worm shaft, and top bearing at the
worm wheel drives to adjust the oil supply.
The oil pressures to the control gear and lubricating system are indicated on high-pressure and low-
pressure oil gauges respectively ; occasional observation of these gauges in conjunction with the flow of
oil in the return oil boxes on the bearings will ascertain whether or not a correct supply of oil is being
maintained.
A sight-glass oil flow indicator is fitted in the gravity tank overflow pipe to drain tank.
OIL  COOLERS  (SERCK)
In this type of oil cooler the cooling water circulates through the tubes, the lubricating oil being
cooled by flowing around the tubes.
An air cock is fitted at the top of the cooler to remove any accumulated air on the water side. An air
cock is also fitted at the highest point on the oil side, likewise to remove any accumulated air.
Corrosion is caused by entrained air in the sea water, and care should be taken to eliminate any air locks.
In the interest of efficiency it is essential that the cooling surfaces are periodically examined and
cleaned when necessary. When circulating very cold water the oil temperature should not be allowed to
drop appreciably below that required for normal working conditions. Cold oil has a tendency to coat the
tubes with a greasy film which will reduce the efficiency of the cooler at the higher temperatures.
The coolers are fitted with removable tube stacks which can be withdrawn for cleaning, repair and
overhaul when necessary.
Each cooler consists of three main parts, namely, cast iron cylinder, tube stack, and cast iron water
boxes. One end of the tube stack is fixed to the cylinder and the other is allowed to expand freely. By
means of two round jointing rings and a lantern ring, expansion of the complete stack can take place without
the possibility of oil leaking into the water space, and vice versa.
Page 15
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
ALTERNATORS
T
HE alternators are 2-pole, 3-phase machines, direct coupled to their turbines. The machines have
two ratings corresponding respectively to the conditions (a) and (b) set out below.
(a) When both alternators are running to supply power to drive the propeller shafts at speeds up to
225 r.p.m. the maximum continuous rating of each alternator is 6000 kVA, 3200 volts, 1082 stator
amperes, unity power factor, 3150 r.p.m.
(b) When one alternator is running driving the propeller shafts at speeds of 160 r.p.m. or below,
the maximum continuous rating of each alternator is 4300 kVA, 2270 volts, 1090 stator amperes,
unity power factor, 2240 r.p.m.
The maximum permissible continuous rotor current is 245 amps, under either condition.
STATOR WINDING
The stator windings (Fig. 11) are of the two-layer type formed in half coils and placed in open core
slots. They are constructed with a number of laminations (each lamination being insulated with mica
tape) the relative positions of which within the conductor are reversed in one half of each phase compared
with the other half of the phase windings. The half coils, which constitute one conductor per layer, are
formed separately and are insulated continuously from one end to the other with successive layers of mica
tape. The two layers of conductors are separated by a strip of hard wood and the whole held in the slot
by a hard wooden wedge. On completion of the assembly of the two layers the ends of the laminations
are joined up, one in the bottom layer corresponding to two in the top layer, by brazing with hard solder.
The insulation between laminations is carried round the joint and the whole group of joints is finally insulated with layers of mica tape.
The whole of the insulation of the stator bars, except the portions at the joints, is impregnated with
bitumen and the bars in the slot portion are pressed to exact size before assembly in the core slots.
The stator leads comprise three phase leads and three neutral leads brought out at the slip-ring end
of the machine. The neutral leads are internally connected by means of copper strip ; three phase leads
and one neutral lead form the external connections.
There are seventeen turns connected in series in each phase and the resistance per phase at 20°C
equals 0-00594 ohm.
Thermo-couples
There are three thermo-couples bedded in the top and bottom coils of the stator winding in slots Nos.
9, 26, and 43. The slot Nos. range from 0 to 50 in a clockwise direction looking at the collector end of the
alternator, and slot No. 16 is on the vertical centre line at the bottom of the machine.
ROTOR
Rotor Body and shaft
The rotor body and shaft are machined from one medium carbon steel forging.
The periphery of the rotor has radial slots milled to receive the exciting windings. After winding,
the tops of the slots are closed with dovetailed metal wedges which are continuous from one end of the core
to the other, forming a complete cage on the rotor surface.
Ventilating slots are provided between the winding slots, air being forced through the slots and discharged into circumferential grooves machined at intervals along the surface of the rotor body.
ROTOR WINDING (See Fig.  12)
This consists of copper coils accurately wound on edge to dimensions so that when placed in the slots,
the surface is truly cylindrical for the reception of the retaining rings.
The turns constituting one coil are insulated from each other in the slot portions by strips of flexible
micanite, while the separation is maintained on the coil end by wrapping mica tape round alternate
laminations.
The slot insulation consists of flexible micanite sandwiched between sheets of leatheroid for mechanical protection during assembly of the coils.
Page 16
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33
I.B.9I69
The coil ends are separated from one another by segmental packings of hard synthetic bonded fabric,
and the end windings as a whole are insulated with flexible sheet micanite sandwiched between sheets of
leatheroid over which the retaining rings are fitted. All joints between coils are made by brazing with
hard solder. Each pole of the rotor winding consists of five coils of varying pitches. The resistances at 20°C
of the individual coils numbering from the coil nearest the pole centre are given in the following table :—
Coil No.                                                              Resistance ohms.
1           0-0229
0-0258
0-0287
0-0317
0-0346
Resistance per pole    . . . . . . .. . = 0-1437 ohm.
Total resistance of winding between sliprings    = 0-2874 ohm.
Retaining rings
The retaining rings are screwed on to the rotor body and held in position by a buttress thread. The
rings' are secured against rotational movement relative to the rotor body by means of grub screws.
Balancing of rotor
Facilities for balancing are provided by means of tapped holes in the rotor end flanges, which holes
may be used for balance screws, or for securing balance weights if found necessary.
Slip-rings
The slip-rings are of steel shrunk on to a mica and synthetic compound insulated sleeve. The rings,
together with the brushgear, are mounted outside the pedestal bearing at the non-driving end and are
enclosed in a ventilated cover.
Rotor connections
The connections between the slip-rings and the rotor windings are of flexible copper strip and pass
through a hole in the centre of the shaft on their way to the slip-ring terminals.
EXCITATION
An exciter is driven in tandem with each of the two 350 kW auxiliary turbo-generators. Adjustment
of the alternator field strength is obtained by rheostats in the exciter field circuit.
ENDSHIELDS
A set of shields is provided at each end of the machine, consisting of :—
1. Winding shield which forms a permanent part of the stator structure, and affords a cover for the
stator end winding. To this is bolted :—
2. The endshield in quadrants which completes the enclosure of the stator windings and forms on
the inner radius a race in which the rotor fans run with suitable clearance.
3. The airshield, in halves, which, with the endshield, forms the passages through which the air is
led into the machine.
The endshield and airshields are small in bulk, and easily removable for inspection of the windings.
VENTILATION (See Fig.  13)
The machine is self-ventilating by means of fans attached to the end flanges at either end of the rotor.
The air forced into the winding shield ventilates the stator end windings and passes into the air gap, and so
through the stator ducts to the outer compartment surrounding the core ; thence it passes through the
air cooler for re-circulation.
The main air flow is supplemented by a small air stream which passes under the rotor end winding
and through the ventilating slots in the rotor body. This stream is discharged into the air gap where it
joins the main stream.
The cooler unit consists of a number of tubes on which are wound continuous copper fins in the form
of a spiral.
Page 17
 I.B.9I89
THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
The tubes are secured between brass tube plates by means of condenser type ferrules with " Crane "
packings. Cast-iron water headers are provided, so arranged as to give a three-pass water flow through
the cooler unit. The header covers are provided with small inspection doors which can readily be removed
without disturbing the water piping.
EXCITERS
TWO exciters are provided, each mounted in tandem with, and flexibly coupled to, one of the 350
kW auxiliary turbo-generators. Normally, each machine supplies the excitation requirements of one
alternator, but can, in case of an emergency, excite both alternators, thereby providing, in effect, 100%
standby. Two 4-pole, double-throw changover switches, with an instruction label, are in the after compartment of the control cubicle.
Each exciter is rated :—
(a) 50 kW, 102 volts, 490 amps., continuous duty.
(b) 254 kW, 230 volts, 1106 amps., intermittent duty, during manoeuvring periods.
Separate excitation is provided from the 220 volt d.c. auxiliary supply. Output is controlled by rheostats in the field circuit.
The exciters are drip-proof and have cylindrical frames with flat disc endshields carrying cartridge
type ball and roller bearings. The excited frame, endshields, brush yoke and field are split on the horizontal
diameter. Inspection windows are fitted at the commutator end and a drip-proof canopy at the drive end.
The fan at the drive end has radial blades. Commutator lugs are riveted as well as soldered. There is a plug
at the bottom of the frame to drain condensed moisture.
CONTROL  EQUIPMENT
THE Control Gear comprises the lever gear, the cubicle, and the alternator set-up switches. The lever
gear in conjunction with the instrument panel on the forward end of the cubicle is used to control
the ship's engines. The main contactor gear for carrying out the switching operations required is located
in the cubicle.
Interlocks are provided to ensure correct operation of the contactors, and to prevent access to the
cubicle or operation of the alternator set-up switches while the high-tension parts are alive.
It will be noted from the key diagram of the electrical circuits (Fig. 14), that the various control gear
components are given device numbers, which are listed in a schedule on the diagram. Where these device
numbers appear in the text of this Instruction Book they are given in brackets.
Fig. 15 is the diagram of connections for the contactor cubicle. Some, of the device numbers shown
on the key diagram are also shown on this diagram.
OPERATING   LEVERS
These are grouped as shown below
Starboard Motor
W
>
w
o
H
o
w
as
o3
CO.
Q
W
w
Ph
CO
bs
rt
£
<v
^
1-—1
-d
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a
nd."
o
U
-Q
Cj
Th
o
Ctf
r^
-M
o
<
H
CO
cs
AFT
(Operator faces aft)
FORWARD
cp
Port Motor
bp
rt
o
£
4->
u
a
<v
CJ
4->
u
K
<
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>
4->
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W
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■"-—'
o
^
o
Ph
o
£
H
H
Q
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«
■w
W
<
W
<&
H
CO
Ph
CO
Q
ap
c
Page 18
 .B.9I89
THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
The tubes are secured between brass tube plates by means of condenser type ferrules with " Crane "
packings. Cast-iron water headers are provided, so arranged as to give a three-pass water flow through
the cooler unit. The header covers are provided with small inspection doors which can readily be removed
without disturbing the water piping.
EXCITERS
TWO exciters are provided, each mounted in tandem with, and flexibly coupled to, one of the 350
kW auxiliary turbo-generators. Normally, each machine supplies the excitation requirements of one
alternator, but can, in case of an emergency, excite both alternators, thereby providing, in effect, 100%
standby. Two 4-pole, double-throw changover switches, with an instruction label, are in the after compartment of the control cubicle.
Each exciter is rated :—
(a) 50 kW, 102 volts, 490 amps., continuous duty.
(b) 254 kW, 230 volts, 1106 amps., intermittent duty, during manoeuvring periods.
Separate excitation is provided from the 220 volt d.c. auxiliary supply. Output is controlled by rheostats in the field circuit.
The exciters are drip-proof and have cylindrical frames with flat disc endshields carrying cartridge
type ball and roller bearings. The excited frame, endshields, brush yoke and field are split on the horizontal
diameter. Inspection windows are fitted at the commutator end and a drip-proof canopy at the drive end.
The fan at the drive end has radial blades. Commutator lugs are riveted as well as soldered. There is a plug
at the bottom of the frame to drain condensed moisture.
CONTROL  EQUIPMENT
THE Control Gear comprises the lever gear, the cubicle, and the alternator set-up switches. The lever
gear in conjunction with the instrument panel on the forward end of the cubicle is used to control
the ship's engines. The main contactor gear for carrying out the switching operations required is located
in the cubicle.
Interlocks are provided to ensure correct operation of the contactors, and to prevent access to the
cubicle or operation of the alternator set-up switches while the high-tension parts are alive.
It will be noted from the key diagram of the electrical circuits (Fig. 14), that the various control gear
components are given device numbers, which are listed in a schedule on the diagram. Where these device
numbers appear in the text of this Instruction Book they are given in brackets.
Fig. 15 is the diagram of connections for the contactor cubicle. Some of the device numbers shown
on the key diagram are also shown on this diagram.
OPERATING   LEVERS
These are grouped as shown below :-
Starboard
Motor
Port Motor
A
*
m
(
>
r
^
-
o
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Pa^e 75
 I.B.9I89
THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
Stability Indicators
These instruments are of special design based on the characteristics of the motors and alternators
and indicate when the excitation of the alternators is correct. With over-excitation there is unnecessary
heating of machines and waste of power. With under-excitation the system may become unstable and the
motor may fall out of synchronism. The amount of excitation for maximum efficiency varies with the
load, and this meter enables this factor to be correctly adjusted.
Temperature indicators
These are of the thermo-electric pattern connected to thermo-couples embedded in the machines
during manufacture. Each instrument has a selector switch with 12 points. The thermo-couple positions
are as follows :—
Pointer No.
Location
1
Stator, Phase A, slot No.
9..
^
2
Stator, Phase B, slot No.
26
3
4
Stator, Phase C, slot No.
Air inlet
43
> Alternator
5
Air outlet
6
Water outlet
7
Stator, Phase A
.     1
8
Stator, Phase B
V Motor
9
Stator, Phase C
10
11
12
>■ Spare
Indicating lamps
These are provided as follows :—
Green
One lamp for each propeller motor fan to indicate when running.
One lamp for each lubricating oil pump to indicate when running.
Red
Temperature of alternator or propeller motor cooling air excessive.
One lamp for port and one for starboard to indicate neutral connection interrupted due to earth fault.
One lamp for each exciter to indicate when boost is available.
Clear
One lamp between earth and each exciter line to indicate earth fault.
One lamp spare.
Bells
These are provided as follows :—
Temperature of alternator or propeller motor cooling air excessive.
Neutral connection interrupted due to earth fault on A.c. system.
CONTROL  SWITCHES, Etc.
The D.c. and a.c. voltmeters and a.c. ammeters have selector switches associated with them so that
numerous readings can be obtained with relatively few meters. Either the indicating or the recording
wattmeters may be connected in circuit by changeover switches.
Control switches are provided to cut out the temperature and earth alarm bells.
Push-buttons
These are provided in order to test out the temperature and earth alarm bells, to switch off the temperature alarm red lamp when the temperature of the machine that has actuated the alarm is once again below
the thermometer setting, and for individual remote stopping of the four lubricating oil pumps.
Page 20
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
PROTECTIVE   DEVICES
Temperature alarm
Each of the alternators and motors is fitted with a thermometer in the outlet air which makes an
electrical contact when the temperature exceeds a predetermined value. This causes a contactor (46) in
the cubicle to close, operate a bell (49) and light a red lamp on the panel. Once warning has been given
the bell can be cut out, leaving the red lamp which will remain lit until the temperature is below the
thermometer setting and the " Stop " push-button is pressed.
A second push-button enables this device to be tested periodically.
Fault protection
A 3-phase overcurrent relay (24) will close its contacts and trip the d.c. excitation circuit-breaker (23)
in the switchboard room in the event of excess current in the main A.c. circuit such as might result from
accidental short circuit.
The port and starboard relays are situated on the panel on either side of the lever gear. They are
fitted with flag indicators and hand resets.
The relay operating coils are shorted out by contactors (47) when boost excitation is applied to the
alternator fields during manoeuvring periods.
These relays are set to trip at 4000 amps.
Earth leakage protection
The neutral of each alternator is connected to ff earth " i.e. ship's structure, through a contactor
switch (25), resistance (26), and current transformer (27) in the cubicle. A relay (30) is connected to the
secondary winding of the transformer.
Should a current flow to earth through this neutral line the relay will trip and open the earth contactor. Contacts on the contactor operate a bell (28) and light a red lamp on the panel. It may not be
necessary to cut off power immediately an earth develops, so a switch is provided to cut out the audible
warning, while still leaving the visible warning.
Push-buttons on the panel enable warning devices to be tested periodically.
REVERSING and MAIN   FIELD  CONTACTORS
The reversing and main field contactors are operative both electrically and manually by solenoid and cam
respectively. The solenoid ensures rapid closing and easy operation and is the normal method of closing.
Controllers (9) and (10) geared from the direction and starting lever cam shafts respectively, energize and
de-energize the solenoids and are timed to energize them before the cams lift and de-energize after the
cams have engaged. The coils are not continuously rated. The cam shafts are operated through gears and
links by the levers. In the event of failure of a solenoid circuit the contactors will be operated entirely
by the cams.
Reversing contactors
There are four reversing contactors per motor, which are numbered (1), (2), (4), and (5) for convenient
reference. Nos. (1) and (2) close for "ahead " ; (4) and (5) for " astern/' The phases, A and B are thereby
reversed to change the direction of rotation. The contactors are virtually interlocked by the camshaft to
prevent single-phase running, i.e. one contactor cannot close without the second.
The cams have " knock-outs " to push the contactors to the open position in the event of the contacts
welding together, and to prevent a short-circuit through closing the " astern " contactors if the " ahead "
contactors for any reason remain closed, and vice versa.
Although the contactors will not normally break current on full voltage, they are fitted with powerful
magnetic blowouts and arc chutes and can be relied on in case of emergency to rupture reasonable fault
currents.
Main field contactors
A field contactor (38) is used for single-pole switching of each alternator field. It is closed in all
positions of the starting lever, except " stop."
This contactor is fitted with a discharge contact which connects a discharge resistance (39) across
the alternator field when the contactor opens.
Two motor-field contactors (6) and (7) are mechanically coupled, and provide double-pole switching
for the motor field circuits. Discharge contacts connect discharge resistances (8) across the motor field.
These contactors are closed in starting lever positions " 2 " and " Run " only.
Page 21
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
EXCITER   FIELD  CIRCUITS
Contactors
Contactor (15) in the exciter field circuit is mechanically operated from the starting lever camshaft,
but arranged to open in advance of, or close after, the alternator field contactor (38). This ensures that
normally contactor (38) does not make or break the full alternator field current.
Port and starboard contactors (15P) and (15S), each have two poles ; the first pole of (15P) is in the
port exciter field circuit and the first pole of (15S) is in the starboard exciter field circuit.
When the alternator fields are supplied by individual exciters the second poles of (15P) and (15S)
are not used.
When both alternator fields are supplied by one exciter, the second pole of the contactor associated
with the disconnected exciter is paralleled across the first pole of the contactor in the field circuit of the
working exciter. Thus the exciter field can be energized by operation of either port or starboard starting
lever. In this case, the alternator field contactors (38) only, determine which of the two alternators are
excited.
Contactors (15) have auxiliary poles so arranged that before an exciter field circuit is opened, a discharge resistance (16) is connected across the field.
Boost circuits
In the event of it being found necessary to cut down the synchronizing time during a manoeuvring
period, a boost circuit can be made, to pass additional current through the alternator field, by closing
the appropriate boost switch (40), but only when the adjacent red lamp is illuminated. The boost switch
is discussed in the next section.
Boost is available when the boost contacts on controller (10), operated from the starting lever camshaft, are closed. These contacts have a " lost motion " feature such that although they are made during a
forward movement of the starting lever at notches " 1 " and " 2," they are not made during a backward
movement to the " Stop " position.
When both port and starboard fields are energized by one exciter the boost contacts of the two controllers (10P) and (10S) are paralleled. Thus, boost excitation is available for an alternator during
manoeuvring periods whether its own exciter is in service or it is sharing the exciter of the other alternator.
Each red lamp can only be illuminated when its particular exciter is in circuit and then only when the
boost contacts are closed. These two lamps, therefore, indicate when boost is available and also which
boost switch must be operated to obtain it.
Boost switches
Switch (40) on the panel adjacent to the lever gear can be made to close the boost circuit of the exciter field should a more rapid acceleration of the propeller motor up to synchronism be required. The
switch is manually operated and spring-loaded so that once the operator's hand is removed the switch
open-circuits. Closing the boost circuit increases the alternator excitation to 200% normal value.
If, in the condition of one exciter supplying both alternator fields, one propeller motor (say port)
is being run up to synchronizing speed while power is being removed from the other propeller motor
(starboard) the boost switch should not be closed until the off-loading alternator field contactor (38S) has
been opened. This is to avoid excessive wear of the contactor (38S) which may result from breaking the full
load boost current.
RHEOSTATS
Each exciter has its own field rheostat (18) mounted on the instrument panel adjacent to the lever
gear, enabling the alternator field setting to be adjusted to the correct value when running. There are two
resistances in the rheostat, one in the normal circuit, which is variable, and the other in the boost circuit.
EXCITER  CHANGEOVER  SWITCHES
A panel carrying a 4-pole double-throw transfer switch (12) for each of the two exciters is mounted
on the port side of the after compartment of the control cubicle. Normally both exciters are in service,
but, if necessary, both alternators can be excited by a single machine. Correct positions for the switches
under these three conditions are indicated on the switch panel.
Page 22
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
D.C.   EXCITATION   PANEL
All power requirements for exciter and propeller-motor fields and propeller-motor ventilating fans
are controlled by a double-pole circuit-breaker (23) on the d.c. excitation panel in the switchboard room.
Requirements for control and alarm circuits are drawn direct from the d.c busbars.
Tripping circuits, made by contacts on controllers (10) provide that breaker (23) cannot be closed
unless the starting levers are in the "Stop" position. The breaker is tripped by operation of the fault
protection relays (24).
HEATING   SWITCHES
In order to maintain the temperature of the alternators, propeller motors and cubicle a few degrees
above ambient, while lying idle, and so prevent accumulation of moisture on the windings and control
gear, four \ kW heaters are located in each of these items.
Supply is drawn either from the d.c auxiliary busbars or from the A.c. shore supply. Switches on the
heater panel, situated at the after end of the cubicle, control the heater circuits to the individual items
of machinery.
SLIDING   DOORS—INTERLOCKING
Access to the forward and after compartments of the cubicle is obtained by two sliding doors on the
starboard side. A door can only be unlocked by key (L), removed from the lever gear ; with the door open,
the key is trapped.
This method of interlocking the cubicle with the lever gear prevents the turbo-alternators being
energized while access to the cubicle is possible. The tripping circuits of circuit-breaker (23) will still be
alive, unless fuses (F3) and (F4) on the d.c excitation panel in the switchboard room are removed, even
when the circuit-breaker itself is tripped.
TRIALS—POWER   MEASUREMENT
In addition to the panel mounted indicating meters and the recording meters on the port side of the
cubicle, sub-standard indicating instruments for trial purposes only can be fitted on the trays provided.
It must be borne in mind that an open circuit in the leads or improper operation of the push-pull
(Off/On) switch is liable to burn out the current transformers (22) and thereby render inoperative the A.c
ammeter, wattmeters, and fault protection relays. Current connections to the meters must, therefore,
be carefully checked before operating the switch. These kW meter trays are, therefore, not to be unscrewed,
unless by manufacturer's representatives or by authorization of the Superintendent Engineer.
SET-UP  SWITCHES
The purpose of the set-up switches (11) is to connect in circuit or isolate the alternators and propeller
motors for the three normal running conditions in which the two motors are supplied by the two alternators
independently or by either alternator, the other being withdrawn from service.
The port and starboard set-up switches are situated in the air chambers beneath their respective
alternators. Each switch is operated by a handwheel on the forward wall of the chamber.
Main Blades
Each switch includes three main double-throw blades, one for each motor stator connection. In the
outboard throw—the normal position—the motor is connected to its own alternator. The centre position
(" Off ") isolates the motor. The inboard throw of the blades switches the motor on to the opposite drive,
so that the two motors share the output of the second alternator.
Field blades
There are also two field blades. The first interrupts the alternator field circuit when the alternator
is not in service, i.e. " Off" and inboard switch positions ; the second interrupts the motor field circuit
in the " Off " position only.
Auxiliary contacts
With one alternator supplying both motors, three of the four sets of contacts ensure that the upper
scales of both port and starboard tachometers indicate the speed of the turbo-alternator in service. This
is of value when synchronizing the propeller motors. Under the same condition the fourth set of contacts
connects a resistance (33) across the current coil of the appropriate stability indicator to correct its
calibration.
Page 23
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
Interlocking
Only with the direction and starting levers in their " Stop " positions can keys (L) and (C) be removed
from the lever gear. The lever gear is now locked and a set-up switch can be unlocked ; both keys are
required to do this.
Only one set-up switch can be switched from the normal outboard throw at any time, and in any
but the normal throw, key (C) is trapped. In other words, if an alternator is isolated the two starting levers
are locked together. Key (L) can only be removed to unlock the lever gear when the set-up switch is in
one of its three definite positions, viz ; outboard, " Stop," or inboard.
T
PROPELLER  MOTORS
HE   main propelling motors are synchronous machines fitted with a squirrel-cage winding at the
rotor pole tips for induction starting.
The stator winding is brought out to three line terminals and three neutral terminals (Fig. 16). The
line terminals are provided with isolating links. The neutral terminals are connected together by a copper
bar which can be removed for testing purposes.
Isolating links are also provided for the two field terminals. Connections to these are taken to the
rotor winding through slip-rings at the forward end of the shaft.
Both the stator frame and the rotor spider are of fabricated steel. The spider carrying the poles is
bolted to flanges on the forged steel shaft.
The bearing housings are mounted on end beams bolted to the stator frame, the space above the
beams being enclosed by endshields, split on the vertical centre line for convenience in dismantling. The
forward-end bearing is insulated from the end beam to prevent bearing currents developing.
To enable the temperature of the stator windings to be observed, six thermo-couples are embedded
in stator core slots Nos. 1, 41, 81, 121, 161, and 201 (see Fig. 17). The three registering the highest values
are connected to the temperature indicator on the cubicle panel. The maximum operating temperature
permissible for the motor is 120°C (248°F).
VENTILATION and COOLING   SYSTEM
With the exception of the slip-rings and brushgear, the motors are totally-enclosed. The cooling system
includes two 12|/7 h.p., 1700/1400 r.p.m., 220 volts d.c motor-driven fans and two air coolers through
which sea water is circulated. Temperature of the cooling air is thus independent of that of the motor room.
Fans, coolers, and all external trunking are mounted on the top of the stator frame. Hot air from
the machine flows outwards through ducts in the stator core, and rises in two vertical streams. Each stream
enters the common air chamber, centrally located above the frame, through a cooler. The cooled air is
drawn from this chamber in two streams by the fans mounted centrally fore and aft and discharged downwards into the end windings.
The cooler outlet tubes can be viewed by removing two inspection plates from the air chamber
roof.
There are drains on the after end of the air trunking on both sides of each cooler, fitted with water
sealed " U " tubes. The air chamber has a dummy floor sloping away from the central axis to assist
drainage.
Ammeters on the fan-motor starters enable the fan deliveries to be balanced up by a slight adjustment
of speed. At low powers it may be possible to shut down one fan, but a more satisfactory arrangement
is to run both fans at reduced speed.
Combined thermometer and temperature alarm devices are mounted on the trunking at each outlet
from the main motors to indicate the temperature of the air as it leaves the motors. The alarm contacts
are connected up to the main control cubicle and set to operate the alarm bell if the air temperature
exceeds 165°F.
Each cooler (Heenan and Froude) consists of a number of cupro-nickel tubes through which water
circulates. These tubes are covered externally with copper elements, soldered in position, and inserted
into naval brass tube plates through water-tight glands. Between these plates and the air passage, steel
plate partitions are fitted having tube holes bushed with rubber, thus forming separate " dead " air chambers
from which any water accidentally leaking past the main tube plates is drained. The headers, of fabricated
mild steel plate, are each fitted with air and drain cocks.
Page 24
C
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
OPERATION  OF TURBO-ALTERNATOR SETS
B
EFORE the propulsion equipment is put into operation (page 28), the turbo-alternator sets must
be given a preliminary check and started up in accordance with the following instructions.
After erection or overhaul the turbine must be suitably lagged before starting up, so as
to avoid the possibility of distortion of the cylinder.
A reasonable time should be allowed for warming up before applying load. During standby periods
a thorough inspection should be made to ensure that the engines will be in operating condition when required to move the propellers. Inspect particularly the oil supply, governor and control gear, bearing
temperatures, tripping mechanism, stop valve, and steam-seal supply.
CONDITIONS   FOR  STARTING
It is assumed that steam is on the mains up to the boiler side of the isolating valve, and that all drains,
steam traps, or blow-downs between the isolating valve and emergency stop-valve are open. Also that
all other drains in connection with the emergency stop-valve, valve casing, extraction pipes, etc., are open
and have been thoroughly drained. The turbine casing drains function automatically except at the first
stage where there is a hand-controlled valve. Set the emergency governor tripping gear by turning the
trip handle vertically downwards and by pulling the re-setting lever to the limit of its travel.
LUBRICATION
Oil all external pivots throughout the governor gear.
Start up the motor-driven main oil pump.
See that the water supply valve to the oil cooler is closed. Water should not be circulated until the
oil from the discharge side of the cooler has reached a temperature of 100/110°F. The use of oil at low
temperatures tends to cause waxing of the oil cooler tubes, damage to the bearing liners, and rough running
of the set.
The minimum quantity of water should be used so that oil from the cooler is maintained at 100/110°F ;
any excess of water encourages erosion.
Because of weather conditions or location of oil tanks, the supply of oil in the lubricating system
sometimes becomes cold and viscous. To guard against this, steam heating coils are fitted in the tank in
order to raise the temperature of the oil to between 70° and 80°F before starting.
With the turbine stationary, a certain amount of low-pressure oil will be delivered to the bearings
as shown by the flow at the return oil boxes, but a considerable quantity will be delivered to the overhead
gravity tank.
STEAM from STEAM-ADMISSION VALVE and STOP-VALVE SPINDLES
If the turbine has been shut down long enough to cool off, it is particularly important that the change-
cock in the sealing steam leakage pipe from the control valves and the emergency stop-valve spindle is
closed to the H-P. glands, and is in the open position for by-passing the leakage steam to the drain tanks.
This precaution is taken to prevent local heating of the turbine shaft and the shaft glands.
NOTE.—If the turbine has been shut down for a few hours only, the change-cock can be left
in the open position to the H-P. glands. This prevents cold air being drawn past the shaft glands and
causing local cooling of the hot shaft.
STEAM to SHAFT  GLAND   PACKINGS
See that the valves from the gland-steam manifold to the gland packings are closed.
It is of the utmost importance that sealing steam is not supplied to the shaft gland packings when
the turbine rotor is stationary ; see previous paragraph.
See that the valve from the boiler side of the emergency and stop valve to the gland-steam manifold
is open.
Page 25
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH  THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
BEFORE   STARTING
Before starting the turbines it is essential in order to safeguard against bearing damage, that the
overhead gravity oil tanks are full, as indicated by overflow in the sight-flow indicator.
The speed lever (1) should be in the quarter speed position (see Fig. 4) and the handwheel on the
governor lever vertical link screwed fully down. This procedure should also be followed to recommission
the turbine after a shut-down caused by loss of oil pressure due to pump failure.
Start up the condenser auxiliaries, i.e., circulating water and condensate pumps, air ejectors and
gland-steam condenser.
STARTING  THE  TURBINES
With all the turbine steam control valves closed, open the emergency stop-valve slowly, drain the
steam chest and gradually build up to boiler pressure. On reaching the full-open position, ease back the
stop-valve handwheel slightly to prevent jamming when hot.
The condenser should now be functioning, and the vacuum gauge should show that a few inches of
vacuum has built up in the condenser.
Now open the control valves to bring the turbine up to quarter speed for warming up, by screwing
back the governor lever handwheel (43) (Fig. 4) until it makes contact with the upper stop nut.:
Warming-up must not be effected with the Turbine Rotor standing still.
If the turbine is being started up cold, the change cock in the leak-off steam pipe from the steam
admission valves and stop-valve spindle should now be opened to the H-P. gland packing pipe. If the
turbine is started up hot, this cock will already be in the open position.
Full vacuum is now being built up and sealing steam can now be admitted by opening the appropriate
valves on the manifold. A slight pressure on the steam gauge indicates that a pressure exists in the packing
housings and that no air is entering the turbine.
The auxiliary leak-off valve on the gland piping should be opened to get rid of any water. Make sure
that the oil is being properly distributed to all bearings by observing the flow at the return oil boxes.
Also make sure that no rubbing or unusual noise is taking place in the machine. /
The turbine is now ready for service.
PREPARING  TO  TAKE   LOAD
All drains should again be tested and if found satisfactory the drain valves should be closed, except
those connected to steam traps, which must be left open.
When load is applied to the turbines, the steam pressure at the first stage increases to such an extent
that the auxiliary supply of steam to the H-P. packing is unnecessary and may be shut off.
LUBRICATING   SYSTEM (See Fig.  10)
The oil purifiers should be in constant commission when the turbines are first started up, and thereafter used as required to ensure that the oil is maintained in good condition.
Oil supply
When the turbine is running, the lubricating oil pump should be run at a speed to give a small overflow through the sight-flow indicator.
Occasional observation of the oil-pressure gauges in conjunction with the flow of oil and its temperature
in the return oil boxes on the bearings will demonstrate whether or not the correct supply of oil is being
maintained.
Oil regulating valves
The regulating valves on the oil supply pipes to the main bearings are adjusted to pass the proper
quantity of oil ; it is rarely necessary to alter these adjustments.
The supply of oil to the thrust bearing is controlled by a restricting nozzle, which is arranged to pass
the correct quantity of oil, and a regulator is, therefore, not required.
Return oil boxes
See that there is an abundant flow of oil in the return oil boxes.
To facilitate inspection of the oil flow, the return oil boxes are fitted with hinged covers so that direct
visual inspection of the flow can be made.
Page 26
 ()
BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
Oil temperatures
The water supply to the oil coolers should be so regulated that the temperature of the oil leaving
the cooler is approximately 110°F (43°C).
The oil from the bearings should not exceed a temperature of 150°F (66°C). If the temperature rises
above 150°F (66°C) with water at the maximum temperature for which the oil cooler was designed, it is
an indication that the cooler requires cleaning or the oil is unsuitable, or that the bearing surfaces are not
in good order.
The maximum permissible temperature of the oil leaving the bearings is 170°F (77°C).
VACUUM
It is specially important that great care is taken to see that all joints under vacuum are kept quite
tight.
See that the exhaust pressure relief valve is provided with a constant supply of sealing water.
It is not desirable to allow the vacuum to drop below 20" until after the turbine has come down to
half speed. Neglect of this precaution may result in over-heating of the turbine, owing to the absence of
any steam flow to to carry away the heat generated by the rotation of the wheels.
ALTERNATOR  AIR  COOLER (See Fig.  13)
All joints between the cooler, flumes, and machine should be made as air-tight as possible.
A vent cock is provided in the water circuit and connected to an open drain. When the machine is
running the water circulation should be established through the air cooler, and in order to ensure against
air locks, water should trickle freely from the vent pipe.
Condensation is liable to take place on the tubes when very cold water is circulated through the cooler.
This condensation may be observed through the glass inspection port in the air chamber. If it occurs, the
quantity of water should be restricted by throttling the outlet water valve until condensation ceases. A
restriction of the water supply will be accompanied by an increase in the temperature of the inlet air to
the machine, but this should not be allowed to exceed 104°F.
Should moisture still be apparent after the water supply has been restricted, the cooler should be
examined for suspected tube leaks.
TESTING   EMERGENCY  GOVERNOR
Before testing the emergency governor, trip the excitation circuit-breaker so that the alternator is
not excited during the test. The main stop-valve should be closed and the governor lever handwheel (43)
(Fig. 4) screwed down to the lowest position. Next place the starting lever in the running position, and the
speed lever in the full speed position. With the oil pump running, observe that all steam admission valves
are closed.
Open the stop-valve and bring the turbine up to speed by gradually screwing back the governor
handwheel (43) to the normal position. If the tripping speed (3460 to 3500 r.p.m.) is not reached, pull
out the cruising stop (61) and move speed lever (1) to maximum position, then raise speed by the hand-
wheel (43) on the pilot-valve lever. Do not exceed 3550 r.p.m. and if the emergency governor fails to trip,
the machine should immediately be shut down by the hand tripping lever. Observe that the stop-valve
closes immediately the trip gear is operated, either by hand or on overspeed.
To re-set the trigger after it has been tripped, the handle at the left-hand side is pushed in, thereby
forcing the tripping spindle forward, until it re-engages the trigger. The turbine must be allowed to slow
down below its normal rated speed before re-setting.
Check the overspeed at least once each voyage before shutting down.
SHUTTING   DOWN
Partially close the emergency stop-valve until about one quarter open.
Shut off steam to the turbine by tripping with the hand emergency gear, thereby closing the emergency stop-valve.
When speed has fallen to about half-speed, shut off steam to the ejectors and allow vacuum to fall.
The vacuum must not be broken down suddenly. Leave sealing steam on the shaft glands to prevent cold
air being drawn in and causing local cooling of the shaft.
The emergency stop-valve handwheel should now be rotated to. the shut position and the emergency
gear re-set by means of the handle provided.
Page 27
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH  THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,  LTD.
Oil supply to the bearings must continue after the turbine has come to rest and until the journals
have become cool. The gravity tank only serves to bring the turbine safely to rest in the event of pump
failure.
When the turbine has come to rest, shut off steam to the shaft packings. The change-cock in the leak-
off pipe from the control valve and stop-valve spindles should now be closed to the packing pipe, and
opened to the drain tank.
When the turbine casings have cooled off, the drying out valve connected to the steam chest should
be opened.
OPERATION   OF   PROPULSION   EQUIPMENT
AS the machine heating circuits may have been in use immediately before the standby is required,
.  the instructions are detailed to cover switching off these circuits.
The operation of the turbo-alternators is closely associated with the control gear and is referred to
in this section, but the preliminary checking and starting-up of the turbo-alternators is described on
page 25.
The numbers in brackets, quoted in this section, all relate to the key diagram Fig. 14, on which appears
a schedule of device numbers.
STAND-BY
1. Move the starting levers to " Stop," lock them and remove the keys " C " and " L."
2. With key (L) enter cubicle and switch off heaters.
3. See that exciter changeover switches (12) are in the required positions for operation of the
exciters associated with the turbo-alternators in service.
4. See that both earth contactors (25) are closed.
5. See that trip circuit fuses (F.3) and (F.4) are in position.
6. Examine switchgear to see that no tools etc. have been left lying about. Lock the control
cubicle and remove key (L).
7. Unlock set-up switches, in turn, with keys (L) and (C) and rotate them to the required combination, lock them and remove the key (L) : also key (C) if both switches are closed for the running
of both alternators.
8. Start one or both turbo-alternators as may be required and check that all auxiliaries are in order.
9. (a)   Close excitation circuit-breaker (23).
(b) Start propeller-motor fan motors.
(c) Open water supply to air coolers.
(d) Unlock the lever gear.
10. With the turbines running at 750 r.p.m., check the excitation of alternators and propeller motors
by means of the starting levers with the direction levers in the " Stop " position. When one
alternator only is in use note that both starting levers must be moved together. The values of
excitation should be approximately :—
(a) Alternator field, manoeuvring 553 amps.
(b) Alternator field, running 245 amps.
(c) Motor field, 190/266 amps.
Adjust the exciter rheostat if necessary to obtain the correct value of alternator field amperes
in the " Run " position of starting lever.
Excitation should not be left on a stationary machine longer than necessary as this
would result in overheating the field windings.
Page 28
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH  THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
Oil supply to the bearings must continue after the turbine has come to rest and until the journals
have become cool. The gravity tank only serves to bring the turbine safely to rest in the event of pump
failure.
When the turbine has come to rest, shut off steam to the shaft packings. The change-cock in the leak-
off pipe from the control valve and stop-valve spindles should now be closed to the packing pipe, and
opened to the drain tank.
When the turbine casings have cooled off, the drying out valve connected to the steam chest should
be opened.
OPERATION   OF   PROPULSION   EQUIPMENT
AS the machine heating circuits may have been in use immediately before the standby is required,
l the instructions are detailed to cover switching off these circuits.
The operation of the turbo-alternators is closely associated with the control gear and is referred to
in this section, but the preliminary checking and starting-up of the turbo-alternators is described on
page 25.
The numbers in brackets, quoted in this section, all relate to the key diagram Fig. 14, on which appears
a schedule of device numbers.
STAND-BY
1. Move the starting levers to " Stop," lock them and remove the keys " C " and " L."
2. With key (L) enter cubicle and switch off heaters.
3. See that exciter changeover switches (12) are in the required positions for operation of the
exciters associated with the turbo-alternators in service.
4. See that both earth contactors (25) are closed.
5. See that trip circuit fuses (F.3) and (F.4) are in position.
6. Examine switchgear to see that no tools etc. have been left lying about. Lock the control
cubicle and remove key (L).
7. Unlock set-up switches, in turn, with keys (L) and (C) and rotate them to the required combination, lock them and remove the key (L) : also key (C) if both switches are closed for the running
of both alternators.
8. Start one or both turbo-alternators as may be required and check that all auxiliaries are in order.
9. (a)  Close excitation circuit-breaker (23).
(b) Start propeller-motor fan motors.
(c) Open water supply to air coolers.
(d) Unlock the lever gear.
10. With the turbines running at 750 r.p.m., check the excitation of alternators and propeller motors
by means of the starting levers with the direction levers in the " Stop " position. When one
alternator only is in use note that both starting levers must be moved together. The values of
excitation should be approximately :—
(a) Alternator field, manoeuvring 553 amps.
(b) Alternator field, running 245 amps.
(c) Motor field, 190/266 amps.
Adjust the exciter rheostat if necessary to obtain the correct value of alternator field amperes
in the " Run " position of starting lever.
Excitation should not be left on a stationary machine longer than necessary as this
would result in overheating the field windings.
Page 28
 I.B.9I89
THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
FULL-AWAY  OPERATION
The following values of voltage and current show the maximum meter readings which should be
obtained under normal conditions. For lower propeller r.p.m. the a.c volts and amperes will be correspondingly reduced. If the currents greatly exceed those specified, the cause should be sought as it may result
in over-heating of the machines and loss of efficiency. If the reason is not immediately obvious, then the
power should be reduced to a safe value while the cause is investigated. With two turbine sets in use, the
load, as shown by the wattmeters, should be shared equally between them by suitable adjustment of the
governor controls and excitation.
Propulsion Circuits
MAXIMUM
INSTRUMENT   READINGS
Condition
1 Alternator
2 Motors
2 Alternators
2 Motors
Motor speed, r.p.m.   . .
Motor kW       . .         . .         .
Motor a.c volts
Motor amps.
Motor field amps, (cold)
Motor field amps, (hot)
Alternator speed, r.p.m.
Alternator field amps.
-.
160
2150*
2270
545*
266
190
2240
245
225
6000
3200
1082
266
190
3150
245
* To obtain alternator kW and a
mps. un
der thes
e condii
tions
, Port and Starboard readings should be added together.
Temperature and earth alarms
Periodical tests with the push-buttons should be made to ensure that the devices are in proper working
order. In the event of an earth occurring it may not be essential to stop immediately, but, as there is danger
of the trouble spreading, the source should be sought and dealt with as soon as circumstances permit
(see page 32).
Temperature readings
Regular readings of the temperature indicator should be taken ; it is advisable to leave the indicator
connected to the thermo-couple giving the highest reading.
Readings of temperatures and load corresponding to these temperatures should be logged, as an
increase in temperature, other conditions such as load and cooling water temperature remaining the same,
may give an early clue to possible trouble.
The difference in temperature between the outlet air from the air coolers and the inlet temperature
of the circulating water supplied to the coolers will give a good indication of whether the coolers need
to be cleaned. The maximum safe operating temperature for alternators and propulsion motor is 120°C
(248°F) and this should not be exceeded. Under normal conditions, the operating temperature will be
considerably lower and any sudden rise in temperature should be immediately investigated. A slow and
gradual rise in temperature for the same load conditions probably indicates that the cooling system
requires cleaning.
TURBINE   OPERATION   IN   HEAVY  SEA-WAY
The speed governor normally maintains any speed substantially constant in accordance with the
setting of the speed control lever, and in doing so varies the steam admission to meet the load variation
occasioned by the pitching and rolling of the ship in a seaway.
Under such seagoing conditions, it may be preferable to operate the turbines at a constant steaming
rate and allow the speed to vary according to the load variations. To do this, the governor speed control
lever should be set for a higher speed than the mean operating speed required, which speed can then be
obtained by manual adjustment of the governor lever handwheel (43) which works on the screwed rod
(40) (Fig. 4).
The speed lever should be advanced and the governor handwheel screwed down until it is observed
that movement of the turbine control valves ceases and the desired speed obtained.
This adjustment does not preclude the governor automatically assuming control in the event of any
circumstance causing loss of electrical load, neither does it prevent it from functioning to reduce speed
if the speed control lever is moved to the manoeuvring speed position; but before any subsequent
manoeuvring operations are carried out, the governor handwheel should be restored to the neutral operating position, i.e., screwed back to the upper stop nut.
Page 30
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS  Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
PROLONGED   RUNS
Emergency stop valve
When the turbine is kept running continuously for several days, and load conditions permit, give
emergency stop-valve handwheel a few turns daily to make sure that the valve spindle is moving freely.
Pressure gauges
All pressure gauges should be controlled by means of the gauge cocks which should be adjusted so as
to reduce vibration of the pointers and consequent wear of the internal mechanism.
EMERGENCY  RUNNING  AND   LOCATION   OF   FAULTS
The following methods may be adopted in locating and rectifying faults :—
If any device fails to function for which there is no obvious visible cause (in which is included mechanical failure), the electrical circuit as shown on the key diagram, Fig. 14, should first be examined. From the
diagram determine what other devices, such as fuses and contacts, are in series with the faulty device,
and examine these. Also examine the circuits from point to point for loose or broken connections. It is
assumed in the following instructions that the fault cannot be remedied or traced immediately, and that
it is imperative to get under way with temporary arrangements. Emergency conditions on the machines
are dealt with in later sections of this book.
u Cape to corner"  running
If, for example, it is found necessary to shut down the port turbo-alternator at a time when the starboard propeller motor cannot be run, connect the machines by the set-up switches (11) for the emergency
condition of the starboard alternator supplying both motors, and isolate the starboard motor by removing
the three stator phase links and the two field links in the motor terminal box.
Should the motor be out of service because of cable failure between the motor and the set-up switch,
the stator must be isolated, not at the terminal box, but by disconnecting the cables from the cubicle at
the set-up switch.
This emergency condition cannot be achieved by operation of the set-up switches only ; the interlocking of the switches will prevent any attempt to do this.
Main contactors and levers
If the solenoids for closing the contactors fail, the contactors can be closed by means of the cams ;
the manual effort required will be greater than normal.
In extreme circumstances, which might prevent the operation of the reversing or field contactors,
the quickest way to stop the propeller is to trip the excitation circuit breaker (23). The propeller will continue to rotate due to way on the ship but will cease to transmit power. In order to reach port under such
conditions, all circuits, including field circuits, may be closed using jumper connections if necessary as for
normal " Ahead " running, the turbine being at standstill. The propeller should then start on opening
up the turbine stop valve and running up the turbine. The speed should be brought up slowly to enable
the motor to pull into step, as the torque when starting in this way is small. Alternator field amperes
should be increased to maximum until the motor is running synchronously.
Exciter field contactors
The exciter field contactors (15) are mechanically operated from the camshaft. Any electrical failure
of the exciter field circuit will be due to either bad contact, loose or broken connections, open-circuited
blow-out coil or resistance.
Should these contactors show excessive arcing look for an open circuit in the discharge resistance
circuit.
Tachometers
Should a tachometer be out of action, synchronizing can be carried out by observing the A.c ammeter
and the motor field ammeter. On synchronizing, the A.c amperes will drop to a steady value ; the motor
field ammeter will also give a steady reading. Failure of the motor to pull into step will be indicated by
the unsteadiness of the motor field amperes and high readings of main a.c amperes. In the event of the
motor not synchronizing, return the starting lever to the " Stop " position and then make another attempt
to synchronize, but allow a longer time for the motor to speed up before putting the lever to position 2.
Page 31
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
Phase balance relay (24)
The greatest caution should be exercised before assuming that the closing of the contacts
of this relay is due to a defect in the relay itself.
When it is proved conclusively that tripping is due to a defect in the relay or its circuit, the relay
may be put out of action by isolating its contacts to obtain a supply to the propeller motor and exciter
fields. The relay acts directly on the trip coil of the circuit-breaker (23).
Earth relays
When an earth develops it may be inconvenient immediately to stop the propellers (due to navigating
in narrow waters etc.) One earth is not serious, but as a second earth may occur on another phase and thus
produce a short circuit, it is advisable to deal with the matter as expeditiously as possible. In any event
speed should be reduced as soon as possible in order to reduce the voltage of the system. The audible alarm
may be switched off by opening the control switch alongside the bell (28). When the bell circuit is closed,
both port and starboard warning red lamps are illuminated. From key diagram, Fig. 14, it will be seen
that opening the bell circuit also switches off one red lamp leaving illuminated only the red lamp associated
with the propulsion drive in which an earth has developed.
If the earth fault develops when running both turbo-alternators, disconnect both propeller motors
and re-connect them to the alternator not associated with the fault. Should the other earth relay now trip,
this will indicate that the earth is not in the alternator which has been disconnected but lies in the propeller
motor, cables or control gear associated with that alternator.
If the fault shows up originally when running on one alternator, transfer the load to the other alternator,
starting first one motor and then the other observing when the trip operates. If the trip does not operate
then the fault is in the first alternator.
Having, by elimination, traced the faulty circuit take steps to make it dead and proceed to trace
the exact location by removing isolating links and testing out with a megger (see page 56).
Alternator air coolers (See Fig.  13)
In the event of it being necessary to run the machine without the air coolers being in service, the top
cover plate of the alternator frame and one of the access cover plates in the side of the air chamber must
be removed.
I
MAINTENANCE   OF   EQUIPMENT
STEAM   TURBINES
(See arrangement of lifting gear Fig.  18)
T must be  remembered that for the satisfactory working of the plant, cleanliness is of the utmost
importance, especially in connection with the oil system.
When it is necessary to remove the top half of the casing, and take out the steam rotor for the purpose
of inspection and cleaning, the following instructions for dismantling and subsequent replacement of these
parts should be noted :—
REMOVING  TOP   HALF  CASING
Before shutting down the machine and with the turbine running at idling speed, turn the thrust
block adjusting spindle counter-clockwise as directed on the instruction plate on the pedestal.
Remove and store in a safe place, tachometer, pressure gauges, and any other instruments liable to
damage during dismantling operations.
Break main steam pipe to stop-valve, remove stop-valve and all connecting pipes, and all subsidiary
piping and gear attached to the top half of casing.
Remove lagging sheets and heat-resisting material so as to obtain access to the horizontal joint of
casing.
Slack off nuts and remove horizontal joint bolts.
Assemble and oil the casing guide pins and casing guide brackets.
Break horizontal casing joint by means of the jack screws provided.
Page 32
 c
BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
Assemble lifting beam, arms and link at the low-pressure end of the casing. Using the ship's lifting
blocks the casing weight is taken at the link at the low-pressure end and the eye bolt at the high-pressure
end.
Having broken the joint, make sure that the casing is not binding anywhere, then lift slowly, care
being taken to see that the casing rises evenly at each corner, the guide pins are marked in inches for this
purpose. Endeavour to rock the casing slightly while lifting ; this will cause the casing to float within its
guides and will be a good indication that there is no binding taking place anywhere.
The weight of the top half of the casing, including half diaphragms and control gear, is 7 tons 10 cwt.
TAKING   OUT  STEAM   ROTOR
Remove the bearing caps from the governor- and exhaust-end bearings, and the top half of exhaust-
end bearing liner.
Remove screws in thrust bearing ring nut and unscrew ring nut to clear ; then remove top half bearing
liner and top half thrust bearing and turn out by means of worm spindle the bottom half of thrust bearing.
Alternatively, the rotor can be lifted with the thrust bearing on the shaft.
Remove, too, cover of worm-gear casing and worm-shaft bearing, and, by rotating gear wheel of
governor in a clockwise direction, draw the worm shaft out of engagement with main shaft.
Take out main coupling bolts.
Assemble the rotor guide brackets—see that the spigots engage properly in the bearing liner recesses
on the horizontal joint ; afterwards, firmly bolt down.
Insert top tie-bolt in guide brackets to make the structure rigid.
Attach lifting straps, which are connected to the lifting beam, to first and last rotor wheels. By means
of the two lifting blocks on the transverse runways, the complete rotor may now be lifted as far as the
top tie-bolts permit.
In the event of the rotor being removed entirely clear of guides, insert and fix the lower tie-bolt in
position before removing the top tie-bolt. Support pads are incorporated in the lower tie-bolt fixture on
which the shaft is lowered for inspection, cleaning wheels, or other light repairs.
Weight of steam rotor is 3 tons 10 cwt.
To prevent damage to the shaft journals, the sliding faces of the rotor guide brackets are white-metal
faced.
REPLACING   STEAM   ROTOR
Before proceeding to replace the steam rotor the joint flanges of both top and bottom half casings
should be cleaned to remove any old jointing compound. This should be done by smearing the flanges
with paraffin and then scraping with a blunt scraper, as it is essential not to injure the bedded faces. After
cleaning, rub the faces with a piece of No. 2 emery cloth, stretched on a wooden block, until a bright surface
is obtained. At the same time, all casing bolts and studs should be cleaned, oiled, and nuts run down.
The shaft journals can be conveniently examined when the rotor is raised clear of the guide brackets
and any roughness or burrs removed with an oil stone.
The bearings can also be examined and any hard marks, roughness, or burrs carefully removed with a
scraper.
After smearing the jornals with lubricating oil and carefully examining the bottom half casing to make
sure that it is quite clean, the rotor can be lowered into position.
As the rotor is being lowered, care must be taken to ensure that no fouling of the wheels and diaphragms occurs.
Re-assemble bottom half of thrust bearing. With stop peg against the journal bearing the position
of rotor is correct for assembling the top half casing. If rotor is lowered with the thrust bearing attached,
the thrust adjusting worm must be oscillated to ensure that it meshes with the teeth of the adjusting gear.
REPLACING  TOP   HALF  CASING
The joint between the top and bottom halves of the steam casing is metal to metal and, therefore,
the jointing material used must be of such consistency that it will rapidly squeeze out when the joint is
tightened. Only sufficient compound to cover the faces uniformly and thinly must be used. After making
ready the joint, and ascertaining that there is nothing lodging in the casing (such as nuts, etc.) carefully
lower the top half into position using the gear in the reverse order as for dismantling.
The top half shaft packing cases and covers at both steam and exhaust ends should be assembled
and bolted up, using suitable high-temperature jointing compound.
Page 33
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
Permanently joint the bearing caps and assemble, using gold size only for this purpose. It is assumed
that the oil guards in the bearing housings have been inspected, cleaned, replaced, and re-jointed with
gold size and litharge ; and also that all packings have been examined and adjusted where necessary.
The remainder of the parts can now be re-assembled in the reverse order in which they were dismantled.
The rotor must now be set in the running position in accordance with the clearance instruction plate.
After the running clearance has been checked and set in this manner, the adjusting spindle should be
locked in position by means of the padlock, and the key safely deposited.
SETTING   OF  VARIABLE-SPEED   GOVERNOR (See Fig. 4)
Normally the governor setting should not require re-adjustment but should it for any reason be
altered the procedure for re-setting is as follows :—
With turbine stationary and oil pressure established, place speed lever (1) in vertical position. Adjust
the linkage from speed lever to the lever on end of base lay-shaft (70), so that the lay-shaft lever and any
other intermediate levers are also vertical. This ensures equal movement each side of the mean centre
line when working.
Hold main governor spring lever (9) against bottom stop, and adjust position of knurled wheel on
pilot valve lever (41) to cause all control valves to become just fully open. The top stop nut should now
be in contact with knurled wheel, and pegged in this position. Next, screw knurled wheel down until all
valves become closed, continue a further half inch then bring bottom stop nut into contact with underside
of knurled wheel and peg it in this position.
Adjust position of the top nut on vertical rod (20) to governor loading relay, so that spring carriage
(12) is just about to leave top stop position. Swing cruising speed stop (61) down and out of action. Move
speed lever (1) to maximum speed position (equals 45° movement from vertical at lever on end of lay-shaft
(20) ). If adjustable radius lever (69) under governor loading pilot valve is set correctly, the hydraulic
relay piston (15) will just reach its bottom stop. If it does not reach bottom stop, the lever radius should
be reduced to increase its angular travel, or if piston reaches the bottom stop with less than 45° movement
of lay-shaft lever, the radius should be increased. Variation of lever radius will slightly upset the top position
of carriage. Thus the nut at top of pilot valve rod should again be set so that carriage is just about to
leave top stop when lever is in the vertical position. This trial and error process must be repeated until
the carriage just travels from the top to bottom of its stroke when the speed lever is moved from the vertical
(quarter speed position) to the maximum speed position. This corresponds to 45° movement from vertical
of the lever on the end of lay-shaft.
The selective valve (2) in supply line to hydraulic piston should be screwed down to restrict its lift,
so that when speed lever is pulled from maximum speed to vertical position quickly, it takes the loading
carriage 3-4 seconds to move from bottom to top of its stroke. Movement in the opposite direction is
already arranged for at a slower rate.
See that there is sufficient initial compression on the linkage return springs (67 and 68), when speed
lever is in the vertical position, to hold up weight of needle valve (51) and pilot valve linkage (18 and 19),
without sticking.
With speed lever (1) vertical, run turbine up to quarter speed, unloaded, by screwing knurled hand-
wheel on the pilot valve lever (41) from bottom to top stop position. When under control of the governor,
let machine speed settle and then close turbine stop valve. As speed starts to fall, control valves will be seen
to open and all valves should become open at 788 r.p.m. (approximately quarter speed).
Re-open stop valve and move speed lever to maximum speed position slowly. With turbine under
control of governor at maximum speed, no-load, again shut stop valve, and turbine speed will fall slowly
causing valves to open. All valves should become fully open at 3178 r.p.m. (approximately maximum
speed).
The closing of the stop valve simulates full load conditions on a machine running light.
The cruising speed stop (61) can be set in a similar manner to the above (or during actual full power
trials) when nearly all valves should be open at 3150 r.p.m., with carriage against stop screws when this
is swung into action.
The dead slow governor is set by moving the speed lever (1) to extreme slow position, then lower
or raise needle valve (51) until turbine rotates at 300 r.p.m., with slight way on ship ; or say, 350 r.p.m.,
on no-load. When the turbine is settled at this dead slow governed speed, the pilot valve pressure gauge
will indicate an oil pressure in the region of 50 lb. per sq. in.
Because of the expansion of turbines when hot, the setting of the nut on top of vertical link (20) to
governor loading pilot valve, which controls the carriage position, should be carried out with turbines hot.
Due to the coarse permanent speed variation of the governor at maximum speed it may cause emergency governor to trip when lever is moved to maximum speed position on no-load. This situation will
not, however, occur when load is on the machine.
Page 34
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
ALTERNATORS
STATOR (For winding see Fig.  II)
CARE must be taken to keep the surface of the coils and air passages through the core free from any
accumulation of dirt or oil or other foreign matter. To clean the machine thoroughly the rotor must be
taken out, after which the dirt should be removed with suitable brushes, and finally all parts blown out
with dry compressed air.
In the event of the insulation resistance of the stator becoming low, all insulators and creepage surfaces should be cleaned as these are the most likely cause of low insulation resistance.
Because of the nature of the insulation used on the stator, moisture is not readily absorbed and low
insulation resistance should not occur unless the machine has been standing for a long time under unfavourable conditions.
If, after cleaning creepage surfaces, the insulation resistance is still found to be low, and no appreciable
improvement is obtained by switching on the air heaters in the trunking under the machine, or by " field
heating " at 80 amps., the machine should be " dried out."
The " drying out " is accomplished by arranging a short-circuit connection across the line terminals
of the three-phase windings at the propeller-motor terminals, the stator isolating links of this motor being
removed and the reversing contactors closed.
The alternator is then run at a speed of about 2400 r.p.m., with the ventilating system so arranged
that the engine room air is circulated through the machine. The field excitation is then adjusted to a value
of 160 amps, which should cause a current of 1080 amps, per phase to circulate in the stator winding, and
short-circuiting connections. The neutral point of the windings should be disconnected from earth by means
of the contactor provided and connected to earth through a megger. Observations are then made of the stator
winding temperature by the embedded temperature detectors, and insulation resistance by the megger.
At first it will be found that as the windings heat up, the insulation resistance falls considerably. It will
remain at this low value for some considerable time during the drying out process, but will finally begin
to rise steadily until a constant figure is obtained. At this point the drying out may be considered to be
complete and the permanent connections to the propeller-motor stator can then be restored and the air
chamber door and alternator top cover replaced.
WITHDRAWAL   OF  ROTOR (See Fig.  18)
In order to withdraw the alternator rotor, the following procedure should be followed, care being taken
that no part of the rotor or slings fouls the stator windings at any time. Remove brushgear and the bearing
caps and top half bearing liners from the coupling end and slip-ring end bearings. Also remove oil guards,
coupling bolts, airshields and endshields. Support the rotor by means of the lifting blocks using the pair
of slings provided, which should be passed around the half-coupling and around the shaft just forward of
the pedestal (weight of rotor, 3 tons, 15 cwt.).
Remove the lower half bearings and rest the aft end of the rotor on a packing piece placed between
the rotor body and the stator core. Attach two lifting eye-nuts to diagonally opposite studs on the
alternator pedestal and use the aft lifting block and runway to remove the pedestal (weight of pedestal,
8 cwt.).
Re-sling aft end of rotor, remove packing piece and begin withdrawal of rotor by hauling both lifting
blocks aft along the runways until limited by the forward sling and stator winding shield. Insert a sheet of
packing between rotor forward retaining ring and stator core and lower forward end to enable sling to be
removed. Screw the lifting pin provided into the shaft end and re-sling on the end of the lifting pin. This
will permit further withdrawal of the rotor until again limited by the sling and stator winding shield. Insert
a sheet of packing between rotor retaining ring and stator core to enable forward sling to be removed.
Support the aft end of the rotor by a packing block from the floor and remove aft sling. Then pass the
special sling for lifting the complete rotor around the rotor body at its centre of gravity taking care to
spread the two loops well so that a level lift is obtained.
Haul the lifting block as far as possible and, if necessary, remove the lifting pin to enable the rotor
to be swung away from the stator. To re-thread the rotor in the stator, proceed in the reverse order. When
replacing the alternator pedestal it is recommended that the pedestal insulation be slipped into position
and the pedestal bolts inserted just before finally lowering the pedestal in place. The dowels are then
used temporarily to locate the pedestal until re-assembly is complete.
The oil guards, after cleaning and inspection, should be replaced using gold size and litharge for re-
jointing. When assembling the bearing caps, use gold size only on the metal to metal joints.
Page 35
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
ROTOR WINDING (See Fig.  12)
That part of the winding exposed near the shaft beneath the retaining rings should be kept clean
by means of dry compressed air. Low insulation resistance may be caused by an accumulation of brush
dust at the slip-rings and rotor leads.
In the event of the general insulation resistance of the rotor windings becoming low, the rotor may
be " dried out " by means of " field heating." With the machine stationary, a current of about 80 amps,
from the exciter is passed through the rotor windings ; this should be maintained until the total temperature of the rotor winding rises to 105°C as measured by resistance. This is equivalent to a rotor resistance
of 0-383 ohms. The current should then be adjusted as required to maintain constant temperature for
the remainder of the field heating period.
The temperature of the rotor windings as measured by resistance is obtained from the following
formula :—
Temperature in degrees C = (866  x r) — 235.
Where r is the measured resistance of the winding.
The resistance should be obtained by Ohm's Law from readings of the current in the winding and
the voltage across the slip-rings.
The voltage should be taken directly on the rings and not across the brushgear and precision instruments should be employed.
SLIP-RINGS and BRUSHGEAR
The brushes must be bedded properly on the slip-rings, i.e. the whole of the brush surface making
contact with the ring. The spring tension must be adjusted to give a pressure of not less than 2 lb. per
brush.
The brushes are set up to run at an angle of 8° trailing referred to the direction of rotation, and it is
most important to ensure that this angle is maintained.
The brush boxes are such that the whole box may be moved to allow for slip-ring wear. It may be
found that the slip-rings wear appreciably during the first few months of running while tracks are being
formed by the brushes. This is primarily due to the ground surface of the ring not being homogeneous
and hard, but irregular to a greater or lesser degree. A hard skin is eventually produced by the burnishing
action of the brushes after several weeks of running, the soft surface metal being worn away, and alternate
grooves and ridges being formed.
Changes of load on the turbo-alternators affect the temperatures of the various rotating parts, thereby
altering the expansion of the shaft from the turbine thrust towards the outboard end. The relative axial
position of the slip-rings to their brushgear will, therefore, change with the load. This causes several sets
of grooves and ridges, the deepest set of grooves corresponding to the position taken up on the load maintained over the greatest total time.
From this consideration it will be realized that with changes of load, the brushes will no longer be
bedding properly, but will be riding over a succession of minute groove edges. Current density at the contact
surface will increase, accompanied by increased contact drop losses and metal " picking up," aggravating
wear of the surfaces. This process is cumulative and, if not prevented, will necessitate grinding of the
surface within a relatively short period of running service.
The foregoing shows that it is necessary to keep the collector surface perfectly level by removing
the ridges during the track-forming period, which may extend over a period of a month or two. The finest
grade of emery cloth should be used on collector rings for surfacing. The emery cloth should be wrapped
over a flat piece of hard wood, wide enough to span the complete width of the ring and applied to the
revolving metal surface riding over all the ridges simultaneously, wearing them down to the level of the
grooves. This procedure should be a matter of routine during the first few weeks the machine is put into
service, say, twice daily. The resulting surface will be smooth, hard, and lasting, requiring only periodic
attention at infrequent intervals.
Whenever a collector has been re-ground, thus destroying the formed surface, it should again receive
the treatment outlined above.
Undue wear on the slip-rings will almost certainly be due to incorrect brush pressure and this is the
first point to be attended to if such trouble is experienced.
Insufficient brush pressure is much more likely to cause ring wear than too much brush pressure.
It will probably be found that the surface of the negative slip-ring is inferior to that formed on the
positive ring and it is recommended that the leads be changed over every six months ; the rings will then
have periods of running with opposite polarities.
Page 36
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
If a turbo-alternator is to be out-of-service for periods exceeding 48 hours, it is strongly recommended
that all brushes should be lifted out of contact with the slip-rings to prevent corrosion of the highly
polished surface. This can be done by lifting the brushes and inserting a thin sheet of insulating material
between the brushes and slip-rings, or by moving back the brush pressure arms and removing the brushes
from the boxes.
ALTERNATOR   BEARING   PEDESTAL   INSULATION
The alternator pedestal is insulated from the baseplate to prevent shaft currents; the fixing bolts
and oil pipe connections also being insulated for the same purpose. In order to test this insulation the rotor
should be raised clear of the bearing and pedestal, and the insulation resistance of the pedestal to the
baseplate taken with a megger. This should be not less than about 50,000 ohms.
BEARING   PEDESTAL   DOWELS
These are provided only for purposes of locating during assembly and must be removed before the
machine is run.
FAULTS   IN   STATOR WINDING
If a fault occurs in the stator winding, the most probable cause is a breakdown of the insulation to
earth. Such a fault does not necessitate the immediate shutting down of the alternator provided there is
no other earth on its particular main circuit. An earth fault will be indicated either by the operation of the
alarm, and/or by megger readings during routine tests. In the latter event, the earthing contactor (25)
should be opened by hand if it is desired to run the alternator with the earth fault existing.
Another possible but less likely fault, is a breakdown between coils in the overhung portions of the
winding. This will be obvious as soon as it occurs and will give rise to an unequal phase current. In this
event the excitation must be removed immediately and the alternator shut down. Such a fault will usually
be located by inspection of the stator end windings.
Location of earth fault in stator winding
If the faulty coil cannot be located by inspection, the following procedure should be adopted :—
1. Open the earthing contactor (25). Disconnect the copper strip joining the neutrals under the
alternator. Disconnect the line cables from the stator leads.
2. Megger each winding separately to earth and thus locate the faulty winding.
3. Connect a source of un-earthed low voltage (approximately 5 volts) direct current supply, such
as may be obtained by running one of the auxiliary d.c generators at low speed, to the ends of
the faulty phase and circulate about 1000-1200 amps.
4. Measure the voltage with a low reading d.c voltmeter from the neutral end of the phase to
earth = vn.
5. Measure the voltage from the line end of the phase to earth — v1.
vn
6. The location of the fault will then be =     n   .—x   x 34  conductors from the neutral end  (2
conductors per turn). '
RE-WINDING   A   PORTION   OF  THE   STATOR WINDING
Remove the electrical rotor, then :—
1. Break the evolute joints at each end of the faulty bar.
2. Cut cording along the overhang of bar.
3. Knock out hard wood wedge on top of slot.
4. Lift out stator bar.
5. Remove any welding on the core due to arcing and insulate between edges of laminations as far
as possible.
6. Insert replace stator bar.
7     Re-wedge and cord.
8.    Braze and insulate evolute taking care that the insulation between laminations is maintained.
Page 37
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
If faulty bar is in the bottom layer :—
1. Remove the bars from the top layer, corresponding to the pitch of the faulty bar in the bottom
layer.
2. Remove the necessary sections of packing ring between layers.
3. Take out the faulty bar.
4. Remove any welding on core due to arcing—insulate between edges of laminations—insert replace
bar.
5. Replace packing rings, top bars, wedges and cording.
6. Braze and insulate evolutes, taking care that the insulation between laminations is maintained.
FAULTS   IN   ROTOR WINDINGS
The possible faults which may occur in the rotor winding are :—
(a) Breakdown of insulation to earth.
(b) Short-circuit between turns or coils.
(c) Open-circuit in winding.
(a) A breakdown of the insulation to earth will be indicated by a reading of the megger and will not
affect the running of the machine provided there is no other earth on its particular excitation
circuit. If two earths exists, either both on the rotor or one on the internal circuit and the other
on the external circuit, the condition is equivalent to a short-circuit between coils.
(b) A short-circuit between turns or coils will be indicated by :—
(i) An increase of excitation current for a given set of load conditions.
(ii) A decrease in the resistance of the windings.
(iii) Mechanical vibration of the alternator stator and bearings. The degree of the short-circuit
will influence the degree of its effects.
(c) An open-circuit in the winding will be indicated by loss of excitation ; this should be checked,
firstly, by testing with a voltmeter across the slip-rings to ascertain that excitation supply has
not failed, and secondly, by testing the continuity of circuit with a megger across the slip-rings
while the brushes are raised.
Repair to rotor winding
In general, repairs to rotor windings are a factory job, and it is not recommended that any attempt
should be made to deal with these on board. However, it may be possible to clear an earth fault on or
near the slip-rings by removal of carbon dust from the collector insulation and from the leads in the-neighbourhood of this point.
Procedure to locate an earth fault in rotor winding
Excite the rotor in the normal manner. Measure the voltage between the outer slip-ring and earth
= v°. Measure the voltage between the inner slip-ring and earth = v1. The resistance of the winding to
v*
the fault from the inner slip-ring will be—:  x 0-2874 ohms.
^      b v1 + v°
The number of the faulty coil may then be located from the table of rotor coil resistances on page 17.
The above assumes that the rotor winding is at a temperature of 20°C. If at any other temperature the
figure 0-2874 in the above formula must be corrected accordingly.
AIR   COOLER
The tubes should be inspected and cleaned out when necessary. Dirty cooler tubes will be indicated
by an increase of temperature difference between inlet water and cooler outlet air temperatures.
A plug is provided at the bottom of each water header to drain the cooler unit.
Access may be obtained by removal of inspection plates on the end cover.
If necessary the header cover can be removed without disturbing the cooler position, by using the
lifting arm and lug provided.
After cleaning, the vent cocks should be opened slightly, when water is first circulated, to free any
air locks.
TEMPERATURE  ALARM
A periodical test of the temperature alarm should be made by turning back the stationary contact
arm of the thermometer, care being taken to re-set at the correct value. The setting should be slightly
above the temperature corresponding to a winding temperature of 100°C and will be about 150°F, but
it should be determined by observation in service.
Page 38
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
ALTERNATOR   EXCITERS
IN general, the only maintenance required on these machines is to keep them clean and lubricated, adjust
brush spring pressure and renew the carbon brushes as required.
The following points are important, however, and should be given careful attention when any
maintenance work is carried out.
All main poles, commutating poles and brushes must be evenly spaced round the circumference of
the armature, the maximum permissible error being B^", e.g. if one brush only is -£%" ou^ °f place, the
dimensions to adjacent brushes will differ by -^". This is the maximum allowable difference.
The brushgear as a whole must be adjusted so that it is in the marked position.
The brushes are set with the centre line radial and it is important to see that this angle is correct.
The brush pressure should be maintained at 2 to 2\ lb. per brush with the electrographitic brushes,
E.G. 12, fitted.
Insufficient brush pressure is just as likely to cause commutator wear as too great brush pressure,
and it is important, therefore, that the pressures be maintained at the correct value and brush wear regularly followed up on the spring adjusting screws.
It will probably be found that the commutators wear appreciably during the first few months of
running while tracks are being formed by the brushes. This is primarily due to the ground surface of the
commutator not being homogeneous and hard, but irregular to a greater or lesser degree. A hard skin is
eventually produced by the burnishing action of the brushes after several weeks of running, the soft
surface being partially worn away and grooves and ridges being formed. It will be realized that under
such conditions the brushes will not be bedding so well, and local current densities will be increased, thus
aggravating surface wear. This process is cumulative and if not prevented may necessitate re-grinding
of the commutator surface within a relatively short period.
The foregoing shows that it is necessary to keep the commutator surface perfectly level by removing
the ridges during the track forming period, which may extend over a period of a month or two. The finest
grade of glass paper should be used for commutator surfacing.
Never use emery cloth or paper on a commutator.
The glass paper should be wrapped over a flat piece of hard wood wide enough to span the complete
width of the commutator and applied to the revolving metal surface, riding over all the ridges simultaneously, and wearing them down to the level of the grooves. This procedure should be a matter of routine,
say twice daily, during the track forming period. The resulting surface should be smooth, hard and lasting,
requiring only attention at infrequent intervals.
Whenever a commutator has been re-ground, thus destroying the formed surface, it should in every
instance receive the treatment outlined above. Undue commutator wear will almost certainly be due to
incorrect brush pressure, incorrect brush spacing, incorrect brush position, or incorrect brush angle, and
these are the first points which must be checked if such trouble should be experienced.
The brush studs are shimmed so that they can be lowered as the commutator wears. The angle of the
brushes is set by taper shims.
CONTROL  GEAR
(See key diagram Fig.  14)
INSPECTION
THIS   equipment is designed to perform its functions satisfactorily under the severe and onerous
conditions imposed on marine apparatus, but certainty of operation may be entirely nullified by a
component device which has become inoperative due to neglect.
The frequency of inspection and the attention given to the component parts of the equipment must
conform to the service it is called upon to render ; but in all cases thorough and regular inspection should
be made if the equipment is to be maintained in a state of efficiency.
If severe or unusual burning of contacts or tips is observed, an effort should immediately be made
to determine and remove the cause as, under normal conditions, no severe burning should occur.
Inspection should be made as frequently as may be found convenient. It is strongly recommended
that a thorough inspection should be made weekly or at the end of each voyage if prolonged ; the equipment receiving adequate attention, including a careful cleaning, lubrication, examination and testing of
the apparatus.
Page 39
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
Panels should be kept as free as possible from dust and moisture ; and at the periodical inspection
the contactors should be operated, either electrically or by hand, to make sure that they are operating
freely, after first ensuring that the circuit is " dead."
GENERAL  CARE  and   MAINTENANCE
The most common causes of trouble and failure of electrical control gear are :—
(a) Loose connections.
(b) Dirty or oxidized contacts.
(c) Insufficient pressure at contact surfaces (due to wear).
(d) Roughened or badly pitted contact surfaces.
(e) Damaged insulation.
(f) Surface leakage on insulation, due to accumulation of dirt, oil, and grease, copper dust, salt deposit,
or moisture.
These are points, therefore, to bear in mind during the periodical inspection. It is a good practice
with switches, particularly those which carry current for long periods, to operate them several times in
quick succession thereby cleaning the surfaces and breaking up any oxide film which may have formed.
Knife switches, contactors, controllers, and relays should, therefore, be periodically manipulated in this
way, either by hand or electrically, whichever is most convenient, care being taken beforehand to see
that the circuit is dead.
The equipment should be kept clean and free from moisture ; all nuts, bolts, screws, cotter pins etc.,
carefully examined and tightened. The contact surface of switches should be coated with a thin film of
vaseline to minimize friction and wear. When making bolted connections, smear lightly the contact
surfaces with vaseline, before bolting up.
Any globules of metal on arcing tips should be chipped off. Serious roughening of contacts should be
removed with a smooth file or emery cloth, and arcing tips renewed if badly worn. No attempt should be
made to produce a polished surface on contacts or remove every trace of pitting, a matt surface which
makes reasonable line contact over the full width of contacts is satisfactory.
Silver tipped contacts should not be cleaned with emery cloth or any other abrasive material ; usually
it is only necessary to remove any dirt or dust with a clean, non-fluffy rag. If the surface has roughened,
the high spots may be removed with a very fine file.
Clean the contacts at least once every six months.
Arc chutes and other insulating parts should be cleaned, and any copper dust deposit or globules
removed.
CONTACTORS
Reversing contactors—(I, 2, 4, and 5)
To examine the reversing contacts, first remove the arc chutes. This is done by withdrawing screws
at top and bottom and lifting off the chute to expose the contacts.
The moving contact system comprises a set of solid contacts of the butt type, one set of intermediate
arcing tips, which introduce the first blowout coil, and a set of final arcing tips which rupture the circuit ;
the final arc is led on to special arcing horns, which connect in series the final blowout coils, two in number,
to open the circuit finally.
It is important that correct contact pressure be maintained and that the order in which the arcing,
auxiliary and main contacts close is not allowed to be upset due to wear of contacts. The following table
gives the correct values of breaks, wipes, and contact pressures.
Page 40
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33
I.B.9I89
CONTACT  PRESSURES   (lb.)
Location
Initial
Final
WIPE (inches)
BREAK (inches)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
Front contact
Centre contact
Rear (main) contact
7
7
40
15
15
55
20
20
65
35
35
85
ii
7
8
1
8
15
16
3
16
l-5-
7
32
ii
Break on Centre contact when front tip touches    ..
Break on rear contact when centre tip touches
Front contact to be set first.
9
32
15
"3¥
With armature movement of 10°, gap at centre of pole face = ^f".
Cam operation : When contactor is held in closed position by cam only, minimum wipe on rear
contact = |".        Maximum final pressure = 65 lb.
To check the contact pressures a light spring balance should be used and the pull should be in the
direction indicated in Figs. 19, 20, and 21.
A piece of paper inserted between the contact tips will readily indicate the instant at which the pull
of the spring balance frees the paper and so measures the pressure of the contact spring.
When making these tests, the armature should be wedged up to the positions required to close the
various contacts and a piece of strong tape or wire passed round the contacts, as shown in Figs. 19, 20,
and 21. It is also important to check the compression of the springs on the main contacts when the contactor is fully closed. To do this, measure the gap between the rocker and the collar immediately below
the main contact spring. This should have a minimum gap of -fy" when the contactor is fully closed.
MAINTENANCE OF THIS GAj_> IS OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE as otherwise over-heating
of the main contacts may ensue. Loss of gap may be due to wear of main contacts. It may be corrected
by renewing the contacts or by lengthening the operating rod of the contactor to obtain earlier contact.
Arc chutes
The arc chutes are of special construction each being divided into halves, completely insulated from
one another, each half being complete with barriers for splitting up and cooling the arc. Each barrier can
readily be removed for inspection after withdrawing two" screws ; the complete arc chute can be dismantled by withdrawing three screws at the top and two screws at the bottom. Examine the arc chutes
and remove any dirt or copper deposit from the inner surfaces.
Operating coils
It should be noted that the operating coils of the reversing and field contactors are intermittently
rated and should not, therefore, be energized continuously. The resistance of the operating coils is 100
ohms at 20°C.
Fitting new contacts etc.
When making replacements the following points should be observed :—
1. See that the surface of the insulating rods is undamaged and that all mica washers are replaced.
2. See that the main contacts bed truly over the whole surface on the fixed contact when the contactor closes.
3. See that the copper flexible shunts are undamaged.
4. See that the wooden connecting link does not foul the coil when the contactor is fully closed.
5. When closed electrically, there should be 0-02" minimum clerance between the cam and the roller.
6. See that the rocking lever, which passes between the two insulated bars, does not foul them in
any position.
7. See that copper foil is placed underneath the clamps, and that it is a sound job.
8. See that the arc chute clears the arcing tips in all positions of the contactor, and that the contacts
do not rub, on the sides of the arc chute. It should be possible to insert a ^-" feeler between the
contacts and the arc chutes at all places.
9. See that all spring rockers are rocking freely in all positions.
Page 41
 I.B.9I89
THE   BRITISH  THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD
FINAL ARCING TIPS TOUCHING
POSITION   WHEN
CONTACTOR   IS   FULLY
CLOSED	
4  TAPE-
DIRECTION OF PULL
WHEN ARCING
TIPS TOUCH
STRING OR
WIRE ROPE
Fig. 19.    Final arcing contacts.
r—a
INTERMEDIATE TIPS TOUCHING
POSITION   WHEN   CONTACTOR
IS FULLV   CLOSEO	
DIRECTION OP PULL
WHEN INTERMEDIATE
TIPS TOUCH
STRING OR
WIRE ROPE
Fig. 20.    Intermediate contacts.
 TIPS TOUCHING
^CONTACTOR  FULLY  CLOSED
Fig. 21.    Main contacts.
Page 42
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33
I.B.9I89
Alternator and motor field contactors (6, 7, and 38)
Important.—These contactors, Nos. 6, 7, and 38, will require more frequent attention than any other
part of the equipment. The contacts and arc chutes should be examined after every trip, and any globules
of copper removed with a smooth file.
General remarks on the maintenance of the reversing contactors also apply to these, including removal
of arc chutes.
The following table shows the correct values of breaks, wipes, and contact pressures.
CONTACT
PRESSURES   (lb.)
WIPE
(inches)
BREAK
Location
Initial
Final
(inches)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
Main contact
Discharge contact
10
1
14
2
38
8
45
101
5
8
3
4
*
l
4
tt
&
With armature movement of 6°, gap at centre of pole face = ^".
Main contact to be set first.
Exciter field, earthing and temperature alarm contactors
Where arc chutes are fitted, they should be pressed down so that the contacts are between the two
arcing plates, otherwise the magnetic blowout will not be effective and the arc may not be ruptured. Below
is given a table of contact pressures and gaps.
Device No.
Type
Contact
CONTACT
PRESSURE
Contact Gap
Initial
Final
in Inches
15
Cam
operated
N.O.
N.C.
3 to 5 lb.
1£ to 2\ oz.
11 to 14 lb.
9 to 11 oz.
if min.
f min.
25
Hand
N.O.
3 to 5 lb.
11 to 14 lb.
if min.
46
Solenoid
N.O.
—
6 oz.
^ min.
Initial pressure is the pressure when the contacts are just touching. Final pressure is with
the contacts fully closed. N.O. = Normally open, i.e. open when the contactor is free or coil
de-energized. N.C. = Normally closed, i.e., closed when the contactor is free or de-energized.
CONTROLLERS (9 and  10)
Fingers should be so adjusted that when each finger leaves its copper segment the drop is -gm, approximately. Remove any grit from the segments and vaseline the surfaces lightly to prevent wear. Too much
lubrication is worse than none at all. Contact pressure should be 4 to 5 lb.
The controllers are mounted on long studs, so that the chain tension and " timing " of the contacts
can be adjusted. They should be set so that the fingers make contact just before the cams begin to lift
the armatures of the contactors. Also see that on each of the control points there is sufficient gap between
the fingers and segments which are not in contact so that the arc does not hold. This is particularly
important in the running position. When renewing segments it is of the utmost importance to see that the
new segment is the same length as the one removed.
Contactor and controller sequences
The following table gives the angular positions of levers, follow-up cams and motor controller contacts
associated with the alternator, exciter and motor field and reversing contactors, in relation to the " Starting "
and " Direction " lever settings.
Normally this information will only be required should anything occur to upset the timing between
the camshafts and controllers e.g. if it is found necessary to remove a chain or lever.
Page 43
 I.B.9I89
THE  BRITISH  THOMSON-HOUSTON  CO.,  LTD.
FIELD   CONTACTORS
Cam and controller sequences
Lever
Position
Angular Position
(degrees from " stop ")
Motor field
contactors
(Devices 6 and 7)
Exciter field
contactor
(Device 15)
Over excitation
contacts on controller
(Device 10)
Alternator field
contactor
(Device 38)
Field
controller
(Device 10)
Lever
Cam
Contr'ler
" Stop "
0°
0°
0°
4f°
22°
28^°
Controller    contacts
touch.
Controller    contacts
touch (breaker closing coil).
5|°
26£°
34£°
Controller    contacts
fully wiped.
Controller    contacts
fully wiped (breaker closing coil).
6f°
31°
40i°
Roller touches cam.
Roller touches cam.
n°
35£°
46°
Contacts touch.
w
44°
57°
Contacts touch.
Roller touches cam.
10°
46^°
6or
Contacts fully closed.
ii*°
53|-°
70°
Contacts touch.
i2r
57J°
74|°
Contacts fully closed
14*°
67|°
88°
Contacts fully closed
"1 "
23i°
108°
140£°
29|°
137°
178°
Controller    contacts
touch.
30^°
141f°
184°
Controller    contacts
fully closed.
31i°
146°
189|°
Roller touches cam.
3-2*°
isor
195i°
Contacts touch.
"2"
35J°
163f°
213°
Contacts fully closed
36°
166°
216°
Contacts start to unwipe.
39°
180°
234°
Contacts touch.
41i°
190°
247°
Contacts fully open.
43 J°
200°
260°
Lost   motion   starts
to open.
44i°
204i°
266°
Controller    contacts
start to unwipe.
•
Controller    contacts
start to unwipe.
45i°
209|°
272°
Controller    contacts
touch.
Controller    contacts
touch.
46J°
215i°
280°
Lost    motion     tips
touch.
" Run "
50°
231°
300°
Returning to " Stop " position
6i°
30f°
40°
Lost motion starts
to close.
5|°
26£°
34£°
Knock-out roller
touches cam.
3i°
15i°
20°
Lost motion tips
touch.
2£°
lli°
14F
Knock-out touches.
io
4
IF
2°
Knock-out cam completed movement.
" Stop "
0°
0°
0°
Page 44
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS  Nos. 32 AND 33
REVERSING   CONTACTORS
Cam and controller sequences
I.B.9I89
Angular Position
"AHEAD "
(Devices 1 and 2)
Camshaft
Controller
(Device 9)
" ASTERN "
(Devices 4 and 5)
" Stop "
0°
0°
" Stop "
Controller contacts touch
30|°
61°
Controller contacts touch
Roller touches cam
33|°
67°
Roller touches cam
Contact tips touch
45°
90°
Contact tips touch
Contacts fully wiped   ..
63°
126°
Contacts fully wiped
Controller contacts leave
68°
136°
Controller contacts leave
Full " ahead "
75°
150°
Full " astern "
Returning to " Stop " position
Knock-out roller touches cam
23°
46°
Knock-out roller touches cam
" Stop "
0°
0°
" Stop "
LUBRICATION (See Fig. 22)
Various points in the control gear requiring lubrication are fitted with grease nipples for lubrication
by means of the grease gun provided. Grease is preferable to oil for this purpose as operation is intermittent. Oil would be liable to drip and run on to the insulated parts, with consequent risk of collecting
and accumulating dirt.
The camshafts are fitted with ball and roller bearings and should only require very infrequent service
with grease. Grease nipples are also supplied for this purpose and the greases recommended are Shell
" R.B.," Price's " Belmoline C," Duckham's " W 2477," or other approved grade.
CAMSHAFTS  and   LEVER  GEAR
If it becomes necessary to dismantle any of the mechanical drive between the levers and the camshafts
and controllers, the re-assembly in their correct relative position is of the utmost importance.
Camshafts
The correct relative positions of quadrant and pinion are indicated by white paint marks on meshing
teeth.
Controllers (9 and  10)
The " Stop " position is clearly denoted by the pawl engaging in the starwheel notch. A slight
adjustment of the " Stop " position of the controller can be made by rocking it bodily on its fixing studs.
Operating rods
The correct lengths of the operating rods between quadrant shafts, intermediate shafts and lever gear
should be carefully recorded before dismantling.
The intermediate shaft levers should be vertical when the lever gear is in the " off " position, and
the operating rods between the intermediate shaft and the quadrant shaft should be approximately 48J"
long.
When fitting the connecting rods the ball joints should be screwed hard up so that the internal spring
is almost compressed solid. The function of this spring is solely to take up wear and eliminate backlash
in the ball joints.
After connecting up, the camshafts should be rotated slowly to see that the solenoids pick up the
contactor armatures before the rollers actually touch the cams. The correct setting of the controllers
should also be checked and, if necessary, the controller frames rotated slightly to obtain correct positioning.
Controller arcing should be checked to see that the arc between segments and fingers breaks satisfactorily
and does not hang on.
Page 45
 I.B.9189 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
EARTH   LEAKAGE   PROTECTION (25 and 30)
The earth protecting equipment should be tested periodically for operation in the following manner,
this being in addition to the usual tests by means of the push-button.
Approximately once a week, operate the relay by hand and see that the earth contactor trips and
operates the alarms.
Also, at the same time, try the cut-out switch to see that when the bell is cut out the lamp still
indicates. See that when the relay is re-set, the warning devices continue to operate until the earth contactor (25) is re-set by hand. During these tests the switch (14) on the d.c. excitation panel in the switchboard room (for d.c supply to contactors) must be closed.
The earth circuit from the neutral to earth should be inspected to see that it is intact throughout,
including the resistance.
TEMPERATURE   INDICATOR
This operates on the principle that if two wires of dissimilar metals are joined at each end to form
an electric circuit, and one of the end junctions is heated, an electromotive force is set up which gives
rise to an electric current in the circuit. The e.m.f. generated depends on the difference in temperature
between the hot junction and the cold junction.
The indicating instrument has an automatically compensated cold junction and once the zero adjustment is set to correspond with the temperature inside the case, direct readings of the temperature of the
machine windings etc., are obtained.
When setting the instrument, place a thermometer inside the case and allow an hour for a steady
temperature, then set the meter to read the same temperature as that indicated by the thermometer. The
selector switch must be in the " off " position when setting the meter.
The selector switch should be left to record the highest temperature during the period between readings.
Special compensating leads, consisting of three copper and one common Constantan core are necessary
to connect the instrument to the thermo-couples in the machines. All connections must be perfectly clean
and secured tightly.
The instrument and thermo-couples are protected from injury by breakdown gaps in the connection
boxes, mounted on the stator frames of the alternators and motors. These gaps are provided by copper
clips between which a piece of silk insulating tape is drawn. There is one gap for each thermo-couple located
between screw heads and the earthing plate, i.e., at the end of the terminal studs remote from the couple
and instrument connections.
If any point gives inconsistent readings the appropriate gap should be prised gently open, care being
taken not to cause permanent distortion of the clip, and a piece of temporary insulation inserted, say
thick paper or thin cardboard. If this effects a change in the reading a fresh length of insulating tape should
be drawn through the gap.
INSTRUMENTS and METERS
If any heavy work is carried out on the instrument panel or adjacent structures, which involves
hammering or severe vibration, it is advisable to remove the instruments as severe jars are liable to injure
pivots or fracture the jewels used in the suspension of the moving elements.
Connections to shunts, ammeters, tachometers and wattmeters should be clean and tight, as loose
or dirty joints will cause inaccurate readings.
The voltage elements of the wattmeters, voltmeters, and stability indicators are fed from the secondary
of potential transformers (20). If no reading is obtained, check whether the h.t. fuses on these transformers
are intact. If the windings of the potential transformers are suspected, check the primary and secondary
winding resistance.
If it becomes necessary to run with any of the A.c. ammeters removed from the panel it is important
to joint the two leads together. If these are left open there is a danger of damaging the current transformers as a high voltage is induced in the secondary on open circuit.
The earth connection on the current transformers should be periodically examined to ensure that it
is efficient and the joints sound.
If the tachometers tend to read low or to be erratic, clean the commutators of the tachometer
generators and see that the brushes are bedding properly. The armatures should on no account be removed
as this weakens the permanent magnets.
Page 46
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS  Nos. 32 AND 33
RHEOSTATS and RESISTANCES
Particulars of these are given below ; all resistance values are at 20°C.
I.B.9I89
Device No.
No. of Boxes, Tubes, etc.
Type and Form
Total Ohms
8
3 boxes
RQ-G
12-8
16
2 (50 ohms each) in parallel
V 50 KF 1
25
17
4 (75 ohms each)
in series-parallel
PP—E
75
18
2 legs
Cressall
85 and 6-6
19
4 (75 ohms each) in series
PP—E
300
26
1 box
RQ-E
3-25
33
1 Plate
Berco
1-83
34
1 tube
V2-5K
2-5
39
1 box
RQ-G
0-35
50
1 tube
Zenith (slide wire)
760
51
1 tube
Zenith (slide wire)
760
INSTRUMENT TRANSFORMERS
The winding data is as follows :—
Device No.
Primary
Secondary
No. of Turns
Wire
No. of Turns
Wire
20
21
22
27
3092-5
No primary
No primary
120
0-0084 DCC Sp. fine
No primary
No primary
0-064 DCC Sp. fine
104
298
798
119
0-034 DCC Sp. fine
0-080 DCC Sp. fine
0-072 DCC Sp. fine
0-064 DCC Sp. fine
MISCELLANEOUS
Indicating lamps
These are 220-volt metal filament B.C. lamps, BTH Ref. 15 W,  B.C.  28 mm. indicating Lamp,
Real Red, or 15 W, B.C. 28 mm. indicating Lamp, Signal Green.
Potential transformer fuses
Cartridge, Cat. C 35982.
Schedule of contactors and
relays
Description
Device No.
Wire
Turns
Resistance
Remarks
Reversing contactors
1, 2, 4, 5
0-032 En.
8000
100 ohm
	
Motor field contactors
6, 7
0-032 En.
8000
100 ohm
—
Phase balance relay..
24
0-052 En.
117
0-115 ohm
—
Neutral earthing contactor
25
0-0124 En.
4785
164 ohm
—
Alarm bells
28, 49
0-0036 En.
and SCC
3250
500 ohm
Two     windings      in
series on one bobbin.
0-0092 SCC
2700
2500 ohm
Copper wound on first.
(Constan-
Constantan      wound
tan)
over it.
Earth alarm relay
30
0-164 En.
1050
8-9 ohm
—
Alternator field contactor  ..
38
0-032 En.
8000
100 ohm
—
Temperature alarm contactor
46
0-0056 En.
20,000
2620 ohm
—
Shorting contactor
47
0-0056 En.
20,000
2620 ohm
—
Boost relay
48
0-056 En.
90
0-066 ohm
—
Page 47
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
STARTERS  FOR LUBRICATING  OIL PUMP and  PROPELLER MOTOR FAN   MOTORS
Particulars of resistances, etc., are given below :—
12J h.p. Propeller Motor Ventilating Fan
9 h.p. Forced Lubrication Pump
Starting Resistance
Starting Resistance
Section
Ohms
S.W.G.
Ferry
Length
in Yd.
Section
Ohms
S.W.G.
Ferry
Length
in Yd.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
3-6
2-1
1-24
0-76
0-40
0-26
0-14
16
15
14
14
14
13
13
18
12-7
9-3
5-72
3-0
2-6
1-4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
3-46
2-0
1-02
0-66
0-34
0-21
0-11
16
14
14
13
13
13
12
17-4
15-1
7-7
6-5
3-35
2-1
1-4
Shunt Field Resistance
Shunt Field Resistance
1-11
12-23
6
7
21
21
7-2 each
8-4 each
1-2
3-22
23
13
13
14
22
23
23
12 each
8-7 each
9-4
Total 150 ohms 1-8/0-8 amps.
Contactor coil economy resistance
Total 300 ohms 1-4/0-5 amps.
Contactor coil economy resistance
—
625
33
82-1
—
625
33
82-1
Contactor Coil
Contactor Coil
No. of
Turns
Size of
copper wire
Ohms
Amps.
No. of
Turns
Size of
copper wire
Ohms
Amps.
7500
30 SWG. En.
220
0-26
7500
30 SWG.En.
220
0-26
Overload Coil
Overload Coil
20
7 SWG.DCC
—
50
27
8 SWG.DCC
—
37
.()
PROPELLER  MOTORS
AFTER each voyage the motor should be inspected, note being taken of the condition of the slip-rings.
2\ Means are provided for preventing oil working along the shaft into the windings and slip-rings and
this point should be checked and the slip-rings and connections cleaned. Accumulation of dust and oil
is the most common cause of low insulation resistance and, therefore, cleanliness is most important.
LUBRICATION
Each bearing of the main motors is self-contained, the oil circulating and cooling arrangements being
located inside each bearing housing. The bearings are fitted with a phosphor-bronze safety ring at each end.
On the lower side of the bottom housings a " Globe ;; stop valve having a special operating key is provided,
and serves to drain the bearings.
In order to effect the preliminary filling of oil, the drain valve should be securely closed, and oil poured
slowly in through the inspection opening in the bearing cap. Each propeller-motor bearing housing will
require about 10 gallons of oil to bring the oil level up to the mark on the oil gauge. This level should be
checked periodically and topped up as necessary, any signs of oil leakage should be investigated and corrected without delay. A direct reading Fahrenheit thermometer is mounted on the lower housing to indicate
the temperature of the oil in the well ; routine observations of oil temperature should be made.
Page 48
<
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
Oil is delivered to the upper half of the bearing liner by a disc and spring-loaded wiper, the spring
tension being readily adjustable through the inspection opening in the bearing cap. The spring tension
should be the lightest which ensures a supply of oil at the lowest speed. The reciprocating revolution counter
and its operating mechanism should be lubricated by hand occasionally.
An inspection should be made to ascertain if oil leakage is taking place inside the machines from time
to time. This is normally prevented by the oil throwers on the shaft in conjunction with the brass oil
baffles and oil deflector on the top centre line. Oily dirt is a source of trouble, and care should be taken
to prevent an accumulation taking place, particularly near collector rings and brushgear. The oil in the
oil wells should be examined periodically to see if it is in good condition ; if the oil has deteriorated it
should be run off, and the oil well refilled with fresh clean oil.
MEASUREMENT   OF   BEARING  WEAR
A micrometer depth gauge is provided to measure the amount of wear in the motor bearing liners.
Readings obtained, when compared with the initial readings, give an indication of the amount of bearing
wear and should be recorded.
FITTING   A   NEW   BEARING   LINER (See Fig. 23)
The procedure as detailed below must be followed when it is required to fit a new bearing liner :—
1. Drain the oil from the bearing housing.
2. At the forward end remove slip-ring mesh guard, tacho-guard and belt ; disconnect revolution
counter push-rod mechanism and remove main shaft tacho-pulley, end cover, oil labyrinth and
eccentric. Remove stub shaft for mechanical indicator on engine room platform.
3. Remove the bolts and screws securing the bearing cap to the lower half of the housing ; two of
the bolts are fitting bolts in order to locate the bearing cap.
4. Lift the bearing cap clear by slinging through the eyebolts provided (weight 5\ cwt.) taking
care not to damage the oil catcher and disc.
5. Remove the oil wiper and supporting bracket from the top half of the bearing.
6. Lift away the top half of the bearing liner (weight 2\ cwt.) after screwing eyebolts into the tapped
holes provided.
7. Remove the load from the bottom half of the bearing liner in the following manner :—
(a) Aft bearing. Relieve the weight of the bearing by jacking from the seating provided under
the motor coupling.
(b) Forward bearing. Place the jacking screws and cradle in position on the supporting stool
provided and bolt the stub shaft to the end of the motor shaft. By adjusting the lifting screws
in the supporting stool the end of the stub shaft may be raised sufficiently to take the weight
of the rotor.
8. Remove pedestal bolts and dowels, and taper keys and retaining plates locating the bearing
laterally. Operate jacking screws just sufficiently to free shims under the p'edestal foot. Remove
shims. Slacken off jacking screws to lower pedestal on to end beam.
Aft.    Rotor is now supported by forward bearing and shaft coupling.
Forward.    Rotor is now supported by aft bearing and stub shaft.
9. After cleaning the new bottom bearing liner, smear the white metal face with oil and place it on
the journal.
10. By inserting a bolt (to be used as a lever) into one of the tapped holes in the new liner, both liners
can be rotated around the shaft sufficiently to enable an eyebolt to be inserted into one of the
tapped holes in the old liner.
11. Remove the bolt from the new liner and rotate both liners until the old liner can be lifted clear
away (weight 2\ cwt.).
12. With the jacking screws raise the pedestal just sufficiently to re-insert shims in the same order
as before then slacken back the jacking screws and re-insert the pedestal dowels, bolts, and finally
the taper keys and retaining plates.
Page 49
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
During the above operations care must be taken not to damage the insulation under, and at the sides
of the pedestal, bolt insulation and insulated dowels at the forward end.
13. In the case of the aft bearing, remove the coupling support ; in the case of the forward bearing
lower the free end of the stub shaft and remove the stub shaft completely.
14. Clean and replace the top bearing liner.
15. Replace the oil wiper and supporting bracket.
16. Smear a layer of gold-size and litharge on the housing joint after cleaning. Replace the bearing
cap and insert clearance and fitting bolts, and screws securing cap to housing.
17. Replace all fittings and refill the bearing housing with oil. Check the air gap at both ends of the
machine as a final safeguard.
MEASUREMENT   OF THE   AIR  GAP
Before the propeller motors are put into service, measurements must be taken by feeler gauges of the
air-gap between rotor and stator. The endshield inspection covers at both ends of the machine should be
removed in turn, and measurements taken between rotor pole and stator tooth. Particular care must be
taken to ensure that the feeler gauges are inserted between the rotor pole faces on the centre line of the
pole and the iron of the stator core, not to the slot wedges. Subsequent readings should be taken with
the rotor in the same position relative to the stator, and to do this it will generally be necessary to rotate
the rotor into the correct position by means of the barring gear.
When the plant is shut down at the conclusion of a voyage, the opportunity should be taken of
obtaining a record of the air gaps. If these readings vary more than 10% from the original recordings, the
rotor should be centred. Vertical adjustment is obtained by shimming under the pedestal feet. For lateral
adjustment it is necessary to adjust the taper keys and re-dowel the pedestal by reamering out the holes
to a larger size.
MAGNETIC   CENTRE   INDICATOR
A pointer is fitted to each aft bearing housing and serves as an indicator of magnetic centre of the
rotor. A line scribed around the shaft external to the bearing housing should coincide with a mark engraved
on the pointer when the rotor is in its magnetic centre. Any endwise movement of the rotor, such as might
be occasioned by the failure of the thrust pads or movement of the thrust blocks as a whole, will be observable on this indicator. There is §" endplay on each side of this magnetic centre provided for in the
main motor bearings.'
BRUSHGEAR (See Fig. 25, page 54)
Wear of brushes should be very slow, but as the brushes wear down the spring tension will be reduced
and should be re-set to 5 lb. The brushes should be renewed when they are about 1" deep.
The rotor slip-rings of the propeller motor are of hard phosphor bronze and wear will take place very
slowly when in service. When, however, about ^" radial wear has taken place the brush-holders should
be adjusted. Each brush is mounted in a separate brush-holder, which is clamped to an arm by means
of small bolts. These bolts pass through slotted holes enabling the brush-holders to be adjusted radially
to counteract the wear of slip-rings. Should the limit of adjustment be reached it will be necessary to
renew the slip-rings ; these will be found to split to facilitate removal.
CARE   OF WINDINGS   IN   SERVICE
It is essential that the stator and rotor windings should be kept clean when the machine is in service.
If the insulation resistance readings (measured with a megger) taken periodically in accordance with
instructions given on page 56 should not be considered satisfactory, the following additional tests should
be taken :—
The stator insulation resistance should be taken between each stator winding and earth, and also
between the phases of each winding. See Fig. 17.
The line cables to the motor must be disconnected at the terminal boxes in order to exclude all cables
when taking insulation to earth.
When measuring between phases, remove neutral plates and megger between A2-B2, B2-C2, C2-A2.
The insulation resistance of rotor windings should also be taken.
Page 50
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33
I.B.9I89
Isolating  LinksN
/Isolating  Links
—fi^vr       I ^--Neutral Link
STARBOARD MOTOR
FOR CrWISE ROTATION AHEAD
PORT MOTOR
FOR CrCrWISE ROTATION AHEAD
Fig. 16.   Stator connections of main propeller motors.
Cut through coil here (both ends)
and insulate.
i
K k * v. x
Faulty coil X
Fig. 24.   Cutting out a defective stator
coil.
Page 51
 I.B.9I89 THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
When the ship is standing in dock for any length of time, use should be made of the heaters attached
to the inside of the plates under the end beams, in order to prevent condensation inside the motors. The
heater switches are in the after compartment of the control cubicle.
STATOR WINDINGS
The stator winding is of the two-layer lap type with four circuits in parallel per phase, as shown dia-
grammatically in Fig. 16. The end of the phases are brought out to six bus-rings. Three of these bus-rings
form the " line " ends of the phases and the other three the " neutral " ends, the complete winding being
" star " connected.
There are 80 coils in each phase, i.e. a total of 240 in the stator. The resistance per phase at 20°C,
equals 0-0109 ohm (see Fig. 17).
If a low insulation resistance reading cannot be improved by the motor heaters and a method of
" drying-out " the windings similar to that described for the alternators on page 35 is considered, but
with the motor synchronized at a quarter speed and then run at " dead slow " (a procedure equivalent
to " basin trials "), it is necessary to remove the corner sections of the air trunking and the inspection
plates in the roof of the central air chamber and cause the fans to circulate engine room air through the
machine. Should it be necessary, however, to lock the propeller shaft for any reason, the following points
should be borne in mind.
The motor field terminals must be shorted together to safeguard the field discharge resistances. Not
more than 50% full-load alternator current should be circulated, the determining factor being the temperature rise of the squirrel-cage winding ; this in addition to the motor and alternator thermo-couple readings
should be watched.
In the event of the machine being " flooded/' " external " heating only must be used.
ELECTRICAL   BREAKDOWN   OF  STATOR
In the event of a propeller motor breaking down in service the voyage would normally be completed
on the remaining motor. It may, however, be desired to continue in service with both machines until
permanent repairs are effected and the method of isolating defective stator coils is, therefore, described
below. A breakdown in the stator winding will usually be obvious either by over-temperature, out-of-
balance phase currents, excessive current, or smell. The motor must be stopped and the faulty coil traced ;
this can usually be detected by inspection (after removing the endshield covers) and by the defective coil
being hotter than others.
Cutting out defective coils
Since each of the three phases is divided into four sections, see Fig. 17, the cutting open of a single
coil will reduce the current carrying capacity of the phase to which the coil belongs by 25%. Current must
therefore be limited to 75% full load value.
As an example if it is found that coil marked " X " in Fig. 24 is faulty, then this coil should be sawn
through at both ends, and the cut ends carefully insulated to prevent induced currents from causing further
damage.
If more than one defective coil is found, the same procedure must be observed in cutting out each
coil and all exposed ends must be well insulated.
The motor may now be started up and operated at slow speed and watched carefully to see that the
faulty section has been disconnected.
Removing end beams (See Fig. 23)
In the event of a major repair being necessary to the stator winding, access will be obtained by the
removal of endshields, stator winding air shields, and a number of rotor poles. If access should ever be
required to the lower part of the stator winding it may be necessary to remove the end beams.
This can be done as follows :—
Remove the bearing cap and liner as previously described and lift the lower half of housing away
from the beam.
Remove all dowels and screws securing the end beam to the stator frame and force the beam
from its spigot by means of the starting screws. The complete end beam may then be slung clear of
the motor (the weight is 1 ton 14 cwt.).
Page 52
 BTH  SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS  Nos. 32 AND 33 I.B.9I89
ROTOR WINDINGS (See Fig. 26, page 54)
The rotor winding consists of 28 poles in series, the ends of the winding being brought out to slip-rings
at the forward end of the motor.
The average rotor resistance at 20°C is 0-800 ohm.
To replace a field coil
If it is required to remove a pole with its field spool from the rotor, the following procedure should
be followed :—
Remove the endshields from the aft end of the machine.
Rotate the rotor until the pole to be replaced is at the top on the vertical centre line. Disconnect
the copper strip pole-to-pole connections. Also remove the bolts which join the segments of the
squirrel-cage winding at both ends of the pole.
Unscrew and remove the bolts which secure the pole to the rotor spider.
Place a manilla rope round the pole and slide aft until the pole is not quite half-way out.
Place a sling round the end of the pole, re-inserting the end pole bolt to retain the sling, and sling
to an eyebolt above.
Slide the pole out further, taking the weight on the sling until the pole is not quite off the spider.
Place another sling round the pole at its forward end and take the weight of the pole completely on
the two slings (weight of pole, 8 cwt.).
If it is necessary to fit a new field coil, remove the existing coil from the pole and after wrapping the
pole with new insulation slide the new coil into place, taking care that the coil connections on the new pole
are in the same positions as on the coil which has been removed.
When re-assembling the pole on the spider care must be taken to ensure that the pole is pulled down
tightly on to the spider by the pole bolts.
After assembling the pole, pass current through the field winding and test the polarity of the new coil
by means of a pocket compass. The coils on either side of the new coil should affect the compass in the
opposite direction to the new coil.
AIR  COOLERS
The coolers will require to be cleaned on the water side when the temperature difference between
outlet air and water increases appreciably. The air surfaces should require little attention.
Access to the tube bores can be gained by removing the inspection covers fitted on the headers. Before
'breaking the joints the cooler should be well drained with a view to ensuring that no water enters the
motors.
In the event of a tube leaking it is recommended that a non-ferrous plug be driven in each end to
seal the tube until a permanent repair can be effected.
After re-assembly, the air-vents should be opened slightly, when water is first circulated, in order
to free any air locks.
Page 53
 I.B.9I89
THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
ADDITIONAL HOLES
FOR ADJUSTING
BRUSH   PRESSURE.
RINGS ARE SPLIT
FOR RENEWAL
PURPOSES.
PART VIEW IN DIRECTION OF ARROW X.
INSULATING SLEEVE.
Fig.  25.    Arrangement  of propeller  motor  brushgear and
slip-rings.
Fig.   26.    Diagram   of  propeller   motor
rotor winding.
( )
O
Page 54
 BTH   SHIP-PROPULSION   EQUIPMENTS   Nos. 32 AND 33
SCHEDULE   OF   BRUSHES  and   BALL and   ROLLER  BEARINGS
I.B.9I89
BRUSHES
(Morgan Crucible)
B & R BEARINGS
(Hoffmann)
Machine
Commutator end
(Ball)
Drive end
(Roller)
Alternator
Propeller motor
Alternator exciter
Forced lubrication pump motor. .
Propeller motor fan motors
1J" X   |" HM.6R
1£" x 1"    EG.O
li" x   f" EG.12
11" x   \" BR.
Ii" x   V EG.12
MS.20V
M.13CD
MS.13
RMS.20V
RMS.14
RMS.14
I
ROUTINE  INSULATION  TESTS
T is recommended that insulation resistance tests be made approximately once per month, and a log
book kept so that readings obtained may be compared with previous values, and any change noted.
The tests set out on page 56 are recommended.
It is not necessary to segregate the circuits any further than shown in the schedule unless the readings
indicate a low insulation resistance or a considerable decrease compared with the previous readings.
The best time to take readings is when the machines are still hot immediately after a run. The water
to the coolers should, therefore, be reduced or cut off entirely at the completion of the run in order to keep
the machines warm until the readings have been taken. The turbo-alternator field insulation tests should
be taken with the machine rotating at full speed unexcited (i.e. with excitation circuit-breaker (23) open)
and also at standstill.
If the machines have been standing in port for some time, insulation tests should be taken before
re-starting, and if low readings are obtained the machines should be warmed up by means of the heating
arrangements to drive off moisture. If time does not permit of complete warming-up in this way, it is
advisable not to run above half power on any unit for a few hours to allow the residual moisture to be
driven off. It is worth noting that if the insulation resistance of one of the alternators is low, or even zero,
but does show appreciable signs of improving after heating for half an hour, this condition can be considered
satisfactory. It will invariably be found that following the subsequent half hour heating through and
idling of the turbo-alternator set, the machine is in a condition suitable for full-power running.
The plant may be considered satisfactory for running if the insulation resistance of the stators and
reversing contactors etc. (1) is not less than one megohm, and the fields and control circuits (2 to 7) not less
than 250,000 ohms. Record on the log the temperature conditions of the machines, i.e., whether hot (after
a run), or cold (after standing in port).
If it becomes necessary, due to low readings, to segregate the circuits further, refer to the key diagram,
Fig. 14, to see what apparatus is connected to the particular point, then disconnect each item one by one
and test it separately until the faulty item is discovered.
It will be found that in the early stages of investigation the circuits can be broken down considerably
by operation of the step-up switches (11) and exciter changeover switches (12) removal of machine terminal
box links, fuses and so on.
It is strongly recommended that after any work has been carried out in the control cubicle or inside
the air chambers under the alternators or on any of the cables, a thorough inspection be made to ensure
that no tools, bolts, etc. have been left lying about near live metal or across cables.
It should be remembered that it is just as important to-check the tightness of all nuts holding electrical
connections, especially in the A.c. circuits, as it is to take regular insulation resistance readings. Poor
contact due to slack joints will cause overheating and careful inspection should, therefore, be made for
signs of this, such as discoloration of copper etc.
In the following table of recommended insulation resistance tests it is assumed that the direction
and starting levers are at " Stop " and the set-up switches (11) in the normal outboard throw.
Page 55
 I.B.9I89
THE   BRITISH   THOMSON-HOUSTON   CO.,   LTD.
Test Item No.
Circuit
Remarks
3
4
6
7
Alternator stator, set-up switches
(a.c. blades) reversing contactors,
motor stator and a.c. cables.
Alternator field, set-up switch
isolating blade, discharge circuit
and exciter armature.
Motor field and discharge circuit.
Supply cables to propeller motor
and exciter fields and fan motors,
motor field isolating blade on set-up
switch and exciter field circuits.
Control and alarm circuits.
A.C. metering circuits.
Heaters.
Earthing contactor (25) open. Test between
earth and neutral cable terminal T0.
Change-over switch (12) " Up," D.c. voltmeter switched from circuit. Fuses 15, 16, 17,
and 18 removed. Test between earth and termi-
als 121 (Port) 321 (Starboard). When machine
is rotating and also with machine at standstill.
Test between earth and terminals 103 (Port)
303 (Starboard).
Circuit-breaker (23) tripped. D.c. voltmeter
switched from circuit. Test between earth and
terminals 13 or 10 (should give same reading),
with change-over switches (12) first "Up " and
then " Down."
Switch (14) open, Earth contactor (25) closed.
Test between earth and terminals 20 (positive),
21 (negative), 240 (Port), 440 (Starboard).
Disconnect earth connections at terminals 50.
Test between earth and terminals 50.
Heater supply switch on d.c. excitation
panel in switchboard room open. Individual
heater switches closed. Test between earth and
terminal 214.
Form of
Log recommended for Insulation  Resistance Readings
*State of
Machine
Circuit
PORT
STARBOARD
Date
Terminal No.
I.R.
Terminal No.
I.R.
Main a.c. system
Item 1
Alternator
Neutral T0
Alternator
Neutral T0
Alternator field system
Item 2
(a) When rotating.
(b) At standstill.
121
121
321
321
Motor field system
Item 3
103
303
Load side of circuit-
breaker   (23)   Item  4
(a) Switches (12) "Up"
(b) Switches (12)
" Down "
(Positive) 13
(Positive) 13
(Negative) 10
(Negative) 10
Control and alarm
circuits Item 5
(Positive) 20
240
(Negative) 21
440
A.C. metering circuits
50
50
Heaters
(Positive) 214
—
* Hot or Cold.    If possible state the temperature.
Page 56
 FlG.3.(FR0M  DW1817620)
SECTIONAL   ARRANGEMENT
OF TURBINE.
 P=nJUflnQ=L""~
rlG.4.CFR0M DW 1861872)
DIAGRAM   OF GOVERNOR
AND CONTROL GEAR.
 ■ r
N?
NAME  OF PART.
PACKING CASE. BOTTOM   HALF.
PACKING CASE. TOP  HALF.
DOWEL.
5
PLUG  FOR    PT. 2.
STOP   PEG   FOR   PT.2.
7
SCREWED  PEG  FOR  PT. 3.
8
PACKING RING.
9
PACKING RING.
IO
PACKING  RING.
PACKING  RING.
12
SPRING.
13
STOP  PIN.
14
HALF   RING.
15
SCREW  N9 2 B.A. 5/b" LG. C'SK. HD.
16
STARTING SCREW.
17
NUT   FOR   PT. 16
PIG. 6. (FROM W 1806722)
ASSEMBLY   OF SHAFT   PACKING.
HIGH-PRESSURE  END.
 NAME  OF PART.
SHAFT   PACKIN6   H0USIN6.
r|G./. (FROM   XI806775)
ASSEMBLY OF SHAFT PACKING.
EXHAUST END.
 Ref.       Flange      Thk.of Size of    No.of
mark Bore  dia. P.CD. flange bolt holes bolts
Purpose
B
3AN
4-1/2" }-l/4"
5/8"
11/16"
4
C
3A"
4-1/2" >l/4"
5/8"
11/16"
4
D
1/2"
3-3/4" 2-5/8"
1/2"
9/16"
4
E
3A"
4-1/2" 3-1/4"
5/8"
11/16"
4
F
3A"
4-1/2" 3-1/4"
5/8"
11/16"
4
G
3A"
4-1/2" 3-1/4"
5/8"
11/16"
4
T
1/2"
3-3A" 2-5/8"
1/2"
9/16"
4
Leak-off from shaft packing manifold, led to
drain cooler or feed tank.
H-P. steam from boiler side of stop valve,
led to steam trap and then to main hot-well.
Oil and water drain from stop valve gear-
case, led to bilge.
H-P. steam from steam chest, led to steam
trap and then to main hot-well.
H-P. steam from drying-out valve, led to
atmosphere.
Drain from control valve stuffing boxes,
led to drain cooler or feed tank.
Drain from pressure regulator, led to
atmosphere.
1/4" B.3.P. drain from shaft packing pipes, led to drain cooler or feed tank.
1/2" B.S.P. drain from exhaust-end casing, led to bilge.
1/2" B.S.P. oil and water drain from pedestal, led to bilge.
_Ex__r
FlG.8.(FROM  XI88862S)
DIAGRAMMATIC ARRANGEMENT OF
TURBINE DRAINS
 I.UJB.OIL
storage
TANK.
PORTABLE SEMI-ROTARY HAND
PUMP. MOUNTEO ON STAND.
TO BE USED AT PORT OR
STARBD- FILUNG. STATIONS.
BARRB- MA\N DECK.
L^     TO STARB°LO. DRAIN TANK.
ms
1,D\RTY OH.TANK.
GOO GAULS.
U TO PURSERS.
I\EKT
L
■INTERNAL PIPE 3"wGH.
oil
O.l
PORT   TURBO-ALTERNATOR.
L SIGHT FLOW INOICATOR.
DSCHARGE TO GRAV TANK. OR
I   /'GRAVITY FEED TO BEARWGS
\r WHCN  LUB OIL PUMPS    ARE
STARB0- TURBO-ALTERNATOR.
LUB. OIL DRAIN TANKt PORT.
LUB OR. DRAIN TANK.-STARB°-
lIG.i O.(F(?0M XI743388)
DIAGRAMMATIC   ARRANGEMENT
OF  FORCED   LUBRICATION
SYSTEM.
 IP
n
35JlG
;_a
|—*
fa
tf „
I
r *■
•J
•-^j
^*             iaJT
ft
NAME  OF  PART.
BOTTOM  BAR (5LAMS)
TOP   BAR            (SLAMS)
BOTTOM   BAR  (5 LAMS)
TOP   BAR           (SLAMS)
Vlead
Vlead
"c'lead
Vcrossover
.'CROSSOVER
"C'CROSSOVER
NEUTRAL RING
CONNECTOR
SEPARATOR  TS-II33
WEDGE
PACKING   RING   TS2II33
SPACER  BLOCK TS2II33
WINDING   TEMPLATE
5 > 5 STRIPS.
each ie"«-49".75:
V» -5 STRIPS   EACH    U'«~49'«39'.
/    -5 STRIPS.
8=5 STRIPS.
9-5 STRIPS
vcn   18' * 49'«52'.
EACH •I6,«-49'.|30:
EACH   I8"«-49'«IZ6:
IC}.5 STRIPS
EACH -l8'«-49-. 124'.
FIG. I  l.(FROM W1705868)
ALTERNATOR  STATOR  WINDING
 DETAIL VIEW   OF CROSSOVER   CONNECTION.
n
♦^«58'k.h. coil
4- .55'l.h. coil
_l ■ 4,' R.H- CP'L
kk!
^
291-193
328-557 1
__p«A-H
IO J_[l6-7-    j
,2   I   131-75    i
L.   i   ?8I   405-374.
i s_„!_,3Zzei_443J.__
( total     ,1835-684
average   [  367-137
11-790
13-012
162-55
177-84
736■08
147-21
NAME    OF     PART
COIL.
2
COIL.
3
COIL.
COIL.
5
COIL.
FILLER.
BOTTOM   SLOT  PACKING  075K-90"x4_l/aT
8
TOP SLOT PACKING OS"xl3/ia"x37*
9
SHIM.
IO
SHIM.
PACKING   IO"» lJ/32*» ''/_!
12
PACKING   BLOCK.
PACKING   SEGMENTS.
PACKING  BETWEEN  COILS
15
BONDING STRIPS. WINDING SLOTS.
BONDING STRIPS. POLE FACE SLOTS.
RING   INSULATION.
18
FORMER  BLOCKS.   (NOT SHOWN)
19
DIAGRAM.
FIG.I 2.(FROM V1705970)
ALTERNATOR   ROTOR
WINDING
 PORT SIDE AS SHOWN.
STARBOARD SIDE WITH
AIR COOLER WATER
INLET & OUTLET BRANCHES
TO  OPPOSITE   HAND
bHOU».M
W18OLTS i SPECIAL WASHERS
K406253PTI6LOCATE FROM
FlG.I3.(FR0M W1831076)
ARRANGEMENT OF ALTERNATOR
VENTILATION
 "Astern* Reversing Contactor'.
"Astern' Reversinc Contactor.
wtorwith Discharcc Contact.
Motor Field Contactor with Discharcc Contact.
Discharcc Resistance.
Master Controller tor Revcrsinc Contactors.
Controller tor Field Contactors.
Alternator I:
Exciter Chanccover Switch.
DC. Control Swtch. (not supplied by B
Exciter Field Contactor.   (<;am operate
Exciter Field Discharge Resistance.
Exciter Field Resistance.
Negative Field Resistance. £oju;
.tage Transformer.
Transformer (Stability Inoicat
Current Transformer   J-Ieters)
Excitation Circuit Breaker,   (notsuppli
Phase Balance Relay.
Earthing Contactor, (closed sy
26.    Neutral Earthing Rcsistancc.
Zl     Earth Protcction Current Transtormcr.
£8    Earth Alarm Bell.
29    Earth Test Button.
30.     Earth AlarmRelay-
Stability Inoicator Reactance.
Stability Indicator Resistance.
Earth Alarm Relay R-sistanc
Alternator Field Contactor.
Field Discharge Resist
4Q    Boost Switch.
Temperature Indicator (Thcrmo -couples)
Temperature Alarm Push Button Station.
Temperature Alarm Contactor.
Shorting Contactor for Fault Protector Rcla-
Boost Relay.
Temperature
Adjusting Resistance for Tachometer. (Motor s
Adjustinc Resistance tor Tachometer. (Turbine
(6 pole)
S Indicate Port a Starboard.
iM^Cy^
Connection Diagram of Contactor Cubiclc DW.I5I88E!
FlG.|4.(FR0M  DW 1800579)
KEY  DIAGRAM   OF
CONNECTIONS.
 CONNECTION    DIAGRAM — CONTACTOR   CUBICLE.   FIG.I5.(froh dwi8I882i)
 _a=_S8&gR2885888fc*S*S85*SS_*__S__8KPKKK!tR|,FS8-__8_8
DRAWN  AS VIEWED   FROM   INSIDE   OF  STATOR.
n8-s8H3888§&3H888§88SS8ms8„8U8Hfsg__^
vxxxx^<v;-?xxxxxi_^
>_2S__^ i<x$o^
r~ i
Ii    i
r    >i    1
	
...
..._
L £
i. X
" '          L
j   L
i   ___..>.
—
 -i
i.\
[
L y
L—i	
  j
 L  ..!
u
—\. 1
-
L
 L-1JA
   i                                  i raw
STARBOARD   MOTOR,
FORWARD   EDGE   OF   BOARD
PORT   MOTOR.
Mew Looking on  Non-DRving or Forward End.
Temperature Octeotdfb in Slots Mumpehed I, -41, 61, 151, Ifel, - 201.
FIG. 17 (FROM W 1755076.)
WINDING  DIAGRAM OF-.
PROPELLOR-MOTOR STATOR.
240 SLOTS. 28 POLES.   3 PHASE.
 FlG.I8.(FR0M WI803778)
ARRANGEMENT OF LIFTING
GEAR.
 LE=fr
JZW=D
EXCITER CONTACTOR £
EARTHI_«   CONTACTOR i-OIL
BEARINGS.
)3t=-_D
FlG.22.(FROM XIB85256)
LUBRICATION   DIAGRAM
FOR CONTROL GEAR.
 SECTION  AT   FRAME 50. LOOKING   FORWARD
ELEVATION   LOOKING TO   PORT
WEIGHT   OF ONE   HALF OF ENDSHIELD     AlzCHJ%.
WEIGHT  OF ONE   SUPPORT   BEAM   FOR   PEDESTAL-    I TON  I5CWTS.
WOUND   ROTOR   POLE   WITHDRAWN.
WEIGHT-8 CWT.
J       JACKS AND VEE BLOCKS
5      STUB   SHAFT
Q      DOOR   IN  BULKHEAD
METHOD OF SUPPORTING ROTOR OF MAIN PROPELLER MOTOR FOR REMOVAL OF BEARINGS.
METHOD OF DISMANTLING ENDSHIELDS AND SUPPORT BEAMS FOR PEDESTAL.
FlG.23.(FROM   MI888607)
 DIM
RECORD
3T.AM  INO
0
-iso-
■ ISO'
p
0.0.
•070"
SHOP
•070"
SITE
DIM
PECORD
COUPUHC
COUPLING
•026"
• oe a"
Y
l-oso"
l-OSQ"
Z
l-oso'
i-oSo"
DIM.
rotwo
TtTaC-
DIM.
metM
F
D.O.
■210"
w
D.C
•179'
SHOP
•£95'
2ig"
SITE
SITE
G
D.O.
_J5-
SHOP
• 185"
SITE
H
P.O.
SHOP
•215"
SITE
J
DO.
•/55"
SHOP
■MO"
SlTf
TRAVEL  OF ROTOR  PER TURN  OF WORM SPINDLE = -0//4
TOTAL   RUNNING   CLEARANCE   AT  STAGE   I   OF    -OJO"
FOR   ROTATION OF WORM SPINDLE
SEE   CLEARANCE    NAMEPLATE.
DIM.
STAGE  1
STAGE 2
STAGE I-
STAGE4
STAGE 5
STAGE 6
STAGE 7
STAGE 8
STAGES
STAGE 10
STAGED
STAGE 12
KfctUKU
l« ROW
6UI0E BLADE
J-0-row
A
O.O.
•o4o"
US'
09o'
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■t/o'
■//cr
■//O'
■I/O'
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•//_>'
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■/to"
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LEFT HAND SIDE
SHOP
•OAO'
—
—
•lie'
• uo'
.115'
•!IO"
■ no"
• i;o"
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• OAO'
• IT3"
• 083"
•IO_"
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• no"
■ ICQ"
.108"
■ I40"
LEFT HAND SIDE
site-
RI«HT HANS SIDE
site
FOUNO out or
SITE
SITE
B
D.O-
■290'
•_50'
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■340*
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•_*>•
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L   -275"
28T
293"
	
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•3-5"
•352'
435"
•419"
	
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;
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•2/0
■2/0'
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215*
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0 0
•:?92"
■29s'
-.290*
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•290"
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-290"
•
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—    '    	
	
215*
•2<30"
• 305"
—
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• 275"
•295"
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E
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■/23" _
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345"
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SITE
S
ROOT OF
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•080'
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RIGHT HAND SIDE
SHOp
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■IAO"
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LEFT HAND SIOC
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RIGHT HAND SIDE
SITE J
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•145*
■IA l"
•141 "
■fbO'
■ia.1'
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• 127*
•135"
• m'
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• 114'
LEFT HAND SIDE
SlTt
RIGHT HAND SIDE
SITE
£M_*__>™
1
1             1             1
|--frHjr«0.|S)Tf
1
1        1        !
tirZAV"         |SH0»
IQ36,
---
1 008
•833
•813"
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■a3"
■OI3'
009"
■oos"
ROTOR IS  SHOWN IN  RUNNING   POSITION.
TO  ASSEMBLE   THE TOP  HALF CASING THE  ROTOR
MUST   8E   MOVED   TOWARDS   ALTERNATOR
AS   FAR   AS   THE   STOP.
THE DIMENSION TO BE RECORDED IS THE SMALLEST
CLEARANCE   ftiTWE-N THE PARTS  BEIN$ MEASURED t
MUST   SE TAKfM   WHCN   TURBlHG   IS   COLO.
THE   FIGURES   SHOYVH   MUST BE. OSTAIHED.
DIM.
RECORO
_5Ss?
OIM.
RECORD
K
77*i"
X
•258'
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00
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DO.
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SITE
Serial N? R.2902.
Fig. 2/.(from XI817702)
ROTOR CLEARANCE RECORD.
PRINCESS  MARGUERITE.   PORT SET.
 DIM
RECORD
PACKING
0
■ISO"
SHOP
•150-
H
010'
SHOP
066"
SITE
GROOVE    OS'DEEP.-
DIM
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COUPLING
5*IM5 FITTED
on siTr
(|F ANY)
END PLAY
COUPLING
026"
•030"
Y
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1-050"
Z
/■oso"
1-050"
DIM.
RECORD
PACKING
Q
•275"
•250"
SITE
T
D.O.
■080'
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SITE
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TRAVEL  OF ROTOR  PER TURN  OF WORM  SPINDLE »
RUNNING  CLEARANCE   AT STAGE  1 OF -04-0"
WITH   THRUST   BLOCK  HARD  OVER  AS SHOWM
FOR    ROTATION   OF   WORM  SPINDLE
SEE CLEARANCE   NAMEPLATE.
-)f ASSUMED   READINGS.
DIM.
STAGE 2
STAGE 3
STAGE 4
STAGE 5
STAGE 6
STAGE 7
STAGE 8
STAGE?
STAGE 10
STAGE 11
STAGE 12
KtUURU
l*r ROW
CUlDE BLADE
2nd-ROW
A
D.O.
■040"
■135'
■090"
■I/O'
■//o"
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■//o"
•//o"
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•129"
•129"
•129"
•123"
■121"
■125"
•125"
•118
•130"
•124"
•146"
RI6HT HAND SIOE
SHOP
040"-
•150"
•092"
•112"
•112"
114"
•III"
•1)2"
•112"
•U2"
•112"
•117"
in"
■I3B"
LEFT HAND SIOE
SITF
RI«HT HAND SlOr
SITE
FOONO OUT OF
SITE
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D-0-
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290"
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•340"
•340"
340'
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•334"
•361"
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232"
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•340'
•MO"
■340"
•340'
_W0"
■340"
_,90"
•3SO-
•590"
R
SHOP
•154'
•0-8"
•-_>"
•330"
•322"
■VH,"
•322"
343"
■305"
•3lfa"
'334'
3??'
•385'
—
SITE
DO.
080"
/AO"
OSO"
■MO'
■M»"
■Mo'
■Mo'
■Mo-
Mo"
•/*>"
■MO'
■to*
■MO'
■no"
s
LEFT HAND SIOE
SHOP
■or.'
	
•137"
■VW
•152"
•104"
■157"
•153"
•168"
■174'
00"
•185"
•I7B"
RIGHT HAND SIDE
SHOf
•152"
•068"
•128"
•196"
•140"
•140"
• 145"
•158"
•158"
•172"
175"
ISO"
•178"
LEFT HAND SIDC
RIGHT HAND SIDE
SIT1
1 o-o-
■OSO"
•ibo"
■OBO'
■Mo-
■MO"
MO'
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MO"
■/40"
•MO"
•/40"
MO"
•MO"
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s.
.EFT HANO SIOE
shop
•o9o'
•140"
•1-4."
•155"
•159"
■157-
•167"
•ni"
■111"
•206"
■too'
•242"
RIGHT HANO SIDE
SHOP
071"
•154"
076"
•128"
•L_4"
•144'
■140"
155-
•ICO"
■160"
•16*"
•n_'
•iaa"
•243"
.EFT HAND SIOE
SITS"
Irighthano sids
SITE
IITI
1                1                 !                 1                 1
SITE
1                 1                 1                 1                 1
SHOP
IC38
I-023-
■835"
•841"
•&2S-
•S52-
•_-43"
•84*"
■855"
•868"
•875"
• 079"
1-290"
r AfH«*G«   PACK.NS   MNU
D O
	
	
■058"
■osr
048'
•0*5*
■035'
•ON
•032'
•AW*
--V3"
-»03"
-_>5"
ROTOR   IS SHOWN  IN   RUNNING  POSITION.
TO ASSEMBLE THE TOP HALF CASING THE  ROTOR
MUST BE MOVED   TOWARDS ALTERNATOR
AS   FAR AS   THE  STOP.
THE  DIMENSION  TO BE  RECORDED IS  THE  SMALLEST
CLEARANCE   BETWEEN   THE PARTS   BEING MEASURED
% MUST BE TAKEN   WHEN TURBINE   IS COLD.
THE  FIGURES    SHOWN   MUST  BE OBTAINED.
DIM.
RECORD
-t-...-„
RECORD
"-'*"
K
O-O.
■/->>
X
■?s&
SHOP
•ztt
SHOP
■:s-::
SITE
SITS     |
1
L
00.
•298"
*
SHOP
•264
SITE
M
DO.
■2/6"
SHOP
•218
SITE
N
DO.
■29Cf
SHOP
■268'
SITE
Serial N9 R.2903.
FlG. 2o.(FROM XI8I7703)
ROTOR CLEARANCE RECORD.
PRINCESS  MARGUERITE.  STARBOARD SET.
 GROOVG   -OS'oERP.
! D'M    [RECORD
!'f»w   ENO
■ISO"
; u
•150"
j
P
D.O.
■OIO'
SHOP
06O-
!
STE
DIM
RECORD
COUPLING
SHIM5 FITTEO
COUPLING
•026"
•02-" •
Y
10 30"
iO?0".
Z
\  1-050"
|.0?o".
DIM.
RECORD
"pacing"0
Q
D.O.
•275*
SHOP
SITE
T
D.O.
•080"
SHOP
•0-15" •
SITE
DIM
RitOAD
VnJm| dim Irccoro
ST^r
F
D.O.
NrV
^79*
Ml OP
•?4_
■IS?"
S'TE
SITE
G
CO.
ftW
shop
•240"
SITE
H
DO.
.?5-5
SHOP
•28?
SITE
J
00
vC55"
SHOP
■lyo".
■#
SITE
DIM.
STAGE  1
STAGE 2
STAGE 3
STAGE 4
STAGE 5
STAGE 6
STAGE 7
STAGE 8
STAGE 9
STAGE 10
STAGE 11
STAGE 12
"      u
1" ROW
SUlCf Bl»DE
Z-«w
A
ao.
040"
■135"
■OSO'
-//_>*
■//o"
•//_>"
I/O"
•//->*
•I/O"
■110"
110'
I/O"
//->"
Mo'
LEFT HAND SIDE
SHOP
•046""
	
	
•114" •
I25"-
•121*
•126'  ■
•117"
•110"
•125"
•IIS"
•114"
114"
•i5o"-
RIGNTHAHD SIDE
•O40- •
■ISO".
•093".
•106"-
•122" •
•ll?" •
■HO
■J05".
•HO
•HO
•095"
•o95"
•I40--
LEFT HAND SIOE
SITE
AJCKT HAND SIOE
SITE
AMOUNT MTMC-L
FOUMOOUTOF
SITE
 1               1
B
DO.
	
       |        1   -290'
■£90"
■S.90'
	
•340"
■340-
■340-
•340"
■390"   j   _!->->"
	
SHOP
	
                  -290"-
•270".
285".
	
•325"
■J,ZO"
•330"
•324"
•405"-     -370"
	
SITE
I
1             1              1
1
c
D.O
■140'
	
      1    -2/0*
•2/0*
•2/0"
•2/0"
•2/0"
•2/0*
■_/_"
■210"   j      -2IO-
■2IO-
•2/0"
SHOP
•140"-
• 211"
•258"
•2J5"
328"
•220"
•230"
•Z2-"
•242"        -218
•24?-'
•245"
SITE
I
	
NQTE> CLEARANCE AT  D WHERE UNDERLINED ARE K?ECOf?_D
0-lOO"TOO  HIGHBT A CLERICAL ERROR   ON THE PART
OF  INSPECTION DEPT. (W.A.R. 28T-"oCT 48)
ROTOR   IS   SHOWN   IN   RUNNING    POSITION.
TO  ASSEMBLE   THE   TOP  HALF CASING   THE   ROTOR
MUST   BE   MOVED   TOWARDS    ALTERNATOR
AS   FAR   AS   THE    STOP.
THE   DIMENSION   TO   BE   RECORDED  IS   THE
SMALLEST   CLEARANCE    BETWEEN    THE    PARTS
BEING   MEASURED  8.   MUST   BE   TAKEN   WHEN
TURBINE    IS    COLD.
THE     FIGURES   SHOWN    MUST   BE   OBTAINED.
TRAVEL OF ROTOR PER TURN OF WORM SPINDLE"!
TOTAL  RUNNING   CLEARANCE AT STAGE 1 OF-C
WITH   THRUST    BLOCK   HARO  OVER AS SHO
FOR    ROTATION    OF  WORM   SPINDLE
SEE   CLEARANCE    NAMEPLATE.
PACK NG
lo.o
I       i        i 	
•292"
•296'
■290"
•25- "
	
•2-5"'
■285"
•23o"
•2.-"
■2SS"
■2 90"
D
TSHOP
!   —     —     —
•516" ■
•371'"
•36o".
•372".
	
•275"
■407"
•525!
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■390".
■390"-
1
■"■•*■
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■125"
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■125"
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•CIO"
■O/O'
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■0/0"
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•1*5"
—    1   —
•125:
•OIO"
■125"'
•OH"'
•Oil"
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•0\Z'-
•Oil",
•OIO".
i
R
Id o.
•IbO"
•080'      -270* 1   •340*
•340'
■340*
•340"
■340"
•340"
-340"
•390"
•390"
•_90"
SHOP
•150"-
•04>5"- ■■  -246"-    -3??".
327"
•327"
•355"
•356".
•325".
•346".
•587"
•395"
•37?"-
	
[site
I
ROOT OF
JD.O
■080'
■160"    :    080'
■MO"
■MO"
■MO'
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■MO"
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•151"
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•150".
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■ -7" •
■no" ■
•195'-
■210"
RIGHT HAhO
•075".
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•130".
150"
•l-O"'
•i_o" •
•140"
•150".
•I4S"-
• -48"
■139"-
•179"
•200" •
LEfT HANO
sot
SITE
JRIGHTHANO
S'CE
SITE
1	
s.
TIP OF
I  0 o.
■OSO'
•160'    :     -080'
■MO"
MO"
■MO-
•MO'
■Mo-
■MO"
■MO'
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•MO"
MO"
I70'
ll EFT HANO
SiDE
SHOP
•101" •
       ,    	
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•171" '
ISO"-
•170"
•158".
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•173"-
•190 ■■■
•l9o* •
■242" •
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SlOF
SHOP
■015"'
•160".   i    Obi".
•127" ■
•158" •
•158"
•173" •
•150"'
■ifT-
•120" •
•152"-
•147"'
• 145" ■
•294"'
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SIDE
SITE
......        .        .
SIDE
SITE
Illl
rmr
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IS
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as H — -f~_ 1 _ 1 .OSB>
■OS4'n
•048'
■045'
■wi
•034"
•032'
	
■018"
0/3'
009"
■005"
DIM.
'S^'57
RECORD
',«
K
D.O.
172'
X
D 0
? :•-,«'
SH0H
■no:
SHOP
■24?:
SITE
SITE
L
DO.
■298
*
-*
SHOP
■2 99
SITE
M
D.O.
■218
ASSUMED    READINGS
SHOP
•zip
AT   -X-
SITE
N
D  C.
■230
SHOP
317"
SITE
Serial N9R.2904.
FlG.fc 7.(FR0M XI8I7704)
ROTOR CLEARANCE RECORD.
PRiNCESS  PATRICIA. PORT SET.
 Groove cs"D£ep
DIM
LRECORO
'wlewila0
0
'/SO"
•I40".
p
DO.
■070"
SHOP
•070".
ste
DIM
RECORD
COU PUN G
SHIM* FITTED
COUPLING
-026"
•025" •
Y
1050"
1050" •
Z
/■OSO"
1050"-
DIM.
RECORD
EXHAUST END
0
DO.
■215
SHOP
•280" •
SITE
T
0.0.
■080"
SHOP
•070" •
SITE
"~LfKl-,V^VVn-<>/VX",V
DIM
ROOM
»T*»M
DIM.   |R£CO«0
TrB-fM
r
0.0.
■2I&
D.O.
773*
SHOP
•24I'-'
w
•-22'
SITE
SITE
G
DO.
■235
SHOP
•217'
SITE
H
D.O
•259"
SHOP
•_??'
SITE
J
D.O.
■/ss-
m
vu
DIM.
STAGE  1
STAGE 2
STAGE 3
STACE4
STAG. 5
STASE6
STAGE 7
STAGE 8
STASE9
STAG- 10
STAGE 11
STAGE 12
Kt»-U*u
1" ROW
(WOE (LADE
Z"*-ROVV
A
D.O.
-040'
nr
■0*0"
110'
•110"
•I/O"
v/o'
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•I/O"
•I/O'
•//»*
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k.E»T HAND SIDE
.HOPj
049 "•
—
—
•100"-
•101" ■
•10b".
•106* .
•095"
•110".
•105" •
•104".
•I0O".
•101" •
•135"-
RI6MT HAND SIDE
•040"
■172"
•085-.
•098" ■
•IO*".
•!<*"•
•IOI"   .
•110".
■058'.'
•098".
•098" •
•190".
LEFT HAND SIOE
SITE
RICHT HANO SIOE
SITE
FOUWO OUT OF
SITE
SITE
B
DO.
—_
     1   __
-290'
290'
•290*
	
•34 Of
•3*0*
•340'
•340'
•380*
■390"
___
SHOP
	
           	
•291".
•286'-
•280".
	
•¥_»".
•350'
■337*-
•316" •
•368".
■195".
	
SITE
1
C
D.O
•140'
•2/0'
-a/p-
•_vp-
2IO"
•*/_••
•aio'
■210'
•2/0*   1   -2/0*
-2IO-
•2/0*
SHOP
•150"-
•200"
•240".
•250".
■210" •
•225*.
•220".
•217"-
•240".     -245",
•_*-"•
•224*
SITE
TRAVEL  OF ROTOR PER TURN OF WORM SPINDLE" 0114"
RUNNING   CLEARANCE  AT  STAGE 1 OF • 04-0"
WITH THRUST   BLOCK   HARD  OVER AS  SHOWN.
FOR    ROTATION   OF WORM  SPINDLE
SEE   CLEARANCE    NAMEPLATE.
PACKING j DO
——
_
_—
•232 "
•2fty"
■290"
-290"
——
•2-5
2-5"
•2»0"
■290'
■285"
■290"
V" ISHOP
—
	
—
•307*-
•275".
•285".
•273".
—
•310".
27?" •
•2%".
•250".
•250".
260".
U
1
1 0 0.
125'
•123'
-O/O"
•O/O'
•0/0'
'/_fi*
•O/O'
•O/O'
■O/O'
•o/O'
•0/0"
•O/O"
C          SHOP
•125"
	
—
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•009".
•OIO"-
•oio5".
•I25".
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OU'-
•OIO".
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■OIO"-
•OIO"-
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'160'
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•340"
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•340"
340"
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■340'
■34<r
■390"
■390'
•390*
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•246".
•340".
•347"
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•35Z".
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•595*
•400"'
	
K        UlTE
1 D.O
■OBO'
■160"
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■/40-
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■MO"
■MO'
•/4-"
■MO"
■MO'
■/40'
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■/TO'
C       Left hand sioc
5«0P
•078"-
	
• iofe" •
■\zr-
•148"
•118" •
•131" •
•133" •
,134"-
•148"'
•161" ■
•180".
•iao"
J          RIGHT MANO SIOE
SHOP
•070"
•|6>"-
•04_".
■115"
h_ll42"
• i^e-
•l_5" •
•147" ■
•135".
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•|?8" •
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•167*'
167"-
ROOT OF    LEfT HAND S OE
SITE
B"*°C      Rl6HTHAN0S<DE
SITE
■oeq"
•*o*
•_•«-•
■/4o"
v£o*
■MO"
■MO"
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■MO"
■MO1'
■MO'
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*? I       llEFT HANO SIDE
SHOP
078"
•HO"-
•126"-
•nr-
133"
•147" •
•133".
•129"
•izh
•182"
■nr ■
■z>,5-
T,onr    IR'GHT HAND iiOE
SHOP
•075"
143".
•OfeO".
•III" •
•162*.
■nr-
•130" •
•Ifc2" •
•143" '
160"-
■ui- •
•200" ■
■158" •
■129"
BLADE      LEFT HANO SIOE
SITE
JRtG«-MAf.C SIOE
STE
1
|».«:rui^„M|ilTt
1
SSU__Ht_A't"     IshopI                          I
.....^_ ...
—
•03S'
•0-4*
■048"
CMS'
•039"
•034'
•032'
■0/8"
-Oi$"
■009"
•OOS"
ROTOR   IS  SHOWN IN  RUNNING   POSITION.
TO ASSEMBLE  THE  TOP HALF CASING   THE   ROTOR
MUST  BE MOVED   TOWAROS   ALTERNATOR
AS   FAR  AS  THE   STOP.
THE  DIMENSION  TO  BE  RECORDED IS  THE SMALLEST
CLEARANCE     BETWEEN    THE   PARTS   BEING MEASURED
8. MUST   BE   TAKEN WHEN    TURBINE    IS COLD.
THE    FIGURES   SHOWN MUST  BE  OBTAINED.
DIM
KHAUSt'
RECORC
IXKAUS1*
K
0.0.
■/7S
X
0.0.
•238'
Shop
■?\9".
SHOP
■2t7'
SITE
sire
L
■298'
•290"
SITE
M
DO.
-2/8"
SHOP
•i9o:
SITE
N
D 0.
■230
SHOP
•302
SITE
Serial N9R.2905.
FlG.30.(FROM XI8I7705)
ROTOR CLEARANCE RECORD.
PRINCESS  PATRICIA. STARBOARD SET.
    PAPor/cuLAne of C.RR. Steamers. B.C.C.S.
->l             ^
/
V2
I
1/
ff/qMZ
JoNr/fiCjE-
Length
1   X
^    <3
B_.Mk,l_j-IV?IJt4
Seats en
X.      .' Clearance        Widi/l of
BS\3l-     0/ fbrW.       tiffer
Jlfl
Engines.  b
Boilers.        w*.Ai^
RflORELLENS.
3petd
in
Knob
^ Fuel
\Copacity
\tn  Bbls.
BO/LDE^S    /S//9r*7E.
/
Gtfoss
Net
O.FI.
B.P.
ll
mm\%n
Fjccm
Lunch
Cartfo Doors.
Ca/jjo
Type--
Cflixdens,
cr Description
1
ffefs
HP
m
Type}..-.  IcTh
J/   f>ta j
rvrnace.
7CZO.I    \\A/ 0
SvryJteLbs.
Dia
Pitch
V
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Sur/ixt
Prop.Shqft
V/HZFjE    BU/LT /IND     YE/iF(.
Coonier
Height.
Width
tf°\Pta.
Dia
length.
Princess of
\Amcoover.
\
5554
2430
416 0
338-0
63 o'\  , .
19-6
14LIOi
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0
0
0
0
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115 A,th         •    »
28 KM.   14-O
14'' 0
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142-9
4-   JDusot
Twin.  Screw
Tot*!   26 Cyl
l7"dicL.
sir
203
/
2.
Verhca
6-0-
11- 0
High
1
so
ro'-4
9-6
4
m
48
10&
33- 6
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I68O _S5
127 Diisel
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t/anatmo.
6787
3409
357-10,
337-0
62-0"    ,   „
/9 9
14-3%
1750
4
8
O
0
64-
96
120
7-4"
7'- S"
JO'- 0"
10-0"
108-0
Single fiedvctic?
Geared  Turbine
T*ytn Screw
■ 2. h.p. Sr
Turbines
2.10
<
3 -vbrroxto .— | ~~
1 iztz?\tti-7?6'-n
1
— \//,289   325
3- if 1224  125
/oo"
10-3
4
46
i/r
27-ni
20-5
3469-
Fair/ield 3c Co., CHIasdow,   Scot,
-built   ,/%/y.  /S&l.
P Marduentc
53//
2379
373-9
355-6
56-O"    .   .
20 0
IS-7
2000
SI
57
25
O
0
180
64
SO
7'-Z"
100 10-0'
34-0
Tvrbo ~£./ectrtc
Trrin   Screw
2 7i/r6o -(}cvendors   \
£ Propeller Mtyors.   Z2*
/
4 Oabeoch
■j6-?£6'-7i
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311   7,224
300
I2S
//'■6
12 0
4
66   J^ \29-8t
23-5
S640-
Fairfield  _5a Co   Glasgow Scot.
JSoilt,    y^larch,       1949
P. Patricia
5911
2379
373-9
355-0
56' 0'     .  .
20-0
15-7
eooo
95
0 \       ] Ida i ^
\ O    j         .\ 64
50
7-2"
io 6
to- 0"
94-6
75r6o-Electric
7hnh- Screw
Z Tor/bo-CjenAfvicn
2 Propeller M6lbrs.
224
l6-7%f-72\ J
3'//
45
8 772
1,224
300
I2S.
Ih6'
12-6
4
68
I4i
29-dk
23-5
3640-
Fairfield &   Co.,  Glas Oor/, Scot.
j _3vi/t,   JVay,      19-43.
P.FIijabrt/i
525/
3023
366-C
35/'~0
52-0".    . .,
\/9 O
15J-9'
If CO
/SO,     J19            \ 66
'3Z5t        \   O    \                34
50
7- 2"
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99-3
4 Cy/.   £){/ad
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16. 23". 33%*'        J/SS
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12,538
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525 '.30,3
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\FairUelcL 3c Co.,  GlasOow, Scot
yMui/t,     rtprt/.         1330 .
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4032
£448
350-0
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i        1	
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yeetort'a,3.C.   Bu/lF OS2
/3?6
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1?
\
fhjuired. from   Hootenqy  lahes .  oncL
\re-constructed   by yarron/slrcl..   V/cfrm
i/trfKtttrJ      I94£
	
c
The  Height   Clearance   of  Cor^o Doors   mates
il/oi/Yonce    for   fixed    o6stroottons   inside
tf ship    adjacent   to   doors .
/VOTS:-       72e   number   of tfoom^s,  Beds,
Sofa  Berths,   and  Seats  in jDinirtcl
Saloon   are    Subject    to   chanfe,
but the   above    numbers    may  be
Distance* from    centre  of passenger
doors   to   centre   e>f   Cargo    doors
is    2f -6" for   a/// passenger  boo is.
II     Diameier   e>f Furnaces
is mini mom   inside
diameter.
I,         Diameter   of PropeJYer    1
Shafts  does   not
include   /cner.
C-6S 3bls  cf Foe/  Oi/
eoual   1 Ton./at   »965sf\
)TtL-  frinc
in    stern
yycth     c/ec
28'"0" yyu
*ess  c
for
*ranct
le.
of
mCOI
■ Cq
/s-
(ver
KS    c
a as
7/7ci
Trac
ie  a
-As
oor
CO
vsid
~hedz>
?red
des.
a.va
i/ab
/e   on
sc/s>
imer
Distance    detween.   Frd. anoi   /Tfrcr
freight J>oors on  Main   Decks
t\3     /2l2?'-o'\
hos a  special  type docMind\
propeller  th 60*v <f $hip>
dru/en  by 20O MP.
E/ecir/c    /4otor.
Engineer]*    Office.,
JB.C Coast   s.s. Serf tee,
Victoria, &.C.
February  20,   f9S~£           KW.r:          \
Ffe>Yised Febrc/ary,    26,    /3SQ

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