The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

Alaska Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1935

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0362815.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0362815.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0362815-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0362815-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0362815-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0362815-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0362815-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0362815-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0362815-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0362815.ris

Full Text

 LASKA
ritish Columbia
Coast Service
Il<#i
 f Location of Canadian Pacific Hotels
Portland, Ore..
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Quebec, Que	
Regina, Sask,.
CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga K. A. Cook, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.404 C. & S. Nat 1 Bk. Bldg.
Banff, Alta J. A. McDonald, Dist. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Boston, Mass L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, N.Y W. P. Wass, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 160 Pearl St.
Calgary, Alta G. D. Brophy, Dist. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111 T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic .71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio M E. Malone, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas, Texas H. C. James, Dist. Pass. Rep'tive 1212 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit, Mich G. G. McKay, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.... 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Fort William, Ont H. J. Skynner, City Pass. Agent 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont W. C. Tully, City Pass. Agent 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S A. C. MacDonald, City Pass. Agent 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig, City Pass. Agent Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T.H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill, Agent
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris, City Pass. Agent 709 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson, Agent
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch, City Pass. Agent 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum, City Pass. Agent 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis F. T. Sansom, City Pass. Agt. Soo Line. 108 E. Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 611 2nd Ave. South
m™+t.qqi  n„Q /p- E. Gingras, Dist. Pass. Agent Windsor Station
Montreal, yue jF c Lydon> Gen Agt> Pass Dept 201 St. James St. W.
Moose Jaw, Sask T. J. Colton, Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson, B.C N. J. Lowes, City Pass. Agent Baker and Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y J.E.Roach, Act. Gen.Agt. Rail Traffic.Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont R. Y. Daniaud, Dist. Pass. Agent 87 Main Street West
Ottawa, Ont. J. A. McGill, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 83 Sparks St.
PeterbOro, Ont........J. Skinner, City Pass. Agent 343 George St.
Philadelphia, Pa J. C. Patteson, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. A. Shackelford, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 338 Sixth Ave.
.. W. H. Deacon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 148A Broadway
.. W. L. Coatea, General Agent
. .C. A. Langevin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Palais Station
.. J. W. Dawson, Dist. Pass. Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John, N.B C. B Andrews, Dist. Pass. Agent 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo Geo. P. Carbrey, Gen. Agt Pass. Dept 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W.H.Lennon,Gen.Agt.Rail Traffic.Soo Line.. .Fourth & Cedar
San Francisco, Cal F. L. Nason, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 675 Market St.
Saskatoon, Sask R. T. Wilson, City Ticket Agent 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. J. O. Johnston, City Pass. Agent 529 Queen Street
Seattle, Wash E. L. Sheehan, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier, City Pass. Agent 91 Wellington St. North
Skagway, Alaska L. H. Johnston, Agent
Spokane, Wash E. S. McPherson, Spokane Internl. Ry Old Nat. Bank Bldg.
Tacoma, Wash City Pass. Agent 1113 Pacific Ave.
t™.™+« r*r,+ /W. Fulton, Asst. Gen. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Building
loronto, unt. jQ B Burpee> Dist Pass. Agent Canadian Pacific Building
Vancouver, B.C F. H. Daly, Dist. Pass. Agent 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria, B.C L. D. Chetham, Dist. Pass. Agent 1102 Government St.
Washington, D.C C.E.Phelps,Gen.Agt.Pass.Dept. .14th & New York Ave.,N.W.
Windsor, Ont W. C. Elmer, City Pass. Agent 142 Ouellette Ave.
Winnipeg, Man E. A. McGuinness, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Main and Portage
EUROPE
.E. Schmitz 25 Quai Jordaens
.F. Bramley 14 Donegal Place
.W. T. Treadaway 4 Victoria Square
.A. S. Ray 18 St. Augustine's Parade
. G. L. Servais 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
.A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
.C. L. Crowe 25 Bothwell St.
.T. H. Gardner Alsterdamm 9
. H. T. Penny Pier Head
[C. E. Jenkins 62 Charing Cross
\G. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall St.
.R. L. Hughes 31 Mosley St.
.A. V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
.J. Springett Coolsingel No. 91
. H. Taylor Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong, China A. M. Parker, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe, Japan  B. G. Ryan, Passenger Agent 7 Harimamachi
Manila, P.I J. R. Shaw, Gen. Agt 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai, China G. E. Costello, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept No. 4 The Bund
Yokohama, Japan E. Hospes, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, ETC.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand, Union
House, Sydney, N.S.W.   A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for
New Zealand, 32-34 Quay St., Acukland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A.. Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.
Auckland, N.Z .UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd...Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.
Christchurch,
N.Z UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z. .UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.:Ltd.)
Fremantle,W.A.Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.
Hobart, Tas... .UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)
Launceston,Tas.UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)
Antwerp, Belgium—
Belfast, Ireland	
Birmingham, Engld..
Bristol, England	
Brussels, Belgium	
Dublin, Ireland	
Glasgow, Scotland...
Hamburg, Germany.
Liverpool, England...
London, England	
Manchester, England.
Paris, France	
Rotterdam, Holland.
Southampton, Engld.
■MT^iu^.^r, fH. F. Boyer, Pass'r. Rep.,
Melbourne, ap_R   g/wuiiam St.
Vlc [Union S.S.Co. of N.S. (Ltd.)
Perth.W.A..Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva, Fiji. c Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Sydney,
N.S.W.
Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
ttt i|. . „ fJ. T. Campbell, Trav. Pass.
Wellington, Agt>f c p £ ^ x{ johnsto„ St.
Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques—
Good the World Over
 ALASKA
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
 LASKA
ritish Columbia
Coast Service
~
I
Princess
Steamships
 •jc Location of Canadian Pacific Hotels
, >
From
Seattle
Victoria
Vancouver
via
Alert Bay
Prince
Rupert
Ketchikan
Wrangell
Taku
Glacier
Juneau
to
Skagway
and
return
by the
"Inside
Passage"
Alaska » Yukon
Taku Glacier
To
Alaska and back by the Inside
Passage is a two-thousand mile nine-day
journey from Vancouver, with six ports of
call. During the summer months the
Canadian Pacific assigns for this service
the finest units of its well-known "Princess" fleet. All staterooms are outside
rooms—light, cozy and well ventilated.
Public rooms—dining room, observation
room, lounges, smoking room—are bright,
cheerful and charmingly furnished. All
ships have dance floors and carry dance
orchestras.
Alaska is a land of gold, of flowers, of
fox farms, salmon, Indians and totem
poles. Its scenery is of a character unknown elsewhere on this continent. For
four days the steamer threads the long,
almost land-locked "Inside Passage,"
winding through mountain-hemmed fiordlike waterways, with wooded islands, tremendous glacier-clad peaks, fascinating
Alaskan towns and queer old settlements
as continuous episodes. No water journey
in America can quite compare in scenery
with the trip to Alaska.
SEE THE CANADIAN ROCKIES EN ROUTE
PRINTED IN CANADA
mm
—
——
 An authentic photograph of the "Trail of '98"
As early as 1861 gold discoveries were made in
the Stikine River, and from 1866 to 1887 some
gravels of value were found at many places along or
tributary to the Yukon River. The location of the
first Klondike claim in August, 1896, was followed
by a feverish and picturesque rush, the like of
which the world has never seen before or since, and
the mines in American territory were temporarily
deserted.
The Yukon is a "placer" mining district: that is,
the gold is found in alluvial gravels, and is obtained
by assorting the gravels in water. Frequently
these deposits are along the hollows of river beds,
but they are also found at higher altitudes, in terraces that formerly were the beds of streams that
have changed their courses.   In the latter case,
instead of being worked in the creek or sluice, the
gold deposits are first washed down by powerful
jets of water projected by hose lines, and so into
the sluices.
The Bonanza was the greatest of the Klondike
creeks, and its tributary, the Eldorado Creek, the
richest, probably surpassing any known placer
deposit. The Klondike output reached its climax
in 1900, with a production of $22,000,000, but has
since then declined. Besides gold, silver mining
has been developed in the Yukon, an outstanding
example being the silver-lead mine near Mayo.
Placer gold was discovered at Juneau in about
1880, but the present mines there are quartz mines
—that is, the gold is found in rocks, which must be
crushed.
 ""3*     .■-■      *
Photographs
in this booklet are
copyright as
follows:
©a . s.n.—Associated
Screen News Ltd.,
Montreal.
©f.n. — Frederick
Niven, Nelson, B.C.
©G.M.T.—G. M. Taylor, Atlin, B.C.
©w.c. a. — Western
Canada Airways.
pan" valued at $1,000!
It came as a whip to men's greed and a challenge; to
men's courage, that first ringing call of the Northland.
Until then—a little over thirty years ago—Alaska was
almost unknown, a white space on the map over which was
shakily scrawled "Come-and-find-me." That is, to mbst
of the world; for the Northland had even then its pioneers,
its prospectors, who had fished its teeming coasts, trapped its furs, started small towns, and panned the first
coarse colorings of gold along its creeks. But outsidej of
these sturdy old-timers Alaska, with its side-partner, the
Yukon, was hardly more than a geographical curiosity—
a huge, unpopulated, unexplored block of land over three-
quarters of a million square miles in size, forming
northern tip of the American continent.
But the discovery of gold in the Klondike in 1896, in
such vast quantities as to astound humanity, let loose so
much sensation that overnight the new bonanza became
almost the most famous place on earth. That feverish
stampede to the north (one does not have to be very
middle-aged to remember it) was like nothing that
had ever happened before, or that has ever happened
since.
Back in '98 someone took a photograph of an everyday
scene in the White Pass. It shows, struggling over the
steep, dangerous snow-clad wastes, a thin black streak
nearly two miles long—a streak composed entirely of
men, mushing "inside" to the Klondike, with nearly 600
miles travel ahead of them, and treading so close to one
another in the narrow trail that they very nearly kicked
the previous man's ankles. And this was an everyday
scene—happening all the time.
They had their hardships, those early days, before the
railway was built, and when cheechako and sourdough
alike had to travel that arduous path over the Chilkoot
Pass (or lat^r, the White Pass) and down the Yukon
River. Greed pulled them forward; the crowd behind
pressed them onwards; if they could not endure the strain
they fell out and perished. There was no turning back.
It was truly no place for weaklings, for one was beset not
only by a hostile Nature, but also by the wickedness and
depravity of mankind.
The Northland put a spell on those who made its
acquaintance then. It will put the same spell on us today. It is a land of mystery—a magnet that will always
draw men and women, even though the lure of the gold is
fainter now. It is still a land of romance, its atmosphere
impregnated with memories of those sad, glad days when
the century was just turning over. Gold has ceased to be
its principal advantage—has, indeed, proved a false hope
in those many ghost-like "cities" that parade their empty
shells from Dyea to Nome; but there is equally the romance of to-morrow, the discovery of other and richer resources, the development of a vigorous, prosperous
northern empire.
 Aerial view of Vancouver
©W.C.A.
Victoria, showing the Empress Hotel
©W.C.A.
Totem Poles
The totem poles of the Indians of British
Columbia constitute one of the most striking
features of the whole northwest coast. These
remarkable carvings should not be mistaken
for idols or deities. They are pictorial records of history and mythology, as the
Indians understand them. Some of them
represent the Raven, the Eagle, the Killer-
whale and the Wolf, which are the emblems
of the largest social groups in the nation.
The Bear, the Frog, the Sea-Lion, the Beaver,
the Thunder-Bird, and many others are the
crests of various clans. Here we have to do only
with coats-of-arms.    (See photo next page.)
Vancouver
Victoria
The voyage to Alaska can be divided into
two parts. From Vancouver to Ketchikan the
journey is mostly through narrow channels,
with steep shores heavily timbered to the
water's edge. The second part, from Ketchikan to Skagway, is through wider stretches of
water, with glaciers, waterfalls, and rugged
mountains on either side, and richly colored
with the purple twilights of Alaska.
The Princess steamship slips away from
Vancouver on its four-day northbound trip
at 9.00 o'clock at night, when the long summer dusks have begun to darken. After
trunks have been stowed and opened, dining
room reservations made, and casual first
impressions formed of one's fellow-travellers,
there is still time for a stroll up and down
deck before turning in. By this time the
ship has left Burrard Inlet, passed Brockton
Point, and has entered the Gulf of Georgia.
On the right is still to be seen the dark bulk
of the mainland; on the left, but invisible
yet, is Vancouver Island, in whose lee the
route is sheltered for over two hundred miles.
The course is south of long, narrow Texada
Island and through Discovery Passage,
between that island and Vancouver Island.
The early risers—and they only will see
Seymour Narrows, for this, the narrowest
part of the channel, is passed about 6.00 a.m.
An hour or so later the ship passes through
Johnstone Straits and Broughton Straits,
along whose shores a number of logging
camps can be seen. And then after breakfast
we reach our first stop, Alert Bay.
 Totem Poles at Alert Bay
Alert Bay
Prince Rupert
■■■-.mmm
IIP ss	
iilxx:
You'll enjoy all types of deck sports
Alert Bay is a small village on a small island—Cormorant
Island—situated so close to Vancouver Island that the maps
are almost unable to make any distinction; but it is nevertheless one of the principal salmon canneries on the Coast.
Here, in fact, will be our first glimpse of this important industry, and during the time in port the canneries invite
visitors to inspect the highly interesting processes of turning
a large, handsome salmon into shiny little round cans. Alert
Bay is an old settlement, with a considerable Indian population; and here, too, we make our first contact with another
object typical of the Northland—the totem pole. (See
"Totem Poles.") The Indian cemetery, with some modern
poles, is well worth the short stroll to see it.
After lunch we leave the shelter of Vancouver Island,
reaching Queen Charlotte Sound—with its short experience
of open Pacific Ocean. From Cape Scott, on Vancouver
Island, to Cape St. James, at the southern end of the Queen
Charlotte Islands, is about 150 miles; but we bear away from
that wild and rather primitive group, and keep instead close
inland, reaching Calvert Island in three hours—the longest
of the three times we shall see the wide horizon of the open
Pacific Ocean during the entire trip.
Passing through Lama Passage, Bella Bella is on the left
—a very old and practically deserted Indian village. At
10.00 at night, or so, we enter Old Ocean again, this time at
Millbank Sound, but only for ten miles, "and so" (as Samuel
Pepys says) "to bed."
Entering the Tolmie Channel, between Princess Royal
Island and the mainland, we pass Swanson Bay in the night,
and then enter Grenville Channel, in the shelter of 60-mile-
long Pitt Island. At about breakfast time we pass the mouth
of the Skeena River, and shortly, with Digby Island on the
west, on which may be seen the Canadian Government
wireless station, arrive at about 9.00 a.m. at Prince
Rupert.
Prince Rupert is the most northerly city of any size in
Canada, with a population of about 7,000. Built on a circle
of hills formed of very hard rock, the city is considerably
above the level of the wharf and is reached by a long staircase. It is a very important fishing centre and a big cold
storage plant is located in the Upper Harbor. The visitor
will probably be interested, during his stay on shore, in the
fur stores of the city—the first sight he will obtain of the
great fur industry of the Northland.
 Ketchikan
Wrangell
and
Taku
Glacier
Ketchikan, most prosperous town in Alaska
Shortly after leaving Prince Rupert, the old Indian village
of Metlakatla is passed. Here is a very successful mission
for the natives, founded by Father Duncan. About 30
minutes later, Port Simpson is passed—one of the oldest
settlements in Northern British Columbia, with an old
Hudson's Bay Company's post that has been a trading-centre
with the Indians for about sixty years.
About three hours after leaving Prince Rupert, Green
Island Lighthouse indicates our nearness to the international
boundary line between Canada and Alaska (United States).
Dixon's Entrance, last entrance of the open Pacific Ocean, is
crossed, and we wind our way through Revilla Gigedo Channel—here called Tongas Narrows—to Ketchikan.
Ketchikan (an Indian word meaning "the town under the
eagle") is the southernmost town in Alaska, situated on
Revilla Gigedo Island. It might also be said to be now
the most prosperous town in Alaska, for salmon and halibut
have made it rich and given it large canneries and cold
storage plants. It is also a mining centre for copper, gold,
platinum, silver and lead, the well-known Salt Chuck platinum mines being within 30 miles. Ketchikan has a bustling
air, with hotels, stores and banks. Originally an Indian fishing
camp, it has several large canneries, and a great mosquito
fleet of fishing vessels is continually bringing in fish.
The visitor will find interesting curio stores. There is
also a pleasant walk to the waterfall in Ketchikan Creek
(about 15 minutes), where in the late summer months thousands of salmon may be seen leaping and struggling through
the rushing, foaming water on their way to the spawning
banks. There are two splendid totem poles—the Chief
Johnson totem, surmounted by Kajuk, a fabled bird of the
mountain which amuses itself by throwing rocks at ground
hogs, with below the Raven and the Frog Woman with her
children, the Salmon; and the Kyan totem, surmounted by
the Crane, followed by the Kyak, another legendary bird,
and the Bear.
A distinct change of scenery occurs from now on. The
stretches of water become wide, and mountains rise on either
side, with waterfalls tumbling down and glaciers crowning
their crests. The steamer winds along Clarence Strait,
with Prince of Wales Island on the west, and turning round
between Etolin and Zarembo Islands reaches Wrangell
about 4.00 a.m., and leaves before breakfast time. We shall,
however, have ample time to visit it when southbound.
Wrangell, situated on the island of the same name, is one
of the oldest cities of Alaska, and is named after Baron Wrangell, who was governor about 1830. It was originally a trading post, populated mainly by Indians under the protection
 West
Coast
Indian
children
A close up of Taku Glacier
©A.S.N.
of the Russians, but came under white dominance during the
gold rush of '98. Part of the Russian fort still remains, and
there are also some very old totem poles near the wharf.
Wrangell is at the mouth of the Stikine River, which,
navigable for about 170 miles, is the entry point to the
celebrated Cassiar big-game country.
Two hours after leaving Wrangell the ship enters Wrangell
Narrows, and for twenty miles proceeds at half-speed through
this narrow, winding channel of a remarkable beauty. Well
marked with buoys and beacons, this passage between the
wooded islands saves a long detour around Cape Decision.
At the north end of the Narrows lies the old town of Petersburg, whose name indicates its origin in the days of the
Russian regime. It is now a flourishing fishing centre.
Kupreanof Island is on the west, and after crossing Frederick
Sound and Cape Fanshaw, we enter Stephen's Passage.
We are now surrounded by the typical grandeur of Alaska
and, turning up Taku Inlet, the Taku Glacier sends out
hundreds of odd-shaped ice floes to meet us—as blue as
indigo, floating by to melt gradually in warmer waters, as
slowly the steamer approaches this famous sight. This
glacier, a mile wide and 100 feet thick, extends for over 90
miles back over the mountains to join Llewellyn Glacier at
the head of Atlin Lake.    It really is two glaciers, one—a
mixture of brown, white, and blue colors—"dead" and receding, the other very much alive and continually moving
forward. Showing all the colors of the rainbow, according
to the time of day or position of the sun, huge masses of ice
frequently break off into the sea, with deafening thunder,
and float majestically away. Even the vibration caused by
the ship's whistle will bring down great hundreds-of-tons
pieces of ice.
Glaciers
Along or near the Inside Passage to Alaska, or round
Atlin Lake, many magnificent glaciers are to be seen.
A glacier is, broadly speaking, an accumulation of ice, of
sufficient size and weight to flow down from a snow-covered
elevation. It is a river flowing from a lake, only the lake is
of snow and the river of ice. The thickness of the ice will
vary greatly—it may be, under favorable conditions, as
much as 1,000 feet.
Glaciers frequently extend far below the snow line of the
region. Exactly how a glacier moves has never been satisfactorily explained, but that it does move has been proved
by observation and calculations; more than that, the stream
at the centre of a glacier moves much faster than at the sides
or bottom.
 **%   il
All ships have dance orchestras
An "unlisted" passenger
mm: ■ . ■   ■
-sms-mmmmm^m^ mm:.
'7^mmmm777> - '^mrt:.':.-
7[7mmm:S7>^7^s7mm7 -\-mm.
A Canadian Pacite "Princess" steamship
XXftft,,..
«pk
Typical stateroom Private Bath
CANADIAN     PACIFIC     "PRINCESS"     STEAMSHIPS
A Dining Room—cool and spacious
The mountain-guarded Inside Passage
 Juneau
Skagway
Juneau—capital of Alaska
Three hours' steaming up Gatineau Channel brings us to
Juneau, clinging to the base and sides of Mount Juneau,
which towers 3,500 feet almost perpendicularly above, near
the mouth of the Taku River. Juneau, named after its
French-Canadian founder, is the capital of Alaska, the residence of the Governor, and the seat of all government
departments. With a population of about 4,000, it is a
bright and interesting city, built (like so many of these coast
settlements) partly on piles over the water, partly on bare
rock, with modern hotels and stores, and many attractive
residences and public buildings.
The Territorial Museum in the Arctic Brotherhood Hall
has a wonderful collection of Alaska curiosities; on the floor
below is the experimental salmon hatchery. Fine raw fur
stocks can be seen at local dealers. Juneau has good roads
and automobiles a-plenty; one particularly interesting ride
is to the face of the Mendenhall Glacier (2J^ hours return) or
to Auk Lake (an hour longer). A short hike away is the
Gold Creek Basin, the site of the first placer gold strike
in Alaska, made by Joe Juneau and Richard Haines in the
early eighties.
Within a short distance from Juneau, but reached by
launch, are Thane and Douglas, where, until some time after
the Great War, three of the largest low-grade gold-crushing
plants in the world were situated. Now only one remains,
the Alaska Juneau, with a mining and milling capacity of
about 9,000 tons of ore daily. On Douglas Island are the old
buildings of the celebrated Treadwell Mine, flooded by a
cave-in in 1917, and not operated since.
The steamer leaves Juneau at midnight, and reaches
Skagway about 9.00 a.m.; but on the southbound journey
there is ample opportunity to see the beautiful Lynn Canal,
which, with the possible exception of the Taku Glacier,
provides the most wonderful scenery of all. For over 80
miles we steam up this arm of the sea, which varies in width
from one to five miles. Mountains of rock capped with snow,
towering glaciers and gushing waterfalls, canyons of all
sizes and wild shapes, and colors in restless variety surround
us. Davidson Glacier is a huge ice wall seen on the west.
Passing the town of Haines and Fort Seward, we suddenly
turn a point to see Skagway ahead of us.
10
 Skagway, the end of the northbound run, is a town that has loomed
large in the history of the North. When the gold rush started to the
Yukon in 1896, the landing was made at Dyea, which lies on the western
branch of the Lynn Canal, and the trail inland led over the dangerous
Chilkoot Pass; but word came of the discovery of the White Pass, and
in a day fifteen thousand people left Dyea, and in a day Skagway arose
where before was chiefly swamp.
At the height of the gold rush, Skagway was one of the wildest, wickedest places on earth, chockfull of the gambling halls, dance halls, saloons
and other lurid temptations that nowadays can be seen nowhere else but
in the "movies." Gangs of "bad men" terrorized the town, preying
not only on the returning successful prospector but on the incoming
"cheechako" as well. Skagway is not such an ancient town but that
old-timers can regale you with stories of its celebrated characters, such
as Soapy Smith or Frank Reid, whose graves nearby will initiate many
reminiscences. But those days are over. Skagway is a model of propriety, with hotels, stores, and the peaceful air of ordinary business.
Amongst the marvels of Skagway—to those at least who have never
considered Alaska as aught but perpetual winter—are its beautiful
flower gardens. The background of mountains that enclose it like a cup
offer many attractive outings, such as "hikes" along the Skagway River,
to Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove, or the great Denver Glacier. There
are fine launch trips available, and good fishing. The steamer lays over
about 36 hours before starting on its southbound journey.
Alaskan blooms
Flowers
Alaska is a land of contrasts. Never
was so mistaken an idea as that it is all
winter. If it were, whence come the
gorgeous, vivid flower gardens that one
sees everywhere, such masses of color
that they dazzle the eye ? The answer
is simple: the warm Japan current, striking Vancouver Island, is deflected northward, and carries to the Land of the Midnight Sun the same delightful humidity
that the Pacific Coast knows.
11
<7
 Inland from Skagway
The
White
Pass
Lake
Bennett
White
Horse
Dawson
Beautiful Lake Bennett
Interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit would be
incomplete without a journey to the equally interesting and
fascinating "inside." Such a journey, difficult as it was in
the early days of the gold rush, can now be easily undertaken,
for Skagway is the southern terminus of the rail line of
the White Pass and Yukon Route. A comfortable train,
with large-windowed observation cars, will carry one
through the magnificent scenery of the White Pass into the
Yukon Territory, connecting at Carcross and at White
Horse with the commodious steamers of the same company.
For those who are returning south by the same "Princess"
steamship, there are available the excursions to West Taku
Arm or to White Horse. For those waiting over until the
next steamship there is the trip to Atlin Lake—where, indeed, many visitors linger much longer than such a brief
visit. A description of these beautiful trips will be found on
page 16. But for those with more time, we will continue on
to White Horse, whence there is the wonderful trip down
the Yukon River to Dawson.
The rail journey is a most spectacular one. The salt tang
of the sea is left behind and the sweetness of lake and moun-
Boundary between British
Columbia and Alaska
tain air fills the nostrils. The scenery grows rugged and
awe-inspiring. We climb steadily around gorges, along the
brink of deep canyons, past roaring cataracts, and near dead
cities to which cling memories of the trail of '98. Such
names as "Dead Horse Gulch" and "Log Cabin" help
vividly to recall those grim days.
At White Pass Summit—nearly 3,000 feet higher than
Skagway in twenty miles—we leave American territory,
and the scarlet-coated Mounted Policeman greets us as we
enter Canada. A bronze monument, where the flags of the
two countries float side by side, marks the boundary line.
For a very short distance we travel through British Columbia, and then at Pennington cross into the Yukon Territory.
On our left, Lake Bennett begins—a long, narrow body of
water which the railway will follow for twenty-six miles. It
is rather amazing to learn that Bennett, where a stop is made
for lunch, and which consists merely of a station and its
outbuildings, once had a population of several thousand, and
teemed with life and excitement. For it was to this beautiful lake, bounded by old-rose color, that the "Trail of '98"
12
 "Whitehorse"
in the
Five Finger Rapids
led. Those who had survived the epic hazards of the Pass
camped on this lake, and whipsawed lumber to make the
rafts, scows and other manner of water craft in which to
reach the golden land of their hopes. Little did they know,
of course, the perils of the White Horse Rapids, or if they
had heard of them, little did they appreciate them.
Along the ever-winding shores of this blue Lake Bennett,
looking out on a long mountain ridge, the railway runs, until
the little town of Carcross is reached. There is an Indian
school nearby, and interesting fox ranches, and in the
cemetery are buried many of the discoverers of the
Klondike.
Lewes and other little lakes are passed and then Miles
Canyon and White Horse Rapids. On still days, the roar
of these rapids can be heard even in the town, about an hour's
walk distant. As we stand on the brink of this famous
gorge, no very highly colored imagination is necessary to
conjure up pictures of the old days. We can imagine the
bold adventurers in their frail craft nearing these death-
dealing rapids, whose waters are thrown from side to side
in a long serpentine series of twists, and which are so troubled
that the water rides higher in the middle than at the sides.
Down they came in their mad rush to the Klondike—not at
intervals, but in a continuous procession that was (in the
words of an eye-witness) like traffic on a city street. Some,
becoming scared, jumped ashore as they saw their dangers,
and watched from the high cliffs the agonies of their
boats; but the majority stayed with their craft. And
so few came through unpunished! Those who did
wasted no time in going back to warn their competitors,
but hurried on.
White Horse is a busy little town on the west bank of
Fifty-Mile River (also known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the Upper Yukon). There is fairly good hotel
accommodation to be obtained.    Trips to the rapids and
Miles Canyon
|i;||X7X||;:||
§xx- v|^5^?^;ES■
»rx -^mM^2^\.:;^m^m:^^
m7§7-..m7M7,. ■  ■        . ■■■:?&::m ..■ 4m' ■
XX7: mm-m- X;:':';:7XX;:';;X77Xf;7 ■;^;-
"    ft ft. : '      '      '    .        :■.,'    .'.■•
:m- mmm\-s.7{77-,-47- :m mm^s.
-ft- < .'     ft'-ft----     :.■-...     ft ftftft-ft.-. ---.ft,    :   '   ---..  -   - ■■■■■■
-   - i ft:- ft   . ■ - -   -:- ."-- ■ -'      ' ft '■      ft- ■        - ' '   '        -' ft ft K':   .   i --ftft.! > . ft - .   ' ■ ■ --       .ftft. - ft',".
;     .,. ' ■'        - .    '   ft'-.    •   ' .       .   7     . i '        • 7    • ■' i     ,
477t:7m^''mml::mmmmmmm7mmm7':^
i:SfivlS:^fe!;l¥..^;X'l^ -M^-'M^
'Mi::mmm'
wmm mmmMm
:.;.ft>-     .■ .:■ ■ ■ ■ .    "..-    ■   --ft-ft-ft'-■....
......... aift^xix-77-',-^
iii7ii''ii:7^7sii
■.'.->■ ■-..... ■■. -- "■
=|iX«xf7:;:X'
13
White Horse Rapids
 Land of the Unsetting Sun
©A.S.N.
Inland
from
Skagway
other points may be made by automobile
over good roads. It is the terminus of
the railway, and the point of departure
for the steamer trip to Dawson.
The journey from White Horse to Dawson and back, one that can be made in
about a week, is the fitting climax to the
trip ''inside.''    White Horse is the present
head of navigation on the Yukon waterway  (the river in its upper reaches is
really a system of tributaries),  which
empties  into  the  sea  at  St.  Michael,
Alaska, over 2,000 miles distant.   It is a
constantly changing succession of pictures
—rolling  hills,   sometimes  bare,   again
heavily    wooded,    towering    mountain
ranges, awe-inspiring rapids, with now
and then a quiet stretch of water between forested banks.   Here and there is
an occasional trading-post, or a mining
camp—perhaps   the   ghost   of   a   dead
"bonanza"—or    a    hermit    settlement
where the steamer stops to "wood-up."
Lake Lebarge, a beautiful widening of
the stream (on whose shores, incidentally,
occurred the episode that inspired Robert
Service's celebrated poem about the cremation  of  Sam  McGee),  Hootalinqua,
Little Salmon, and Carmacks, with its
coal mine, are some of the interesting
places passed.   The  shooting  of  Five-
Finger Rapids, and their postscript Rink
Rapids, gives plenty of thrill to even the
most jaded.    At Yukon  Crossing,  the
overland winter trail to Dawson, used
when the river is frozen up, is passed, and
then Fort Selkirk—an important trading-
centre founded in 1898 as a militia post to
guard gold shipments.
One of the most extraordinary sights of
the river trip, if you are so fortunate as
to see it, is a herd of caribou swimming
Caribou swimming the Yukon
©F.N.
14
 The Unsetting Sun
On the 21st of June,
Dawson has 22 hours of
sunshine and two hours
of twilight. Approximately 114 days in the
mid-summer months
have no real night. On
the contrary, the sun is
out of sight from December 5th until January 6th, and December
21st has 18 hours of
darkness and six of twilight.
Dawson City
the Yukon River. The answer to the riddle, "Why should a
caribou swim the river?" is precisely the same as to the other
historic one about the chicken crossing the road; but often
the caribou number hundreds, and even thousands. For the
past four or five years, practically every Dawson steamer
in the months of July and August has passed within reach of
this unique spectacle, and on the opposite page we show a
photograph of the migration.
The mouths of mighty tributaries are passed, amongst
them White River—the only large river that enters the
Yukon from the west or south—and Stewart River, entrance
to the new Mayo silver-lead camp 175 miles east. Smaller
steamers ply the Stewart as far as Mayo, whence it is a case
of "packing in." Swede Creek has a Government Experimental Agricultural Station, and then we are at Dawson.
The trip from White Horse takes about two days—the return trip, owing to the current, about four days.
Dawson, once the focus of the world's greatest gold rush,
the headquarters of the whole Klondike region, is now hardly
more than a shadow of its former glory. Mining operations
are still in progress, but they are carried on under hydraulic
and dredging conditions; the picturesque days of which one
reads in Service and Jack London have departed. Gone
with them are the highly colored, sensational chapters of
Dawson's history, when the city was the rendezvous of
0mwWmWs
Summit W. P. & Y. Ry.
outlaws as well as greed-crazed miners, when dance halls,
saloons and gambling places ran wide open for the full twenty-
four hours. But to be able to recall that "them was the
days" makes one a real old-timer, a sourdough—but not
necessarily a more than middle-aged man.
Dawson is the administrative centre of the Yukon Territory, and the headquarters of a large detachment of that
fine body of men, the Mounted Police. It is beautifully
situated on a bend of the Yukon River, up-to-date, well-
built, with comfortable hotels, fine homes and gardens.
Over good roads one can visit mining plants and old,
played-out but famous bonanza claims. The Indian village
of Moosehide, and the fox farms, are worth a visit; while the
old cabin of Robert W. Service, the poet-laureate of the
Northland, is the objective of many pilgrimages.
BOOKS ABOUT THE NORTHLAND
A great many interesting books can be obtained about Alaska and the Yukon.
By all means, read some before you start. There are the well-known stories
by Rex Beach—"The Spoilers," "The Barrier," and "The Silver Horde;"
Jack London's famous "Call of the Wild," and many others; Elizabeth Robins'
"Magnetic North" and "Come and Find Me;"* James Oliver Curwood's
"Alaskan;" Edison Marshall's "Seward's Folly;" and Robert W. Service's
4' Trail of Ninety-Eight.''
Service's poems, "Songs of a Sourdough" and "Ballads of a Cheechako,"
are, we imagine, so well known as hardly to need mention.
15
 ' V** Mr
Beautiful Lake Atlin
©G.M.T.
"Ben-my-Chree" Homestead
©G.M.T.
16
Lake Atlin
West Taku Arm
To Atlin is another delightful excursion from Skagway,
either as a side trip on the Dawson trip or as one in itself.
The route is the same as before to Carcross, but here the
commodious steamer Tutshi is taken, through a chain of
sapphire lakes, mountain-girt and forest-guarded.
The steamer first crosses Lake Nares, and then through
the narrows enters Tagish Lake, horseshoe-shaped and
guarded by high peaks. Old mining towns and fox farms
are seen along the way. Presently we turn into the Taku
Arm of the lake, a beautiful sheet of water encompassed
by the most inspiring scenery, and then into Taku Inlet
as far as Taku Landing. Here, where a wonderful view
may be obtained of Jubilee Mountain, to the north, a
transfer is made across a three-mile neck of land by an
unique little train.
At the end of the portage we reach Lake Atlin, and
board the twin-screw motorship Tarahne for a six-mile
run to the little town of Atlin. Near the boat landing,
and facing the lake, is the Atlin Inn, built and maintained
for tourists by the White  Pass and Yukon Route.
The principal event of the trip to Atlin is the afternoon
excursion on the steamer Tarahne. For about forty miles
the boat winds its way through the narrow mountain-
ribbed passage of the West Channel. The boat then
passes out through Copper Island Narrows, and the return is made down the other side of these islands on Lake
Atlin, where a magnificent view is obtained of the huge
Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast Range.
When the water is smooth, as it generally is, and on its
surface are mirrored the vari-colored verdure-clad hills
and snow-crowned mountains with their cathedral-like
spires, the scene is of sublime beauty and grandeur.
West Taku Arm
Another beautiful scenic trip is that to the West Taku
Arm, which has been especially designed for passengers
who are making the round trip from Vancouver to Skagway and back on the same steamship. It gives these passengers an opportunity of seeing a maximum number of
points ol interest in the short time at their disposal. It
is a journey which takes the visitor into the very heart of
primeval surroundings, where giant mountains raise their
lofty peaks from the glittering glacial waters of the Arm,
which ends at what might be termed the "back door" of
the Taku Glacier.
The route followed is the same as to Atlin, except that
at Golden Gate, instead of turning into the Taku Inlet,
the steamer continues a southerly course and then west,
reaching West Taku Arm Landing and Ben-My-Chree
homestead. Passengers sleep on board and reach Car-
cross in the morning in time to catch the southbound train
and their "Princess" steamer.
 CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga K. A. Cook, Gen. Agt. Pass, Dept.404 C. & S. Nat 1 Bk. Bldg.
Banff, Alta J. A. McDonald, Dist. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Boston, Mass L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, N.Y W. P. Wass, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.|  160 Pearl St.
Calgary, Alta . G. D. Brophy, Dist. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111 T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio M E. Malone, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas, Texas H. C. James, Dist. Pass. Rep'tive 1212 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit, Mich G. G. McKay, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.... 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Fort William, Ont H. J. Skynner, City Pass. Agent 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont W. C. Tully, City Pass. Agent 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S .... A. C. MacDonald, City Pass. Agent 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig, City Pass. Agent Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T.H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill, Agent
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris, City Pass. Agent  709 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson, Agent
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch, City Pass. Agent 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum, City Pass. Agent 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis F. T. Sansom, City Pass. Agt. Soo Line. 108 E. Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 611 2nd Ave. South
Tvyr™+™«i o„« /P' E. Gingras, Dist. Pass. Agent Windsor Station
Montreal, Que ^ c Lydonj Gen. Agt Pass# Dept 201 St. James St. W.
Moose Jaw, Sask T. J. Colton, Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson, B.C N. J. Lowes, City Pass. Agent Baker and Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y..... .J.E.Roach, Act. Gen.Agt. Rail Traffic. Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont R. Y. Daniaud, Dist. Pass. Agent 87 Main Street West
Ottawa, Ont J. A. McGill, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont J. Skinner, City Pass. Agent 343 George St.
Philadelphia, Pa J. C. Patteson, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. A. Shackelford, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 338 Sixth Ave.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 148A Broadway
Prince Rupert, B.C.. .W. L. Coates, General Agent
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept., Palais Station
Regina, Sask J. W. Dawson, Dist. Pass. Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John, N.B C. B Andrews, Dist. Pass. Agent 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo Geo. P. Carbrey, Gen. Agt Pass. Dept 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W.H.Lennon,Gen.Agt.Rail Traffic.Soo Line.. .Fourth & Cedar
San Francisco, Cal F. L. Nason, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 675 Market St.
Saskatoon, Sask R. T. Wilson, City Ticket Agent 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. J. O. Johnston, City Pass. Agent 529 Queen Street
Seattle, Wash E. L. Sheehan, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier, City Pass. Agent 91 Wellington St. North
Skagway, Alaska. L. H. Johnston, Agent
Spokane, Wash E. S. McPherson, Spokane Internl. Ry Old Nat. Bank Bldg.
Tacoma, Wash City Pass. Agent 1113 Pacific Ave.
Trt,™,+« r»„+ /W. Fulton, Asst. Gen. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Building
loronto, unt jQ B Burpee> Dist Pass> Agent Canadian Pacific Building
Vancouver, B.C F. H. Daly, Dist. Pass. Agent 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria, B.C L. D. Chetham, Dist. Pass. Agent 1102 Government St.
Washington, D.C C.E.Phelps.Gen.Agt.Pass.Dept. .14th & New York Ave.,N.W.
Windsor, Ont W. C. Elmer, City Pass. Agent... 142 Ouellette Ave.
Winnipeg, Man E. A. McGuinness, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp, Belgium E. Schmitz 25 Quai Jordaens
Belfast, Ireland .F. Bramley.. .* 14 Donegal Place
Birmingham, Engld... W. T. Treadaway  4 Victoria Square
Bristol, England,.....A. S. Ray '.-.. . .18 St. Augustine's Parade
Brussels, Belgium..... G. L. Servais .98 Blvd. Adolphe»Max
Dublin, Ireland...... .A. T. McDonald -...'."..'.. 44 Dawson St.
Glasgow, Scotland... .C. L. Crowe   25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg, Germany. .T. H. Gardner.  Alsterdamm 9
Liverpool, England H. T. Penny Pier Head
t ™a™ t?»~i„~a       /G. E. Jenkins   62 Charing Cross
London, England.....|GgaxonJones    103 Leadenhall St.
Manchester, England.. R. L. Hughes 31 Mosley St.
Paris, France A. V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
Rotterdam, Holland. .J. Springett ,-; Coolsingel No. 91
Southampton, Engld.. H. Taylor    ",  ^Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong, China A. M. Parker, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept .. .Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe, Japan B. G. Ryan, Passenger Agent .7 Harimamachi
Manila, P.I J. R. Shaw, Gen. Agt 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai, China G. E. Costello, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept  No. 4 The Bund
Yokohama, Japan E. Hospes, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept  .21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, ETC.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand, Union
House, Sydney, N.S.W.   A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for
New Zealand, 32-34 Quay St., Acukland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A..Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.   Tu-oiurmimo (!*• ^- Boyer, Pass'r. Rep.,
Auckland, N.Z. UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z. (Ltd.)   M^Pourne' C.P.R., 59 William St.
Brisbane, Qd.. .Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.   _      ''" V IJJ1110!1 S'?jC?f of ^:S' (f ^
nu • .„i „„;%, Perth,W.A..Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Chnstzchurch,    Uniongs>Co ofN z (Ud }    Sova Fiji    Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z. .UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.{Ltd.) n <f. W.   )Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Fremantle,W.A.Macdonald,Hamilton&Co. w   "       '   fj. T. Campbell, Trav. Pass.
Hobart, Tas... .UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.) Wellington, Agt#> c p R ? u JohAston SL
Launceston,Tas.UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)       rimI' (Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques—
Good the World Over
 ALASKA
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
 .LASKA
ritish Columbia
oast Service
Princess
Steamships
 if Location of Canadian Pacific Hotels
From
Seattle
Victoria
Vancouver
via
Alert Bay
Prince
Rupert
Ketchikan
Wrangell
Taku
Glacier
Juneau
to
Skagway
and
return
by the
"Inside
Passage"
Alaska » Yukon
liKlMlX:
Taku Glacier
To
Alaska and back by the Inside
Passage is a two-thousand mile nine-day
journey from Vancouver, with six ports of
call. During the summer months the
Canadian Pacific assigns for this service
the finest units of its well-known "Princess" fleet. All staterooms are outside
rooms—light, cozy and well ventilated.
Public rooms—dining room, observation
room, lounges, smoking room—are bright,
cheerful and charmingly furnished. All
ships have dance floors and carry dance
orchestras.
Alaska is a land of gold, of flowers, of
fox farms, salmon, Indians and totem
poles. Its scenery is of a character unknown elsewhere on this continent. For
four days the steamer threads the long,
almost land-locked "Inside Passage,"
winding through mountain-hemmed fiord-
like waterways, with wooded islands, tremendous glacier-clad peaks, fascinating
Alaskan towns and queer old settlements
as continuous episodes. No water journey
in America can quite compare in scenery
with the trip to Alaska.
SEE THE CANADIAN ROCKIES EN ROUTE
PRINTED IN CANADA
 An authentic photograph of the "Trail of '98"
As early as 1861 gold discoveries were made in
the Stikine River, and from 1866 to 1887 some
gravels of value were found at many places along or
tributary to the Yukon River. The location of the
first Klondike claim in August, 1896, was followed
by a feverish and picturesque rush, the like of
which the world has never seen before or since, and
the mines in American territory were temporarily
deserted.
The Yukon is a "placer" mining district: that is,
the gold is found in alluvial gravels, and is obtained
by assorting the gravels in water. Frequently
these deposits are along the hollows of river beds,
but they are also found at higher altitudes, in terraces that formerly were the beds of streams that
have changed their courses.   In the latter case,
instead of being worked in the creek or sluice, the
gold deposits are first washed down by powerful
jets of water projected by hose lines, and so into
the sluices.
The Bonanza was the greatest of the Klondike
creeks, and its tributary, the Eldorado Creek, the
richest, probably surpassing any known placer
deposit. The Klondike output reached its climax
in 1900, with a production of $22,000,000, but has
since then declined. Besides gold, silver mining
has been developed in the Yukon, an outstanding
example being the silver-lead mine near Mayo.
Placer gold was discovered at Juneau in about
1880, but the present mines there are quartz mines
—that is, the gold is found in rocks, which must be
crushed.
 Photographs
in this booklet are
copyright as
follows:
©a . s. n .—Associated
Screen News Ltd.,
Montreal.
©f.n. — Frederick
Niven, Nelson, B.C.
©G.M.T—G.M.Taylor, Atlin, B.C.
©w.c.a. — Western
Canada Airways.
A "pan" valued at $1,000!
It came as a whip to men's greed and a challenge to
men's courage, that first ringing call of the Northland.
Until then—a little over thirty years ago—Alaska was
almost unknown, a white space on the map over which was
shakily scrawled "Come-and-find-me." That is, to most
of the world; for the Northland had even then its pioneers,
its prospectors, who had fished its teeming coasts, trapped its furs, started small towns, and panned the first
coarse colorings of gold along its creeks. But outside of
these sturdy old-timers Alaska, with its side-partner, the
Yukon, was hardly more than a geographical curiosity—
a huge, unpopulated, unexplored block of land over three-
quarters of a million square miles in size, forming the
northern tip of the American continent.
But the discovery of gold in the Klondike in 1896, in
such vast quantities as to astound humanity, let loose so
much sensation that overnight the new bonanza became
almost the most famous place on earth. That feverish
stampede to the north (one does not have to be very
middle-aged to remember it) was like nothing that
had ever happened before, or that has ever happened
since.
Back in '98 someone took a photograph of an everyday
scene in the White Pass. It shows, struggling over the
steep, dangerous snow-clad wastes, a thin black streak
nearly two miles long—a streak composed entirely of
men, mushing "inside" to the Klondike, with nearly 600
miles travel ahead of them, and treading so close to one
another in the narrow trail that they very nearly kicked
the previous man's ankles. And this was an everyday
scene—happening all the time.
They had their hardships, those early days, before the
railway was built, and when cheechako and sourdough
alike had to travel that arduous path over the Chilkoot
Pass (or later, the White Pass) and down the Yukon
River. Greed pulled them forward; the crowd behind
pressed them onwards; if they could not endure the strain
they fell out and perished. There was no turning back.
It was truly no place for weaklings, for one was beset not
only by a hostile Nature, but also by the wickedness and
depravity of mankind.
The Northland put a spell on those who made its
acquaintance then. It will put the same spell on us today. It is a land of mystery—a magnet that will always
draw men and women, even though the lure of the gold is
fainter now. It is still a land of romance, its atmosphere
impregnated with memories of those sad, glad days when
the century was just turning over. Gold has ceased to be
its principal advantage—has, indeed, proved a false hope
in those many ghost-like "cities" that parade their empty
shells from Dyea to Nome; but there is equally the romance of to-morrow, the discovery of other and richer resources, the development of a vigorous, prosperous
northern empire.
 Aerial view of Vancouver
©W.C.A.
Victoria, showing the Empress Hotel
©W.C.A.
Totem Poles
The totem poles of the Indians of British
Columbia constitute one of the most striking
features of the whole northwest coast. These
remarkable carvings should not be mistaken
for idols or deities. They are pictorial records of history and mythology, as the
Indians understand them. Some of them
represent the Raven, the Eagle, the Killer-
whale and the Wolf, which are the emblems
of the largest social groups in the nation.
The Bear, the Frog, the Sea-Lion, the Beaver,
the Thunder-Bird, and many others are the
crests of various clans. Here we have to do only
with coats-of-arms.    (See photo next page.)
Vancouver
Victoria
The voyage to Alaska can be divided into
two parts. From Vancouver to Ketchikan the
journey is mostly through narrow channels,
with steep shores heavily timbered to the
water's edge. The second part, from Ketchikan to Skagway, is through wider stretches of
water, with glaciers, waterfalls, and rugged
mountains on either side, and richly colored
with the purple twilights of Alaska.
The Princess steamship slips away from
Vancouver on its four-day northbound trip
at 9.00 o'clock at night, when the long summer dusks have begun to darken. After
trunks have been stowed and opened, dining
room reservations made, and casual first
impressions formed of one's fellow-travellers,
there is still time for a stroll up and down
deck before turning in. By this time the
ship has left Burrard Inlet, passed Brockton
Point, and has entered the Gulf of Georgia.
On the right is still to be seen the dark bulk
of the mainland; on the left, but invisible
yet, is Vancouver Island, in whose lee the
route is sheltered for over two hundred miles.
The course is south of long, narrow Texada
Island and through Discovery Passage,
between that island and Vancouver Island.
The early risers—and they only—will see
Seymour Narrows, for this, the narrowest
part of the channel, is passed about 6.00 a.m.
An hour or so later the ship passes through
Johnstone Straits and Broughton Straits,
along whose shores a number of logging
camps can be seen. And then after breakfast
we reach our first stop, Alert Bay.
 Totem Poles at Alert Bay
Alert Bay
Prince Rupert
You'll enjoy all types of deck sports
Alert Bay is a small village on a small island—Cormorant
Island—situated so close to Vancouver Island that the maps
are almost unable to make any distinction; but it is nevertheless one of the principal salmon canneries on the Coast.
Here, in fact, will be our first glimpse of this important industry, and during the time in port the canneries invite
visitors to inspect the highly interesting processes of turning
a large, handsome salmon into shiny little round cans. Alert
Bay is an old settlement, with a considerable Indian population; and here, too, we make our first contact with another
object typical of the Northland—the totem pole. (See
"Totem Poles.") The Indian cemetery, with some modern
poles, is well worth the short stroll to see it.
After lunch we leave the shelter of Vancouver Island,
reaching Queen Charlotte Sound—with its short experience
of open Pacific Ocean. From Cape Scott, on Vancouver
Island, to Cape St. James, at the southern end of the Queen
Charlotte Islands, is about 150 miles; but we bear away from
that wild and rather primitive group, and keep instead close
inland, reaching Calvert Island in three hours—the longest
of the three times we shall see the wide horizon of the open
Pacific Ocean during the entire trip.
Passing through Lama Passage, Bella Bella is on the left
—a very old and practically deserted Indian village. At
10.00 at night, or so, we enter Old Ocean again, this time at
Millbank Sound, but only for ten miles, "and so" (as Samuel
Pepys says) "to bed."
Entering the Tolmie Channel, between Princess Royal
Island and the mainland, we pass Swanson Bay in the night,
and then enter Grenville Channel, in the shelter of 60-mile-
long Pitt Island. At about breakfast time we pass the mouth
of the Skeena River, and shortly, with Digby Island on the
west, on which may be seen the Canadian Government
wireless station, arrive at about 9.00 a.m. at Prince
Rupert.
Prince Rupert is the most northerly city of any size in
Canada, with a population of about 7,000. Built on a circle
of hills formed of very hard rock, the city is considerably
above the level of the wharf and is reached by a long staircase. It is a very important fishing centre and a big cold
storage plant is located in the Upper Harbor. The visitor
will probably be interested, during his stay on shore, in the
fur stores of the city—the first sight he will obtain of the
great fur industry of the Northland.
 wmm&mmmimy
Ketchikan, most prosperous town in Alaska
Ketchikan
Wrangell
and
Taku
Glacier
Shortly after leaving Prince Rupert, the old Indian village
of Metlakatla is passed. Here is a very successful mission
for the natives, founded by Father Duncan. About 30
minutes later, Port Simpson is passed—one of the oldest
settlements in Northern British Columbia, with an old
Hudson's Bay Company's post that has been a trading-centre
with the Indians for about sixty years.
About three hours after leaving Prince Rupert, Green
Island Lighthouse indicates our nearness to the international
boundary line between Canada and Alaska (United States).
Dixon's Entrance, last entrance of the open Pacific Ocean, is
crossed, and we wind our way through Revilla Gigedo Channel—here called Tongas Narrows—to Ketchikan.
Ketchikan (an Indian word meaning "the town under the
eagle") is the southernmost town in Alaska, situated on
Revilla Gigedo Island. It might also be said to be now
the most prosperous town in Alaska, for salmon and halibut
have made it rich and given it large canneries and cold
storage plants. It is also a mining centre for copper, gold,
platinum, silver and lead, the well-known Salt Chuck platinum mines being within 30 miles. Ketchikan has a bustling
air, with hotels, stores and banks. Originally an Indian fishing
camp, it has several large canneries, and a great mosquito
fleet of fishing vessels is continually bringing in fish.
The visitor will find interesting curio stores. There is
also a pleasant walk to the waterfall in Ketchikan Creek
(about 15 minutes), where in the late summer months thousands of salmon may be seen leaping and struggling through
the rushing, foaming water on their way to the spawning
banks. There are two splendid totem poles—the Chief
Johnson totem, surmounted by Kajuk, a fabled bird of the
mountain which amuses itself by throwing rocks at ground
hogs, with below the Raven and the Frog Woman with her
children, the Salmon; and the Kyan totem, surmounted by
the Crane, followed by the Kyak, another legendary bird,
and the Bear.
A distinct change of scenery occurs from now on. I he
stretches of water become wide, and mountains rise on either
side, with waterfalls tumbling down and glaciers crowning
their crests. The steamer winds along Clarence Strait,
with Prince of Wales Island on the west, and turning round
between Etolin and Zarembo Islands reaches Wrangell
about 4.00 a.m., and leaves before breakfast time. We shall,
however, have ample time to visit it when southbound.
Wrangell, situated on the island of the same name, is one
of the oldest cities of Alaska, and is named after Baron Wrangell, who was governor about 1830. It was originally a trading post, populated mainly by Indians under the protection
 A close up of Taku Glacier
©A.S.N.
of the Russians, but came under white dominance during the
gold rush of '98. Part of the Russian fort still remains, and
there are also some very old totem poles near the wharf.
Wrangell is at the mouth of the Stikine River, which,
navigable for about 170 miles, is the entry point to the
celebrated Cassiar big-game country.
Two hours after leaving Wrangell the ship enters Wrangell
Narrows, and for twenty miles proceeds at half-speed through
this narrow, winding channel of a remarkable beauty. Well
marked with buoys and beacons, this passage between the
wooded islands saves a long detour around Cape Decision.
At the north end of the Narrows lies the old town of Petersburg, whose name indicates its origin in the days of the
Russian regime. It is now a flourishing fishing centre.
Kupreanof Island is on the west, and after crossing Frederick
Sound and Cape Fanshaw, we enter Stephen's Passage.
We are now surrounded by the typical grandeur of Alaska
and, turning up Taku Inlet, the Taku Glacier sends out
hundreds of odd-shaped ice floes to meet us—as blue as
indigo, floating by to melt gradually in warmer waters, as
slowly the steamer approaches this famous sight. This
glacier, a mile wide and 100 feet thick, extends for over 90
miles back over the mountains to join Llewellyn Glacier at
the head of Atlin Lake.    It really is two glaciers, one—a
mixture of brown, white, and blue colors—"dead" and receding, the other very much alive and continually moving
forward. Showing all the colors of the rainbow, according
to the time of day or position of the sun, huge masses of ice
frequently break off into the sea, with deafening thunder,
and float majestically away. Even the vibration caused by
the ship's whistle will bring down great hundreds-of-tons
pieces of ice.
Glaciers
Along or near the Inside Passage to Alaska, or round
Atlin Lake, many magnificent glaciers are to be seen.
A glacier is, broadly speaking, an accumulation of ice, of
sufficient size and weight to flow down from a snow-covered
elevation. It is a river flowing from a lake, only the lake is
of snow and the river of ice. The thickness of the ice will
vary greatly—it may be, under favorable conditions, as
much as 1,000 feet.
Glaciers frequently extend far below the snow line of the
region. Exactly how a glacier moves has never been satisfactorily explained, but that it does move has been proved
by observation and calculations; more than that, the stream
at the centre of a glacier moves much faster than at the sides
or bottom.
 II xx
All ships have dance orchestras
An "unlisted" passenger
:   V"; :   '   ' •   " • '"   '■   7    ■' .....     ' '   :"'';"''      ■■:        -^    " '    -   .       :: :  .'ft  ■  m '^
A Canadian Pacific "Princess" steamship
Typical stateroom
CANADIAN      PACIFIC
Private Bath
"PRINCESS"     STEAMSHIPS
A Dining Room—cool and spacious
The mountain-guarded Inside Passage
 Juneau
Skagway
Juneau—capital of Alaska
Three hours' steaming up Gatineau Channel brings us to
Juneau, clinging to the base and sides of Mount Juneau,
which towers 3,500 feet almost perpendicularly above, near
the mouth of the Taku River. Juneau, named after its
French-Canadian founder, is the capital of Alaska, the residence of the Governor, and the seat of all government
departments. With a population of about 4,000, it is a
bright and interesting city, built (like so many of these coast
settlements) partly on piles over the water, partly on bare
rock, with modern hotels and stores, and many attractive
residences and public buildings.
The Territorial Museum in the Arctic Brotherhood Hall
has a wonderful collection of Alaska curiosities; on the floor
below is the experimental salmon hatchery. Fine raw fur
stocks can be seen at local dealers. Juneau has good roads
and automobiles a-plenty; one particularly interesting ride
is to the face of the Mendenhall Glacier (2J^ hours return) or
to Auk Lake (an hour longer). A short hike away is the
Gold Creek Basin, the site of the first placer gold strike
in Alaska, made by Joe Juneau and Richard Haines in the
early eighties.
Within a short distance from Juneau, but reached by
launch, are Thane and Douglas, where, until some time after
the Great War, three of the largest low-grade gold-crushing
plants in the world were situated. Now only one remains,
the Alaska Juneau, with a mining and milling capacity of
about 9,000 tons of ore daily. On Douglas Island are the old
buildings of the celebrated Treadwell Mine, flooded by a
cave-in in 1917, and not operated since.
The steamer leaves Juneau at midnight, and reaches
Skagway about 9.00 a.m.; but on the southbound journey
there is ample opportunity to see the beautiful Lynn Canal,
which, with the possible exception of the Taku Glacier,
provides the most wonderful scenery of all. For over 80
miles we steam up this arm of the sea, which varies in width
from one to five miles. Mountains of rock capped with snow,
towering glaciers and gushing waterfalls, canyons of all
sizes and wild shapes, and colors in restless variety surround
us. Davidson Glacier is a huge ice wall seen on the west.
Passing the town of Haines and Fort Seward, we suddenly
turn a point to see Skagway ahead of us.
10
 Skagway, the end of the northbound run, is a town that has loomed
large in the history of the North. When the gold rush started to the
Yukon in 1896, the landing was made at Dyea, which lies on the western
branch of the Lynn Canal, and the trail inland led over the dangerous
Chilkoot Pass; but word came of the discovery of the White Pass, and
in a day fifteen thousand people left Dyea, and in a day Skagway arose
where before was chiefly swamp.
At the height of the gold rush, Skagway was one of the wildest, wickedest places on earth, chockfull of the gambling halls, dance halls, saloons
and other lurid temptations that nowadays can be seen nowhere else but
in the "movies." Gangs of "bad men" terrorized the town, preying
not only on the returning successful prospector but on the incoming
"cheechako" as well. Skagway is not such an ancient town but that
old-timers can regale you with stories of its celebrated characters, such
as Soapy Smith or Frank Reid, whose graves nearby will initiate many
reminiscences. But those days are over. Skagway is a model of propriety, with hotels, stores, and the peaceful air of ordinary business.
Amongst the marvels of Skagway—to those at least who have never
considered Alaska as aught but perpetual winter—are its beautiful
flower gardens. The background of mountains that enclose it like a cup
offer many attractive outings, such as "hikes" along the Skagway River,
to Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove, or the great Denver Glacier. There
are fine launch trips available, and good fishing. The steamer lays over
about 36 hours before starting on its southbound journey.
Alaskan blooms
Flowers
Alaska is a land of contrasts. Never
was so mistaken an idea as that it is all
winter. If it were, whence come the
gorgeous, vivid flower gardens that one
sees everywhere, such masses of color
that they dazzle the eye ? The answer
is simple: the warm Japan current, striking Vancouver Island, is deflected northward, and carries to the Land of the Midnight Sun the same delightful humidity
that the Pacific Coast knows.
11
 Inland from Skagway
■mm.- -^;
m
The
White
Pass
Lake
Bennett
White
Horse
Dawson
Interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit would be
incomplete without a journey to the equally interesting and
fascinating "inside." Such a journey, difficult as it was in
the early days of the gold rush, can now be easily undertaken,
for Skagway is the southern terminus of the rail line of
the White Pass and Yukon Route. A comfortable train,
with large-windowed observation cars, will carry one
through the magnificent scenery of the White Pass into the
Yukon Territory, connecting at Carcross and at White
Horse with the commodious steamers of the same company.
For those who are returning south by the same "Princess"
steamship, there are available the excursions to West Taku
Arm or to White Horse. For those waiting over until the
next steamship there is the trip to Atlin Lake—where, indeed, many visitors linger much longer than such a brief
visit. A description of these beautiful trips will be found on
page 16. But for those with more time, we will continue on
to White Horse, whence there is the wonderful trip down
the Yukon River to Dawson.
The rail journey is a most spectacular one. The salt tang
of the sea is left behind and the sweetness of lake and moun-
Boundary between British
Columbia and Alaska
tain air fills the nostrils. The scenery grows rugged and
awe-inspiring. We climb steadily around gorges, along the
brink of deep canyons, past roaring cataracts, and near dead
cities to which cling memories of the trail of '98. Such
names as "Dead Horse Gulch" and "Log Cabin" help
vividly to recall those grim days.
At White Pass Summit—nearly 3,000 feet higher than
Skagway in twenty miles—we leave American territory,
and the scarlet-coated Mounted Policeman greets us as we
enter Canada. A bronze monument, where the flags of the
two countries float side by side, marks the boundary line.
For a very short distance we travel through British Columbia, and then at Pennington cross into the Yukon Territory.
On our left, Lake Bennett begins—a long, narrow body of
water which the railway will follow for twenty-six miles. It
is rather amazing to learn that Bennett, where a stop is made
for lunch, and which consists merely of a station and its
outbuildings, once had a population of several thousand, and
teemed with life and excitement. For it was to this beautiful lake, bounded by old-rose color, that the "Trail of '98"
12
 lili
S.S. "Whitehorse"
in the
Five Finger Rapids
led. Those who had survived the epic hazards of the Pass
camped on this lake, and whipsawed lumber to make the
rafts, scows and other manner of water craft in which to
reach the golden land of their hopes. Little did they know,
of course, the perils of the White Horse Rapids, or if they
had heard of them, little did they appreciate them.
Along the ever-winding shores of this blue Lake Bennett,
looking out on a long mountain ridge, the railway runs, until
the little town of Carcross is reached. There is an Indian
school nearby, and interesting fox ranches, and in the
cemetery are buried many of the discoverers of the
Klondike.
Lewes and other little lakes are passed and then Miles
Canyon and White Horse Rapids. On still days, the roar
of these rapids can be heard even in the town, about an hour's
walk distant. As we stand on the brink of this famous
gorge, no very highly colored imagination is necessary to
conjure up pictures of the old days. We can imagine the
bold adventurers in their frail craft nearing these death-
dealing rapids, whose waters are thrown from side to side
in a long serpentine series of twists, and which are so troubled
that the water rides higher in the middle than at the sides.
Down they came in their mad rush to the Klondike—not at
intervals, but in a continuous procession that was (in the
words of an eye-witness) like traffic on a city street. Some,
becoming scared, jumped ashore as they saw their dangers,
and watched from the high cliffs the agonies of their
boats; but the majority stayed with their craft. And
so few came through unpunished! Those who did
wasted no time in going back to warn their competitors,
but hurried on.
White Horse is a busy little town on the west bank of
Fifty-Mile River (also known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the Upper Yukon). There is fairly good hotel
accommodation to be obtained.    Trips to the rapids and
Miles Canyon
Kill
lilSI-:
... :
11
ISfllHH
IlflSH
fllllllllXBiS
7§||||||||||
liiftBIt!
XXXilPlilll;
llvilPlllll!
1111
IlKxl
ft-ft.7'
mm-:
mm
xiiiiix
:;" ~llg
13
White Horse Rapids
 Land of the Unsetting Sun
©A.S.N.
Inland
from
Skagway
other points may be made by automobile
over good roads. It is the terminus of
the railway, and the point of departure
for the steamer trip to Dawson.
The journey from White Horse to Dawson and back, one that can be made in
about a week, is the fitting climax to the
trip "inside." White Horse is the present
head of navigation on the Yukon waterway (the river in its upper reaches is
really a system of tributaries), which
empties into the sea at St. Michael,
Alaska, over 2,000 miles distant. It is a
constantly changing succession of pictures
—rolling hills, sometimes bare, again
heavily wooded, towering mountain
ranges, awe-inspiring rapids, with now
and then a quiet stretch of water between forested banks. Here and there is
an occasional trading-post, or a mining
camp—perhaps the ghost of a dead
"bonanza"—or a hermit settlement
where the steamer stops to "wood-up."
Lake Lebarge, a beautiful widening of
the stream (on whose shores, incidentally,
occurred the episode that inspired Robert
Service's celebrated poem about the cremation of Sam McGee), Hootalinqua,
Little Salmon, and Carmacks, with its
coal mine, are some of the interesting
places passed. The shooting of Five-
Finger Rapids, and their postscript Rink
Rapids, gives plenty of thrill to even the
most jaded. At Yukon Crossing, the
overland winter trail to Dawson, used
when the river is frozen up, is passed, and
then Fort Selkirk—an important trading-
centre founded in 1898 as a militia post to
guard gold shipments.
One of the most extraordinary sights of
the river trip, if you are so fortunate as
to see it, is a herd of caribou swimming
Caribou swimming the Yukon
©F.N. '
14
 The Unsetting Sun
On the 21st of June,
Dawson has 22 hours of
sunshine and two hours
of twilight. Approximately 114 days in the
mid-summer months
have no real night. On
the contrary, the sun is
out of sight from December 5th until January 6th, and December
21st has 18 hours of
darkness and six of twilight.
Dawson City
the Yukon River. The answer to the riddle, "Why should a
caribou swim the river?" is precisely the same as to the other
historic one about the chicken crossing the road; but often
the caribou number hundreds, and even thousands. For the
past four or five years, practically every Dawson steamer
in the months of July and August has passed within reach of
this unique spectacle, and on the opposite page we show a
photograph of the migration.
The mouths of mighty tributaries are passed, amongst
them White River—the only large river that enters the
Yukon from the west or south—and Stewart River, entrance
to the new Mayo silver-lead camp 175 miles east. Smaller
steamers ply the Stewart as far as Mayo, whence it is a case
of "packing in." Swede Creek has a Government Experimental Agricultural Station, and then we are at Dawson.
The trip from White Horse takes about two days—the return trip, owing to the current, about four days.
Dawson, once the focus of the world's greatest gold rush,
the headquarters of the whole Klondike region, is now hardly
more than a shadow of its former glory. Mining operations
are still in progress, but they are carried on under hydraulic
and dredging conditions; the picturesque days of which one
reads in Service and Jack London have departed. Gone
with them are the highly colored, sensational chapters of
Dawson's history, when the city was the rendezvous of
I*
Summit W. P. & Y. Ry.
outlaws as well as greed-crazed miners, when dance halls,
saloons and gambling places ran wide open for the full twenty-
four hours. But to be able to recall that "them was the
days" makes one a real old-timer, a sourdough—but not
necessarily a more than middle-aged man.
Dawson is the administrative centre of the Yukon Territory, and the headquarters of a large detachment of that
fine body of men, the Mounted Police. It is beautifully
situated on a bend of the Yukon River, up-to-date, well-
built, with comfortable hotels, fine homes and gardens.
Over good roads one can visit mining plants and old,
played-out but famous bonanza claims. The Indian village
of Moosehide, and the fox farms, are worth a visit; while the
old cabin of Robert W. Service, the poet-laureate of the
Northland, is the objective of many pilgrimages.
BOOKS ABOUT THE NORTHLAND
A great many interesting books can be obtained about Alaska and the Yukon.
By all means, read some before you start. There are the well-known stories
by Rex Beach—"The Spoilers," "The Barrier," and "The Silver Horde;"
Jack London's famous "Call of the Wild," and many others; Elizabeth Robins'
t Magnetic North" and "Come and Find Me;" James Oliver Curwood's
"Alaskan;" Edison Marshall's "Seward's Folly;" and Robert W. Service's
"Trail of Ninety-Eight."
Service's poems, "Songs of a Sourdough" and "Ballads of a Cheechako,"
are, we imagine, so well known as hardly to need mention.
15
 Beautiful Lake Atlin
©G.M.I
"Ben-my-Chree" Homestead
©G.M.T.
16
Lake Atlin
West Taku Arm
To Atlin is another delightful excursion from Skagway,
either as a side trip on the Dawson trip or as one in itself.
The route is the same as before to Carcross, but here the
commodious steamer Tutshi is taken, through a chain of
sapphire lakes, mountain-girt and forest-guarded.
The steamer first crosses Lake Nares, and then through
the narrows enters Tagish Lake, horseshoe-shaped and
guarded by high peaks. Old mining towns and fox farms
are seen along the way. Presently we turn into the Taku
Arm of the lake, a beautiful sheet of water encompassed
by the most inspiring scenery, and then into Taku Inlet
as far as Taku Landing. Here, where a wonderful view
may be obtained of Jubilee Mountain, to the north, a
transfer is made across a three-mile neck of land by an
unique little train.
At the end of the portage we reach Lake Atlin, and
board the twin-screw motorship Tarahne for a six-mile
run to the little town of Atlin. Near the boat landing,
and facing the lake, is the Atlin Inn, built and maintained
for tourists by the White Pass and Yukon Route.
The principal event of the trip to Atlin is the afternoon
excursion on the steamer Tarahne. For about forty miles
the boat winds its way through the narrow mountain-
ribbed passage of the West Channel. The boat then
passes out through Copper Island Narrows, and the return is made down the other side of these islands on Lake
Atlin, where a magnificent view is obtained of the huge
Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast Range.
When the water is smooth, as it generally is, and on its
surface are mirrored the vari-colored verdure-clad hills
and snow-crowned mountains with their cathedral-like
spires, the scene is of sublime beauty and grandeur.
West Taku Arm
Another beautiful scenic trip is that to the West Taku
Arm, which has been especially designed for passengers
who are making the round trip from Vancouver to Skagway and back on the same steamship. It gives these passengers an opportunity of seeing a maximum number of
points of interest in the short time at their disposal. It
is a journey which takes the visitor into the very heart of
primeval surroundings, where giant mountains raise their
lofty peaks from the glittering glacial waters of the Arm,
which ends at what might be termed the "back door" of
the Taku Glacier.
The route followed is the same as to Atlin, except that
at Golden Gate, instead of turning into the Taku Inlet,
the steamer continues a southerly course and then west,
reaching West Taku Arm Landing and Ben-My-Chree
homestead. Passengers sleep on board and reach Car-
cross in the morning in time to catch the southbound train
and their "Princess" steamer.
 CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga .K. A. Cook, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.404 C. & S. Nat 1 Bk. Bldg.
Banff, Alta J. A. McDonald, Dist. Pass. Agt.... .Canadian Pacific Station
Boston, Mass  L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, N.Y W. P. Wass, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 160 Pearl St.
Calgary, Alta G. D. Brophy, Dist. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111  .T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt. Rail Trafiic 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio. M. E. Malone, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas, Texas H. C. James, Dist. Pass. Rep'tive 1212 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit, Mich G. G. McKay, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.... 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent  .Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Fort William, Ont....H. J. Skynner, City Pass. Agent 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont W. C. Tully, City Pass. Agent 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S A. C. MacDonald, City Pass. Agent 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig, City Pass. Agent Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T.H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill, Agent
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris, City Pass. Agent 709 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson, Agent
Kingston, Ont ... J. H. Welch, City Pass. Agent 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum, City Pass. Agent 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis F. T. Sansom, City Pass. Agt. Soo Line. 108 E. Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 611 2nd Ave. South
■\/Tr. 4.     l n /P. E. Gingras, Dist. Pass. Agent Windsor Station
Montreal, Que |F c Lydon> Gen# Agt> Pass> Dept 201 St. James St. W.
Moose Jaw, Sask.. T. J. Colton, Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson, B.C N. J. Lowes, City Pass. Agent Baker and Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y J.E.Roach, Act. Gen.Agt. Rail Traffic.Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont R. Y. Daniaud, Dist. Pass. Agent 87 Main Street West
Ottawa, Ont J. A. McGill, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.. 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont J. Skinner, City Pass. Agent 343 George St.
Philadelphia, Pa J. C. Patteson, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. A. Shackelford, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 338 Sixth Ave.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 148A Broadway
Prince Rupert, B.C.. .W. L. Coates, General Agent
Quebec, Que C, A. Langevin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Palais Station
Regina, Sask. J. W. Dawson, Dist. Pass. Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John, N.B C. B Andrews, Dist. Pass. Agent 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo Geo. P. Carbrey, Gen. Agt Pass. Dept 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W.H.Lennon,Gen.Agt.Rail Traffic.Soo Line.. .Fourth & Cedar
San Francisco, Cal F. L. Nason, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 675 Market St.
Saskatoon, Sask......R. T. Wilson, City Ticket Agent 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. J. O. Johnston, City Pass. Agent 529 Queen Street
Seattle, Wash E. L. Sheehan, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier, City Pass. Agent 91 Wellington St. North
Skagway, Alaska L. H. Johnston, Agent
Spokane, Wash E. S. McPherson, Spokane Internl. Ry.... Old Nat. Bank Bldg.
Tacoma, Wash City Pass. Agent 1113 Pacific Ave.
t„,™+~ n~+ /W. Fulton, Asst. Gen. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Building
loronto, Unt jG R Burpee, Dist. Pass. Agent Canadian Pacific Building
Vancouver, B.C F. H. Daly, Dist. Pass. Agent 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria, B.C L. D. Chetham, Dist. Pass. Agent 1102 Government St.
Washington, D.C C.E.Phelps.Gen.Agt.Pass.Dept. .14th & New York Ave.,N.W.
Windsor, Ont W. C. Elmer, City Pass. Agent 142 Ouellette Ave.
Winnipeg, Man E. A. McGuinness, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp, Belgium E. Schmitz 25 Quai Jordaens
Belfast, Ireland F. Bramley 14 Donegal Place
Birmingham, Engld.. .W. T. Treadaway 4 Victoria Square
Bristol, England A. S. Ray 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Brussels, Belgium G. L. Servais 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
Dublin, Ireland A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
Glasgow, Scotland... C. L. Crowe 25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg, Germany. .T. H. Gardner Alsterdamm 9
Liverpool, England.... H. T. Penny Pier Head
t™a™  t?„«i„„^        JC. E. Jenkins 62 Charing Cross
London, England \Q. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall St.
Manchester, England.. R. L. Hughes 31 Mosley St.
Paris, France A. V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
Rotterdam, Holland. .J. Springett Coolsingel No. 91
Southampton, Engld..H. Taylor Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong, China A. M. Parker, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe, Japan B. G. Ryan, Passenger Agent 7 Harimamachi
Manila, P.I J. R. Shaw, Gen. Agt 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai, China G. E. Costello, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept No. 4 The Bund
Yokohama, Japan E. Hospes, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, ETC.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand, Union
House, Sydney, N.S.W.   A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for
New Zealand, 32-34 Quay St., Acukland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A..Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.   ■Kir0iun..r.no, (H. F. Boyer, Pass'r. Rep.,
Auckland, N.Z. UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)   M^.bourne' C.P.R   59 William St.        ^
Brisbane, Qd... Macdonald, Hamilton&Co.   _      ''' * 7 IJJm°J S'?\C?;of ^:S- £**•>
«,   • . *   m Perth,W.A..Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
C^8.ZhUrCh:. .UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.) ^ Fiji   Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z. .UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.) n |.W.   )Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Fremantle,W.A.Macdonald,Hamilton&Co. w   "       "   (J. T. Campbell, Trav. Pass.
Hobart, Tas... .UnionS.S.Co.of N.Z. (Ltd.) Wellington, I Agt., C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Launceston,Tas.UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)       iN '* (Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques—
Good the World Over
 CANADIAN
PACIFIC
  CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
Hotels of High Standard at Low Cost
PACIFIC COAST
Hotel Vancouver Largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, over-
Vancouver, B.C. looking the Straitof Georgia, and serving equally
the business man and the tourist. Golf, motoring,
fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer excursions.
Open all year.   European plan.
Empress Hotel A luxurious hotel in Canada's Evergreen Play-
Victoria, B.C. ground, which, by its equable climate, has be
come a favorite summer and winter resort.
Motoring, yachting, fishing, shooting and all-
year golf. Crystal Garden for swimming and
music.  Open all year.   European plan.
THE ROCKIES
Emerald Lake Chalet Situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, in picturesque Yoho
a??! ye,A>&T National Park.    Roads and trails to the BurSess Pass, Yoho
Altitude 4,272 feet Valley,  etc    Boatins and  fishing.     Open summer months.
American plan.
Chateau Lake Louise Facing an  exquisite Alpine  lake   in  Banff National  Park.
AU? i°c'!fon « Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips, swimming,
/Altitude 5,080 feet drives or motoring, tennis, boating, fishing in neighbouring
waters.   Open summer months.   European plan.
Banff Springs Hotel In  the   heart  of  Banff  National   Park.     Alpine  climbing,
?i??'j   ?!?c i motoring, golf, bathing, hot sulphur springs, tennis, fishing,
Altitude 4,625 feet boating and riding.   Open summer months.   European plan.
THE PRAIRIES
Hotel Palliser A handsome  hotel of metropolitan standard.    Ideal  head-
Lalgary, Alberta quarters for the business man or the tourist travelling to and
from the  Canadian Rockies,   or beyond.      Open all year.
European plan.
Hotel Saskatchewan In the capital of the Province of Saskatchewan.    Golf and
Kegma, bask, motoring.   Open all year.   European plan.
The Royal Alexandra, A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada, and
Winnipeg, Man. the centre of Winnipeg's social life.   Open all year.   Euro
pean plan.
EASTERN CANADA
Toronto, Ont. The Royal York—The largest hotel  in the British Empire.
Open all year.
Montreal, Que. Place Viger Hotel—A charming hotel in Canada's largest
f.'ty.    Open aljyear.(> Summer port for Canadian Pacific
Duchess    and "Mont" Steamships to Europe.
Quebec, Que. Chateau Frontenac—A metropolitan hotel in the most his
toric and romantic city of all North America. Open all
year. Port for Canadian Pacific "Empress" Steamships to
Europe.
McAdam, N.B. McAdam   Hotel—A   commercial   and   sportsman's   hotel.
Open all year.
St. Andrew's, N.B. The  Algonquin—The social  centre  of  New  Brunswick's
most popular seashore summer resort.   Open summer months.
Digby, N.S. The Pines—Nova Scotia's premier resort hotel.  Golf, tennis,
swimming pool.   Open summer months.
Kentville, N.S. The Corn wall is   Inn—centre for excursions to Evangeline
Land.    Open all year.
Yarmouth, N.S. Lakeside Inn—Designed in attractive bungalow style.   Golf
available for hotel guests.   Open summer months.
Chafes-Bungalow Camps reached by Canadian Pacific
Yoho Valley Field, B.C
LakeWapta   -       - Hector, B.C.
Lake O'Hara Hector, B.C
Radium Hot Springs Rddium B c
Moraine Lake  Moraine Lake. Alta.
Mount Assiniboine Lodge Banff Alta
Castle Mountain Camp -      ....... Castle Mountain,'Alta!
Devil', Gap Camp Kenora, Ont.
French River Camp French River, Ont.
Hote   Sicamous      -       - Sicamous, B.C
Hotel Incola Penticton, Ont.
Harrison Hot Springs Hotel ASassiz, B.C.
Cameron Lake Chalet   -      -      .      ... Cameron Lake (Vancouver Island)' B.C.
OuUe^Uf theiaiuli
of the Sutuujmqht
2000 miles... 9 days
/ALASKA! Enjoy two thousand miles of smooth sailing to and from this land of mystery
and romance . . . cruise from Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle to historic Skagway and back, via the
famous "Inside Passage"! The Canadian Pacific's regular nine-day cruises to Alaska offer you
perfectly-planned adventures to the Land of the Midnight Sun.
A modern Canadian Pacific liner is your home . . . gay with congenial companions and a happy
social life . . . complete with dancing, deck sports, informal parties, and a dazzling panorama of
magnificent scenery. Your itinerary includes awe-inspiring Taku Glacier sparkling like millions
of diamonds in the brilliant sunshine . . . towering mountains with giant trees and glistening
snow . . . avenues of smooth, mirror waters reflecting the rich rays of lingering sunshine . . .
quaint villages perched on rocky cliffs or built on stilts . . . great salmon runs and nearby
canneries; active gold-mines, museums, Indians, totem poles, tremendous flowers, old Russian
landmarks, early Indian trading posts ... places you've read about and wanted to see! And
of course the glorious sun!
Contrasts and beauty, fascination and glamour . . . that is Alaska . . . and these cruises bring
you to Alaska at its best.
Printed in Canada, 1935
Page   One
 .    :  .:...,.::' •    ft : ft     7:777,        '  '■'  !7"!77'
■-. "■ XIXX   /7m7mm7777mmm:--&.7mm4mmm^m.
mmw   mm . . ^7
... CrwsUe Style
Courteous service
H
I ERE is your unique opportunity to enjoy all the fun of an
ideal vacation, plus all the hospitality of a famous service and the
experience of experts in the art of cruising.
The Canadian Pacific "Princess" liners in the Alaska service are
well-equipped to provide the privileges and comforts of cruise-
life. They are under the supervision and management of men with
years of cruise experience . . . part of a service that is world-
renowned for its courtesy and attention to each individual's wants.
The broad decks and public rooms are popular for sports,
games, informal parties. Or, you may relax on deck, bask in
the sun and be invigorated by the tang of ocean breezes. Then,
enjoy the excellent cuisine . . . delicious creations of Canadian
Pacific  master chefs  .   .  .  served  in   congenial   surroundings.
There's an excellent orchestra aboard to provide inspired dance-
music under the twilights of near-midnight sunsets. Last night out
there's a Masquerade Ball ... no ordinary affair when you consider that the merry throng have been under the constant spell of
happy adventure. That glorious, carefree fun should reign supreme
on such a night, in such a setting, is inevitable.
Over the whole scene an experienced master of ceremonies holds
sway, arranges entertainment, makes certain that you enjoy yourself. L
Everyone travels first class.    Everyone has the opportunity to
know everyone else.  Very much after the style of a house party.
Truly, it is a real cruise!
Page   Two
PHOTOGRAPHS IN  THIS BOOKLET ARE
COPYRIGHT AS FOLLOWS:
© A.S.N.-ASSOCIATED SCREEN NEWS,
LIMITED, MONTREAL
© G.M.T.-G. M. TAYLOR, ATLIN
 xi x
1^\
'^
= ."\
■7*;.;,.
7,7,:
An authentic photograph of the historic "Trail of *9B'i
A $1,000 "pan*
Stmama "Doug*.
'98
of the Great Gold Rush
. when Alaska and the Yukon leaped into world prominence as a fabulous land
of wealth that lay in the golden sands of its rushing creeks and rivers . . . when men swarmed
over the snow-packed mountains on a quest wherein the race was to the swift and destruction
stood ever near. Those early-days' scars are still there . . . deserted villages, untravelled trails,
monuments—stray evidence of man and his "cross of gold."
Those exciting days in the Klondike with their bonanzas and their side play on life were amongst
the most amazing in the history of man. The name of the Northland was on millions of lips
throughout the world. Men begged and borrowed the wherewithal to reach its rocky shores
and push into the bonanzas of Dawson Creek and the Klondike. The spell of the land gripped
human souls. Its mystery intrigued men. Its gamble lured the weak as well as the strong. Anyone could play the game. It was "placer" mining for the most part and all one needed was a
pan, patience and luck.  This history of '98 is a most exciting chapter in the history of man.
The fury of '98 is displaced by the allure of '35. Law reigns in the land. The fever has gone
with the fury and the wild days of the Klondike are as dreams of far-off centuries. Yet there
are few who can return to the scene without feeling the same spell in their souls. The spell is
adequately recreated on these Canadian Pacific Alaska cruises . . . even intensified in this
year of '35 when gold is again a universal topic!
Page   Three
 7   "
Two charming hotels
in Canada's
Evergreen
Playground
from Vancouver, Victoria or Seattle
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver
/OUR cruise has a beautiful embarkation point. Either
Vancouver or Victoria, in charming British Columbia, are worthy
of lengthy visits in themselves. They are in the heart of Canada's
Evergreen Playground, and possess every vacation appeal.
Vancouver is built regally on hills which slope down to sheltered
waters. It is Canada's largest Pacific port, and its harbor is busy
with shipping from all parts of the world, and majestic Canadian
Pacific liners sailing frequently to Honolulu, Japan, China and
the Philippines. Ships of the Canadian Australasian Line also
leave Vancouver regularly for Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand
and Australia. Vancouver is active with commerce, lumbering,
mining and manufacturing industries, and its vicinity is a veritable
paradise of resorts and facilities for recreation.
Victoria, on Vancouver Island, is a charming bit of Old England.
Besides boasting splendid Parliament buildings (it is the capital
of British Columbia), it is a city of beautiful homes, parks, boulevards and gardens. The Provincial Museum has a fascinating
exhibit of Indian life and culture on the Pacific Coast. It is a
year-round resort city. Seattle, the third point of possible
embarkation is one of the most progressive cities in the Northwest.
So, no matter where you plan to start your cruise, allow time for
sightseeing.
Departure is in the early evening. First night out you sail through
smooth, protected waters. Sleep like a log. Get up early to
watch your passage through Seymour Narrows, and after breakfast
you go ashore for your first Far North adventure.
Page   Four
 W|*1
|||n.uj!
V     1
1
~^»~~Ag|.
Quaint Totem Poles at Alert Bay
IRST port of call is Alert Bay, an Indian
village, on small Cormorant Island, and
busier little place than you might imagine
from its size. Salmon canneries invite
your inspection and no matter how many
years visitors have been trooping into
these canneries, they manage to make
you feel as though it all exists for the
sole purpose of showing you the secrets
of the trade.
Here is your first experience with those
quaint Totem poles. The Indian cemetery
>Uert BouBr
Prince Rupert
Where Indians and Gold Rushers Lived
offers some excellent specimens. If you don't mind intruding
upon the final resting-place of Red Skin Braves, you will enjoy
browsing among those grotesque exhibits of their ideas—for
all Totem poles have a meaning and tell a story.
After an afternoon hugging the shore and offering a broadside to
the great Pacific Ocean, if you are lucky with your long range
glasses you may pick out great whales at play, spouting like
floating fountains. You creep into the narrow channel again
and spend your second evening watching the sun paint pictures
on the smooth waters ahead. After a night of sweet sleep you
arrive at Prince Rupert, to go ashore immediately after breakfast.
If you are interested in something different in cities, you will
enjoy this visit to the utmost. This bustling community is built on
a circle of rocky hills. You marvel at the persistence of man in
overcoming nature's handicaps. Important as a fishing center and
a fur-trading post, it is Canada's largest Far North city.
Page   Five
 Taku—the Mighty Glacier
On
Ketchikan,WroMtqell
♦ ♦♦
TO ALASKA! After about three hours of cruising
from Prince Rupert, passing en route an ancient Indian village,
an old Hudson's Bay Company trading post, and the international
boundary, your "Princess" liner glides into Ketchikan. This was
an old settlement, whose Indian name connotes "the town under
the eagle."    It is the southernmost town in Alaska.
At Ketchikan you find definite signs of the Far North. Salmon
and halibut support large canneries and cold storage plants.
(During the late summer months, at Ketchikan Creek, you can see
the salmon leaping and fighting their way up to the spawning
banks.) And the harbor is a picturesque haven for a mighty
fleet of small fishing craft. Mining is extensively conducted.
Copper, gold, platinum, silver and lead are all found within a
radius of thirty miles.
There are many little curio shops, hotels, banks, stores—excellent
short trips, including beautiful walks through avenues of giant
trees . . . and an excellent collection of totem poles.
Wrangell, another island village, is the next stop. The stay is short
and early in the morning on the northbound trip. Coming back
you have ample time to explore its attractions.
All the way up from Ketchikan you can see and sense the change
in scenery—wider waters, taller mountains (and many more of
them), waterfalls pounding down the cliffs—bushier, thicker
undergrowth, more abundant wild animal life, fewer settlements
and wilderness that appears almost impassable. Wrangell is an
enchanted little place with many historic landmarks. It was
originally an Indian trading post under Russian rule. The ruins
of an old Russian fort are still to be seen, and some extremely old
totem poles. Your imagination will be stirred by tales of the big
game hunting, for Wrangell is situated at the mouth of the Stikine
River, which is the gateway to the Cassiar big-game country.
"Taku ahead!" The cry is like the call of "curtain" at the theatre.
Everybody runs up front for a point of vantage. As the boat sails
up Taku Inlet, sentinels of oddly-shaped ice-floes come drifting
Page   Six
 XgU^£7
"John fiffirfep
down on their way to warmer waters and oblivion. Soon you see
giant Taku Glacier itself. A mile wide, reaching back over the
mountains for ninety miles, and at least a mile thick, it looms
before you—sinister, yet beautiful beyond compare.
It is really TWO glaciers: the one dead, a mixture of brown,
white and blue colors, hardly moving but always drifting backwards to its mysterious source. And the other alive, the symbol
of power untamed. Its brilliance in the sparkling sunshine rivals
the rainbow, the colors changing with each hour of the day,
according to the angle of the sun's rays. When its edges crumble
and plunge into the water, the effect is as though an artillery
battalion were laying down a terrific barrage. A blast from the
ship's whistle is echoed by deafening roars.
The boat stands by at a safe distance long enough for you to
understand what geologists mean by the glacial age, and although
you will hardly be able to see the movement of the giant, you
can easily understand how such a force, on a rampage, could
carve mountains, valleys, prairies. Certainly there is no resisting
it . . . nor forgetting it!
Page   Seven
 "ft ' :.■ "■ '      '   'ft'
'Princess Charlotte
y»w SMidayMeme 4§Umt
IHE CANADIAN PACIFIC maintains
a year-round steamship service to Alaska,
and during the summer months operates
three of the finest of its "Princess" liners,
all of which are large, modern vessels of
the most comfortable, sea-going type. They
are oil-burners, and equipped with wireless
telegraphy.
The staterooms are comfortable, cozy,
well-ventilated, and designed to accommodate only two passengers per stateroom.
On each ship there are a few de luxe rooms
with private bath-rooms, and also some with
sofa berths.
All ships have large community rooms,
dining saloons, observation rooms, lounges,
smoking rooms, and spacious dance floors.
They are well proportioned and charmingly
furnished. Delicious food, tastefully prepared, with menus remarkable for their
variety, contribute to the distinction of
Canadian Pacific's Alaska Service. In addition to breakfast, luncheon and dinner,
light refreshments are served in the dining
saloon at night.
The "Princess Charlotte" is 330 feet long,
with berthing capacity for 232 persons.
The "Princess Louise" is 317 feet long, with
berthing capacity for 210 persons.
The "Princess Alice" is 289 feet long, with
berthing capacity for 206 persons.
Page   Eight
Page   Nine
 #fffl4*flff
Capital of Alaska — Active city of
gold   mines . . .   Quaint   museum
of far north curiosities.
■ RESH from your Taku adventure, and after three of the fastest
flying hours of your life, wherein one scenic thrill follows another,
you steam into the harbor at Juneau at about 7 p.m. The sun will
still shine for a few hours more, so don't let TIME mislead you!
Juneau is named after its French-Canadian founder, who made the
first Alaskan placer gold strike near the city's site in the early
eighties. It is the capital of Alaska and is the seat of all government departments. It fairly "hangs on" to earth, for right behind it,
Mount Juneau shoots up an almost perpendicular 3,500 feet.
And it offers much to explore. There's the museum in the Arctic
Brotherhood Hall. It contains priceless curiosities: a lamp carved
in stone, old Chinese talisman coins, queer trinkets, skeletons of
first settlers; centuries-old ivory and innumerable evidence of
Indian art and craftsmanship.
In the many stores you will be able to find similar items to bring
home as souvenirs.
Page   Ten
There are many dealers in furs and
bargain signs are everywhere.
Good roads lead inland and there are
any number of "cabbies" who will
take you for a small fare. You can
visit Mendenhall Glacier and go on
further to Auk Lake. Gold Creek
Basin, a short hike from the city, is the
site of Joe Juneau's and Dick Haines'
first gold strike. Launches will take
you to Thane and Douglas, sites of
the largest low-grade gold-crushing
plants in the world, abandoned in
recent years.
 SHm&mmmmtwum
On The Lynn Canal,
Gateway To The Yukon, Northernmost Point
On Your Cruise ...
Alaskan flowers rival tropic blooms
B.
IE out on deck early on the fourth morning for that eighty-mile
sail through the Lynn Canal. It is the "Scenery of the world."
You will be able to see it again on your way back, but there are
artists who have returned for as many as twelve times for these
views. YOU will certainly want to see it twice. And this time
you see it with the aid of early morning stillness and low angle
rays of the rising sun casting magic shadows.
The canal is from one to five miles wide, bordered on both sides
by towering mountains that rise straight to the clouds or bend
away in graceful canyons—sending forth gushing waterfalls from
the snow-capped peaks. They are as full of character as any
mountain range you ever saw. The water itself is the perfect
mirror to which waters are inevitably compared.
Then around a bend—and suddenly, Skagway! Cruise's end .
Tales of Skagway have travelled to the remotest hamlet. It was
Hell's Hole in '98, one of the wildest, wickedest, "open"
gambling, dancing, drinking places on the face of the globe. Old-
timers, some of them not so old at that, will love to tell you of
those old days, including the legends of Soapy Smith or Frank
Reid, whose bodies lie in nearby, well-marked graves.
Page    Eleven
 Inland, frem Skaqumig
Robert W. Service at his cabin in Dawson,
where his Northern poems were written
V.AN ADI AN PACIFIC "Princess" ships in regular service stopover for approximately thirty-six hours in Skagway before commencing their return voyage. Skagway has been from the earliest
gold rush days, the very doorway to the interior. So your time,
your pocket book, and your yearning for adventure must determine
whether you will remain in Skagway, or go inland.
If you do not wish to make side-trips, you may arrange to continue
to live aboard the steamer or in a Skagway hotel, and explore the
immediate vicinity of that fascinating city. And there are many
marvels in Skagway to interest you, not the least of which are
the wild and cultivated flowers and the woods that appear almost
semi-tropical with their dense undergrowth;  proof indeed of the
potency of twenty-hour sunshine. Why, there are gardens in
which pansies measure three and one-half inches in diameter, and
nasturtium vines grow three inches in twenty-four hours! In such a
heavenly spot, enclosed in a background of great snow-ridged
mountains, you can hike along the Skagway River to Fortune Bay,
Smuggler's Cove, or the Great Denver Glacier. Short excursions
by launch vary this attractive programme. The fishing is splendid!
Interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit would be incomplete without a journey to the equally interesting and fascinating interior. Such a journey, difficult as it was in the early
days of the gold rush, can now be easily undertaken, for Skagway
is the southern terminus of the White Pass and Yukon Route.
Page   Twelve
 s,xaxixBii
wmmmmm
ft^ftftSftiftftft   ftftft.:.ftft;w'ft!(K
mm:m
m?mm
■ifeli
11S11I1I
'<777m,,,, '-■■
f»7;7;;,::::.7ft'-'
1:;<:X.XX7;
mM:
lisiii
V/A'/te Horse-
Starting point of River Boats
ilillllllll
ft'ftft;'''::ISllXS77'
,^,,^77m77,777:777i-7:
S.S. "White Horse"
in the Five-Finger Rapids
~\
j&t'^ *"•'
*&££.?*£
hl;^m».:,-
Boundary between British Columbia
and Alaska
White Pass and Yukon Route
© A.S.N.
"Jhirupi te Aee...pioce4. to q#
tl
m
I HOSE returning south by the same
"Princess" steamship may, if they wish,
see the Skagway scene in one quick tour
and then be off inland. They can do it in
the allotted thirty-six hours, by taking
one of two choices. One is by rail to
White Horse where the Yukon begins,
seeing beautiful Lake Bennett, intriguing
little played-out "towns" of gold
rush days, the international boundary
Where Stars and Stripes and the Union
Jack fly side by side, and rugged,
picturesque country. The other choice is
by rail over the same route as far as
Carcross, thence by boat on the silvery
mountain-hemmed waters of West Taku
Arm, returning on the southbound train from Carcross the next
morning for Skagway and the trail home.
Those with more time will of course take the most important trip
of all, and visit the Klondike region itself. You take the same trail
the "rushers" took in '98, only you now go by rail, and in comfort,
on the White Pass and Yukon Route to White Horse and thence
via steamer from the Yukon to Dawson. It is truly a spectacular
journey, requiring approximately one week's time.
Side trips available in conjunction with this trip to Dawson
(requiring extra time, of course) or to be taken as entirely separate
adventures, include excursions to Lake Atlin. (You can take this
trip and catch the next returning "Princess".)
Descriptions of these trips are given on pages 14 and 15.
Page   Thirteen
 Summit of White Pass and Yukon Route Railway
B
_'OARD those wide-windowed little cars of the White Pass
and Yukon Route, sit back relaxed, comfortable, and take a LOOK
at history. You can tell by the very tone in the conductor's
"ail-aboard" that it's going to be an exciting adventure.
And then you're off. Soon you're over the international boundary
and into Yukon territory. There at the left is Lake Bennett.
Follow it for twenty-six miles. And so to Carcross. (Excursions
to West Taku Arm and Lake Atlin change here for steamship.)
Then on again, past little mountain lakes, and Miles Canyon to
stop at White Horse Rapids—what a name for a watery graveyard! When you are watching those waters, recreate the scene of
'98 when hundreds perished there in awful terror.
Then just a little farther—and rail's end, White Horse itself and
Scujoa.
cfthePaAt
"On Our Way
To The Klondike"
the Yukon. (End of trip from Skagway to White Horse that may
be taken during the 36-hour stop-over at Skagway.) The town is
certainly an answer to the clamor for something DIFFERENT!
And then on to Dawson by transferring to a White Pass and Yukon
stern-wheel steamship. En route you travel WITH the current.
There's an idea, a river in America that flows north. Two days it
takes . . . two days of the unusual. It never really gets dark, so it
matters not in the least WHEN you sleep. But you will want to
be awake when you "shoot" Five-Finger Rapids. Talk about thrills!
Finally Dawson . . . dream city of the past, once headquarters for
the whole Klondike, now almost a museum of the hectic days.
It is rich experience. Really it is living history . . . chapters out
of the past.
Page    Fourteen
 :||il:;::l||:||||i
Lake Atlin and the motor-ship "Tarahne"
West Taku Arm
I WO trips to inland Alaska, popular because of the
spectacular scenery, are detailed below.
For both trips the route is the same to Carcross. (See
details, page 14.) You leave Carcross on the steamer
TUTSHI, proceed through a chain of sapphire lakes—so
smooth, so clear that they reflect the wooded and snow-
covered mountains on all sides. Giant flowers in brilliant
colors line the lower mountain levels. You glide from
one little lake into another, never knowing where one
begins and the other ends 'till you come to the Golden
Gate and Taku Landing.
If you're going to Lake Atlin, you disembark and take a
little narrow gauge railway across a narrow neck of land
to the waiting motor-ship TARAHNE (twin-screw
motors) which takes you the remaining six miles to Atlin
and its comfortable Inn. After luncheon at the Inn you
are away in the TARAHNE again for a forty-mile
cruise. This time through narrow mountain-lined passages
of Lake Atlin's western channel, down through the
island narrows at the southern end of the lake and back
up the largest branch of the lake where you have an
amazing view of Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast Range.
From Atlin you retrace your path to Carcross, and to your
"Princess" at Skagway. Time of the trip, four days ...
or as much longer as you wish to stay at Atlin Inn,,
On the shorter trip to West Taku Arm, you remain on
the steamship TUTSHI. It holds its course straight down
from the Golden Gate, past Engineer Mountain to West
Taku Arm Landing and that world-famous lodge in the
wilderness—Ben-My-Chree homestead. You sleep aboard
the TUTSHI, reach Carcross in the morning; then to your
"Princess" and return on your 9-day cruise!
"Ben-my-Cnree" Homestead
Page   Fi fteen
 '7-3-i>
WORLD-WIDE      SERVICE
• Great Britain and Europe
AIR-LINE ROUTE . . . Frequent sailings via the short St.
Lawrence Seaway from Montreal and Quebec (summer)...
Saint John, N.B., and Halifax, N.S. (winter) ... to and
from British and Continental ports ... the majestic "Empress of Britain" and other great "Empress," "Duchess"
and "Mont" ships of the CANADIAN PACIFIC fleet set
new standards of Trans-Atlantic service.
• Canada and United States
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (comprising
21,235 miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches
from the Atlantic to the Pacific, across Canada and into
the United States. The main line, Montreal to Vancouver,
2,886 miles, passes through the heart of the famous Canadian Rockies, with their crowning jewels of Banff, Lake
Louise and Emerald Lake, unsurpassed as vacation resorts.
Modern and comfortable transcontinental and local passenger train services link the important cities, industrial
sections, agricultural regions and holiday resorts. Fast and
efficient freight service. Convenient coastal and inland
steamship services.
• Honolulu, Orient and South Seas
Regular sailings to and from Vancouver and Victoria . . .
DIRECT EXPRESS ROUTE TO ORIENT . . . swift sister
ships, "Empress of Asia" and "Empress of Russia" . . .
Yokohama in 10 days flat!
VIA HONOLULU . . . The mighty "Empress of Japan"
and her running mate, "Empress of Canada," make Honolulu in 5 days, Yokohama in just 8 days more.
SOUTH SEAS ... Canadian Australasian Line fast modern
liners to Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand and Australia.
• Round-the-World
ANNUAL WORLD-CRUISE on celebrated "Empress of
Britain," perfectly timed to see world-renowned beauty
spots at their best. . . Other attractive cruises to Mediterranean—East and South Africa—South America, West
Indies, Norwegian Fjords, etc.
INDEPENDENT ROUND-THE-WORLD TOURS, choice
of 215 itineraries ... 179 offices maintained throughout
the World to assist CANADIAN PACIFIC patrons.
• Hotels, Express, Communications
HOTELS ... A chain of comfort from Atlantic to Pacific
. . . Sixteen hotels in leading cities and resorts, including
Chateau Frontenac, Quebec; Royal York, Toronto,-
Banff Springs; Empress Hotel, Victoria . . . Eight chalet-
bungalow camps in the Canadian Rockies and at Ontario
fishing resorts.
COMMUNICATIONS AND EXPRESS . . . owned and
operated by the CANADIAN PACIFIC . . . trans-Canada
Service . . . world-wide connections . . . travellers' cheques
—good the world over.
"Empress of Britain" a
77X7
Canadian Pacific Transcontinental Train near Banff
;::: 7 7       :
"Empress of Japan"—Largest and Fastest Ship on the Pacific
CANADIAN
BUI
PACIFIC
 —   PRINCIPAL   —
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  AGENCIES
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga H. C. James 404 C. & S. Nat'l Bk. Bldg.
Banff, Alta.  (Summer) . .J. A. McDonald Canadian Pacific Station
Boston, Mass    L. R. Hart     405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, N.Y W. P.  Wass 22 Court Street
Calgary, Alta G. D.  Brophy Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111 T. J. Wall 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio S. E. Corbin 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas, Texas P. G. Jefferson 1212 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit, Mich M. E. Malone 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C.S. Fyfe Canadian Pacific Building
Fort William, Ont H.  J.  Skynner 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont W. C. Tully 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S A. C. MacDonald 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig. . Cor.  King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T.H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill
Kansas City, Mo R.   G.   Norris 709 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum Richmond Bldg.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis J. A. Millington 1014 Warner Theatre Bldg.
Minneapolis, Minn.. . . . .H. M. Tait 611 2nd Ave. South
Montreal, Que (£■ £. Gingras  Windsor Station
IF. C. Lydon 201 St. James St. W.
Moose Jaw, Sask T. J. Colton Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson, B.C N. J. Lowes Baker and Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y J. E.  Roach Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont R.  Y. Daniaud 87  Main Street West
Ottawa, Ont J.  A.  McGill 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont J. Skinner 343 George St.
Philadelphia, Pa E. A. Kenney 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. A. Shackelford Koppers Bldg., 444 7th Ave.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon 626 S.W. Broadway
Prince Rupert, B.C W. L. Coates
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin Palais Station
Regina, Sask J. W. Dawson Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John, N.B C.  B. Andrews 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo G. P. Carbrey 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn. W. H. Lennon Fourth and Cedar
San Francisco, Cal F. L.  Nason 152 Geary St.
Saskatoon, Sask R. T. Wilson 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. . . J. O.  Johnston 529 Queen Street
Seattle, Wash . . E. L. Sheehan 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier 91 Wellington St. North
Skagway, Alaska L. H. Johnston
Tacoma, Wash E. S. McPherson    ... .Old National Bank Bldg.
Toronto  Ont /w- Fulton Canadian Pacific Building
ioronto, unt \G. B. Burpee Canadian Pacific Building
Trois Rivieres, Que J. A. Tourville 1262 Notre Dame St.
Vancouver, B.C F. H. Daly 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria, B.C J. Macfarlane 1102 Government St.
Washington, D.C.       . . .C. E. Phelps 14th and New York Ave., N.W.
.   Windsor, Ont W. C. Elmer  . 142 Ouellette Ave.
Winnipeg, Man E. A. McGuinness Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp, Belgium W. D. Grosset 25 Quai Jordaens
Belfast, Ireland F. Bramley    ....... .24 Donegall Place
Jirmingham, England. . .J. R. W. Taylor 4 Victoria Square
Jristol, England . T. W. Thorne  . 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Jrussels, Belgium G. L. M. Servais 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
Dublin, Ireland A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
Glasgow, Scotland W. H. Boswell 25 Bothwell St.
lamburg, Germany T. H. Gardner Alsterdamm 9
-iverpool, England H. T. Penny Pier Head
onHr.n   Fniylanrl ic- E- Jenkins 62 Charing Cross
,ondon, England J Q  s^Qn Joneg 103 Leadenhall St.
lanchester, England.. . . R. L. Hughes 31 Mosley St.
aris, France  .A. V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
otterdam, Holland J. Springett Coolsingel No.91
outhampton, England . . H. Taylor Canute Road
ASIA
ong Kong, China E. Hospes Opposite Blake Pier
obe, Japan W. R. Buckberrough 7 Harima-machi
[anila, P.I  . J. R. Shaw 14-16 Calle David
langhai, China A. M. Parker The Bund and Peking Road
okohama, Japan B. G. Ryan 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, FIJI
Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand,
Union House, Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for New Zealand,
32-34 Quay St., Auckland, N.Z.
lelaide, Aus     Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
ickland, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
isbane, Qd    . .Macdonald, Hamilton &. Co.
iristchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
medin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
emantle, Aus Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
tbart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
unceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
ilbourne, Vic H. F. Boyer, Pass'r. Rep., C.P.R., 59 William St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
rth. W.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
va, Fiji X Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
dney, N.S.W Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
illington, N.Z Trav. Pass. Agt., C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
iways Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques—
GOOD THE WORLD OVER
PRINTED  IN   CANADA   1935
 CANADIAN PACIFIC
 m
'fSS
itish Columbia
Coast Service
"Princess"
Steamships
 _- _ m mt ■ • — fu{^AUSTRALIA
^J?0   HONOLULU   AHD
6299       POOLE BROS. CHICAGO
^r Location of Canadian Pacific Hotels
From
Seattle
Victoria
Vancouver
via
Alert Bay
Prince
Rupert
Ketchikan
Wrangell
Taku
Glacier
Juneau
to
Skagway
and
return
by the
"Inside
Passage"
Alaska » Yukon
Taku Glacier
I O Alaska and back by the Inside
Passage is a two-thousand mile nine-day
journey from Vancouver, with six ports of
call. During the summer months the
Canadian Pacific assigns for this service
the finest units of its well-known "Princess" fleet. All staterooms are outside
rooms—light, cozy and well ventilated.
Public rooms—dining room, observation
room, lounges, smoking room—are bright,
cheerful and charmingly furnished. All
ships have dance floors and carry dance
orchestras.
Iliixi
Alaska is a land of gold, of flowers, of
fox farms, salmon, Indians and totem
poles. Its scenery is of a character unknown elsewhere on this continent. For
four days the steamer threads the long,
almost land-locked "Inside Passage,"
winding through mountain-hemmed fiord-
like waterways, with wooded islands, tremendous glacier-clad peaks, fascinating
Alaskan towns and queer old settlements
as continuous episodes. No water journey
in America can quite compare in scenery
with the trip to Alaska.
SEE THE CANADIAN ROCKIES EN ROUTE
PRINTED IN CANADA
 An authentic photograph of the "Trail of '98"
As early as 1861 gold discoveries were made in
the Stikine River, and from 1866 to 1887 some
gravels of value were found at many places along or
tributary to the Yukon River. The location of the
first Klondike claim in August, 1896, was followed
by a feverish and picturesque rush, the like of
which the world has never seen before or since, and
the mines in American territory were temporarily
deserted.
The Yukon is a "placer" mining district: that is,
the gold is found in alluvial gravels, and is obtained
by assorting the gravels in water. Frequently
these deposits are along the hollows of river beds,
but they are also found at higher altitudes, in terraces that formerly were the beds of streams that
have changed their courses.   In the latter case,
instead of being worked in the creek or sluice, the
gold deposits are first washed down by powerful
jets of water projected by hose lines, and so into
the sluices.
The Bonanza was the greatest of the Klondike
creeks, and its tributary, the Eldorado Creek, the
richest, probably surpassing any known placer
deposit. The Klondike output reached its climax
in 1900, with a production of $22,000,000, but has
since then declined. Besides gold, silver mining
has been developed in the Yukon, an outstanding
example being the silver-lead mine near Mayo.
Placer gold was discovered at Juneau in about
1880, but the present mines there are quartz mines
—that is, the gold is found in rocks, which must be
crushed.
 Photographs
in this booklet are
copyright as
follows:
©a.s.n.—Associated
Screen News Ltd.,
Montreal.
©f.n. — Frederick
Niven, Nelson, B.C.
©G.M.T—G.M.Taylor, Atlin, B.C.
©w.c.a. — Western
Canada Airways.
A "pan" valued at $1,000!
It came as a whip to men's greed and a challenge to
men's courage, that first ringing call of the Northland.
Until then—a little over thirty years ago—Alaska was
almost unknown, a white space on the map over which was
shakily scrawled "Come-and-find-me." That is, to most
of the world; for the Northland had even then its pioneers,
its prospectors, who had fished its teeming coasts, trapped its furs, started small towns, and panned the first
coarse colorings of gold along its creeks. But outside of
these sturdy old-timers Alaska, with its side-partner, the
Yukon, was hardly more than a geographical curiosity—
a huge, unpopulated, unexplored block of land over three-
quarters of a million square miles in size, forming the
northern tip of the American continent.
But the discovery of gold in the Klondike in 1896, in
such vast quantities as to astound humanity, let loose so
much sensation that overnight the new bonanza became
almost the most famous place on earth. That feverish
stampede to the north (one does not have to be very
middle-aged to remember it) was like nothing that
had ever happened before, or that has ever happened
since.
Back in '98 someone took a photograph of an everyday
scene in the White Pass. It shows, struggling over the
steep, dangerous snow-clad wastes, a thin black streak
nearly two miles long—a streak composed entirely of
men, mushing "inside" to the Klondike, with nearly 600
miles travel ahead of them, and treading so close to one
another in the narrow trail that they very nearly kicked
the previous man's ankles. And this was an everyday
scene—happening all the time.
They had their hardships, those early days, before the
railway was built, and when cheechako and sourdough
alike had to travel that arduous path over the Chilkoot
Pass (or later, the White Pass) and down the Yukon
River. Greed pulled them forward; the crowd behind
pressed them onwards; if they could not endure the strain
they fell out and perished. There was no turning back.
It was truly no place for weaklings, for one was beset not
only by a hostile Nature, but also by the wickedness and
depravity of mankind.
The Northland put a spell on those who made its
acquaintance then. It will put the same spell on us today. It is a land of mystery—a magnet that will always
draw men and women, even though the lure of the gold is
fainter now. It is still a iand of romance, its atmosphere
impregnated with memories of those sad, glad days when
the century was just turning over. Gold has ceased to be
its principal advantage—has, indeed, proved a false hope
in those many ghost-like "cities" that parade their empty
shells from Dyea to Nome; but there is equally the romance of to-morrow, the discovery of other and richer resources, the development of a vigorous, prosperous
northern empire.
 Aerial view of Vancouver
Victoria, showing the Empress Hotel
©W.C.A.
Totem Poles
The totem poles of the Indians of British
Columbia constitute one of the most striking
features of the whole northwest coast. These
remarkable carvings should not be mistaken
for idols or deities. They are pictorial records of history and mythology, as the
Indians understand them. Some of them
represent the Raven, the Eagle, the Killer-
whale and the Wolf, which are the emblems
of the largest social groups in the nation.
The Bear, the Frog, the Sea-Lion, the Beaver,
the Thunder-Bird, and many others are the
crests of various clans. Here we have to do only
with coats-of-arms.    (See photo next page.)
Vancouver
Victoria
The voyage to Alaska can be divided into
two parts. From Vancouver to Ketchikan the
journey is mostly through narrow channels,
with steep shores heavily timbered to the
water's edge. The second part, from Ketchikan to Skagway, is through wider stretches of
water, with glaciers, waterfalls, and rugged
mountains on either side, and richly colored
with the purple twilights of Alaska.
The Princess steamship slips away from
Vancouver on its four-day northbound trip
at 9.00 o'clock at night, when the long summer dusks have begun to darken. After
trunks have been stowed and opened, dining
room reservations made, and casual first
impressions formed of one's fellow-travellers,
there is still time for a stroll up and down
deck before turning in. By this time the
ship has left Burrard Inlet, passed Brockton
Point, and has entered the Gulf of Georgia.
On the right is still to be seen the dark bulk
of the mainland; on the left, but invisible
yet, is Vancouver Island, in whose lee the
route is sheltered for over two hundred miles.
The course is south of long, narrow Texada
Island and through Discovery Passage,
between that island and Vancouver Island.
The early risers—and they only—will see
Seymour Narrows, for this, the narrowest
part of the channel, is passed about 6.00 a.m.
An hour or so later the ship passes through
Johnstone Straits and Broughton Straits,
along whose shores a number of logging
camps can be seen. And then after breakfast
we reach our first stop, Alert Bay.
 Totem Poles at Alert Bay
Alert Bay
Prince Rupert
You'll enjoy all types of deck sports
Alert Bay is a small village on a small island—Cormorant
Island—situated so close to Vancouver Island that the maps
are almost unable to make any distinction; but it is nevertheless one of the principal salmon canneries on the Coast.
Here, in fact, will be our first glimpse of this important industry, and during the time in port the canneries invite
visitors to inspect the highly interesting processes of turning
a large, handsome salmon into shiny little round cans. Alert
Bay is an old settlement, with a considerable Indian population; and here, too, we make our first contact with another
object typical of the Northland—the totem pole. (See
"Totem Poles") The Indian cemetery, with some modern
poles, is well worth the short stroll to see it.
After lunch we leave the shelter of Vancouver Island,
reaching Queen Charlotte Sound—with its short experience
of open Pacific Ocean. From Cape Scott, on Vancouver
Island, to Cape St. James, at the southern end of the Queen
Charlotte Islands, is about 150 miles; but we bear away from
that wild and rather primitive group, and keep instead close
inland, reaching Calvert Island in three hours—the longest
of the three times we shall see the wide horizon of the open
Pacific Ocean during the entire trip.
Passing through Lama Passage, Bella Bella is on the left
—a very old and practically deserted Indian village. At
10.00 at night, or so, we enter Old Ocean again, this time at
Millbank Sound, but only for ten miles, "and so" (as Samuel
Pepys says) "to bed."
Entering the Tolmie Channel, between Princess Royal
Island and the mainland, we pass Swanson Bay in the night,
and then enter Grenville Channel, in the shelter of 60-mile-
long Pitt Island. At about breakfast time we pass the mouth
of the Skeena River, and shortly, with Digby Island on the
west, on which may be seen the Canadian Government
wireless station, arrive at about 9.00 a.m. at Prince
Rupert.
Prince Rupert is the most northerly city of any size in
Canada, with a population of about 7,000. Built on a circle
of hills formed of very hard rock, the city is considerably
above the level of the wharf and is reached by a long staircase. It is a very important fishing centre and a big cold
storage plant is located in the Upper Harbor. The visitor
will probably be interested, during his stay on shore, in the
fur stores of the city—the first sight he will obtain of the
great fur industry of the Northland.
 ,,-,Xft#;
Ketchikan
Wrangell
and
Taku
Glacier
Ketchikan, most prosperous town in Alaska
Shortly after leaving Prince Rupert, the old Indian village
of Metlakatla is passed. Here is a very successful mission
for the natives, founded by Father Duncan. About 30
minutes later, Port Simpson is passed—one of the oldest
settlements in Northern British Columbia, with an old
Hudson's Bay Company's post that has been a trading-centre
with the Indians for about sixty years.
About three hours after leaving Prince Rupert, Green
Island Lighthouse indicates our nearness to the international
boundary line between Canada and Alaska (United States).
Dixon's Entrance, last entrance of the open Pacific Ocean, is
crossed, and we wind our way through Revilla Gigedo Channel—here called Tongas Narrows—to Ketchikan.
Ketchikan (an Indian word meaning "the town under the
eagle") is the southernmost town in Alaska, situated on
Revilla Gigedo Island. It might also be said to be now
the most prosperous town in Alaska, for salmon and halibut
have made it rich and given it large canneries and cold
storage plants. It is also a mining centre for copper, gold,
platinum, silver and lead, the well-known Salt Chuck platinum mines being within 30 miles. Ketchikan has a bustling
air, with hotels, stores and banks. Originally an Indian fishing
camp, it has several large canneries, and a great mosquito
fleet of fishing vessels is continually bringing in fish.
The visitor will find interesting curio stores. There is
also a pleasant walk to the waterfall in Ketchikan Creek
(about 15 minutes), where in the late summer months thousands of salmon may be seen leaping and struggling through
the rushing, foaming water on their way to the spawning
banks. There are two splendid totem poles—the Chief
Johnson totem, surmounted by Kajuk, a fabled bird of the
mountain which amuses itself by throwing rocks at ground
hogs, with below the Raven and the Frog Woman with her
children, the Salmon; and the Kyan totem, surmounted by
the Crane, followed by the Kyak, another legendary bird,
and the Bear.
A distinct change of scenery occurs from now on. The
stretches of water become wide, and mountains rise on either
side, with waterfalls tumbling down and glaciers crowning
their crests. The steamer winds along Clarence Strait,
with Prince of Wales Island on the west, and turning round
between Etolin and Zarembo Islands reaches Wrangell
about 4.00 a.m., and leaves before breakfast time. We shall,
however, have ample time to visit it when southbound.
Wrangell, situated on the island of the same name, is one
of the oldest cities of Alaska, and is named after Baron Wrangell, who was governor about 1830. It was originally a trading post, populated mainly by Indians under the protection
 A close up of Taku Glacier
©A.S.N.
of the Russians, but came under white dominance during the
gold rush of '98. Part of the Russian fort still remains, and
there are also some very old totem poles near the wharf.
Wrangell is at the mouth of the Stikine River, which,
navigable for about 170 miles, is the entry point to the
celebrated Cassiar big-game country.
Two hours after leaving Wrangell the ship enters Wrangell
Narrows, and for twenty miles proceeds at half-speed through
this narrow, winding channel of a remarkable beauty. Well
marked with buoys and beacons, this passage between the
wooded islands saves a long detour around Cape Decision.
At the north end of the Narrows lies the old town of Petersburg, whose name indicates its origin in the days of the
Russian regime. It is now a flourishing fishing centre.
Kupreanof Island is on the west, and after crossing Frederick
Sound and Cape Fanshaw, we enter Stephen's Passage.
We are now surrounded by the typical grandeur of Alaska
and, turning up Taku Inlet, the Taku Glacier sends out
hundreds of odd-shaped ice floes to meet us—as blue as
indigo, floating by to melt gradually in warmer waters, as
slowly the steamer approaches this famous sight. This
glacier, a mile wide and 100 feet thick, extends for over 90
miles back over the mountains to join Llewellyn Glacier at
the head of Atlin Lake.    It really is two glaciers, one—a
mixture of brown, white, and blue colors—"dead" and receding, the other very much alive and continually moving
forward. Showing all the colors of the rainbow, according
to the time of day or position of the sun, huge masses of ice
frequently break off into the sea, with deafening thunder,
and float majestically away. Even the vibration caused by
the ship's whistle will bring down great hundreds-of-tons
pieces of ice.
Glaciers
Along or near the Inside Passage to Alaska, or round
Atlin Lake, many magnificent glaciers are to be seen.
A glacier is, broadly speaking, an accumulation of ice, of
sufficient size and weight to flow down from a snow-covered
elevation. It is a river flowing from a lake, only the lake is
of snow and the river of ice. The thickness of the ice will
vary greatly—it may be, under favorable conditions, as
much as 1,000 feet.
Glaciers frequently extend far below the snow line of the
region. Exactly how a glacier moves has never been satisfactorily explained, but that it does move has been proved
by observation and calculations; more than that, the stream
at the centre of a glacier moves much faster than at the sides
or bottom.
 SSSBSfk
/   //
A Canadian Pacific "Princess" steamship
^Hi$m?TM?*V^'^^:..
All ships have dance orchestras
A Dining Room—cool and spacious
"**si 4- X •
An "unlisted" passenger
Typical stateroom
Private Bath
The mountain-guarded Inside Passage
CANADIAN      PACIFIC      "PRINCESS"     STEAMSHIPS
 Approaching Juneau
Juneau
Skagway
Juneau—capital of Alaska
Three hours' steaming up Gatineau Channel brings us to
Juneau, clinging to the base and sides of Mount Juneau,
which towers 3,500 feet almost perpendicularly above, near
the mouth of the Taku River. Juneau, named after its
French-Canadian founder, is the capital of Alaska, the residence of the Governor, and the seat of all government
departments. With a population of about 4,000, it is a
bright and interesting city, built (like so many of these coast
settlements) partly on piles over the water, partly on bare
rock, with modern hotels and stores, and many attractive
residences and public buildings.
The Territorial Museum in the Arctic Brotherhood Hall
has a wonderful collection of Alaska curiosities; on the floor
below is the experimental salmon hatchery. Fine raw fur
stocks can be seen at local dealers. Juneau has good roads
and automobiles a-plenty; one particularly interesting ride
is to the face of the Mendenhall Glacier (23^ hours return) or
to Auk Lake (an hour longer). A short hike away is the
Gold Creek Basin, the site of the first placer gold strike
in Alaska, made by Joe Juneau and Richard Haines in the
early eighties.
Within a short distance from Juneau, but reached by
launch, are Thane and Douglas, where, until some time after
the Great War, three of the largest low-grade gold-crushing
plants in the world were situated. Now only one remains,
the Alaska Juneau, with a mining and milling capacity of
about 9,000 tons of ore daily. On Douglas Island are the old
buildings of the celebrated Treadwell Mine, flooded by a
cave-in in 1917, and not operated since.
The steamer leaves Juneau at midnight, and reaches
Skagway about 9.00 a.m.; but on the southbound journey
there is ample opportunity to see the beautiful Lynn Canal,
which, with the possible exception of the Taku Glacier,
provides the most wonderful scenery of all. For over 80
miles we steam up this arm of the sea, which varies in width
from one to five miles. Mountains of rock capped with snow,
towering glaciers and gushing waterfalls, canyons of all
sizes and wild shapes, and colors in restless variety surround
us. Davidson Glacier is a huge ice wall seen on the west.
Passing the town of Haines and Fort Seward, we suddenly
turn a point to see Skagway ahead of us.
10
 Skagway, the end of the northbound run, is a town that has loomed
large in the history of the North. When the gold rush started to the
Yukon in 1896, the landing was made at Dyea, which lies on the western
branch of the Lynn Canal, and the trail inland led over the dangerous
Chilkoot Pass; but word came of the discovery of the White Pass, and
in a day fifteen thousand people left Dyea, and in a day Skagway arose
where before was chiefly swamp.
At the height of the gold rush, Skagway was one of the wildest, wickedest places on earth, chockfull of the gambling halls, dance halls, saloons
and other lurid temptations that nowadays can be seen nowhere else but
in the "movies." Gangs of "bad men" terrorized the town, preying
not only on the returning successful prospector but on the incoming
"cheechako" as well. Skagway is not such an ancient town but that
old-timers can regale you with stories of its celebrated characters, such
as Soapy Smith or Frank Reid, whose graves nearby will initiate many
reminiscences. But those days are over. Skagway is a model of propriety, with hotels, stores, and the peaceful air of ordinary business.
Amongst the marvels of Skagway—to those at least who have never
considered Alaska as aught but perpetual winter—are its beautiful
flower gardens. The background of mountains that enclose it like a cup
offer many attractive outings, such as "hikes" along the Skagway River,
to Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove, or the great Denver Glacier. There
are fine launch trips available, and good fishing. The steamer lays over
about 36 hours before starting on its southbound journey.
Alaskan blooms
Flowers
Alaska is a land of contrasts. Never
was so mistaken an idea as that it is all
winter. If it were, whence come the
gorgeous, vivid flower gardens that one
sees everywhere, such masses of color
that they dazzle the eye ? The answer
is simple: the warm Japan current, striking Vancouver Island, is deflected northward, and carries to the Land of the Midnight Sun the same delightful humidity
that the Pacific Coast knows.
11
 Inland from Skagway
The
White
Pass
Lake
Bennett
White
Horse
Dawson
Beautiful Lake Bennett
Interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit would be
incomplete without a journey to the equally interesting and
fascinating "inside." Such a journey, difficult as it was in
the early days of the gold rush, can now be easily undertaken,
for Skagway is the southern terminus of the rail line of
the White Pass and Yukon Route. A comfortable train,
with large-windowed observation cars, will carry one
through the magnificent scenery of the White Pass into the
Yukon Territory, connecting at Carcross and at White
Horse with the commodious steamers of the same company.
For those who are returning south by the same "Princess"
steamship, there are available the excursions to West Taku
Arm or to White Horse. For those waiting over until the
next steamship there is the trip to Atlin Lake—where, indeed, many visitors linger much longer than such a brief
visit. A description of these beautiful trips will be found on
page 16. But for those with more time, we will continue on
to White Horse, whence there is the wonderful trip down
the Yukon River to Dawson.
The rail journey is a most spectacular one. The salt tang
of the sea is left behind and the sweetness of lake and moun-
Boundary between British
Columbia and Alaska
tain air fills the nostrils. The scenery grows rugged and
awe-inspiring. We climb steadily around gorges, along the
brink of deep canyons, past roaring cataracts, and near dead
cities to which cling memories of the trail of '98. Such
names as "Dead Horse Gulch" and "Log Cabin" help
vividly to recall those grim days.
At White Pass Summit—nearly 3,000 feet higher than
Skagway in twenty miles—we leave American territory,
and the scarlet-coated Mounted Policeman greets us as we
enter Canada. A bronze monument, where the flags of the
two countries float side by side, marks the boundary line.
For a very short distance we travel through British Columbia, and then at Pennington cross into the Yukon Territory.
On our left, Lake Bennett begins—a long, narrow body of
water which the railway will follow for twenty-six miles. It
is rather amazing to learn that Bennett, where a stop is made
for lunch, and which consists merely of a station and its
outbuildings, once had a population of several thousand, and
teemed with life and excitement. For it was to this beautiful lake, bounded by old-rose color, that the "Trail of '98"
12
 7 ■, XX
rmm
■MMWm
mmmm
S.S. "Whitehorse"
in the
Five Finger Rapids
led. Those who had survived the epic hazards of the Pass
camped on this lake, and whipsawed lumber to make the
rafts, scows and other manner of water craft in which to
reach the golden land of their hopes. Little did they know,
of course, the perils of the White Horse Rapids, or if they
had heard of them, little did they appreciate them.
Along the ever-winding shores of this blue Lake Bennett,
looking out on a long mountain ridge, the railway runs, until
the little town of Carcross is reached. There is an Indian
school nearby, and interesting fox ranches, and in the
cemetery are buried many of the discoverers of the
Klondike.
Lewes and other little lakes are passed and then Miles
Canyon and White Horse Rapids. On still days, the roar
of these rapids can be heard even in the town, about an hour's
walk distant. As we stand on the brink of this famous
gorge, no very highly colored imagination is necessary to
conjure up pictures of the old days. We can imagine the
bold adventurers in their frail craft nearing these death-
dealing rapids, whose waters are thrown from side to side
in a long serpentine series of twists, and which are so troubled
that the water rides higher in the middle than at the sides.
Down they came in their mad rush to the Klondike—not at
intervals, but in a continuous procession that was (in the
words of an eye-witness) like traffic on a city street. Some,
becoming scared, jumped ashore as they saw their dangers,
and watched from the high cliffs the agonies of their
boats; but the majority stayed with their craft. And
so few came through unpunished! Those who did
wasted no time in going back to warn their competitors^
but hurried on.
White Horse is a busy little town on the west bank of
Fifty-Mile River (also known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the Upper Yukon). There is fairly good hotel
accommodation to be obtained.    Trips to the rapids and
^mmsmmiMmmmmmm
mMMM7Mm7mmmi§mmM7U7M
■" miiimimmm"
Miles Canyon
■^mB^mmmMi
^^^^^^^M:^^^^^S
H||i
mmm^mmmmm7 7m:7:}7^7
ir^m?^^^^^^^^^^M
^:iM7?7Wl
mm' ■v 7mmmm&77mm:.;;■ ■
77 '77:77777mi:::7t::
v^m^m' '':^mmmmm:m-\7 7'''
lxpl|x|l
X:;77>
Silllilif^iil;':..:' StSl#
ft#i;l:;;^
'7ft:;:;<77>ft.ft;."
...mmmB7'77777::: - *':'.'"ft:ft ft:.   ....>.* i;ft:'ftS7:'-
lliliili
mmMm&.
w^^^&sm^^^&^v^^w^wi
§|1§|1
V;k:.,:MffM:7*m:777
SXlllilllll
^^^^^^^S?^^^^^^^-
WSmMmmm
ililllli
III1H
^m9m]m§m&MWMm:mms7m&MiMS
Ililllli
iHilKMmm7
wmm77^'^mmmf::mm7, '*'7.:
illl
^^SrM^^^^^^^^^S^^^.I^M
XXXX
SlSy^xl^
mil
X.iPffllft^
ft:»:ft:ftftQs.llill:iii
W^^^^0^'7^^Mi^^77^^B'^^i^^JSSXfi^:M^
S\'SS:
ft::ftftss«;:!:-'-'ft 7        '   '
13
White Horse Rapids
 Land of the Unsetting Sun
©A.S.N.
Inland
from
Skagway
other points may be made by automobile
over good roads. It is the terminus of
the railway, and the point of departure
for the steamer trip to Dawson.
The journey from White Horse to Dawson and back, one that can be made in
about a week, is the fitting climax to the
trip "inside."   White Horse is the present
head of navigation on the Yukon waterway  (the river in its upper reaches is
really a system of tributaries), which
empties  into  the  sea  at  St.  Michael,
Alaska, over 2,000 miles distant.   It is a
constantly changing succession of pictures
—rolling  hills,   sometimes  bare,   again
heavily    wooded,    towering    mountain
ranges,  awe-inspiring rapids, with now
and then a quiet stretch of water between forested banks.   Here and there is
an occasional trading-post, or a mining
camp—perhaps   the   ghost   of   a   dead
"bonanza"—or    a    hermit    settlement
where the steamer stops to "wood-up."
Lake Lebarge, a beautiful widening of
the stream (on whose shores, incidentally,
occurred the episode that inspired Robert
Service's celebrated poem about the cremation of  Sam McGee),  Hootalinqua,
Little Salmon, and Carmacks, with its
coal mine, are some of the interesting
places passed.    The  shooting  of  Five-
Finger Rapids, and their postscript Rink
Rapids, gives plenty of thrill to even the
most jaded.     At Yukon Crossing,  the
overland winter trail to Dawson, used
when the river is frozen up, is passed, and
then Fort Selkirk—an important trading-
centre founded in 1898 as a militia post to
guard gold shipments.
One of the most extraordinary sights of
the river trip, if you are so fortunate as
to see it, is a herd of caribou swimming
Caribou swimming the Yukon
©F.N.
14
 The Unsetting Sun
On the 21st of June,
Dawson has 22 hours of
sunshine and two hours
of twilight. Approximately 114 days in the
mid-summer months
have no real night. On
the contrary, the sun is
out of sight from December 5th until January 6th, and December
21st has 18 hours of
darkness and six of twilight.
the Yukon River. The answer to the riddle, "Why should a
caribou swim the river?" is precisely the same as to the other
historic one about the chicken crossing the road; but often
the caribou number hundreds, and even thousands. For the
past four or five years, practically every Dawson steamer
in the months of July and August has passed within reach of
this unique spectacle, and on the opposite page we show a
photograph of the migration.
The mouths of mighty tributaries are passed, amongst
them White River—the only large river that enters the
Yukon from the west or south—and Stewart River, entrance
to the new Mayo silver-lead camp 175 miles east. Smaller
steamers ply the Stewart as far as Mayo, whence it is a case
of "packing in." Swede Creek has a Government Experimental Agricultural Station, and then we are at Dawson.
The trip from White Horse takes about two days—the return trip, owing to the current, about four days.
Dawson, once the focus of the world's greatest gold rush,
the headquarters of the whole Klondike region, is now hardly
more than a shadow of its former glory. Mining operations
are still in progress, but they are carried on under hydraulic
and dredging conditions; the picturesque days of which one
reads in Service and Jack London have departed. Gone
with them are the highly colored, sensational chapters of
Dawson's history, when the city was the rendezvous of
outlaws as well as greed-crazed miners, when dance halls,
saloons and gambling places ran wide open for the full twenty-
four hours. But to be able to recall that "them was the
days" makes one a real old-timer, a sourdough—but not
necessarily a more than middle-aged man.
Dawson is the administrative centre of the Yukon Territory, and the headquarters of a large detachment of that
fine body of men, the Mounted Police. It is beautifully
situated on a bend of the Yukon River, up-to-date, well-
built, with comfortable hotels, fine homes and gardens.
Over good roads one can visit mining plants and old,
played-out but famous bonanza claims. The Indian village
of Moosehide, and the fox farms, are worth a visit; while the
old cabin of Robert W. Service, the poet-laureate of the
Northland, is the objective of many pilgrimages.
BOOKS ABOUT THE NORTHLAND
A great many interesting books can be obtained about Alaska and the Yukon.
By all means, read some before you start. There are the well-known stories
by Rex Beach—"The Spoilers," "The Barrier," and "The Silver Horde;"
Jack London s famous "Call of the Wild," and manv others; Elizabeth Robins'
Magnetic North" and "Come and Find Me;" James Oliver Curwood's
Alaskan; Edison Marshall's "Seward's Folly;" and Robert W. Service's
"Trail of Ninety-Eight."
Service's poems, "Songs of a Sourdough" and "Ballads of a Cheechako,"
are, we imagine, so well known as hardly to need mention.
15
 •   -
..ftft1' ..     ' '       ■'-'.'■
.ft,,.7ft:    ■..
■■ ■■■"■",,    : ■■ ,:.
Beautiful Lake Atlin
©G.M.T.
7777 77:^ 7yr7,,7,7,7:777,777	
mam
uBen-my-Chree" Homestead
TTO.M.T.
16
Lake Atlin
West Taku Arm
To Atlin is another delightful excursion from Skagway,
either as a side trip on the Dawson trip or as one in itself.
The route is the same as before to Carcross, but here the
commodious steamer Tutshi is taken, through a chain of
sapphire lakes, mountain-girt and forest-guarded.
The steamer first crosses Lake Nares, and then through
the narrows enters Tagish Lake, horseshoe-shaped and
guarded by high peaks. Old mining towns and fox farms
are seen along the way. Presently we turn into the Taku
Arm of the lake, a beautiful sheet of water encompassed
by the most inspiring scenery, and then into Taku Inlet
as far as Taku Landing. Here, where a wonderful view
may be obtained of Jubilee Mountain, to the north, a
transfer is made across a three-mile neck of land by an
unique little train.
At the end of the portage we reach Lake Atlin, and
board the twin-screw motorship Tarahne for a six-mile
run to the little town of Atlin. Near the boat landing,
and facing the lake, is the Atlin Inn, built and maintained
for tourists by the White  Pass and Yukon Route.
The principal event of the trip to Atlin is the afternoon
excursion on the steamer Tarahne. For about forty miles
the boat winds its way through the narrow mountain-
ribbed passage of the West Channel. The boat then
passes out through Copper Island Narrows, and the return is made down the other side of these islands on Lake
Atlin, where a magnificent view is obtained of the huge
Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast Range.
When the water is smooth, as it generally is, and on its
surface are mirrored the vari-colored verdure-clad hills
and snow-crowned mountains with their cathedral-like
spires, the scene is of sublime beauty and grandeur.
West Taku Arm
Another beautiful scenic trip is that to the West Taku
Arm, which has been especially designed for passengers
who are making the round trip from Vancouver to Skagway and back on the same steam ship. It gives these passengers an opportunity of seeing a maximum number of
points of interest in the short time at their disposal. It
is a journey which takes the visitor into the very heart of
primeval surroundings, where giant mountains raise their
lofty peaks from the glittering glacial waters of the Arm,
which ends at what might be termed the "back door" of
the Taku Glacier.
The route followed is the same as to Atlin, except that
at Golden Gate, instead of turning into the Taku Inlet,
the steamer continues a southerly course and then west,
reaching West Taku Arm Landing and Ben-My-Chree
homestead. Passengers sleep on board and reach Car-
cross in the morning in time to catch the southbound train
and their "Princess" steamer.
 CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga K. A. Cook, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.404 C. & S. Nat'l Bk. Bldg.
Banff, Alta  J. A. McDonald, Dist. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Boston, Mass L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, N.Y. W. P. Wass, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 160 Pearl St.
Calgary, Alta. G. D. Brophy, Dist. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111 T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio M. E. Malone, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas, Texas H. C. James, Dist. Pass. Rep'tive 1212 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit, Mich G. G. McKay, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.... 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Fort William, Ont H. J. Skynner, City Pass. Agent 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont W. C. Tully, City Pass. Agent 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S A. C. MacDonald, City Pass. Agent 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig, City Pass. Agent Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T.H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill, Agent
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris, City Pass. Agent 709 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson, Agent
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch, City Pass. Agent 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum, City Pass. Agent 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis.......F. T. Sansom, City Pass. Agt. Soo Line. 108 E. Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 611 2nd Ave. South
tv/t^+.^i r\..~ JP- E. Gingras, Dist. Pass. Agent Windsor Station
Montreal, yue ^ c Lydoil| Gen> Agt> Pasg Dept 201 St. James St. W.
Moose Jaw, Sask T. J. Colton, Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson, B.C N. J. Lowes, City Pass. Agent Baker and Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y J.E.Roach.Act.Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic. .Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont R. Y. Daniaud, Dist. Pass. Agent 87 Main Street West
Ottawa, Ont J. A. McGill, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont J. Skinner, City Pass. Agent 343 George St.
Philadelphia, Pa J. C. Patteson, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. A. Shackelford, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 338 Sixth Ave.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 148A Broadway
Prince Rupert, B.C.. .W. L. Coates, General Agent
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Palais Station
Regina, Sask J. W. Dawson, Dist. Pass. Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John, N.B C. B. Andrews, Dist. Pass. Agent 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo Geo. P. Carbrey, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W.H.Lennon,Gen.Agt.Rail Traffic.Soo Line.. .Fourth & Cedar
San Francisco, Cal F. L. Nason, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 675 Market St.
Saskatoon, Sask R. T. Wilson, City Ticket Agent 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. J. O. Johnston, City Pass. Agent 529 Queen Street
Seattle, Wash E. L. Sheehan, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier, City Pass. Agent 91 Wellington St. North
Skagway, Alaska L. H. Johnston, Agent
Spokane, Wash E. S. McPherson, Spokane Internl. Ry.. .Old Nat. Bank Bldg
Tacoma, Wash City Pass. Agent 1113 Pacific Ave.
rp«-« <.~ rk + /W. Fulton, Asst. Gen. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Building
loronto, Unt \G. B. Burpee> Dist Pass> Agent Canadian Pacific Building
Vancouver, B.C F. H. Daly, Dist. Pass. Agent 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria, B.C L. D. Chetham, Dist. Pass. Agent 1102 Government St.
Washington, D.C C.E.Phelps,Gen.Agt.Pass.Dept. .14th & New York Ave.,N.W.
Windsor, Ont W. C. Elmer, City Pass. Agent 142 Ouellette Ave.
Winnipeg, Man E. A. McGuinness, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp, Belgium E. Schmitz 25 Quai Jordaens
Belfast, Ireland F. Bramley 14 Donegal Place
Birmingham, Engld... W. T. Treadaway 4 Victoria Square
Bristol, England A. S. Ray 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Brussels, Belgium G. L. M. Servais 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
Dublin, Ireland A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
Glasgow, Scotland... .C. L. Crowe  .25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg, Germany. .T. H. Gardner Alsterdamm 9
Liverpool, England H. T. Penny Pier Head
London, England {§• |^jj j^viiiiii.v;;;;;;;;;;:;;:^;.^^^^^1^
Manchester, England.. R. L. Hughes  31 Mosley St.
Paris, France A. V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
Rotterdam, Holland. .J. Springett Coolsingel No. 91
Southampton, Engld.. H. Taylor  Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong, China A. M. Parker, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe, Japan B. G. Ryan, Passenger Agent 7 Harimamachi
Manila, P.I J. R. Shaw, Gen. Agt 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai, China G. E. Costello, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept .\ .. No. 4 The Bund
Yokohama, Japan E. Hospes, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept  .21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, ETC.
J. Sclater. Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand, Union
House, Sydney, N.S.W.   A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for
New Zealand, 32-34 Quay St., Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A. .Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.   tvt^iu^ fH. F. Boyer, Pass'r. Rep.,
Auckland, N.Z. UnionS.S.Co.of N.Z. (Ltd.)   Melbourne,     C.P.R., 59 William St.,
Brisbane, Qd.. .Macdona!d,Hamilton&Co.       V1C [Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.
Christchurch Perth.W.A..Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
N.Z !.. UnionS.S.Co.of N.Z. (Ltd.)    Suva, Fiji. UnionS.S.Co.of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin,'N.Z'.' .UnionS.'s.'Co!ofN.'z!(Ltd!) Sy^n| \
Fremantle,W.A.Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.
Hobart, Tas... .UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.) Wellington,
Launceston,Tas.UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)       N,Zl	
Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
J. T. Campbell, Trav. Pass.
Agt., C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques-
Good the World Over
 Canadian Pacific Sailings to
ALASKA
SUMMER 1935
Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle
VIA
Alert Bay, Prince Rupert, Ketchikan, Wrangell, *Taku Glacier, Juneau
to Skagway and return (through the smooth "Inside Passage")
• From Vancouver (also
Victoria or Seattle) to
Skagway   and   return
$
85
up
Berth   and   meals   are
included   en   route   but
not on board steamship
while in Skagway
Voy
No.
* From
Vancouver
9 p.m.
®
SAILINGS
From
Skagway
7.00 p.m
©
Arrive
Vancouver
9.00 a.m.
©
Voy
I  No.
From
Vancouver
9 p.m.
®
SAILINGS
From
Skagway
7.00 p.m.
©
Arrive
Vancouver
9.00 a.m.
©
1.
Sat.,
June
8
Princess Louise
Thur.,
June
13
Mon.,
June
17
10.
Wed.,   July
24
Princess Alice
Mon.,   July   29
Fri.,       Aug.
2
2.
Sat.,
June
15
Princess Charlotte
Thur.,
June
20
Mon.,
June
24
11.
Sat.,      July
27
Princess Louise
Thur.,     Aug.    1
Mon.,   Aug.
5
3.
4.
Sat.,
Sat.,
June
June
22
29
Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte
Thur.,
Thur.,
June
July
27
4
Mon.,
Mon.,
July
July
1
8
12.
Wed.,   July
31
Princess Charlotte
Special Cruise
See Schedule
5.
Sat.,
July
6
Princess Louise
Thur.,
July
11
Mon.,
July
15
13.
Sat.,      Aug.
3
Princess Alice
Thur.,     Aug.    8
Mon.,   Aug.
12
6.
Wed.
r   July
10
Princess Charlotte
Mon.
July
15
Fri.,
July
19
14.
Sat.,      Aug.
10
Princess Louise
Thur.,     Aug. 15
Mon.     Aug.
19
7.
Sat.,
July
13
Princess Alice
Thur.,
July
18
Mon.,
July
22
15.
Sat.        Aug.
17
Princess Alice
Thur.,     Aug. 22
Mon.     Aug.
26
8.
Wed.
,   July
17
Princess Louise
Mon.
July
22
Fri.,
July
26
16.
Wed.,   Aug.
21
Princess Louise
Mon.,    Aug. 26
Fri.,       Aug.
30
9.
Sat,
July
20
Princess Charlotte
Thur.,
July
25
Mon.,
July
29 !
17.
Fri.,       Aug.
30
Princess Louise
Wed.,   Sept.    4
Sun.,     Sept.
8
©All times shown in Pacific Standard time except sailing hour from Skagway, which is Alaska time—one hour slower than Pacific time.
* Call will be made at Taku Glacier on all northbound voyages, weather permitting.
• FROM SEATTLE
or VICTORIA
Through tickets to Alaska
include passage, meals and
berth on the Canadian
Pacific "Triangle" Steamship Service from Seattle or
Victoria, and permit stopovers of 48 hours either
north or southbound. See
current folders forschedules.
SOME ATTRACTIONS OF CANADIAN PACIFIC STEAMSHIPS:
# All rooms have hot and cold running water
and lights in each berth.
# All rooms have portholes.
# All steamships have excellent dance floors
and carry orchestras.
# All steamships carry barbers and lady hairdressers.   Valet service is also provided.
# All steamships have steamer rugs and a
limited number of field glasses which may be
rented from the News Agent on board at a
nominal charge.
# All steamships are provided with comfortable camp chairs with backs which are at the
disposal of all passengers free of charge.
Regulation ocean liner deck chairs are not
supplied as they are rather cumbersome for
this service.
ii i
 CRUISE    TO    ALASKA    IN    MODERN    COMFORT
ON    A    CANADIAN    PACIFIC    "PRINCESS"    LINER
i
BAGGAGE etc., for use in making up the manifest required by the Immi-
(a) 150 lbs. of baggage will be carried free on each adult sration Department, and will be given a card by him This
ticket and 75 lbs. on each half ticket. Charge for excess baggage, '"spection ,s greatly facl.tated for passengers from the Un ted
<to -m. ~~.. i aa iL ■ l j- *• l t c ni w l • Mates if they carry identification slips which will be supplied
J3.75 per 100 lbs. in each direction between Seattle, Victoria, n. ■                V.           ■               i 7
\/,—~.             j  ci                 cA                   i                        xl       i a by selling agent.   I he card received from the purser is presented
Vancouver and  Skagway.    Steamer trunks  not  more  than   14 ,              °              ....                     .      .        .               .
•»^u^ •    l  •  Li           u       i      j •     l i                 n                      ii by  passenger to  Immigration   inspector, who  boards steamship
inches in height may be placed in staterooms.   Passengers will .    ,        „     , ..                                                    .         .           ,
f.  j  ..                          .                ..              , ■          ,        ,        ,  .     ., on  arrival  at  Ketchikan, and  as soon  as  particulars  shown  by
find  it more convenient to allow trunks to  be placed  in the .,              '           K            .
i                      I        i     i        ,i               ,            ,          ,., purser on manifest are checked by the inspector, the passenger
baggage room on board where they can be made readily acces- .           T,                       Y                        ,       ,
•i i    -c   i    •     i       i      i       i  j is permitted to go ashore,    mere is a similar inspection by the
sible if desired, unless bonded. ^       ,.      •                     r>                                  i    t            •             •
. Canadian Immigration Department on arrival or steamship south-
(b) Free   Storage,   Seattle,   Victoria   or   Vancouver. bound at Prjnce Rupert    These inspections are ,argely forma,
Free storage of baggage will  be permitted for not more than $Q far as ^m^ ^ concernedi
30 days at the above mentioned ports.   Regular storage charges
will accrue after expiration of this period. FARES FROM PRINCE RUPERT
(c) Bonded Baggage.-Baggage may be checked through pare$ quoted frQm Vancouver to Skagway will also apply
from Seattle to Skagway, and if not required en route may be from prjnce Rupert tQ Skagway and return to pr|nce Rupert or
forwarded under bond to avoid necessity of customs inspection. Vancouver, or vice versa.
If baggage is requred en route it should be checked to Victoria
or Vancouver only and presented for Canadian Customs inspec- EXTRA CHARGE FOR BERTH AND MEALS
tion   before   boarding   steamship   for   Alaska.     U.S.   Customs AT SKAGWAY
inspection will also be necessary at Ketchikan, the first port of Round trjp fares tQ Skagway indude berth and mea|s cn route
entry into Alaska.   Baggage checked from Vancouver or Vic- but „of while 5teamship  /$ /n port at Skagway, except that
tor.a to Skagway will be inspected by U.S. Customs officers at breakfast will be served on morning of arrival and dinner on day
Ketchikan, or may be bonded if desired. of departure without extra charge<
(d) Southbound.-Canadian Customs baggage inspection Passengers making the round trip on the same voyage have the
will be made at Prince Rupert and U.S. Customs inspection at option of remaining on board whi|e at Skagway on payment of
Vancouver (,f passenger is travelling east via Canadian Pacific regu(ar tarjff rate for mea|s and berth Approximate cost per
Railway) or at Seattle. passenger:
(e) Baggage can be checked through from Puget Sound and .         .          .        ,     .    .                                           „_•    _
d -i- l r  i     l-                     Aii-          r>                     ,.    w/Li    n Lunch on day of arrival $1.00
British Columbia ports to Atlin or Dawson, via the White Pass _.                  .'     ,     .    ,                                            ^ ^„
• v i        d    i        -il            j                          i-      l     r   i Dinner on day of arrival 1.25
and   /ukon Koute, without undergoing  inspection by Customs ■»*■■*.,          i.
a.          . ci                        _i  j                      l   i j il        l i- i   i Berth Rate, ordinary room 2.00
omcers at Skagway, provided passengers hold through tickets, ■»       ■ *    *  \        t  i
• . I               i      ii   l     •          L   i          iii-          n Breakfast day or departure          .75
in   which   case   it   will   be   inspected   at   destination.    Baggage .■•/..                                                   . ^^
....        . D... ,  r  ,     , .        . .          ,            ,   ,       ,       ,    , Lunch day of departure 1.00
originating at British Columbia points can be corded and sealed 	
and sent through Alaska in bond without inspection.   Baggage $6.00
originating at United States ports destined to points in Alaska DEPOSIT
on the lower Yukon River below Dawson  can  go through to Deposit of 25% of fare wi„ be required when reservation is
destination ,n bond without inspection. made/ ba,ancc to be pajd when tkkets jssued/ but not ,ess than
IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS SixJy dayS f™ T liL"3 "J*" V? i   T'V" *"""*
sailings north and southbound, or rorty-hve days when space is
Passengers entering Alaska from Canada are required to pass reserved for the round trip on one sailing.
the customary United States Immigration Inspection at Ketchikan,
the port of entry.   This inspection is not strict so far as bona fide LIMITS
tourists are concerned.   Passengers will  be asked by purser for Round trip tickets to Skagway will  be  limited to October
certain information regarding age, place of residence, business, 31,1935.
WHITE PASS AND YUKON ROUTE
The White Pass and Yukon Route operates train services shown below between SKAGWAY and WHITE HORSE in both
directions during the tourist season, and steamships on the Yukon River to Dawson and Mayo. Service is also provided for an interesting trip from CARCROSS to ATLIN by steamship through Nares and Tagish lakes and across Lake Atlin.
Agents may secure RESERVATIONS and detail information from White Pass & Yukon Route agent at the following addresses:
2026 Straus Bldg., Chicago, III., 407 Douglas Building, Seattle, Wash., and 640 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
SPECIAL SUMMER EXCURSION FARES
Skagway to Lake Bennett and return, including
lunch at Bennett (parlor car fare extra $1.00 round
trip) either day while steamship is in port      ...  $     7.50
Skagway to West Taku Arm and return, including all expenses (except parlor car fare Skagway to
Carcross and return $1.50) time required, two days,
while steamship is in port. See description of trip
below 27.50
Skagway to White Horse and return (parlor car
fare extra $2.00 round trip) time required, two days,
while steamship is in port 20.00*
Skagway to Atlin-White Horse and return
(parlor car fare extra, Skagway to White Horse and
return $2.00) minimum time required one week,
southbound reservations should be made not earlier
than next returning steamship 42.50*
Skagway to White Horse and return (parlor car
fare extra $2.00 round trip) thirty-day limit .     .     .       20.00*
Skagway to Dawson and return (parlor car fare
extra Skagway to White Horse and return $2.00)
minimum time required one week, southbound
reservations should be made not earlier than next
returning steamship 110.00*
Skagway to Dawson-West Taku Arm and return (parlor car fare extra, Skagway to White Horse
and return $2.00) minimum time required one week,
southbound reservations should be made not earlier
than next returning steamship       ......     125.00*
Skagway to Dawson-Atlin and return (parlor
car fare extra, Skagway to White Horse and return
$2.00) minimum time required two weeks, southbound reservations should be made not earlier than
second returning steamship    .     .     .     .     .     .     .     130.00*
*Estimate of hotel and incidental expenses will be furnished on
request.
Rail Service between Skagway and White Horse
Trains leave Skagway at:
10.00 a.m., Wednesday and Friday.
8.30 a.m., Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Trains arrive at Skagway at 3.25 p.m.* and 4.30 p.m.*
*Alaska time—one hour slower than Pacific time.
RIVER AND LAKE STEAMSHIP SERVICE
To Dawson
Navigation on the Yukon River between White Horse and
Dawson opens from May 20 to June 1 and closes, depending
upon weather conditions, about the middle of October. At
the opening of navigation the steamships do not operate on a
definite schedule for the first week or so. The regular service
commences with the sailing of the "Casca" from White Horse,
June 12 and every Wednesday thereafter at 7:00 p.m. This
service continues until the middle of August, after which there
will be irregular sailings about twice a week for the balance of
the season.
The round trip, White Horse to Dawson and return, occupies
6^/z days, bringing the passenger back to White Horse on a
Wednesday morning.
The Wednesday arrival at White Horse leaves the passenger
the option of remaining in White Horse that day and going to
Skagway Thursday to connect with the Canadian Pacific Railway
steamship southbound/ or, leaving White Horse Wednesday
morning connecting at Carcross with steamship "Tutshi" for
West Taku Arm, which will bring the passenger into Skagway
Thursday afternoon in time for Canadian Pacific steamship sailing
Thursday evening,- or leaving White Horse Thursday morning
connecting at Carcross with steamship "Tutshi" for Atlin for a
stay at that point, connecting with the following Thursday sailing
southbound from Skagway.
To Atlin
At Carcross connection is made for Lake Atlin on the steamship "Tutshi," which schedule will be as follows: From June 2
to July 7, inclusive, and from August 11 to September 1, inclusive, the "Tutshi" will leave Carcross Sunday, Thursday and
Saturday afternoon,- returning from Atlin, the "Tutshi" arrives in
Carcross Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. From July 14 to
August 4, inclusive, the "Tutshi" will leave Carcross Monday,
Thursday and Saturday afternoon,- returning from Atlin, the
"Tutshi" arrives in Carcross Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.
Sailing time from Atlin is 7:30 p.m. previous evening.
Special West Taku Arm Excursion
Leaving Skagway by special train Sunday and Wednesday
mornings, returning to Skagway Monday and Thursday afternoons. (Special trip will be made to connect with the S.S.
Princess Louise, arriving at Skagway September 3.)
This is a special excursion 68 miles by rail over the White
Pass Summit, along the shores of Lake Bennett to Carcross, where
connection is made with a comfortable stern-wheel steamship for
a twenty-hour trip on the West Taku Arm to the north end of
Taku Glacier, 82 miles and return, a total distance of 300 miles
through   magnificent  mountain  and  lake scenery.
Atlin Inn
At Atlin, near the boat landing, facing the lake and within
a few feet of the shore, is the Atlin Inn, owned and operated
on the American plan by the White Pass & Yukon Route. All
rooms have hot and cold running water. Rates—Single room
$6.50 to $7.00 per day per person. Double room $5.75 to
$6.25 per day per person. A few smaller rooms at $5.50 per
day single and $5.00 per day per person, double.
Those who stay more than three days at this resort may obtain
the following discount off their total bill:
4 days, 10% — Weekly rates, 15%
The foregoing information covering the White Pass and Yukon
Route is subject to change at any time. Due notice will be given
when possible.
CANADIAN       PACIFIC       RAILWAY      AND       STEAMSHIP      SERVICES      SPAN      THE      WORLD
2 ]
3]
 ITINERARIES TO POINTS ON .WHITE PASS and YUKON ROUTE
SEASON 1935
DAWSON-ATLIN ROUND TRIP
FROM VANCOUVER
Skagway
Ar.   Lv.
A.M.
Atlin
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
White
Horse
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
Dawson
Ar.   Lv.
A.M.
White
Horse
Ar.   Lv.
A.M.
Atlin
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
STEAMER
Date
P.M.
Date
A.M.
STEAMER
June      8
June   15
June   22
June   29
July      6
July    10
July    13
July    17
July    20
July    24
July    27
Aug.     3
Aug.  10
12    12
19   19
26   26
3     3
10   10
14   15
17   17
21    22
24   24
28   29
31    31
7      7
14   14
15   16
22   23
29   30
12   12
19   19
26   26
3     3
10   10
17   17
17   17
24   24
24   24
31    31
31    31
7      7
14   14
14   15
21    22
28   29
5     6
12   13
19   20
19   20
26   27
26   27
2      3
2     3
9   10
16   17
19   20
26   27
3     4
10   11
17   18
24   25
24   25
31      1
31      1
7      8
7      8
14   15
21    22
20   25
27      2
4     9
11    13
18   20
25   27
1      6
8   13
15   20
22   24
26   27
3      4
10   11
14   15
21    22
25   25
28   29
1      1
7 8
8 8
14   15
21    22
25   26
July      1
July      8
July    15
July    19
July    26
July    29
Aug.     2   -
Aug.     5
Aug.  12
Aug.  12
Aug.  19
Aug.  26
Aug.  30
DAWSON-WEST TAKU ARM or DAWSON ROUND TRIP
FROM VANCOUVER
Skagway
Ar.   Lv.
A.M.
West
Taku Arm
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
White
Horse
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
Dawson
Ar.   Lv.
A.M.
White
Horse
Ar.   Lv.
A.M.
West
Taku Arm
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
STEAMER
Date
P.M.
Date
A.M.
STEAMER
June      8
June   15
June    22
June    29
July      6
July    10
July    13
July    17
July    20
July    24
July    27
Aug.     3
Aug.  10
12   12
19   19
26   26
3      3
10   10
14   14
17   17
21    21
24   24
28   28
31    31
7      7
14   14
14   14
21    21
28   28
12   12
19   19
26   26
3      3
10   10
15   17
17   17
22   24
24   24
29   31
31    31
7      7
14   14
14   15
21    22
28   29
5     6
12   13
19   20
19   20
26   27
26   27
2     3
2     3
9   10
16   17
19   19
26   26
3     3
10   10
17   17
24   24
24   24
31    31
31    31
7      7
7      7
14   14
21    21
19   19
26   26
3     3
10   10
17   17
24   24
31    31
7      7
14   14
21    21
20   20
27   27
4     4
11    11
18   18
24   25
24   25
31      1
1      1
7 8
8 8
15   15
22   22
June   24
July      1
July      8
July    15
July    22
July    29
July    29
Aug.     5
Aug.     5
Aug.  12
Aug.  12
Aug.  19
Aug.  26
Princess Louise	
Princess Louise
ATLIN ROUND TRIP
FROM VANCOUVER
STEAMER
Date
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.   Lv.
A.M.
Atlin
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
White
Horse
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.   A.M.
Atlin
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.   Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
Date
A.M.
STEAMER
Princess Louise. .
Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise. .
Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise..
Princess Charlotte
Princess Alice.. .
Princess Louise..
Princess Charlotte
Princess Alice. . .
Princess Louise..
Princess Alice.. .
Princess Louise..
Princess Alice. . .
Princess Louise. .
June 8
June 15
June 22
June 29
July 6
July 10
July 13
July 17
July 20
July 24
July 27
Aug. 3
Aug. 10
Aug. 17
Aug. 21
12 12
19 19
26 26
3 3
10 10
14 14
17 17
21 21
24 24
28 28
31
7
14 14
21 21
25   25
25   29
12 13
19 20
26 27
3 4
10 11
14 15
17 18
21 22
24 25
28 29
31 1
7 8
14 15
21 22
30 31
13 18
20 25
27 2
4 9
11 13
15 16
18 20
22 23
25 27
29 30
1 6
8 13
15 20
22 24
19 20
26 27
3 4
10 11
14 15
17 18
21 22
24 25
28 29
31
7
14 15
21 22
25 26
31 4
June 24
July 1
July 8
July 15
July 19
July 22
July 26
July 29
Aug. 2
Aug. 5
Aug. 12
Aug. 19
Aug. 26
Aug. 30
Sept. 8
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Alice
Louise
Charlotte
Alice
Louise
Alice
Louise
Alice
Louise
Louise
WEST TAKU ARM
FROM VANCOUVER
STEAMER
Date
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.
Lv.
A.M.
12
12
19
19
26
26
3
3
10
10
14
14
17
17
21
21
24
24
28
28
31
31
4
4
7
7
14
14
21
21
25
25
3
3
West
Taku Arm
Ar.     Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.
Lv.
P.M.
13
13
20
20
27
27
4
4
11
11
15
15
18
18
22
22
25
25
29
29
1
1
5
5
8
8
15
15
22
22
26
26
4
4
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
Date
A.M.
Steamer
Princess Louise.	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte	
Princes Alice	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Alice    	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte (Special Cruise)
Princess Alice	
Princess Louise	
Princess Alice	
Princess Louise	
Princess Louise  	
June 8
June 15
June 22
June 29
July 6
July 10
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.  10
Aug.  17
Aug.  21
Aug.  30
12 12
19 19
26 26
3 3
10 10
14 14
17 17
21 21
24 24
28 28
June 17
June 24
July      1
July
31
4
7
31
4
7
14 14
21 21
25 25
3 3
July 15
July 19
July 22
July 26
July 29
Aug. 2
Aug. 5
Aug. 10
Aug. 12
Aug. 19
Aug. 26
Aug. 30
Sept. 8
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princes
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Alice
Louise
Charlotte
Alice
Louise
Charlotte
Alice
Louise
Alice
Louise
Louise
[4
PRINTED   IN  CANADA   1935
 •
ALASKA
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
 Alaska » Yukon
6299      POOLE BROS. CHICAGO.
From
Seattle
Victoria
Vancouver
via
Alert Bay
Prince
Rupert
Ketchikan
Wrangell
Taku
Glacier
Juneau
to
Skagway
and
return
by the
"Inside
Passage"
Taku Glacier
To
Alaska and back by the Inside
Passage is a two-thousand mile nine-day
journey from Vancouver, with six ports of
call. During the summer months the
Canadian Pacific assigns for this service
the finest units of its well-known "Princess" fleet. All staterooms are outside
rooms—light, cozy and well ventilated.
Public rooms—dining room, observation
room, lounges, smoking room—are bright,
cheerful and charmingly furnished. All
ships have dance floors and carry dance
orchestras.
Alaska is a land of gold, of flowers, of
fox farms, salmon, Indians and totem
poles. Its scenery is of a character unknown elsewhere on this continent. For
four days the steamer threads the long,
almost land-locked "Inside Passage,"
winding through mountain-hemmed fiordlike waterways, with wooded islands, tremendous glacier-clad peaks, fascinating
Alaskan towns and queer old settlements
as continuous episodes. No water journey
in America can quite compare in scenery
with the trip to Alaska.
SEE THE CANADIAN ROCKIES EN ROUTE
PRINTED IN CANADA
if Location of Canadian Pacific Hotels
 An authentic photograph of the "Trail of '98"
As early as 1861 gold discoveries were made in
the Stikine River, and from 1866 to 1887 some
gravels of value were found at many places along or
tributary to the Yukon River. The location of the
first Klondike claim in August, 1896, was followed
by a feverish and picturesque rush, the like of
which the world has never seen before or since, and
the mines in American territory were temporarily
deserted.
The Yukon is a "placer" mining district: that is,
the gold is found in alluvial gravels, and is obtained
by assorting the gravels in water. Frequently
these deposits are along the hollows of river beds,
but they are also found at higher altitudes, in terraces that formerly were the beds of streams that
have changed their courses.    In the latter case,
instead of being worked in the creek or sluice, the
gold deposits are first washed down by powerful
jets of water projected by hose lines, and so into
the sluices.
The Bonanza was the greatest of the Klondike
creeks, and its tributary, the Eldorado Creek, the
richest, probably surpassing any known placer
deposit. The Klondike output reached its climax
in 1900, with a production of $22,000,000, but has
since then declined. Besides gold, silver mining
has been developed in the Yukon, an outstanding
example being the silver-lead mine near Mayo.
Placer gold was discovered at Juneau in about
1880, but the present mines there are quartz mines
—that is, the gold is found in rocks, which must be
crushed.
 Photographs
in this booklet are
copyright as
follows:
©a.s.n.—Associated
Screen News Ltd.,
Montreal.
©p.n. — Frederick
Niven, Nelson, B.C.
©g.m.t.—G.M.Taylor, Atlin, B.C.
©w.c.a. — Western
Canada Airways.
A "pan" valued at $1,000!
It came as a whip to men's greed and a challenge to
men's courage, that first ringing call of the Northland.
Until then—a little over thirty years ago—Alaska was
almost unknown, a white space on the map over which was
shakily scrawled "Come-and-find-me." That is, to most
of the world; for the Northland had even then its pioneers,
its prospectors, who had fished its teeming coasts, trapped its furs, started small towns, and panned the first
coarse colorings of gold along its creeks. But outside of
these sturdy old-timers Alaska, with its side-partner, the
Yukon, was hardly more than a geographical curiosity—
a huge, unpopulated, unexplored block of land over three-
quarters of a million square miles in size, forming the
northern tip of the American continent.
But the discovery of gold in the Klondike in 1896, in
such vast quantities as to astound humanity, let loose so
much sensation that overnight the new bonanza became
almost the most famous place on earth. That feverish
stampede to the north (one does not have to be very
middle-aged to remember it) was like nothing that
had ever happened before, or that has ever happened
since.
Back in '98 someone took a photograph of an everyday
scene in the White Pass. It shows, struggling over the
steep, dangerous snow-clad wastes, a thin black streak
nearly two miles long—a streak composed entirely of
men, mushing "inside" to the Klondike, with nearly 600
miles travel ahead of them, and treading so close to one
another in the narrow trail that they very nearly kicked
the previous man's ankles. And this was an everyday
scene—happening all the time.
They had their hardships, those early days, before the
railway was built, and when cheechako and sourdough
alike had to travel that arduous path over the Chilkoot
Pass (or later, the White Pass) and down the Yukon
River. Greed pulled them forward; the crowd behind
pressed them onwards; if they could not endure the strain
they fell out and perished. There was no turning back.
It was truly no place for weaklings, for one was beset not
only by a hostile Nature, but also by the wickedness and
depravity of mankind.
The Northland put a spell on those who made its
acquaintance then. It will put the same spell on us today. It is a land of mystery—a magnet that will always
draw men and women, even though the lure of the gold is
fainter now. It is still a land of romance, its atmosphere
impregnated with memories of those sad, glad days when
the century was just turning over. Gold has ceased to be
its principal advantage—has, indeed, proved a false hope
in those many ghost-like "cities" that parade their empty
shells from Dyea to Nome; but there is equally the romance of to-morrow, the discovery of other and richer resources, the development of a vigorous, prosperous
northern empire.
 Aerial view of Vancouver
©W.C.A.
Victoria, showing the Empress Hotel
©W.C.A.
Totem Poles
The totem poles of the Indians of British
Columbia constitute one of the most striking
features of the whole northwest coast. These
remarkable carvings should not be mistaken
for idols or deities. They are pictorial records of history and mythology, as the
Indians understand them. Some of them
represent the Raven, the Eagle, the Killer-
whale and the Wolf, which are the emblems
of the largest social groups in the nation.
The Bear, the Frog, the Sea-Lion, the Beaver,
the Thunder-Bird, and many others are the
crests of various clans. Here we have to do only
with coats-of-arms.    (See photo next page.)
Vancouver
Victoria
The voyage to Alaska can be divided into
two parts. From Vancouver to Ketchikan the
journey is mostly through narrow channels,
with steep shores heavily timbered to the
water's edge. The second part, from Ketchikan to Skagway, is through wider stretches of
water, with glaciers, waterfalls, and rugged
mountains on either side, and richly colored
with the purple twilights of Alaska.
The Princess steamship slips away from
Vancouver on its four-day northbound trip
at 9.00 o'clock at night, when the long summer dusks have begun to darken. After
trunks have been stowed and opened, dining
room reservations made, and casual first
impressions formed of one's fellow-travellers,
there is still time for a stroll up and down
deck before turning in. By this time the
ship has left Burrard Inlet, passed Brockton
Point, and has entered the Gulf of Georgia.
On the right is still to be seen the dark bulk
of the mainland; on the left, but invisible
yet, is Vancouver Island, in whose lee the
route is sheltered for over two hundred miles.
The course is south of long, narrow Texada
Island and through Discovery Passage,
between that island and Vancouver Island.
The early risers—and they only will see
Seymour Narrows, for this, the narrowest
part of the channel, is passed about 6.00 a.m.
An hour or so later the ship passes through
Johnstone Straits and Broughton Straits,
along whose shores a number of logging
camps can be seen. And then after breakfast
we reach our first stop, Alert Bay.
 Totem Poles at Alert Bay
Alert Bay
Prince Rupert
:    .■ ■■.,;:....
You'll enjoy all types of deck sports
Alert Bay is a small village on a small island—Cormorant
Island—situated so close to Vancouver Island that the maps
are almost unable to make any distinction; but it is nevertheless one of the principal salmon canneries on the Coast.
Here, in fact, will be our first glimpse of this important industry, and during the time in port the canneries invite
visitors to inspect the highly interesting processes of turning
a large, handsome salmon into shiny little round cans. Alert
Bay is an old settlement, with a considerable Indian population; and here, too, we make our first contact with another
object typical of the Northland—the totem pole. (See
"Totem Poles") The Indian cemetery, with some modern
poles, is well worth the short stroll to see it.
After lunch we leave the shelter of Vancouver Island,
reaching Queen Charlotte Sound—with its short experience
of open Pacific Ocean. From Cape Scott, on Vancouver
Island, to Cape St. James, at the southern end of the Queen
Charlotte Islands, is about 150 miles; but we bear away from
that wild and rather primitive group, and keep instead close
inland, reaching Calvert Island in three hours—the longest
of the three times we shall see the wide horizon of the open
Pacific Ocean during the entire trip.
Passing through Lama Passage, Bella Bella is on the left
—a very old and practically deserted Indian village. At
10.00 at night, or so, we enter Old Ocean again, this time at
Millbank Sound, but only for ten miles, "and so" (as Samuel
Pepys says) "to bed."
Entering the Tolmie Channel, between Princess Royal
Island and the mainland, we pass Swanson Bay in the night,
and then enter Grenville Channel, in the shelter of 60-mile-
long Pitt Island. At about breakfast time we pass the mouth
of the Skeena River, and shortly, with Digby Island on the
west, on which may be seen the Canadian Government
wireless station, arrive at about 9.00 a.m. at Prince
Rupert.
Prince Rupert is the most northerly city of any size in
Canada, with a population of about 7,000. Built on a circle
of hills formed of very hard rock, the city is considerably
above the level of the wharf and is reached by a long staircase. It is a very important fishing centre and a big cold
storage plant is located in the Upper Harbor. The visitor
will probably be interested, during his stay on shore, in the
fur stores of the city—the first sight he will obtain of the
great fur industry of the Northland.
 pmhhmmhwimmI
ttnRSSamnt	
.iHiliOlilsiii
Wt^^^El
I     I ,1: M I ■■ii 7
it
Uli^iplllpiB^
,^§
pill
IKki
*v V-
Ketchikan
Wrangell
and
Taku
Glacier
Ketchikan, most prosperous town in Alaska
Shortly after leaving Prince Rupert, the old Indian village
of Metlakatla is passed. Here is a very successful mission
for the natives, founded by Father Duncan. About 30
minutes later, Port Simpson is passed—one of the oldest
settlements in Northern British Columbia, with an old
Hudson's Bay Company's post that has been a trading-centre
with the Indians for about sixty years.
About three hours after leaving Prince Rupert, Green
Island Lighthouse indicates our nearness to the international
boundary line between Canada and Alaska (United States).
Dixon's Entrance, last entrance of the open Pacific Ocean, is
crossed, and we wind our way through Revilla Gigedo Channel—here called Tongas Narrows—to Ketchikan.
Ketchikan (an Indian word meaning "the town under the
eagle") is the southernmost town in Alaska, situated on
Revilla Gigedo Island. It might also be said to be now
the most prosperous town in Alaska, for salmon and halibut
have made it rich and given it large canneries and cold
storage plants. It is also a mining centre for copper, gold,
platinum, silver and lead, the well-known Salt Chuck platinum mines being within 30 miles. Ketchikan has a bustling
air, with hotels, stores and banks. Originally an Indian fishing
camp, it has several large canneries, and a great mosquito
fleet of fishing vessels is continually bringing in fish.
The visitor will find interesting curio stores. There is
also a pleasant walk to the waterfall in Ketchikan Creek
(about 15 minutes), where in the late summer months thousands of salmon may be seen leaping and struggling through
the rushing, foaming water on their way to the spawning
banks. There are two splendid totem poles—the Chief
Johnson totem, surmounted by Kajuk, a fabled bird of the
mountain which amuses itself by throwing rocks at ground
hogs, with below the Raven and the Frog Woman with her
children, the Salmon; and the Kyan totem, surmounted by
the Crane, followed by the Kyak, another legendary bird,
and the Bear.
A distinct change of scenery occurs from now on. The
stretches of water become wide, and mountains rise on either
side, with waterfalls tumbling down and glaciers crowning
their crests. The steamer winds along Clarence Strait,
with Prince of Wales Island on the west, and turning round
between Etolin and Zarembo Islands reaches Wrangell
about 4.00 a.m., and leaves before breakfast time. We shall,
however, have ample time to visit it when southbound.
Wrangell, situated on the island of the same name, is one
of the oldest cities of Alaska, and is named after Baron Wrangell, who was governor about 1830. It was originally a trading post, populated mainly by Indians under the protection
 A close up of Taku Glacier
©A.S.N.
of the Russians, but came under white dominance during the
gold rush of '98. Part of the Russian fort still remains, and
there are also some very old totem poles near the wharf.
Wrangell is at the mouth of the Stikine River, which,
navigable for about 170 miles, is the entry point to the
celebrated Cassiar big-game country.
Two hours after leaving Wrangell the ship enters Wrangell
Narrows, and for twenty miles proceeds at half-speed through
this narrow, winding channel of a remarkable beauty. Well
marked with buoys and beacons, this passage between the
wooded islands saves a long detour around Cape Decision.
At the north end of the Narrows lies the old town of Petersburg, whose name indicates its origin in the days of the
Russian regime. It is now a flourishing fishing centre.
Kupreanof Island is on the west, and after crossing Frederick
Sound and Cape Fanshaw, we enter Stephen's Passage.
We are now surrounded by the typical grandeur of Alaska
and, turning up Taku Inlet, the Taku Glacier sends out
hundreds of odd-shaped ice floes to meet us—as blue as
indigo, floating by to melt gradually in warmer waters, as
slowly the steamer approaches this famous sight. This
glacier, a mile wide and 100 feet thick, extends for over 90
miles back over the mountains to join Llewellyn Glacier at
the head of Atlin Lake.    It really is two glaciers, one—a
mixture of brown, white, and blue colors—"dead" and receding, the other very much alive and continually moving
forward. Showing all the colors of the rainbow, according
to the time of day or position of the sun, huge masses of ice
frequently break off into the sea, with deafening thunder,
and float majestically away. Even the vibration caused by
the ship's whistle will bring down great hundreds-of-tons
pieces of ice.
Glaciers
Along or near the Inside Passage to Alaska, or round
Atlin Lake, many magnificent glaciers are to be seen.
A glacier is, broadly speaking, an accumulation of ice, of
sufficient size and weight to flow down from a snow-covered
elevation. It is a river flowing from a lake, only the lake is
of snow and the river of ice. The thickness of the ice will
vary greatly—it may be, under favorable conditions, as
much as 1,000 feet.
Glaciers frequently extend far below the snow line of the
region. Exactly how a glacier moves has never been satisfactorily explained, but that it does move has been proved
by observation and calculations; more than that, the stream
at the centre of a glacier moves much faster than at the sides
or bottom.
 SSSBSfk
/   //
A Canadian Pacific "Princess" steamship
^Hi$m?TM?*V^'%m^:..
All ships have dance orchestras
A Dining Room—cool and spacious
^     7   X    '
An "unlisted" passenger
Typical stateroom
Private Bath
The mountain-guarded Inside Passage
CANADIAN      PACIFIC      "PRINCESS"     STEAMSHIPS
 Juneau
Skagway
Juneau—capital of Alaska
Three hours' steaming up Gatineau Channel brings us to
Juneau, clinging to the base and sides of Mount Juneau,
which towers 3,500 feet almost perpendicularly above, near
the mouth of the Taku River. Juneau, named after its
French-Canadian founder, is the capital of Alaska, the residence of the Governor, and the seat of all government
departments. With a population of about 4,000, it is a
bright and interesting city, built (like so many of these coast
settlements) partly on piles over the water, partly on bare
rock, with modern hotels and stores, and many attractive
residences and public buildings.
The Territorial Museum in the Arctic Brotherhood Hall
has a wonderful collection of Alaska curiosities; on the floor
below is the experimental salmon hatchery. Fine raw fur
stocks can be seen at local dealers. Juneau has good roads
and automobiles a-plenty; one particularly interesting ride
is to the face of the Mendenhall Glacier (23^ hours return) or
to Auk Lake (an hour longer). A short hike away is the
Gold Creek Basin, the site of the first placer gold strike
in Alaska, made by Joe Juneau and Richard Haines in the
early eighties.
Within a short distance from Juneau, but reached by
launch, are Thane and Douglas, where, until some time after
the Great War, three of the largest low-grade gold-crushing
plants in the world were situated. Now only one remains,
the Alaska Juneau, with a mining and milling capacity of
about 9,000 tons of ore daily. On Douglas Island are the old
buildings of the celebrated Treadwell Mine, flooded by a
cave-in in 1917, and not operated since.
The steamer leaves Juneau at midnight, and reaches
Skagway about 9.00 a.m.; but on the southbound journey
there is ample opportunity to see the beautiful Lynn Canal,
which, with the possible exception of the Taku Glacier,
provides the most wonderful scenery of all. For over 80
miles we steam up this arm of the sea, which varies in width
from one to five miles. Mountains of rock capped with snow,
towering glaciers and gushing waterfalls, canyons of all
sizes and wild shapes, and colors in restless variety surround
us. Davidson Glacier is a huge ice wall seen on the west.
Passing the town of Haines and Fort Seward, we suddenly
turn a point to see Skagway ahead of us.
10
 Skagway, the end of the northbound run, is a town that has loomed
large in the history of the North. When the gold rush started to the
Yukon in 1896, the landing was made at Dyea, which lies on the western
branch of the Lynn Canal, and the trail inland led over the dangerous
Chilkoot Pass; but word came of the discovery of the White Pass, and
in a day fifteen thousand people left Dyea, and in a day Skagway arose
where before was chiefly swamp.
At the height of the gold rush, Skagway was one of the wildest, wickedest places on earth, chockfull of the gambling halls, dance halls, saloons
and other lurid temptations that nowadays can be seen nowhere else but
in the "movies." Gangs of "bad men" terrorized the town, preying
not only on the returning successful prospector but on the incoming
"cheechako" as well. Skagway is not such an ancient town but that
old-timers can regale you with stories of its celebrated characters, such
as Soapy Smith or Frank Reid, whose graves nearby will initiate many
reminiscences. But those days are over. Skagway is a model of propriety, with hotels, stores, and the peaceful air of ordinary business.
Amongst the marvels of Skagway—to those at least who have never
considered Alaska as aught but perpetual winter—are its beautiful
flower gardens. The background of mountains that enclose it like a cup
offer many attractive outings, such as "hikes" along the Skagway River,
to Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove, or the great Denver Glacier. There
are fine launch trips available, and good fishing. The steamer lays over
about 36 hours before starting on its southbound journey.
Alaskan blooms
Flowers
Alaska is a land of contrasts. Never
was so mistaken an idea as that it is all
winter. If it were, whence come the
gorgeous, vivid flower gardens that one
sees everywhere, such masses of color
that they dazzle the eye ? The answer
is simple: the warm Japan current, striking Vancouver Island, is deflected northward, and carries to the Land of the Midnight Sun the same delightful humidity
that the Pacific Coast knows.
11
 Inland from Skagway
The
White
Pass
Lake
Bennett
White
Horse
Dawson
Interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit would be
incomplete without a journey to the equally interesting and
fascinating "inside." Such a journey, difficult as it was in
the early days of the gold rush, can now be easily undertaken,
for Skagway is the southern terminus of the rail line of
the White Pass and Yukon Route. A comfortable train,
with large-windowed observation cars, will carry one
through the magnificent scenery of the White Pass into the
Yukon Territory, connecting at Carcross and at White
Horse with the commodious steamers of the same company.
For those who are returning south by the same "Princess"
steamship, there are available the excursions to West Taku
Arm or to White Horse. For those waiting over until the
next steamship there is the trip to Atlin Lake—where, indeed, many visitors linger much longer than such a brief
visit. A description of these beautiful trips will be found on
page 16. But for those with more time, we will continue on
to White Horse, whence there is the wonderful trip down
the Yukon River to Dawson.
The rail journey is a most spectacular one. The salt tang
of the sea is left behind and the sweetness of lake and moun-
Boundary between British
Columbia and Alaska
tain air fills the nostrils. The scenery grows rugged and
awe-inspiring. We climb steadily around gorges, along the
brink of deep canyons, past roaring cataracts, and near dead
cities to which cling memories of the trail of '98. Such
names as "Dead Horse Gulch" and "Log Cabin" help
vividly to recall those grim days.
At White Pass Summit—nearly 3,000 feet higher than
Skagway in twenty miles—we leave American territory,
and the scarlet-coated Mounted Policeman greets us as we
enter Canada. A bronze monument, where the flags of the
two countries float side by side, marks the boundary line.
For a very short distance we travel through British Columbia, and then at Pennington cross into the Yukon Territory.
On our left, Lake Bennett begins—a long, narrow body of
water which the railway will follow for twenty-six miles. It
is rather amazing to learn that Bennett, where a stop is made
for lunch, and which consists merely of a station and its
outbuildings, once had a population of several thousand, and
teemed with life and excitement. For it was to this beautiful lake, bounded by old-rose color, that the "Trail of '98"
12
 S.S. "Whitehorse"
in the
Five Finger Rapids
led. Those who had survived the epic hazards of the Pass
camped on this lake, and whipsawed lumber to make the
rafts, scows and other manner of water craft in which to
reach the golden land of their hopes. Little did they know,
of course, the perils of the White Horse Rapids, or if they
had heard of them, little did they appreciate them.
Along the ever-winding shores of this blue Lake Bennett,
looking out on a long mountain ridge, the railway runs, until
the little town of Carcross is reached. There is an Indian
school nearby, and interesting fox ranches, and in the
cemetery are buried many of the discoverers of the
Klondike.
Lewes and other little lakes are passed and then Miles
Canyon and White Horse Rapids. On still days, the roar
of these rapids can be heard even in the town, about an hour's
walk distant. As we stand on the brink of this famous
gorge, no very highly colored imagination is necessary to
conjure up pictures of the old days. We can imagine the
bold adventurers in their frail craft nearing these death-
dealing rapids, whose waters are thrown from side to side
in a long serpentine series of twists, and which are so troubled
that the water rides higher in the middle than at the sides.
Down they came in their mad rush to the Klondike—not at
intervals, but in a continuous procession that was (in the
words of an eye-witness) like traffic on a city street. Some,
becoming scared, jumped ashore as they saw their dangers,
and watched from the high cliffs the agonies of their
boats; but the majority stayed with their craft. And
so few came through unpunished! Those who did
wasted no time in going back to warn their competitors,
but hurried on.
White Horse is a busy little town on the west bank of
Fifty-Mile River (also known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the Upper Yukon). There is fairly good hotel
accommodation to be obtained.    Trips to the rapids and
^smsmmsimwmmB^ifWMmiMm^Mmm'M
g|||llli';;::'::5S:eri iiaiiiSi
■XlXXii
mmmmmimmM-
Miles Canyon
Ililllli
tltllX
W-imp
Ifliillll
llPliilllllPlI
;!»ft«rie:ft,;;ft:
liiflBMlXilXXXX:
lIBlBlill
ffiiilalll
lllilllllll
7%ftftft";;7Xfi77;g;77-;;
Wm^&7'm:
IlllllSilll
XXXXX'7
IKilllx'X:;
x7-'&7Z^MS777:«rv7.        ;■
m^mm^m^'-',, 7,7
13
WhiteJHorse Rapids
 Land of the Unsetting Sun
©A.S.N.
Inland
from
Skagway
other points may be made by automobile
over good roads. It is the terminus of
the railway, and the point of departure
for the steamer trip to Dawson.
The journey from White Horse to Dawson and back, one that can be made in
about a week, is the fitting climax to the
trip "inside."   White Horse is the present
head of navigation on the Yukon waterway  (the river in its upper reaches is
really a system of tributaries),  which
empties  into  the  sea  at  St.  Michael,
Alaska, over 2,000 miles distant.    It is a
constantly changing succession of pictures
—rolling  hills,   sometimes   bare,   again
heavily    wooded,    towering    mountain
ranges,  awe-inspiring rapids, with now
and then a quiet stretch of water between forested banks.   Here and there is
an occasional trading-post, or a mining
camp—perhaps   the   ghost   of   a   dead
"bonanza"—or    a    hermit    settlement
where the steamer stops to "wood-up."
Lake Lebarge, a beautiful widening of
the stream (on whose shores, incidentally,
occurred the episode that inspired Robert
Service's celebrated poem about the cremation  of  Sam  McGee),  Hootalinqua,
Little Salmon, and Carmacks, with its
coal mine, are some of the interesting
places passed.   The  shooting  of  Five-
Finger Rapids, and their postscript Rink
Rapids, gives plenty of thrill to even the
most jaded.    At Yukon  Crossing,  the
overland winter trail to Dawson, used
when the river is frozen up, is passed, and
then Fort Selkirk—an important trading-
centre founded in 1898 as a militia post to
guard gold shipments.
One of the most extraordinary sights of
the river trip, if you are so fortunate as
to see it, is a herd of caribou swimming
Caribou swimming the Yukon
©F.N.
14
 The Unsetting Sun
On the 21st of June,
Dawson has 22 hours of
sunshine and two hours
of twilight. Approximately 114 days in the
mid-summer months
have no real night. On
the contrary, the sun is
out of sight from December 5th until January 6th, and December
21st has 18 hours of
darkness and six of twi-
ight.
the Yukon River. The answer to the riddle, "Why should a
caribou swim the river?" is precisely the same as to the other
historic one about the chicken crossing the road; but often
the caribou number hundreds, and even thousands. For the
past four or five years, practically every Dawson steamer
in the months of July and August has passed within reach of
this unique spectacle, and on the opposite page we show a
photograph of the migration.
The mouths of mighty tributaries are passed, amongst
them White River—the only large river that enters the
Yukon from the west or south—and Stewart River, entrance
to the new Mayo silver-lead camp 175 miles east. Smaller
steamers ply the Stewart as far as Mayo, whence it is a case
of "packing in." Swede Creek has a Government Experimental Agricultural Station, and then we are at Dawson.
The trip from White Horse takes about two days—the return trip, owing to the current, about four days.
Dawson, once the focus of the world's greatest gold rush,
the headquarters of the whole Klondike region, is now hardly
more than a shadow of its former glory. Mining operations
are still in progress, but they are carried on under hydraulic
and dredging conditions; the picturesque days of which one
reads in Service and Jack London have departed. Gone
with them are the highly colored, sensational chapters of
Dawson's history, when the city was the rendezvous of
Summit W. P. & Y. Ry.
outlaws as well as greed-crazed miners, when dance halls,
saloons and gambling places ran wide open for the full twenty-
four hours. But to be able to recall that "them was the
days" makes one a real old-timer, a sourdough—but not
necessarily a more than middle-aged man.
Dawson is the administrative centre of the Yukon Territory, and the headquarters of a large detachment of that
fine body of men, the Mounted Police. It is beautifully
situated on a bend of the Yukon River, up-to-date, well-
built, with comfortable hotels, fine homes and gardens.
Over good roads one can visit mining plants and old,
played-out but famous bonanza claims. The Indian village
of Moosehide, and the fox farms, are worth a visit; while the
old cabin of Robert W. Service, the poet-laureate of the
Northland, is the objective of many pilgrimages.
BOOKS ABOUT THE NORTHLAND
A great many interesting books can be obtained about Alaska and the Yukon.
By all means, read some before you start. There are the well-known stories
by Rex Beach—"The Spoilers," "The Barrier," and "The Silver Horde;"
Jack London's famous "Call of the Wild," and many others; Elizabeth Robins'
"Magnetic North" and "Come and Find Me;" James Oliver Curwood's
"Alaskan;" Edison Marshall's "Seward's Folly;" and Robert W. Service's
'' Trail of Ninety-Eight."
Service's poems, "Songs of a Sourdough" and "Ballads of a Cheechako,"
are, we imagine, so well known as hardly to need mention.
15
 Beautiful Lake Atlin
©G.M.T.
"Ben-my-Chree" Homestead
©G.M.T.
16
Lake Atlin
West Taku Arm
To Atlin is another delightful excursion from Skagway,
either as a side trip on the Dawson trip or as one in itself.
The route is the same as before to Carcross, but here the
commodious steamer Tutshi is taken, through a chain of
sapphire lakes, mountain-girt and forest-guarded.
The steamer first crosses Lake Nares, and then through
the narrows enters Tagish Lake, horseshoe-shaped and
guarded by high peaks. Old mining towns and fox farms
are seen along the way. Presently we turn into the Taku
Arm of the lake, a beautiful sheet of water encompassed
by the most inspiring scenery, and then into Taku Inlet
as far as Taku Landing. Here, where a wonderful view
may be obtained of Jubilee Mountain, to the north, a
transfer is made across a three-mile neck of land by an
unique little train.      ^
At the end of the portage we reach Lake Atlin, and
board the twin-screw motorship Tarahne for a six-mile
run to the little town of Atlin. Near the boat landing,
and facing the lake, is the Atlin Inn, built and maintained
for tourists by the White Pass and Yukon Route.
The principal event of the trip to Atlin is the afternoon
excursion on the steamer Tarahne. For about forty miles
the boat winds its way through the narrow mountain-
ribbed passage of the West Channel. The boat then
passes out through Copper Island Narrows, and the return is made down the other side of these islands on Lake
Atlin, where a magnificent view is obtained of the huge
Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast Range.
When the water is smooth, as it generally is, and on its
surface are mirrored the vari-colored verdure-clad hills
and snow-crowned mountains with their cathedral-like
spires, the scene is of sublime beauty and grandeur.
West Taku Arm
Another beautiful scenic trip is that to the West Taku
Arm, which has been especially designed for passengers
who are making the round trip from Vancouver to Skagway and back on the same steam ship. It gives these passengers an opportunity of seeing a maximum number of
points of interest in the short time at their disposal. It
is a journey which takes the visitor into the very heart of
primeval surroundings, where giant mountains raise their
lofty peaks from the glittering glacial waters of the Arm,
which ends at what might be termed the "back door" of
the Taku Glacier.
The route followed is the same as to Atlin, except that
at Golden Gate, instead of turning into the Taku Inlet,
the steamer continues a southerly course and then west,
reaching West Taku Arm Landing and Ben-My-Chree
homestead. Passengers sleep on board and reach Car-
cross in the morning in time to catch the southbound train
and their "Princess" steamer.
 CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga K. A. Cook, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.404 C. & S. Nat'l Bk. Bldg.
Banff, Alta J. A. McDonald, Dist. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Boston, Mass L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, N.Y W. P. Wass, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 160 Pearl St.
Calgary, Alta G. D. Brophy, Dist. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111 T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio M. E. Malone, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas, Texas H. C. James, Dist. Pass. Rep'tive 1212 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit, Mich G. G. McKay, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.... 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Fort William, Ont H. J. Skynner, City Pass. Agent 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont W. C. Tully, City Pass. Agent 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S  A. C. MacDonald, City Pass. Agent 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig, City Pass. Agent  .Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T.H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill, Agent
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris, City Pass. Agent 709 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson, Agent
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch, City Pass. Agent 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum, City Pass. Agent 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 621 South Grand Avo.
Milwaukee, Wis F. T. Sansom, City Pass. Agt. Soo Line. 108 E. Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 611 2nd Ave. South
ivyr^+^oi n.,« JP- E. Gingras, Dist. Pass. Agent Windsor Station
Montreal, «ue ^F c Lydoilf Gen# Agt< paS8< Dept 201 St. James St. W.
Moose Jaw, Sask T. J. Colton, Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson, B.C N. J. Lowes, City Pass. Agent Baker and Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y J.E.Roach,Act.Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic. .Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont R. Y. Daniaud, Dist. Pass. Agent 87 Main Street West
Ottawa, Ont J. A. McGill, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept  83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont J. Skinner, City Pass. Agent 343 George St.
Philadelphia, Pa J. C. Patteson, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. A. Shackelford, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 338 Sixth Ave.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 148A Broadway
Prince Rupert, B.C.. .W. L. Coates, General Agent
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Palais Station
Regina, Sask J. W. Dawson, Dist. Pass. Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John, N.B C. B. Andrews, Dist. Pass. Agent 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo Geo. P. Carbrey, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W.H.Lennon,Gen.Agt.Rail Traffic,Soo Line.. .Fourth & Cedar
San Francisco, Cal F. L. Nason, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 675 Market St.
Saskatoon, Sask R. T. Wilson, City Ticket Agent 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. J. O. Johnston, City Pass. Agent 529 Queen Street
Seattle, Wash E. L. Sheehan, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier, City Pass. Agent 91 Wellington St. North
Skagway, Alaska L. H. Johnston, Agent
Spokane, Wash E. S. McPherson, Spokane Internl. Ry.. .Old Nat. Bank Bldg
Tacoma, Wash City Pass. Agent 1113 Pacific Ave.
t~.,«,+,> r»«* /W. Fulton, Asst. Gen. Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Building
loronto, unt. jQ B Burpe6f Digt> PaS8# Agent Canadian Pacific Building
Vancouver, B.C F. H. Daly, Dist. Pass. Agent 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria, B.C L. D. Chetham, Dist. Pass. Agent 1102 Government St.
Washington, D.C C.E.Phelps,Gen.Agt.Pass.Dept..l4th & New York Ave.,N.W.
Windsor, Ont W. C. Elmer, City Pass. Agent 142 Ouellette Ave.
Winnipeg, Man E. A. McGuinness, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp, Belgium.... .E. Schmitz 25 Quai Jordaens
Belfast, Ireland .. .F. Bramley 14 Donegal Place
Birmingham, Engld... W. T. Treadaway  4 Victoria Square
Bristol, England .A. S. Ray . 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Brussels, Belgium.....G. L. M. Servais 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
Dublin, Ireland A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
Glasgow, Scotland... .C. L. Crowe. .25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg, Germany. .T. H. Gardner  Alsterdamm 9
Liverpool, England....H. T. Penny. Pier Head
t ™a™ T?ni,ionA        JO. E. Jenkins 62 Charing Cross
London, England (G. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall St.
Manchester, England.. R. L. Hughes .31 Mosley St.
Paris, France A. V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
Rotterdam, Holland. .J. Springett Coolsingel No. 91
Southampton, Engld..H. Taylor Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong, China A. M. Parker, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept  .Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe, Japan B. G. Ryan, Passenger Agent  7 Harimamachi
Manila, P.I J. R. Shaw, Gen. Agt 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai, China  G. E. Costello, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept  No. 4 The Bund
Yokohama, Japan E. Hospes, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, ETC.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand, Union
House, Sydney, N.S.W.   A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for
New Zealand, 32-34 Quay St., Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A. .Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.   xyr^iu^„,„« (H. F. Boyer, Pass'r. Rep.f
Auckland, N.Z. UnionS.S.Co.of N.Z. (Ltd.)   ^bourne, j    c p R   g9 William $Lf
Brisbane, Qd.. .Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.       * , ;  ' \' (Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.
Christchurch Perth.W.A..Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
N.Z [..UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)   gu™, Fiji. .UnionS.S.Co.of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z. .UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)   ^^
Fremantle,W.A.Macdonald,Hamilton&Co.
Hobart, Tas.... UnionS.S.Co.of N.Z. (Ltd.)   Wellington,
Launceston,Tas.UnionS.S.Co.ofN.Z.(Ltd.)       N,z	
Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
J. T. Campbell, Trav. Pass.
Agt., C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
[Union S.S.Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques-
Good the World Over
 ALASKA
 LASKA
.S^Sl    ritish olumbia
Coast Service
"Princess1
Steamships
 CANADIAN    PACIFIC
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
ALASKA
1933
SUPPLEMENT 1
to
Sailing List and general Information folder
NEW   LOW   FARES
Vancouver ^ r Skagway
or V      to     <        and
Victoria    J I    Return
$75.00 and upwards
B. C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
(Issued   April,   1933)
 Cancel fares shown on page 3 of folder and substitute the following:
Minimum
Fare
VANCOUVER, B.C
rTO(SKA?JAX   175.00
VICTORIA, B. C.   J       I    RETURN
Effective June 10 to  September 10,  1933
AND UPWARDS
Fares shown will apply in each direction between Vancouver and Skagway on all direct sailings.
Berth and meals are included enroute, but not on board steamship while in port at  Skagway.    See paragraph 2, page  6 of
folder.
Fares quoted herein also apply from Seattle and passengers from Seattle and /or Victoria will be furnished with similar accommodation and meals on the Company's local steamships to and from Vancouver, B. C.
ROUND TRIP FARES WILL BE THE SUM OF FARES  FOR ACCOMMODATION  OCCUPIED   NORTH  AND
SOUTHBOUND.
S.S. PRINCESS NORAH
GROSS TONNAGE  2,500
BERTHING CAPACITY      165
LOWER DECK
(a) Rooms 100, 103, Double lower and single upper	
(b) Rooms 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121,
123, 125, Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
(c) Rooms 122,124,127,129, Deluxe rooms each with twin beds (3 ft. wide) separate bath and toilet..
(d) Rooms 126, 128, 131, Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
(e) Rooms 132, 134, 135, 137, Single lower and single upper berth	
(f) Rooms 130, 133, 136, 139, Single lower and single upper berth—Bibby room.	
(g) Rooms 138, 140, 141, 142, 143, 145, Single lower, single upper and sofa berth.    Deck entrance....
(h) Rooms 144, 146, 147, Single lower and single upper berth	
UPPER DECK
(i)   Rooms 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, Bed (3 ft. wide), single upper and sofa berth,
shower bath and toilet	
ONE-WAY FARES
North or Southbound
For 1
In
Room
$ 75.00
75.00
110.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
95.00
For iy2
In
Room
$ 56.25
56.25
110.00
56.25
56.15
56.25
56.25
56.25
For 2
In
Room
$ 75.00
75.00
110.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
For 2^
In
Room
$ 93.75
93.75
93.75
© For 3
In
Room
$112.50
112.50
112.50
132.50
Berth
Rate
37.50
37.50
37.50
37.50
37.50
37.50
37.50
47.50
© IMPORTANT:—See paragraph 10, page 8, of folder before booking.    Three persons cannot be accommodated in rooms where no rate is shown.
Cabin plan S.S. Princess Norah will be found on page 3 of folder.
REFER TO PAGE 6 OF FOLDER, RULE 4—CHILDREN'S FARES:
Fare for children two years and under five years is reduced to $6.25 one-way or $12.50 round trip.
REFER TO PAGE  10  OF  FOLDER—STIKINE   RIVER   SERVICE   VIA   BARRINGTON   TRANSPORTATION COMPANY:
Round trip summer tourist fare, Wrangell to Telegraph Creek is reduced to $40.00 including meals
and berth.
Special rate for big game hunters, including transportation of all baggage and trophies is reduced to
$60.00.
Page Two
 Cancel fares shown on page 4 of folder and substitute the following:
S.S. PRINCESS LOUISE
GROSS TONNAGE :  4,200
BERTHING CAPACITY      254
AWNING (LOWER DECK)
(a) Rooms Al-Bl, Cl-Dl—Separate tub bath and toilet, also one three-quarter bed (4 feet wide)
and sofa berth with each room   ©	
(b) Room 133—Large room with twin beds (3 feet wide); shower bath and toilet	
(c) Rooms 100 to 117 inclusive—Large rooms containing sofa berth in addition to double lower and
single upper berths; electric heaters :	
(d) Rooms 120, 121, 122, 123, 128, 129, 130, 136,137, 138, 139, outside rooms amidships 	
(e) Rooms 142, 143, 144, 145—Large rooms containing sofa berth in addition to double lower and
single upper berths; electric heaters	
(f) Rooms 148, 149, 150, 151	
(g) Rooms 118, 119, 124, 125, 126, 127, 132, 134, 135, 140, 141, 146, 147, 152, 153—Bibby rooms,
with porthole at end of alcove	
(h) Rooms 154, 155, 157, 158, 159	
PROMENADE DECK
(i)   Rooms 200 to 231, 234 to 241, inclusive	
BOAT DECK
(j)   Rooms 300 to 307 inclusive, 312 to 326 inclusive—Rooms with deck entrance	
(k) Rooms E-3 and F-3—Separate shower bath and toilet, also one single bed (3 feet 6 inches wide)
with each room (accommodating one passenger only)	
For
1
Room
$110.00
110.00
87.50
75.00
87.50
75.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
84.00
85.00
ONE-WAY FARES
North or Southbound
For
IK
in
Room
$110.00
110.00
68.75
56.25
68.75
56.25
56.25
56.25
56.25
65.25
103.75
For
2
in
Room
$110.00
110.00
87.50
75.00
87.50
75.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
For
2V2
in
Room
$128.75
106.25
93.75
106.25
93.75
93.75
93.75
93.75
102.75
© For
3
in
Room
125.00
112.50
Berth
Rate
$43.75
37.50
43.75
37.50
37.50
37.50
37.50
42.00
© See   paragraph 10, page 8 of folder regarding de luxe accommodation and number to be berthed in one room.
© Special attention is called to the fact that these are three-quarter beds and not full size double beds.
BOAT  DECK
0MI1VA7IOM
Dfcri
l/PPER• BERTHS DESIGNATED     "A"
Lower- berths        .. "&"
SOFA-BERTHS- WHERE FITTEP
PE5I<SNATED. BY       *C"
PROMENADE  DECK
igiiffi?   " i*i  * iftiai °  i'i ° ,", '  .  *
AWNING  DECK
CABIN PLAN—PRINCESS LOUISE
Page Three
 Cancel fares shown on page 5 of folder and substitute the following:
S.S. PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
GROSS TONNAGE  3,924
BERTHING CAPACITY      230
LOWER DECK
(a) Rooms 104, 105, 106, 107—Each room has one three-quarter bed (3 feet 9 inches wide) shower
bath and toilet © -
(b) Rooms 100, 101, 102, 103, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 115—Large rooms with sofa berth, in addition to double lower and single upper	
(c) Rooms  114, 117—One single  bed (3  feet wide) shower bath and toilet (accommodating onej
passenger only)	
(d) Rooms 116, 119—Twin beds (3 feet wide) shower bath and toilet	
(Memo:—Rooms 114-116, 117-119 can be sold en suite)
(e) Rooms 118, 121—Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
(f) Rooms 120, 123—Double lower, single upper and sofa berth _	
(g) Rooms 122, 125—Double lower and single upper.    Bibby rooms	
(h) Rooms 124, 127—Twin beds (3 feet wide)	
(i)   Rooms 134, 137, 142, 145, 150, 153, 158, double lower, single upper, shower bath and toilet...
(j)   Room 159, large room with twin beds (3 feet wide) sofa berth, shower and toilet	
(k) Rooms 132, 135, 138, 140, 141, 143, 146, 148, 149, 151, 154, 156, 157, 162, bibby rooms with porthole at end of alcove	
(1)   Rooms 161, 163, 168, 170, 172	
(m) Rooms 165, 167, 169, 171, 173, 174, 176, 178, 180, 182, 184	
(n) Room 164, twin beds (3 feet wide) shower bath and toilet.	
UPPER DECK
(o)  Rooms 16-18, 17-19, 20-22, 21-23, connecting rooms with double lower and single upper berths.
Rooms 16, 17, 20, 21, with saloon entrance only	
Rooms 18, 19, 22, 23, with deck entrance only	
(p) Rooms 24 to 43 inclusive, rooms with double lower and single upper berths	
(q) Rooms 1 to 12 inclusive, 14 and 15. 44 to 53 inclusive, rooms with double lower and single upper
berths -	
ONE-WAY FARES
North or Southbound
For
1
Room
$105.00
87.50
80.00
110.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
105.00
95.00
160.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
110.00
84.00
84.00
84.00
75.00
For
IK
Room
$105.00
68.75
110.00
56.25
56.25
56.25
105.00
76.25
160.00
56.25
56.25
56.25
110.00
65.25
65.25
65.25
56.25
For
2
Room
For
in
Room
$105.00
87.50
110.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
105.00
95.00
160.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
110.00
84.00
84.00
84.00
75.00
$106.25
93.75
93.75
93.75
113.75
178.75
93.75
93.75
93.75
102.75
102.75
102.75
93.75
©For
3
in
Room
$125.00
112.50
112.50
112.50
197.50
112.50
112.50
112.50
Berth
Rate
$43.75
37.50
37.60
37.50
47.50
37.50
37.50
37.50
42.00
42.00
42.00
37.50
©  See paragraph 10, page 8, of folder regarding de luxe accommodation and number to be berthed in one room.
©   Special attention is called to the fact that these are three-quarter beds and not full size double beds.
UPPER DECK
\TfJ5\  7°'**r "svc* »SwM»y
Egg3 <S*ttbm
LOWER DECK
CABIN PLAN—PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
Page Four
 CANADIAN    PACIFIC
mini mini
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
ALASKA
1933
SUPPLEMENT 1
to
Sailing List and general Information folder
NEW   LOW   FARES
Vancouver ^ r Skagway
or r     to     -<        and
Victoria     J I    Return
$75.00 and upwards
B. C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
458 (Issued  April,   1933)
 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIII
 lllllllllllllf
«    CANADIAN   PACIFIC   »
iiiiii niiiiti n i n it hi ii i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii
«   CANADIAN   PACIFIC   »
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiii'
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
i CANADIAN
PACIFIC
ALASKA    ALASKA
1933
1933
SAILING LIST
AND
GENERAL INFORMATION
SAILING LIST
AND
GENERAL INFORMATION
Seattle - Victoria - Vancouver, B.C
TO
Skagway, Alaska
Seattle - Victoria - Vancouver, B.C
TO
Skagway, Alaska
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii inn hi iiiiiiu i iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
B.C. COAST  STEAMSHIP  SERVICE
iiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iii iiiiiiiiiiimi iiiiii m mini 1111111111 in iiiiii ni ii ii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii in mi
■ mi urn iiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii nut
B.C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiimiimmmimiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimi
 i /IXXftXftXi
'\X7X;<:;2::/;-\
/-'
lX'X;:Xl; X
ft,-.::,,ftftftftft7ft=ftft|ft|i|.7
ft;:"; XXfiftvft::;;
iiii
lllj|ft   mm 7^
Northward Ho!
SCHEDULE
Vancouver -Victoria
TO
Prince Rupert, Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau
and Skagway
SAILINGS
From
From
Arrive
Voy.       Vancouver
Skagway
Vanc'ver
No
9:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
8:15 a.m.
©
©
©
1.
Sat,
June 10
Pr. Norah
June 15
June 19
2.
Sat.,
June 17
Pr. Louise
June 22
June 26
3.
Sat.,
June 24
Pr. Charlotte
June 29
Tuly    3
4.
Sat,
July    1
Pr. Louise
July    6
July 10
5.
Sat.,
July    8
Pr. Charlotte
July 13
July 17
6.
Sat.,
July 15
Pr. Louise
July 20
July 24
7.
Sat,
July 22
Pr. Charlotte
July 27
July 31
8.
Sat.,
July 29
Pr. Louise
Aug.   3
Aug.   7
9.
Thur.
, Aug. 10
Pr. Louise
Aug. 15
Aug. 19
10.
Sat,
Aug. 19
Pr. Louise
Aug. 24
Aug. 28
11.
Thur.
, Aug. 31
Pr. Louise
Sept.  5
Sept. 9
©All times shown in Pacific Standard time except sailing hour from Skagway, which is Alaska
time—one hour slower than Pacific time.
Specimen Itinerary
NORTHBOUND
Lv.
Vancouver
9:00 p.m.,
Sat. or Thur
Ar.
Alert Bay
10:00 a.m.,
Sun. or Fri
Ar.
Prince Rupert
9:00 a.m.,
Mon. or Sat
Ar.
Ketchikan
7:00 p.m.,
Mon. or Sat
Ar.
Wrangell
4:00 a.m.,
Tues. or Sun
©Ar.
Taku Glacier
5 :00 p.m.,
Tues. or Sun
Ar.
Juneau
7:00 p.m.,
Tues. or Sun
Ar.
Skagway
9:00 a.m.,
Wed. or Mon.
SOUTHBOUND
Lv.
Skagway
©7:00 p.m.,
Thur. or Tues.
Ar.
Juneau
6:00 a.m.,
Fri. or Wed.
Ar.
Wrangell
7:30 p.m.,
Fri. or Wed.
Ar.
Ketchikan
7:00 a.m.,
Sat. or Thur.
Ar.
Prince Rupert
4:00 p.m.,
Sat. or Thur.
Ar.
Alert Bay
4:00 p.m.,
Sun. or Fri.
Ar.
Vancouver
8:15 a.m.,
Mon. or Sat.
Times of arrival at way ports are approximate
only.    Length of stay varies from 1 to 3 hours.
©All times shown in Pacific Standard time except sailing hour from Skagway, which is Alaska
time—one hour slower than Pacific time.
©Call will be made at Taku Glacier on all
northbound voyages, weather permitting.
Seattle   - Victoria   - Vancouver
"TRIANGLE" SERVICE
Through tickets to Alaska include passage,
meals and berth on the Company's "Triangle" Service from Seattle or Victoria, and permit stop-overs
of 48 hours either north or southbound. Particulars
of schedule will be found in current folders.
Princess Kathleen and Princess Marguerite
"Triangle" Service
Page Two
 FARES—SKAGWAY SERVICE
VANCOUVER
OR
VICTORIA
TO
SKAGWAY
AND
RETURN
$90.00
AND    UPWARDS
Effective June 10 to September 10,  1933
Fares shown will apply in each direction between Vancouver and Skagway on all direct sailings.
Berth and meals are included enroute, but not on board steamship while in port at Skagway.   See paragraph 2, page 6.
Fares quoted herein also apply from Seattle and passengers from Seattle and/or Victoria will be furnished with similar accommodation and meals on the Company's local steamships to and from Vancouver, B. C.
ROUND TRIP FARES WILL BE THE SUM OF FARES FOR ACCOMMODATION OCCUPIED NORTH AND
SOUTHBOUND.
S.S. PRINCESS NORAH
GROSS TONNAGE  2,500
BERTHING CAPACITY      165
LOWER DECK
(a) Rooms 100, 103, Double lower and single upper	
(b) Rooms 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121,
123, 125, Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
(c) Rooms 122, 124, 127, 129, Deluxe rooms each with twin beds (3 ft. wide) separate bath and toilet..
(d) Rooms 126, 128, 131, Double lower, single upper and sofa berth _	
(e) Rooms 132, 134, 135, 137, Single lower and single upper berth.  	
(f) Rooms 130, 133, 136, 139, Single lower and single upper berth—Bibby room . .,. 	
(g) Rooms 138, 140, 141, 142, 143, 145, Single lower, single upper and sofa berth.    Deck entrance....
(h) Rooms 144, 146, 147, Single lower and single upper berth	
(i)   Rooms 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
shower bath and toilet	
UPPER DECK
10, 11, 12, 14, 15, Bed (3 ft. wide), single upper and sofa berth,
ONE-WAY FARES
North or Southbound
For 1
In
Room
$ 90.00
90.00
130.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
For \y2
In
Room
$ 67.50
67.50
130.00
67.50
67.50
67.50
67.50
67.50
87.50
For 2
In
Room
$ 90.00
90.00
130.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
110.00
For 2y2
In
Room
$112.50
112.50
132.50
CD For 3
In
Room
$135.00
135.00
135.00
155.00
Berth
Rate
45.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
55.00
® IMPORTANT:—See paragraph 10, page 8, before booking.    Three persons cannot be accommodated in rooms where no rate is shown.
LOWER  DECK
CABIN PLAN—PRINCESS NORAH
Page; Three
 S.S. PRINCESS LOUISE
GROSS TONNAGE  4,200
BERTHING CAPACITY      254
ONE-WAY FARES
North or Southbound
For
1
Room
For
1H
Room
For
2
Room
For
2V2
in
Room
©For
3
in
Room
Berth
Rate
AWNING (LOWER DECK)
(a) Rooms Al-Bl, Cl-Dl—Separate tub bath and toilet, also one three-quarter bed (4 feet wide)
and sofa berth with each room   ©	
(b) Room 133—Large room with twin beds (3 feet wide); shower bath and toilet	
(c) Rooms 100 to 117 inclusive—Large rooms containing sofa berth in addition to double lower and
single upper berths; electric heaters	
(d) Rooms 120, 121, 122, 123, 128, 129, 130, 136,137, 138, 139, outside rooms amidships 	
(e) Rooms 142, 143, 144, 145—Large rooms containing sofa berth in addition to double lower and
single upper berths; electric heaters	
(f) Rooms 148, 149, 150, 151	
(g) Rooms 118, 119, 124, 125, 126, 127, 132, 134, 135, 140, 141, 146, 147, 152, 153—Bibby rooms,
with porthole at end of alcove.	
(h) Rooms 154, 155, 157, 158, 159	
PROMENADE DECK
(i)   Rooms 200 to 231, 234 to 241, inclusive	
BOAT DECK
(j)   Rooms 300 to 307 inclusive, 312 to 326 inclusive—Rooms with deck entrance.	
(k) Rooms E-3 and F-3—Separate shower bath and toilet, also one single bed (3 feet 6 inches wide)
with each room (accommodating one passenger only) ,	
$130.00
130.00
105.00
90.00
105.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
100.00
100.00
$130.00
130.00
82.50
67.50
82.50
67.50
67.50
67.50
67.50
77.50
122.50
$130.00
130.00
105.00
90.00
105.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
100.00
$152.50
152.50
127.50
112.50
127.50
112.50
112.50
112.50
112.50
122.50
150.00
150.00
135.00
$52.50
45.00
52.50
45.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
50.00
(T) See   paragraph 10, page 8 regarding de luxe accommodation and number to be berthed in one room.
(D Special attention is called to the fact that these are three-quarter beds and not full size double beds.
UPPER-BERTHS DESIGNATED     *A"
LtfWER- BERTHS .. "B"
SOFA-BERTHS' WHERE-FITTEP
PESI6JNATED- BY       "C"
«- fC^> m^~m *xx-> <rv>
BOAT DECK
CABIN PLAN—PRINCESS LOUISE
Page Four
 S.S. PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
GROSS TONNAGE ..  3,924
BERTHING CAPACITY....      230
ONE-WAY FARES
North or Southbound
For
1
in
Room
For
V4
in
Room
For
2
in
Room
For
in
Room
©For
3
in
Room
Berth
Rate
LOWER DECK
(a) Rooms 104, 105, 106, 107—Each room has one three-quarter bed (3 feet 9 inches wide) shower
bath and toilet ©	
(b) Rooms 100, 101, 102, 103, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 115—Large rooms with sofa berth, in addition to double lower and single upper	
(c) Rooms  114, 117—One single bed (3  feet wide) shower bath and toilet (accommodating one
passenger only)	
(d) Rooms 116, 119—Twin beds (3 feet wide) shower bath and toilet	
(Memo:—Rooms 114-116, 117-119 can be sold en suite)
(e) Rooms 118, 121—Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
(f) Rooms 120, 123—Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
(g) Rooms 122, 125—Double lower and single upper.    Bibby rooms	
(h) Rooms 124, 127—Twin beds (3 feet wide)	
(i)   Rooms 134, 137, 142, 145, 150, 153, 158, double lower, single upper, shower bath and toilet—	
(j)   Room 159, large room with twin beds (3 feet wide) sofa berth, shower and toilet.	
(k) Rooms 132, 135,138,140,141,143,146,148,149, 151,154, 156, 157, 162, bibby rooms with porthole at end of alcove	
(1)   Rooms 161, 163, 168, 170, 172	
(m) Rooms 165, 167, 169, 171, 173, 174, 176, 178, 180, 182, 184	
(n) Room 164, twin beds (3 feet wide) shower bath and toilet	
UPPER DECK
(o) Rooms 16-18, 17-19, 20-22, 21-23, connecting rooms with double lower and single upper berths.
Rooms 16, 17, 20, 21, with saloon entrance only	
Rooms 18, 19, 22, 23, with deck entrance only _	
Rooms 24 to 43 inclusive, rooms with double lower and single upper berths	
Rooms 1 to 12 inclusive, 14 and 15.. 44 to 53 inclusive, rooms with double lower and single upper
berths	
$125.00
105.00
95.00
130.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
125.00
110.00
187.50
90.00
90.00
90.00
130.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
90.00
$125.00
82.50
130.00
67.50
67.50
67.50
125.00
87.50
187.50
67.50
67.50
67.50
130.00
77.50
77.50
77.50
67.50
$125.00
105.00
130.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
125.00
110.00
187.50
90.00
90.00
90.00
130.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
90.00
$127.50
112.50
112.50
112.50
132.50
210.00
112.50
112.50
112.50
122.50
122.50
122.50
112.50
$150.00
135.00
135.00
232.50
$52.50
45.00
45.00
45.00
55.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
45.00
©  See paragraph 10, page 8, regarding de luxe accommodation and number to be berthed in one room.
©  Special attention is called to the fact that these are three-quarter beds and not full size double beds.
UPPER DECK
|7j^5|  7o/**-r s9/»fc? jggggf
g£3 &TTem
LOWER DECK
CABIN PLAN—PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
Page Five
 lenera
IRul
es
1. Fares from
Prince Rupert
Fares quoted from Vancouver to
Skagway will also apply from
Prince Rupert to Skagway and
return to Prince Rupert or Vancouver, or visa-
versa.
2. Extra Charge   Round trip fares to Skagway in-
for Berth elude   berth   and   meals   enroute
r Wjr    , but not while steamship is in port
and Meals at ~, , .«   i u     . ,   ,
at Skagway, except that breaktast
Skagway w*jj   ^e   served   on   morning   of
arrival and dinner on day of departure without extra charge.
Passengers making the round trip on the same
voyage have the option of remaining on board while
at Skagway on payment of regular tariff rate for
meals and berth. See B.C.C.S. Tariff 21-2 and
Supplements, night berth rates shown therein will
apply for entire time steamship is in port. Approximate cost per passenger:
LUNCH on day of arrival $1.00
DINNER on day of arrival  1.50
BERTH RATE, ordinary room  2.00
BREAKFAST day of departure 75
LUNCH day of departure  1.00
$6.25
Tickets should be endorsed "Berth & Meals
extra at Skagway." These charges will be collected
by Purser and MUST NOT be collected by Ticket
Agents.
of Rooms
3. Exclusive Use Two full fares will be charged
for exclusive use of any two-
berth   room   during   the   tourist
season, and Selling Agent should stamp or write the
words "Exclusive Use", also amount collected,
across face of ticket or order.
4. Children's Children 5 years and under 12
fares                        years  will  be   charged   half  the
minimum fare plus full premium
(if any) except that no reduction will be made for
children in deluxe rooms when same are occupied
by two passengers only. See fares pages 3 to 5.
Children two years of age and under 5 will be
charged $7.50 one-way or $15.00 round trip. This
will entitle them to separate seat in the dining
saloon, but, if separate berth is required, charge
will be the same as for children between 5 and 12
years of age. Children under two years will be
carried free when accompanied by parent or
guardian.
5. Deposit Deposit of 25%  of fare will be
required when reservation is
made, balance to be paid when tickets issued, but
not less than sixty days prior to sailing when space
is reserved on separate sailings north and southbound, or forty-five days when space is reserved
for the roundtrip on one sailing.
6. Limits Round   trip   tickets   to   Skagway
will   be   limited   to   October   31,
1933.
7. Local Service   Fares quoted from Vancouver to
Seattle-Victoria-    Skagway     either     one-way     or
round
also    apply    from
Vancouver, Stop- *uuli^        "
Seattle or from Victoria includ-
over Privileges     ing. mea]s and berth on the Com.
pany's local steamship service between Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver as follows:
(a) NORTHBOUND FROM SEATTLE—Provided passengers use local steamships sailing from
Seattle not earlier than 48 hours prior to departure
of Alaska steamship from Vancouver. Passengers
using night steamship from Seattle day previous to
sailing from Vancouver, may, if they desire, board
Alaska steamship on arrival and occupy their accommodation, in which case lunch and dinner will
be served on Alaska steamship without extra charge.
Passengers should not be encouraged to do this
however, as ship has to load freight and may have
to shift berth during the day. Passengers using
morning steamship from Seattle on day Alaska
steamship sails from Vancouver will be furnished
-Page Six
 lunch on local steamship enroute and dinner on
Alaska steamship on arrival at Vancouver.
(b) NORTHBOUND FROM VICTORIA—Provided passengers use local steamships from Victoria
not earlier than 48 hours prior to departure of
Alaska steamship from Vancouver. Passengers
using midnight steamship from Victoria day previous to sailing from Vancouver may, if they desire,
board Alaska steamship on arrival and occupy their
accommodation and will be served lunch and dinner without extra charge. Passengers using afternoon steamship from Victoria on day of sailing
from Vancouver will be furnished day stateroom on
local steamship and dinner on Alaska steamship on
arrival.
(c) SOUTHBOUND FROM VANCOUVER —
Alaska steamships are due Vancouver, southbound,
at 8:15 a.m. on advertised date. Breakfast will be
served to Alaska passengers before debarkation.
Passengers holding through tickets Skagway to
Victoria or Seattle may transfer to local steamship
sailing same morning for Seattle via Victoria or
may use night direct steamship to Seattle, or may
stopover either at Vancouver or Victoria for 48
hours. Meals and berth are furnished without extra
charge on local steamships within limit.
Dining Saloon—Princess Louise
ir Location of Canadian Pacific Hotels
Page seven
 General Information and
Instructions
11. Meal
Service
8. En Suite
Accommodation
Princess Louise
9. Berth Lights,
Hot and Cold
Running Water
Rooms Al-129, Cl-128, Dl-130
Princess Louise may be used as
adjoining rooms if desired.
All rooms have hot and cold
running water and berth lights in
each berth.
10. Number to
be Berthed in
One Room
With the exception of rooms
mentioned below, all staterooms
are designed to accommodate two
passengers only and are not large
enough to accommodate more
than two adults. Exception, rooms covered by paragraphs C and E "Princess Louise," B, E and F,
"Princess Charlotte", and B, D, G, and I, Princess
Norah". See pages 3 to 5. These latter rooms each
contain sofa berth in addition to double lower and
single upper berth and can accommodate three passengers if desired. Rooms E3 and F3 Princess
Louise and rooms 114 and 117 on Princess Charlotte
should not be sold for more than one passenger
each. Third passenger in any stateroom will be
charged minimum fare.
BREAKFAST — 7:30 a.m. to
9:30 a.m., continuous service.
LUNCHEON — 1st sitting 12
noon, 2nd sitting 12:45 p.m.
DINNER—1st sitting 6:00 p.m.,
2nd sitting 6:45 p.m.
Light refreshments are also served in dining saloon
at 10:00 p.m. without extra charge. Table reservations should be made with Second Steward on
embarkation.
12. Barbers,
Hairdressers
and Valet
Service
13. Music
14. Steamer
Rugs and
Glasses
15. Clothing
Barbers and lady hairdressers are
carried on all steamships. Valet
service is also provided.
All steamships have excellent
dance floors and carry orchestras.
Steamer rugs and also a limited
number of field glasses may be
rented from the News Agent on
board at a nominal charge.
The average temperature during
the summer months at Northern
B. C. and Alaska ports is between 65 and 70 degrees
and medium weight clothing is all that is necessary.
Page Eight
 16. Steamer All steamships are provided with
Chairs comfortable   camp   chairs   with
backs which are at the disposal
of all passengers free of charge. Regulation ocean
liner deck chairs are not supplied as there is not
sufficient room on the decks to provide all passengers with this type of chair.
17. Baggage (a)    150 lbs. of baggage will be
carried free on each adult ticket
and 75 lbs. on each half ticket. Charge for excess
baggage, $3.75 per 100 lbs. in each direction between Seattle, Victoria, Vancouver and Skagway.
Steamer trunks not more than 14 inches in height
may be placed in staterooms. Passengers will find
it more convenient to allow trunks to be placed in
the baggage room on board where they can be made
readily accessible if desired, unless bonded.
(b) FREE STORAGE, SEATTLE, VICTORIA
OR VANCOUVER. Free storage of baggage will
be permitted for not more than 30 days at the above
mentioned ports. Regular storage charges will
accrue after expiration of this period.
(c) BONDED BAGGAGE — Baggage may be
checked through from Seattle to Skagway, and if
not required en route may be forwarded under
bond to avoid necessity of customs inspection. If
baggage is required en route it should be checked to
Victoria or Vancouver only and presented for Canadian  Customs inspection before boarding steam
ship for Alaska. U. S. Customs inspection will also
be necessary at Ketchikan, the first port of entry
into Alaska. Baggage checked from Vancouver or
Victoria to Skagway will be inspected by U. S. Customs officers at Ketchikan, or may be bonded if
'desired.
(d) SOUTHBOUND — Canadian Customs baggage inspection will be made at Prince Rupert and
U. S. Customs inspection at Vancouver (if passenger is travelling east via Canadian Pacific Railway)
or at Seattle.
(e) Baggage can be checked through from Puget
Sound and British Columbia ports to Atlin or Dawson, via the White Pass and Yukon Route, without
undergoing inspection by Customs officers at Skagway, provided passengers hold through tickets in
which case it will be inspected at destination. Baggage originating at British Columbia points can be
corded and sealed and sent through Alaska in bond
without inspection. Baggage originating at United
States ports destined to points in Alaska on the
lower Yukon River below Dawson can go through
to destination in bond without inspection.
18. Immigration Passengers entering Alaska from
Requirements Canada are required to pass the
customary United States Immigration Inspection at Ketchikan, the port of entry.
This inspection is not strict so far as bona fide
tourists are concerned.    Passengers will be asked
Taku Glacier
Page Nine
 by purser for certain information regarding age,
place of residence, business, etc., for use in making
up the manifest required by the Immigration Department, and will be given a card by him. This
inspection is greatly facilitated for passengers from
the United States if they carry "identification
slips" which will be supplied by selling agent. The
card received from the purser is presented by pas
senger to Immigration inspector, who boards steamship on arrival at Ketchikan, and as soon as particulars shown by purser on manifest are checked by
the inspector, the passenger is permitted to go
ashore. There is a similar inspection by the Canadian Immigration Department on arrival of steamship southbound at Prince Rupert. These inspections are largely formal so far as tourists are concerned.
Stikine River Service to Big Game District Northern B.C.
Wrangell, Alaska, to Telegraph Creek, B.C., via
Barrington Transportation Company
The Cassiar District of Northern British Columbia, famous for its Big Game hunting, can be
reached from Wrangell via the Stikine River, 185
miles to Telegraph Creek, B. C.
The Barrington Transportation Company operate a regular weekly service by Diesel propelled
river steamers during the season of navigation, from
May 5 to early October. These vessels have accommodation for from fifteen to fifty passengers
and about fifty tons of freight.
River steamers leav^e Wrangell every Tuesday
during the tourist season, after arrival of Canadian
Pacific steamship leaving Vancouver the preceding Saturday, and arrive Telegraph Creek on Thursday.
Round trip summer tourist fare, Wrangell to
Telegraph Creek is $50.00, including meals and
berth. Big Game hunters will be given a special
round trip rate of $75.00 including transportation
of all baggage and trophies.
Telegraph Creek is the outfitting point for the
big game country. Full particulars regarding cost
of hunting trips, etc., will be furnished by General
Tourist Agent, Canadian Pacific Railway, Montreal,
Que.
"Skagway and the White Pass"
Page Ten
 I-
S. S. Princess Louise
S. S. Princess Charlotte
Page Eleven
 White Pass and Yukon Route
The White Pass and Yukon Route operates daily trains between SKAGWAY and WHITEHORSE in both directions during the
tourist season, and steamships on the Yukon River to Dawson and Mayo. Service is also provided for an interesting trip from
CARCROSS to ATLIN by steamship through Nares and Tagish Lakes and across Atlin Lake.
Rail Service between Skagway and White Horse
NORTHBOUND
Dist. from
Skagway
Alt. above
sea level
STATIONS
SOUTHBOUND
Mon., Tues.,
Thurs., Sat.
Wed., Fri.
Sun., Wed.,
Fri.
Tues., Thurs.,
Sat.
Mon., Thurs.,
Sat.
6un., Wed.,
Fri.
*8 :30 a.m.
11:30 a.m.
12 :01 p.m.
1:40 p.m.
3:50 p.m.
*t8 :30 a.m.
10:40 a.m.
12 :45 p.m.
2 :45 p.m.
*10:00 a.m.
1:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
3:05 p.m.
5 :05 p.m.
0.0
40.6
67.5
110.7
0
2,158
2,164
2,079
Lv     Skagway Ar.
Ar.    )                        ._                                 )    Lv.
tw     j     JBennett    >     a<-
3:25 p.m.
12:45 p.m.
12:01 p.m.
10:45 a.m.
8 :45 a.m.
4:30 p.m.
1:40 p.m.
1:15 p.m.
11:50 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
4:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
12:10 p.m.
9:30 a.m.
Lv  Carcross  Lv.
Ar     Whitehorse     Lv.
* Alaska Time—One hour behind Pacific Time.
tWest Taku Arm Special leaves from Skagway Wharf-
$Meal Station.
-Other trains leave from Skagway Depot.
River and Lak
TO DAWSON
Navigation on the Yukon River between Whitehorse
and Dawson opens from May 20 to June 1, and closes, depending upon weather conditions about the middle of
October. At the opening of navigation the steamships do
not operate on a definite schedule for the first week or so.
The regular service commences with the sailing of the
"Casca" from Whitehorse, June 14 and every Wednesday
thereafter at 7:00 p.m.. This service continues until the
middle of August, after which there will be irregular sailings about twice a week for the balance of the season.
The round trip, Whitehorse to Dawson and return,
occupies 6JA days, bringing the passenger back to Whitehorse on a Wednesday morning.
The WEDNESDAY arrival at Whitehorse leaves the
passenger the option of remaining in Whitehorse that day
and going to Skagway Thursday to connect with the Canadian Pacific Railway steamship southbound; or, leaving
Whitehorse Wednesday morning connecting at Carcross
with steamship "Tutshi" for West Taku Arm, which will
bring the passenger into Skagway Thursday afternoon in
time for Canadian Pacific steamship sailing Thursday evening; or leaving Whitehorse Thursday morning connecting
at Carcross with steamship "Tutshi" for Atlin for a stay at
that point, connecting with the following Thursday sailing
southbound from Skagway.
TO ATLIN
At Carcross connection is made for Lake Atlin on the
steamship "Tutshi," which sails for Atlin, Monday and
Thursday afternoon shortly after arrival of train from
Skagway. At Atlin the White Pass and Yukon Route operates the Atlin Inn, where good accommodations and meals
are available for the passenger. Returning from Atlin, the
"Tutshi" arrives in Carcross Wednesday and Sunday morning in time for train either for Skagway^ or Whitehorse,
having left Atlin at 7:30 p.m. previous evening.
SPECIAL SUMMER EXCURSION FARES
The  following low  round-trip  excursion  fares will  be
in effect during the summer season:
Skagway   to   Lake   Bennett   and   return   (1-day   limit)    (including
lunch at Bennett)   $ 7.50
Skagway to Whitehorse and return   (2-day limit)  22.00
Skagway to Whitehorse and return  (30-day limit)  32.00
Skagway to Atlin-Whitehorse and return  (30-day limit)  45.00
e Steamship Service
Skagway to Dawson and return  (30-day limit) $110.00
Skagway to Dawson-West Taku Arm and return (30-day limit).... 125.00
Skagway to Dawson-Atlin and return  (30-day limit)  130.00
SPECIAL EXCURSION TO WEST TAKU ARM
(During June, July and August)
Leaving Skagway Wednesday morning, returning to
Skagway Thursday afternoon. (Special trips will be made
to connect with the S. S. Princess Louise arriving at Skagway, August 14th and September 4th, leaving Skagway
Monday morning, returning to Skagway Tuesday afternoon).
Skagway to north end of Taku Glacier and return, including meals
at Bennett and meals and berth on lake steamship $30.00
Parlor car seat fare Skagway to Carcross, return, extra (2.00)
This is a special excursion, 68 miles by rail over the
White Pass Summit, along the shores of Lake Bennett to
Carcross, where connection is made with a comfortable
stern-wheel steamship for a twenty-hour trip on the West
Taku Arm to the north end of Taku Glacier, 82 miles and
return, a total distance of 300 miles through magnificent
mountain and lake scenery.
PARLOR CAR FARES
Skagway and Whitehorse—one way $1.50
Round  trip    3.00
Round trip including stopover at Carcross  3.00
Skagway and  Carcross—one way   1.00
Round  trip   „  2.00
Skagway and Bennett—round trip   1.50
Lunch at Bennett, B. C  1.00
ATLIN INN
At Atlin, near the boat landing, facing the lake and
within a few feet of the shore, is the ATLIN INN owned
and operated by the White Pass & Yukon Route on the
European plan. All rooms have hot and cold running water.
Rates—Single room $3.00 to $3.50 per day per person.
Double room $2.00 to $2.75 per day per person. Breakfast $1.00; lunch $1.00; dinner $1.50.
Those who stay more than two days at this resort may
obtain the following discount off their total bill:
3 days, 10% — 4 days, 20% — 5 days or more, 25%
The foregoing information covering the White Pass and Yukon
Route is subject to change at any time. Due notice will be given when
possible.
Page Twelve
 DAWSON-ATLIN ROUND TRIP
SEASON 1933
FROM VANCOUVER
Skagway
Ar.      Lv.
A.M.
Atlin
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Dawson
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
Atlin
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
Steamship
Date
P.M.
Date
A.M.
Steamship
Princess Norah	
Princess Louise  	
Princess Charlotte	
June   10
June   17
June   24
July      1
July      8
July    15
July    22
July    29
Aug.    10
14 14
21 21
28    28
5 5
12 12
19 19
26    26
2 2
14    14
14    15
14 14
21 21
28   28
5 5
12 12
19 19
26   26
2 2
16    16
16 17
23 24
30      1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28    29
4 5
18    19
21    22
28    29
5      6
12    13
19    20
26    27
2      3
9    10
23    24
22 27
29      4
6 11
13 18
20 25
27      1
3 12
10    12
28    29
5      6
12 13
19    20
26    27
2      3
13 15
13    15
24    24
July      3
July    10
July    17
July    24
July    31
Aug.      7
Aug.   19
Aug.    19
Aug.   28
Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise	
Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise
Princess Louise -	
Princess Louise ,	
Princess Louise
Princess Louise
2 DAWSON-WEST TAKU ARM OR DAWSON ROUND TRIP
(For Dawson round-trip use same as below, omitting West Taku Arm Dates, passenger spending extra time between Whitehorse
and Skagway.)
SEASON 1933
FROM VANCOUVER
Steamship
Norah	
Louise	
Charlotte	
Louise. 	
Charlotte	
Louise.  ....
Charlotte	
Louise :	
Louise ,	
Date
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
West
Taku  Arm
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Dawson
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
West
{Taku  Arm
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
Date
A.M.
Steamship
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
June 10
June 17
June 24
July
July
July
July 22
July 29
Aug. 10
15
14 14
21 21
28 28
5 5
12 12
19 19
26 26
2 2
14 14
14    14
14 14
21 21
28 28
5 5
12 12
19 19
26 26
2 2
15 16
16 17
23 24
30 1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29
4 5
18 19
21 21
28 28
5 5
12 12
19 19
26 26
2 2
9 11
23 24
21 21
28 28
5 5
12 12
19 19
26 26
2 2
11 11
22 22
29 29
6 6
13 13
20 20
•27 27
3 3
12 15
24 24
June
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Louise
Louise
ATLIN ROUND TRIP
SEASON 1933
FROM VANCOUVER
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
Atlin
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
P.M. A.M.
Atlin
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
Steamship
Date
P.M.
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Date
A.M.
Steamship
Princess Norah	
June   10
June    17
June   24
July      1
July      8
July    15
July    22
July    29
Aug.    10
Aug.   19
14    14
21    21
28    28
5      5
12    12
19    19
26    26
2      2
14    14
23    23
14    15
21    22
28    29
5      6
12    13
19    20
26    27
2      3
14    15
23    24
15    20
22    27
29      4
6    11
13    18
20    25
27      1
3    12
15    22
24    29
21    22
28    29
5      6
12 13
19    20
26    27
2      3
13 15
23    24
30      5
June   26
July      3
July 10
July    17
July    24
July    31
Aug.      7
Aug.    19
Aug.    28
Sept.     9
Princess Louise	
 Princess Charlotte
Princess Charlotte 	
WEST TAKU ARM
SEASON 1933
FROM VANCOUVER
Arrive
Skagway
A.M.
Leave
Skagway
A.M.
Arrive
W.T.A.
P.M.
Leave
W.T.A.
P.M.
Arrive
Skagway
P.M.
Leave
Skagway
P.M.
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
Steamship
Date
P.M.
Date
A.M.
Steamship
Princess Norah 	
June    10
June    17
June   24
July      1
July      8
July    15
July    22
July    29
Aug.    10
Aug.    19
Aug.   31
14
21
28
5
12
19
26
2
14
23
4
14
21
28
5
12
19
26
2
14
23
4
14
21
28
5
12
19
26
2
14
23
4
14
21
28
5
12
19
26
2
14
23
4
15
22
29
6
13
20
27
3
15
24
5
15
22
29
6
13
20
27
3
15
24
5
June    19
June   26
July      3
July    10
July    17
July    24
July    31
Aug.      7
Aug.    19
Aug.    28
Sept.     9
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte 	
Princess Louise..	
Princess Charlotte .7. 	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise.	
Princess Louise	
Princess Louise 	
Princess Louise	
Page  Thirteen
 WHITE PASS AND YUKON ROUTE
Scenes Along the White Pass and Yukon Route
Page Fourteen
 Hotel Vancouver—Canadian Pacific Railway
The Empress Hotel, Victoria, B. C.—Canadian Pacific Railway
Page  Fifteen
 For Reservations
On Alaska Steamships apply to nearest Canadian Pacific Agent, or to
PASSENGER AGENTS IN THE UNITED STATES
K. A.  COOK General Agent .404 Citiz. and Southn. Nat. Bk. Bid Atlanta, Ga.
L. R. HART General Agent .405 Boylston St Boston, Mass.
W. P. WASS General Agent 160 Pearl St Buffalo,  N.Y.
T. J. WALL General Agent .71 E. Jackson Blvrd Chicago, 111.
M. E. MALONE General  Agent 201 Dixie Termial Bldg Cincinnati,   O.
G. H. GRIFFIN General Agent 1010 Chester Ave Cleveland,  O.
H.  C. JAMES District Passenger Agent 906 Kirby Building Dallas, Texas
G. G. McKAY General Agent 1231  Washington Blvrd Detroit, Mich.
P.   G.  JEFFERSON Travelling Passenger Agent Merchants' Bank Bldg Indianapolis, Ind.
R.  G. NORRIS City Passenger Agent 723 Walnut St Kansas  City,  Mo.
W.   McILROY General  Agent 621 So. Grand Ave Los Angeles, Cal.
J. C.  CASEY District Freight Agent 35 Porter Building Memphis, Tenn.
F. T. SANSOM City Passenger Agent 108 East Wisconsin Ave Milwaukee, Wis.
H. M. TAIT General Agent 611 2nd Ave. So   Minneapolis, Minn.
J.  E.  ROACH Asst. General Agent ,.- Madison Ave. at 44th .New York,  N.Y.
H. J.  CLARK Travelling Passenger Agent....   803 W. O. W. Building Omaha, Neb.
JOHN C. PATTESON General Agent 1500 Locust St Philadelphia,   Pa.
W. A.  SHACKELFORD General Agent 338 Sixth Ave .Pittsburg, Pa.
W. H. DEACON General Agent 148a Broadway Portland, Ore.
G. P.  CARBREY... General Agent 412 Locust St St. Louis, Mo.
W. H. LENNON General Agent, Soo Line     Fourth and Cedar St.  Paul,  Minn.
F. L. NASON General Agent   t152 Geary St San Francisco, Cal.
E. L. SHEEHAN General Agent .1320 4th Ave.... .Seattle,  Wash.
E. S. McPHERSON Vice-President, S. I. Railway       Old National Bank Bldg. Spokane, Wash.
 City Passenger Agent 1113 Pacific Ave. .Tacoma, Wash.
C. E. PHELPS. General Agent 14th and New York Ave. N. W Washington,  D.C.
PASSENGER AGENTS IN CANADA
C.  B. ANDREWS District Passenger Agent 40 King St Saint John, N.B.
P.  E.  GINGRAS District Passenger Agent Windsor   Station Montreal, Que.
F. C. LYDON General Agent, Passenger  Dept .Dom. Sq. Bldg., 201 St. James St. W.. Montreal, Que.
C.  A.  LANGEVIN ..General Agent,  Passenger Dept ...Palais  Station , Quebec, Que.
J. A. McGILL - General Agent,  Passenger Dept 83  Sparks St Ottawa, Ont.
WM.   FULTON Assistant General Passenger Agent Can. Pac. Bldg., King and Yonge Sts..Toronto, Ont.
R. Y. DANIAUD .District Passenger Agent 87 Main St. W North  Bay,  Ont.
E. A.  McGUINNESS General Agent,  Passenger Dept Main and Portage .Winnipeg, Man.
J. W. DAWSON District Passenger Agent Can.  Pac.  Station Regina,  Sask.
G. D. BROPHY District Passenger Agent .....Can.  Pac.  Station Calgary,  Alta.
F. H.  DALY District Passenger Agent  ......434 Hastings St. W.... Vancouver,   B.C.
L. D. CHETHAM District Passenger Agent .1102 Government St Victoria, B.C.
398      ^^SCLTd^     Printed in Canada
Page Sixteen
 CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CANADIAN
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
|SBiEXMSH?pTS
PAC IFIC
ALASKA    ALASKA
1934
SUMMER SERVICE
&
1934
SUMMER SERVICE
«
Oailmgs, _T ares
AND
Cxeneral JLnl<
ormation
Oailings, t ares
AND
(jeneral lnl<
ormation
«
«
Oeattle - Victoria - Vancouver, JD.C
to
okagway7 Alaska
Oeattle ~ Victoria <- V
ancouver
7 B.C.
TO
okagway7 Alaska
B.C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
B.C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
 SCHEDULE
Vancouver
TO
Prince Rupert, Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau and  Skagway
From
Voy. Vancouver
No. 9:00 p.m.
1. Sat,
2. Sat.,
3. Sat,
4. Sat.,
5. Sat,
6. Sat.,
7. Sat,
8. Sat.,
9. Sat,
10. Sat,
11. Tue.,
12. Thur.,
June 9
June 16
June 23
June 30
July 7
July 14
July 21
July 28
Aug. 4
Aug. 11
Aug. 21
Aug. 30
SAILINGS
From
Arrive
Skagway
Vanc'ver
7:00 p.m.
8:15 a.m.
®
<D
Pr. Norah
June 14
June 18
Pr. Louise
June 21
June 25
Pr. Charlotte
June 28
July   2
Pr. Louise
July    5
July   9
Pr. Charlotte
July 12
July 16
Pr. Louise
July 19
July 23
Pr. Charlotte
July 26
July 30
Pr. Louise
Aug.   2
Aug.   6
Pr. Charlotte
Aug.   9
Aug. 13
Pr. Louise
Aug. 16
Aug. 20
Pr. Louise
Aug. 26
Aug. 30
Pr. Louise
Sept.   4
Sept.   8
® All times shown in Pacific Standard time except sailing
hour from Skagway, which is Alaska time—one hour slower
than Pacific time.
Specimen Itinerary
NORTHBOUND
Lv. Vancouver
9:00 p.m.
Tues.
Thur.
Sat.
Ar. Alert Bay
10:00 a.m.
Wed.
Fri.
Sun.
Ar. Prince Rupert
9:00 a.m.
Thur.
Sat.
Mon.
Ar. Ketchikan
7:00 p.m.
Thur.
Sat.
Mon.
Ar. Wrangell
4:00 a.m.
Fri.
Sun.
Tues
© Ar. Taku Glacier
5 :00 p.m.
Fri.
Sun.
Tues
Ar. Juneau
7:00 p.m.
Fri.
Sun.
Tues
Ar. Skagway
9:00 a.m.
Sat.
Mon.
Wed
SOUTHBOUND
Lv. Skagway
®7:00 p.m.
Sun.
Tues.
Thur
Ar. Juneau
6:00 a.m.
Mon.
Wed.
Fri.
Ar. Wrangell
7:30 p.m.
Mon.
Wed.
Fri.
Ar. Ketchikan
7:00 a.m.
Tues.
Thur.
Sat.
Ar. Prince Rupert
4:00 p.m.
Tues.
Thur.
Sat.
Ar. Alert Bay
4:00 p.m.
Wed.
Fri.
Sun.
Ar. Vancouver
8:15 a.m.
Thur.
Sat.
Mon.
Times of arrival at way points are approximate
only.   Length of stay varies from 1 to 3 hours.
®A11 times shown in Pacific Standard time except sailing hour from Skagway, which is Alaska
time—one hour slower than Pacific time.
©Call will be made at Taku Glacier on all northbound voyages, weather permitting.
Triangle Service
Between
SEATTLE   »   VICTORIA   ^VANCOUVER
DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE
Connecting at Vancouver with Alaska Steamships
Alaska steamships sail from Vancouver but fares quoted
herein apply also from either Seattle or Victoria to Skagway.
Passengers purchasing through tickets from Seattle or
Victoria are furnished with transportation, including meals
and berth on the Company's local "Triangle Service" steamships "Princess Kathleen" and "Princess Marguerite" to and
from Vancouver.
Through tickets from Seattle give the passenger the privilege of stopping over in Victoria and/or Vancouver not
exceeding (2) days, either north or southbound.
"Triangle Service" steamships leave Seattle for Vancouver
at 9:00 a.m. via Victoria and 11:30 p.m. daily direct.
Steamships leave Victoria for Vancouver 2:15 p.m. daily
and midnight daily.
Southbound "Triangle Service" steamships leave Vancouver for Seattle 10:30 a.m. via Victoria and 11.00 p.m.
daily direct, and for Victoria only at midnight daily
The Canadian Pacific maintains a regular all year service
to Alaska ports, schedules on this page cover the summer
months only. Detailed schedule for the balance of year
can be obtained from any Canadian Pacific Ticket Agent.
Wfi:0mim
!lllll|||g
m
:;K';";:*;"'	
nmmsfSM
illl
m^m::
Princess Kathleen and Princess Marguerite
"Triangle" Service
Gross Tonnage  5,875—Speed 21  Knots
One Way and Round Trip Fares
Between
SEATTLE- VICTORIA OR VANCOUVER
AND PORTS SHOWN
Effective May 16, 1934
One Way        Round Trip
Ketchikan         $26.50 $53.00
Wrangell  31.00 62.00
Juneau  36.50 73.00
Skagway   40.00 80.00
Above fares apply for standard minimum rate
berth and include meals.
Fares for superior accommodation to Skagway
shown on pages 3, 4 and 5 and to other ports on
application.
Page Two
 PACES—SI\AGWAY SERVICE
VANCOUVER
SEATTLE
.To(SKA?JAy)$8€.CC
VICTORIA    J        I    RETURN    J   ANDUPWARDS
Effective June 9 to  September 8,  1934
Fares quoted herein also apply from Seattle and passengers from Seattle and/or Victoria will be furnished with similar accommodation and meals on the Company's local steamships to and from Vancouver, B. C, as outlined in paragraph 7, page 6.
Fares shown will apply in each direction between Vancouver and Skagway on all direct sailings.
Berth and meals are included en route, but not on board steamship while in port at Skagway.   See paragraph 2, page 6.
ROUND TRIP FARES WILL BE THE SUM  OF FARES FOR ACCOMMODATION   OCCUPIED   NORTH   AND   SOUTHBOUND
S.S. PRINCESS NORAH
ONE-WAY FARES—
-North or Southbound
GROSS TONNAGE  2,500
Berth
Rate
For 1
In
Room
For W2
In
Room
For 2
In
Room
For 2y2
In
Room
® For 3
BERTHING CAPACITY      165
In
Room
UPPER DECK
(a)  Rooms 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, Bed (3 ft. wide), single upper and sofa berth,
shower bath and toilet                                            	
$ 50.00
40.00
40.00
$100.00
80.00
80.00
115.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
$ 80.00
60.00
60.00
115.00
60.00
60.00
60.00
60.00
60.00
$100.00
80.00
80.00
115.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
$120.00
$140.00
LOWER DECK
(b) Rooms 100, 103, Double lower and single upper	
(c) Rooms 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121,
123, 125, Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
100.00
120.00
(d) Rooms 122, 124,127,129, Deluxe rooms each with twin beds (3 ft. wide) separate bath and toilet..
(e) Rooms 126, 128, 131, Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
40.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
100.00
120.00
(f) Rooms 132, 134, 135, 137, Single lower and single upper berth..... _	
(g) Rooms 130, 133, 136, 139, Single lower and single upper berth—Bibby room	
(h) Rooms 138, 140, 141, 142, 143, 145, Single lower, single upper and sofa berth.    Deck entrance....
(i)   Rooms 144, 146, 147, Single lower and single upper berth	
100.00
120.00
®  IMPORTANT:—See paragraph 10, page 8, before booking.    Three persons cannot be accommodated in rooms where no rate is shown.
; DIMENSIONS  OF BERTHS—Uppers, 6ft. 3in. x 2ft. 6in.; Single Lowers, 6ft. 3in x 2ft. 6in.; Double Lowers, 6ft. 3in. x 3ft. 6in.; Sofas, 6ft. 3in. x 2ft 6in.
LOWER DECK
CABIN PLAN—PRINCESS NORAH
Page Three
 ROUND TRIP FARES WILL BE THE SUM OF FARES FOR ACCOMMODATION   OCCUPIED
NORTH
AND   SOUTHBOUND
S.S. PRINCESS LOUISE
GROSS TONNAGE                 4,200
ONE-WAY FARES—
—North or Southbound
Berth
Rate
For
1
in
Room
For
IK
in
Room
For
2
in
Room
For
2y2
in
Room
©For
3
BERTHING CAPACITY       210
in
Room
BOAT DECK
(a)  Rooms 300 to 303 inclusive,   311, 312, 314, 315, 316, 318, 319, 320,  321—Large rooms with
double lower and single upper berth _	
$ 44.50
40.00
$ 89.00
80.00
70.00
89.00
80.00
115.00
115.00
115.00
89.00
80.00
89.00
80.00
80.00
$ 69.00
60.00
90.00
69.00
60.00
115.00
115.00
115.00
69.00
60.00
69.00
60.00
60.00
$ 89.00
80.00
$109.00
100.00
(c)   Rooms J-3, and K-3—Each room contains separate shower bath and toilet also one single bed
PROMENADE DECK
(d) Rooms 200 to 212, inclusive 215, 216, 218, 219, 221-Large rooms with double lower and single
44.50
40.00
89.00
80.00
115.00
115.00
115.00
89.00
80.00
89.00
80.00
80.00
109.00
100.00
135.00
135.00
(e) Rooms 214 and 217—Double lower and single upper berth and settee (Seat only)	
(f) Rooms E-2,. F-2, G-2, H-2—Each room contains shower bath and toilet, one bed (4ft. wide) ©
and pullman upper berth (3ft. lin. wide)   	
AWNING (LOWER DECK)
(g)  Rooms Al, Bl, CI, DI—Separate tub bath and toilet, also one three-quarter bed (4 feet wide)
and sofa berth with each room   ©	
(i)   Rooms 100 to 111 incl., 11 IA, 112 to 117 incl.—Large rooms containing double lower, single
upper and sofa berths  —  	
44.50
40.00
44.50
40.00
40.00
109.00
100.00
109.00
100.00
100.00
$129.00
(j)   Rooms 120, 121, 122, 123, 128, 129, 130, 136,137, 138, 139, outside rooms amidships.    Double
lower and single upper berths...	
(k) Rooms 142, 143, 144, 145-—Large rooms containing double lower, single upper, and sofa berths
(1)   Rooms 148, 149, 150, 151, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159—Double lower and single  upper berths
(m) Rooms 118, 119, 124, 125, 126, 127, 132, 134, 135, 140, 141, 146, 147, 152, 153—Bibby rooms,
with porthole at end of alcove—Double lower and single upper berths	
129.00
120.00
(D See   paragraph 10, page 8 regarding de luxe accommodation and number to be berthed in one room. © Special attention is called to the fact that these are three-
quarter beds and not full size double beds.        DIMENSIONS OF BERTHS—Lowers, 6ft. 6in. x 3ft. 6in; Uppers, 6ft. 6in. x 2ft. 6in; Sofas, 6ft. x 2ft.
|    $/a/si.£ Lows* £ Wj*£/?.
I   DOUBJ.E Low£A 8. SMGL£ UPP£K-
[^~C"|    3£OST£/9Q.
S£rree.
I TW11H
*Cm>i sC^~>i aC7""^
BOAT DECK—(DECK  3)
| T£S j To/let & S/sowea.
1   S.    I Showe*.
I D.T.   j O/fsss/A/a 7&&.£.
~ W/?AO*OS£-
Page Four
AWNING  (LOWER)   DECK—(DECK  1)
CABIN PLAN—PRINCESS LOUISE
 ROUND TRIP FARES WILL BE THE SUM  OF FARES FOR ACCOMMODATION   OCCUPIED   NORTH   AND   SOUTHBOUND
S.S. PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
GROSS TONNAGE	
BERTHING CAPACITY..
3,924
224
ONE-WAY FARES North or Southbound
Berth
Rate
For
1
Room
For
IK
Room
For
2
in
Room
For
2K
©For
3
in
Room
UPPER DECK
(a) Rooms 16-18, 17-19, 20-22, 21-23, connecting rooms with double lower and single upper berths.
Rooms 16, 17, 20, 21, with saloon entrance only	
Rooms 18, 19, 22, 23, with deck entrance only	
(b) Rooms 24 to 43 inclusive, rooms with double lower and single upper berths	
(c) Rooms 1 to 12 inclusive, 14 and 15. 44, 47, 49, 51, 53 rooms with double lower and single upper
berths	
LOWER DECK
(d)
Rooms 104, 105, 106, 107—Each room has one three-quarter bed (3 feet 9 inches wide) shower
bath and toilet ©	
Rooms 100, 101, 102, 103, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 115—Large rooms containing double lower
single upper and sofa berth,   	
Rooms  114, 117—One single  bed (3  feet wide) shower bath and toilet (accommodating one
passenger only)	
Rooms 116, 119—Twin beds (3 feet wide) shower bath and toilet	
(Memo:—Rooms 114-116, 117-119 can be sold en suite)
(h) Rooms 118, 121—Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
(i)   Rooms 120, 123—Double lower, single upper and sofa berth	
(j)   Rooms 122, 125—Double lower and single upper.    Bibby rooms _	
(k) Rooms 124, 127—Twin beds (3 feet wide) „»	
(1)   Rooms 134, 137, 142, 145, 150, 153, 158, double lower, single upper, shower bath and toilet	
(e)
(f)
(g)
(m) Room 159, large room with twin beds (3 feet wide) sofa berth, shower and toilet,
(n) Rooms 132,135, 138, 140, 141,143,146, 148,149, 151, 154, 156,157,162, bibby rooms with porthole at end of alcove	
(o)  Rooms 161, 163, 168, 170, 172, double lower and single upper	
(p) Rooms 165, 167, 169, 171, 173, 174, 176, 178, 180, 182, 184 double lower and single upper.	
(q) Room 164, twin beds (3 feet wide) shower bath and toilet	
$40.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
50.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
$80.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
110.00
89.00
65.00
115.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
110.00
100.00
165.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
115.00
$60.00
60.00
60.00
60.00
110.00
69.00
115.00
60.00
60.00
60.00
110.00
80.00
165.00
60.00
60.00
60.00
115.00
$80.00
80,0Q
80.00
80.00
110.00
89.00
115.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
110.00
100.00
165.00
80.00
80.00
80.00
115.00
$100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
120.00
185.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
$129.00
120.00
120.00
205.00
© See paragraph 10, page 8, regarding de luxe accommodation and number to be berthed in one room.
©  Special attention is called to the fact that these are three-quarter beds and not full size double beds.
DIMENSIONS  OF  BERTHS—Lower berths, 6ft. 2in. x 3ft. 6in.; upper berths, 6ft. x 2ft 4in-; Sofas 6ft. 4in. x 2ft.
£23
2>7r  jDnrSS,„/ -Xtf/e
[gggjWMi  /Lower£.&„(& Ifay
CABIN PLAN—PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
Page Five
 General Information
The "Inside Passage" along the Northern B. C.
and Alaska Coast to Skagway, with its hundreds of
miles of narrow channels and sheltered waterways,
provides an opportunity for a delightful pleasure
trip during the summer months, the average temperature being from 60 to 70 degrees, with long-
hours of daylight in these northern latitudes.
Medium weigh^ underwear and clothing, such
as would be worn in the late spring, is all that is
necessary; those enjoying hikes should provide
themselves with an outfit including a pair of good
walking shoes, and those who enjoy fishing are recommended to bring along their fishing tackle as
opportunities are provided, particularly at certain
points in the Yukon Territory.
1. Fares from
Prince Rupert
Fares quoted from Vancouver to
Skagway will also apply from
Prince Rupert to Skagway and
return to Prince Rupert or Vancouver, or visa-
versa.
2. Extra Charge   Round trip fares to Skagway in-
for Berth elude   berth   and   meals   enroute
j jU    i     / but not while steamship is in port
at Skagway, except that breakfast
*>     y will   be   served   on   morning   of
arrival and dinner on day of departure without extra charge.
Passengers making the round trip on the same
voyage have the option of remaining on board while
at Skagway on payment of regular tariff rate for
meals and berth (Standard lower berth $2.00, upper
$1.50). Berth rates will apply for entire time steamship is in port.   Approximate cost per passenger:
LUNCH on day of arrival $1.00
DINNER on day of arrival  1.25
BERTH RATE, ordinary room  2.00
BREAKFAST day of departure 75
LUNCH day of departure  1.00
$6.00
Page Six
Tickets will be endorsed "Berth and Meals
extra at Skagway/' These charges will be collected
by Purser and NOT by Ticket Agents.
3. Exclusive Use Two full fares, plus full premium
of Rooms (^ any)> will be charged for exclusive    use    of   any    two-berth
room during the tourist season, and Selling Agent
will stamp or write the words "Exclusive Use", also
amount collected, across face of ticket or order.
4. Children's Children 5 years and under 12
Fares                        years   will   be   charged  half  the
minimum fare plus full premium
(if any) except that no reduction will be made for
children in deluxe rooms when same are occupied
by two passengers only. See fares pages 3 to 5.
Children two years and under 5 will be
charged $6.65 one-way or $13.30 round trip. This
will entitle them to separate seat in the dining
saloon, but, if separate berth is required, charge
will be the same as for children between 5 and 12
years of age. Children under two years will be
carried free when accompanied by parent or
guardian.
5. Deposit Deposit of 25%  of fare will be
required when reservation is
made, balance to be paid wThen tickets issued, but
not less than sixty days prior to sailing when space
is reserved on separate sailings north and southbound, or forty-five days when space is reserved
for the roundtrip on one sailing.
Round trip tickets to Skagway
will be limited to October 31,
1934.
Fares quoted from Vancouver to
Skagway either one-way or
round trip also apply from
Seattle or from Victoria including meals and berth on the Company's local steamship service between Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver as follows:
6. Limits
7. Local Service
Seattle- Victoria-
Vancouver, Stopover Privileges
 (a) NORTHBOUND FROM SEATTLE—Provided passengers use local steamships sailing from
Seattle not earlier than 48 hours prior to departure
of Alaska steamship from Vancouver. Passengers
using night steamship from Seattle day previous to
sailing from Vancouver, may, if they desire, board
Alaska steamship on arrival and occupy their accommodation, in which case lunch and dinner will
be served on Alaska steamship without extra charge.
Passengers are not encouraged to do this however, as ship has to load freight and may have
to shift berth during the day. Passengers using
morning steamship from Seattle on day Alaska
steamship sails from Vancouver will be furnished
lunch on local steamship enroute and dinner on
Alaska steamship on arrival at Vancouver.
(b) NORTHBOUND FROM VICTORIA—Provided passengers use local steamships from Victoria
not earlier than 48 hours prior to departure of
Alaska steamship from Vancouver. Passengers
using midnight steamship from Victoria day previous to sailing from Vancouver may, if they desire,
board Alaska steamship on arrival and occupy their
accommodation and will be served lunch and dinner without extra charge. Passengers using afternoon steamship from Victoria on day of sailing
from Vancouver will be furnished day stateroom on
local steamship and dinner on Alaska steamship on
arrival.
(c) SOUTHBOUND FROM VANCOUVER —
Alaska steamships are due Vancouver, southbound,
at 8:15 a.m. on advertised date.    Breakfast will be
The Morning Bouillon
ic Location of Canadian Pacific Hotels
Page Seven
 served to Alaska passengers before debarkation.
Passengers holding through tickets Skagway to
Victoria or Seattle may transfer to local steamship
sailing same morning for Seattle via Victoria or
may use night direct steamship to Seattle, or may
stopover either at Vancouver or Victoria for 48
hours. Meals and berth are furnished without extra
charge on local steamships within limit.
8. En Suite
Accommodation
Princess Louise
9. Berth Lights,
Hot and Cold
Running Water
Rooms Al-129, Cl-128, Dl-130
Princess Louise may be used as
adjoining rooms if desired.
All rooms have hot and cold
running water and berth lights in
each berth.
10. Number to
be Berthed in
One Room
than two adults.
With the exception of rooms
mentioned below, all staterooms
are designed to accommodate two
passengers only and are not large
enough to accommodate more
Exception, rooms covered by paragraphs, I and K "Princess Louise," E, H, and I
"Princess Charlotte", and A, C, E and H "Princess
Norah". See pages 3 to 5. These latter rooms each
contain sofa berth in addition to double lower and
single upper berth and can accommodate three passengers   if  desired.    Rooms   K3   and   J3   Princess
Louise and rooms 114 and 117 on Princess Charlotte
should not be sold for more than one passenger
each. Third passenger in any stateroom (except
room 159, Princess Charlotte) will be charged minimum fare.
11. Meal BREAKFAST —  7:30  a.m.   to
Service ^ :^0 a.m., continuous service.
LUNCHEON — 1st   sitting   12
noon, 2nd sitting 12 :45 p.m.
DINNER—1st sitting 6:00 p.m.,
2nd sitting 6:45 p.m.
Light refreshments are also served in dining saloon
at 10:00 p.m. without extra charge. Table reservations should be made with Second Steward on
embarkation.
12. Barbers,
Hairdressers
and Valet
Service
13. Music
14. Steamer
Rugs and
Glasses
Barbers and lady hairdressers are
carried on all steamships. Valet
service is also provided.
Each steamship has an excellent
dance floor and carries an orchestra.
Steamer rugs and also a limited
number of field glasses may be
rented from the News Agent on
board at a nominal charge.
Page Eight
 15. Steamer All steamships are provided with
Chairs comfortable   camp   chairs    with
backs which are at the disposal
of all passengers free of charge. Regulation ocean
liner deck chairs are not supplied as there is not
sufficient room on the decks to provide all passengers with this type of chair.
16. Baggage (a)-   150 lbs. of baggage will be
carried free on each adult ticket
and 75 lbs. on each half ticket. Charge for excess
baggage, $3.75 per 100 lbs. in each direction between Seattle, Victoria, Vancouver and Skagway.
Steamer trunks not more than 14 inches in height
may be placed in staterooms. Passengers will find
it more convenient to allow trunks to be placed in
the baggage room on board where they can be made
readily accessible if desired, unless bonded.
(b) FREE STORAGE, SEATTLE, VICTORIA
OR VANCOUVER. Free storage of baggage will
be permitted for not more than 30 days at the above
mentioned ports. Regular storage charges will
accrue after expiration of this period.
(c) BONDED BAGGAGE — Baggage may be
checked through from Seattle to Skagway, and if
not required en route may be forwarded under
bond to avoid necessity of customs inspection. If
baggage is required en route it should be checked to
Victoria or Vancouver only and presented for Canadian  Customs  inspection  before boarding steam
ship for Alaska. U. S. Customs inspection will also
be necessary at Ketchikan, the first port of entry
into Alaska. Baggage checked from Vancouver or
Victoria to Skagway will be inspected by U. S. Customs officers at Ketchikan, or may be bonded if
desired.
(d) SOUTHBOUND — Canadian Customs baggage inspection will be made at Prince Rupert and
U. S. Customs inspection at Vancouver (if passenger is travelling east via Canadian Pacific Railway)
or at Seattle.
(e) Baggage can be checked through from Puget
Sound and British Columbia ports to Atlin or Dawson, via the White Pass and Yukon Route, without
undergoing inspection by Customs officers at Skagway, provided passengers hold through tickets in
which case it will be inspected at destination. Baggage originating at British Columbia points can be
corded and sealed and sent through Alaska in bond
without inspection. Baggage originating at United
States ports destined to points in Alaska on the
lower Yukon River below Dawson can go through
to destination in bond without inspection.
17. Immigration Passengers entering Alaska from
Requirements Canada are required to pass the
customary United States Immigration Inspection at Ketchikan, the port of entry.
This inspection is not strict so far as bona fide
tourists are concerned.    Passengers will be asked
A "Princess" at Taku Glacier
Page Nine
 by purser for certain information regarding age,
place of residence, business, etc., for use in making
up the manifest required by the Immigration Department, and will be given a card by him. This
inspection is greatly facilitated for passengers from
the United States if they carry "identification
slips" which will be supplied by selling agent. The
card received from the purser is presented by pas
senger to Immigration inspector, who boards steamship an arrival at Ketchikan, and as soon as particulars shown by purser on manifest are checked by
the inspector, the passenger is permitted to go
ashore. There is a similar inspection by the Canadian Immigration Department on arrival of steamship southbound at Prince Rupert. These inspections are largely formal so far as tourists are concerned.
Stikine River Service to Big Game District Northern B.C.
Wrangell, Alaska, to Telegraph Creek, B.C., via
Barrington Transportation Company
The Cassiar District of Northern British Columbia, famous for its Big Game hunting, can be
reached from Wrangell via the Stikine River, 185
miles to Telegraph Creek, B. C.
The Barrington Transportation Company operate a regular weekly service by Diesel propelled
river steamships during the season of navigation,
from May 5 to early October. These vessels have
accommodation for from fifteen to fifty passengers
and about fifty tons of freight.
River steamships leave Wrangell every Tuesday during the tourist season, after arrival of Can
adian Pacific steamship leaving Vancouver the preceding Saturday, and arrive Telegraph Creek on
Thursday.
Round trip summer tourist fare, Wrangell to
Telegraph Creek is $40.00, including meals and
berth.
Telegraph Creek is the outfitting point for the
big game country. Full particulars regarding cost
of hunting trips, etc., will be furnished by General
Tourist Agent, Canadian Pacific Railway, Montreal,
Oue.
llltll
(Courtesy Fisher Studio,  Ketchikan)
Page Ten
The "Inside Passage" at Ketchikan
 S. S. Princess Louise
Gross Tonnage - 4,200
S. S. Princess Charlotte
Gross Tonnage -  3,924
Page Eleven
 White Pass and Yukon Route
The White Pass and Yukon Route operates train services shown below between SKAGWAY and WHDTEHORSE in both
directions during the tourist season, and steamships on the Yukon River to Dawson and Mayo. Service is also provided for an
interesting trip from CARCROSS to ATLIN by steamship through Nares and Tagish Lakes and across Atlin Lake.
For suggested itineraries beyond Skagway see detailed schedules on page 13.
Agents may secure RESERVATIONS and detail information from White Pass & Yukon Route agent at the following addresses: 2026 Straus Bldg., Chicago, 111., 407 Douglas Building, Seattle, Wash., and 640 Hastings West, Vancouver, B. C.
SPECIAL SUMMER EXCURSION FARES
Skagway to Lake Bennett and return, including- lunch at Bennett (parlor car fare extra $1.00 round trip) either day while
steamship is in port  $    7.50
Skagway to West Taku Arm and return, including all expenses
(except parlor care fare Skagway to Carcross and return
$1.50) time required, two days, while steamship is in port.
See description of trip below      30.00
Skagway to Whitehorse and return (parlor car fare extra $2.00
round trip) time required, two days, while steamship is in
port     22.00*
Skagway to Atlin-Whitehorse and return (parlor car fare extra,
Skagway to Whitehorse and return $2.00) minimum time required  one   week,   southbound   reservations   should   be  made
not earlier than next returning steamship      45.00*
*Estimate o'f hotel and incidental expenses
Skagway to Whitehorse and return   (parlor car fare extra $2.00
round trip)  thirty day limit  $ 32.00*
Skagway to Dawson and return (parlor car fare extra Skagway
to Whitehorse and return $2.00) minimum time required one
week, southbound reservations should be made not earlier
than  next  returning  steamship     110.00*
Skagway to Dawson-West Taku Arm and return (parlor car
fare extra, Skagway to Whitehorse and return $2.00) minimum time required one week, southbound reservations should
be made not earlier than next returning steamship     125.00*
Skagway to Dawson-Atlin and return (parlor car fare extra,
Skagway to Whitehorse and return $2.00) minimum time
required two weeks, southbound reservations should be made
not earlier than  second returning  steamship    130.00*
will be furnished on request.
RAIL SERVICE
Between Skagway and Whitehorse
Wednesday's and Friday's train leaves Skagway at 10:00 a.m.*
Sunday's, Tuesday's, Thursday's and Saturday's train leaves Skagway at 8:30 a.m.*
Trains arrive at Skagway at 3:25 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.*
*Alaska time—one hour slower than Pacific time.
RIVER AND LAKE STEAMSHIP SERVICE
TO DAWSON
Navigation on the Yukon River between Whitehorse
and Dawson opens from May 20 to June 1 and closes, depending upon weather conditions about the middle of
October. At the opening of navigation the steamships do
not operate on a definite schedule for the first week or so.
The regular service commences with the sailing of the
"Casca" from Whitehorse, June 13 and every Wednesday
thereafter at 7:00 p.m. (see itineraries page 13). This service continues until the middle of August, after which there
will be irregular sailings about twice a week for the balance
of the season.
The round trip, Whitehorse to Dawson and return,
occupies 6y2 days, bringing the passenger back to Whitehorse on a Wednesday morning.
The WEDNESDAY arrival at Whitehorse leaves the
passenger the option of remaining in Whitehorse that day
and going to Skagway Thursday to connect with the Canadian Pacific Railway steamship southbound; or, leaving
Whitehorse Wednesday morning connecting at Carcross
with steamship "Tutshi" for West Taku Arm, which will
bring the passenger into Skagway Thursday afternoon in
time for Canadian Pacific steamship sailing Thursday evening; or leaving Whitehorse Thursday morning connecting
at Carcross with steamship "Tutshi" for Atlin for a stay at
that point, connecting with the following Thursday sailing
southbound from Skagway.
TO ATLIN
At Carcross connection is made for Eake Atlin on the
steamship "Tutshi," which sails for Atlin, Sunday and
Thursday afternoon shortly after arrival of train from
Skagway (see itineraries page 13). At Atlin the White Pass
and Yukon Route operates the Atlin Inn, where good ac
commodations and meals are available for the passenger.
Returning from Atlin the "Tutshi" arrives in Carcross
Wednesday and Sunday morning in time for train either for
Skagway or Whitehorse, having left Atlin at 7:30 p.m. previous evening.
SPECIAE WEST TAKU ARM EXCURSION
Eeaving Skagway by special train Wednesday morning,
returning to Skagway Thursday afternoon. (Special trips
will be made to connect with the S. S. Princess Eouise
arriving at Skagway, August 25th and September 3rd.)
This is a special excursion, 68 miles by rail over the
White Pass Summit, along the shores of Lake Bennett to
Carcross, where connection is made with a comfortable
stern-wheel steamship for a twenty-hour trip on the West
Taku Arm to the north end of Taku Glacier, 82 miles and
return, a total distance of 300 miles through magnificent
mountain and lake scenery.
ATLIN INN
At Atlin, near the boat landing, facing the lake and
within a few feet of the shore, is the ATLIN INN owned
and operated by the White Pass & Yukon Route on the
American plan. All rooms have hot and cold running water.
Rates—Single room $6.50 to $7.00 per day per person.
Double room $5.75 to $6.25 per day per person. A few
smaller rooms at $5.50 per day single and $5.00 per day,
per person, double.
Those who stay more than three days at this resort may
obtain the following discount off their total bill:
4 days, 10% — Weekly rates, 15%
The foregoing information covering the White Pass and Yukon
Route is subject to change at any time. Due notice will be given when
possible.
Page Twelve
 DAWSON-ATLIN ROUND TRIP
SEASON 1934
FROM VANCOUVER
Skagway
Ar.      Lv.
A.M.
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Dawson
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
Atlin
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
Steamship
Date
P.M.
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Date
A.M.
Steamship
Princess Norah	
June      9
June    16
June    23
June    30
July      7
July    14
July    21
July    28
Aug.      4
Aug.    11
13    13
20    20
27    27
4      4
11    11
18    18
25    25
1    1
8      8
15    15
13    13
20    20
27    27
4      4
11    11
18    18
25    25
1      1
8      8
15    15
15 16
22 23
29    30
6 7
13 14
20 21
27    28
3 4
10 11
17    18
20    21
27    28
4      5
11    12
18    19
25    26
1      2
8      9
15    16
22    23
21    26
28      3
5    10
12    17
19    24
26    31
2      7
9    14
16    25
23    25
27    28
4      5
11    12
18    19
25 26
1      2
8      9
15    16
26 26
26    26
July      2
July      9
July    16
July    23
July    30
Aug.      6
Aug.    13
Aug.    20
Aug.   30
Aug.   30
Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise	
Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise  	
Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte... :	
Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise	
Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise	
Princess Louise
Princess Louise	
Princess Louise
2
DAWSON-WEST TAKU ARM OR DAWSON ROUND TRIP
(For Dawson round-trip use same as below, omitting West Taku Arm dates, passengers spending extra time between Whitehorse
and Skagway.)
FROM VANCOUVER
Steamship
Princess Norah	
Princess Louise...	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise..	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise	
Date
P.M.
June 9
June 16
June 23
June 30
July 7
July 14
July 21
July 28
Aug. 4
Aug. 11
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
13 13
20 20
27 27
4 4
11 11
18 18
25 25
1 1
8 8
15 15
West
Taku  Arm
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
13 13
20 20
27 27
4 4
11 11
18 18
25 25
1 1
8 8
15 15
Dawson
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
15 16
22 23
29 30
6 7
13 14
20 21
27 28
3 4
10 11
17 18
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
20 20
27 27
4 4
11 11
18 18
25 25
1 1
8 8
15 15
22 25
West
Taku  Arm
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
20 20
27 27
4 4
11 11
18 18
25 25
1 1
8 8
15 15
25 25
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
21 21
28 28
5 5
12 12
19 19
26 26
2 2
9 9
16 16
26 26
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
Date
A.M.
June 25
July 2
July 9
July 16
July 23
July 30
Aug. 6
Aug. 13
Aug. 20
Aug. 30
Steamship
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Louise
ATLIN ROUND TRIP
FROM VANCOUVER
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
A.M.
White
Horse
Ar.    Lv.
P.M. A.M.
Atlin
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE VANCOUVER
Steamship
Date
P.M.
Ar.    Lv.
P.M.
Date
A.M.
Steamship
Princess Norah	
June      9
June    16
June   23
June   30
July      7
July    14
July    21
July    28
Aug.      4
Aug.    11
Aug.   21
13    13
20    20
27    27
4      4
11    11
18    18
25    25
1      1
8      8
15    15
25    25
13    14
20    21
27    28
4      5
11    12
18    19
25    26
1      2
8      9
15    16
31      I
14    19
21    26
28      3
5    10
12    17
19    24
26    31
2      7
9    14
16    25
20    21
27    28
4      5
11    12
18    19
25 26
1      2
8      9
15    16
26 26
1      4
June   25
July      2
July      9
July    16
July    23
July    30
Aug.      6
Aug.    13
Aug.    20
Aug.   30
Sept.     8
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte .	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise	
 Princess Charlotte
Princess Charlotte.	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte	
 ..Princess Louise
Princess Louise 	
Princess Louise —
25    30
WEST TAKU ARM
FROM VANCOUVER
Arrive
Skagway
A.M.
Leave
Skagway
A.M.
Arrive
W.T.A.
P.M.
Leave
W.T.A.
P.M.
Arrive
Skagway
P.M.
Leave
Skagway
P.M.
AR]
RIVE VANCOUVER
Steamship
Date
P.M.
Date
A.M.
Steamship
Princess Norah _ Lie	
June      9
June    16
June   23
•-, June   30
July ft 7
July? 14
July f 21
July !J 28
Aug.^i 4
Aug. Ml
Aug.    21
Aug.   30
*    13
20
27
4:
11
18
25
1
8
15
25
3
13
7     20
27
4
11
18
25
1
8
15
25
3
13
20
27
4
11
18
25 V
1
8
15
25
3
13
H    20
m 27
4
11
18
25
1
8
15
25
3
14
21
28
5
12
19
26
2
9
16
26
4
_ 14
21
28
5
12
19
26
2
9
16
26
4
June   18
June   25
July      2
July      9
July    16
July    23
July    30
Aug.      6
Aug.    13
Aug.    20
Aug.   30
Sept.     8
Princess Louise .:-...:	
 Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise -i ::	
Princess Charlotte ."L.....1—.... .....
Princess Lbuise .........v.	
Princess Charlotte	
Princess Louise	
Princess Charlotte '	
 Princess Charlotte
Princess Louise „	
Princess Louise	
Princess Louise .......:....
Page Thirteen
 WHITE PASS AND YUKON ROUTE
Page Fourteen
' Scenes Along the White Pass and Yukon Route
 ,- OTEL
\NCOUVEK
Glorious Carefree Days!
AT  THESE   CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RESORTS
Empress Hotel, Victoria A glorious change of surroundings and an equable climate greet the visitor—here outdoor
sports are followed every day in the year—tennis, golf, swimming in the pleasant Crystal Garden, and easy, nearby fishing
of all sorts.
nOtel Vancouver At Vancouver are many diversions to
appeal to the visitor—Stanley Park, Burrard Inlet, Capilano
Canyon, Grouse Mountain and Harrison Hot Springs nearby.
ElmeralCl Lake Lhalet A green gem, unlike anything in the
Rockies. It is hidden in the wilds, where a central Chalet clubhouse, individual bungalows with all conveniences of home give
the effect of a quaint little Swiss village.
Chateau Lake Louise One of the supremely beautiful
places of the world. A lake that puts soul into colors. A chateau
as foreign and as interesting as you can imagine. A snowtopped
background in a foreground of brilliant Alpine poppies.
Banff Springs Hotel Everything in superlatives: Mile-
high golf, climbing with Swiss guides, warm sulphur or cool
clear swimming pools—with glorious sun-bathing on the terrace,
fast clay court tennis, fishing, boating, riding, and always interesting people.
Enquire about our all-inclusive tours to mountain resorts.
Might |
BANFF SPRINGS I
HOTEL
MweZMZKALD
LAKE CHALET
Right- CHATEAU
LAKE LOUISE
Page  Fifteen
 For Reservations
On Alaska Steamships apply to nearest Canadian Pacific Agent, or to
PASSENGER AGENTS IN THE UNITED STATES
ATLANTA,  GA 404 Citz. & Southn. Nat. Bk. Bldg S.
BOSTON, MASS 405   Boylston   St L.
BUFFALO,  N.  Y 160 Pearl St W
CHICAGO,  ILL 71 E. Jackson Blvd T.
CINCINNATI,   0 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg K.
CLEVELAND,   O ...1010  Chester Ave G.
DALLAS,  TEX 1212  Kirby  Building H.
DETROIT,   MICH 1231 Washington Blvd M.
INDIANAPOLIS,   IND Merchants Bank Building P.
KANSAS CITY, MO 709 Walnut St R.
LOS ANGELES, CAL 621  So.  Grand Ave .W.
MEMPHIS,   TENN 36 Porter Building J.
MILWAUKEE, WIS 108 E. Wisconsin Ave J.
MINNEAPOLIS,  MINN 611 2nd Ave. South H.
NEW YORK,  N.  Y Can. Pac. Bldg., Madison Ave. at 44th ...J.
OMAHA, NEB 803 W.  O. W. Building H.
PHILADELPHIA,  PA 1500 Locust Street J.
PITTSBURG,  PA 338  Sixth Ave.* W.
PORTLAND, ORE  -626 S. W.  Broadway .W.
ST. LOUIS, MO 412 Locust St G.
ST.  PAUL,  MINN Fourth  &  Cedar _ W.
SAN FRANCISCO,   CAL 152  Geary  St F.
SEATTLE, WN 1320 4th Ave E.
SPOKANE,  WN Old National Bank Bldg E.
TACOMA,  WN 1113  Pacific Ave L.
WASHINGTON, D. C 14th & New York Ave. N. W C.
^Effective May 1—444 7th Ave., Koppers
E.   Corbin Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
R.   Hart Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
P. Wass Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
J.  Wall Gen. Agent, Rail
A.   Cook Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
H.  Griffin Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
C.  James Dist. Pass'r. Rep.
E.  Malone Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
G.  Jefferson Trav. Pass'r Agent
G.  Norris City Pass'r Agent
.  Mcllroy Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
C.   Carey Dist.   Freight Agent
A.  Millington Gen. Agt.,  Soo Line
M.   Tait Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
E. Roach Gen. Agt., Rail
J.   Clark ...Trav. Pass'r Agent
C.   Patteson .....Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
. A.  Shackelford Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
, H. Deacon Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
P.  Carbrey Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
,  H.  Lennon Gen. Agt., Rail, Soo Line
L.   Nason Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
L.   Sheehan Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
S.  McPherson Spokane Intern'l Rly.
N. Jones Act'g City Pass'r Agt.
E.  Phelps Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
Bldg.
PASSENGER AGENTS IN CANADA
BANFF,  ALTA Canadian  Pacific  Station J. A. McDonald. Dist. Pass'r Agent
CALGARY, ALTA Canadian Pacific Station .G.  D.  Brophy Dist. Pass'r Agent
MONTREAL,   QUE Windsor  Station P.  E.  Gingras Dist.  Pass'r Agent
MONTREAL,   QUE - 201  St. James St.  W F. C. Lydon Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
NORTH  BAY,  ONT 87 Main St.  W R.  Y.  Daniaud Dist. Pass'r Agent
OTTAWA,   ONT 83 Sparks St J. A.  McGill.  .r Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
QUEBEC,  QUE Palais   Station .C. A. Langevin .' Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
REGINA,   SASK ^.Canadian Pacific Station J.   W.   Dawson :': Dist. Pass'r Agent
SAINT JOHN, N.  B .40 King St C.  B. Andrews Dist. Pass'r Agent
TORONTO,  ONT .....Can. Pac. Bldg., King & Yonge W.  Fulton......... Asst.  Gen.  Pass'r Agent
VANCOUVER,  B.  C 434 Hastings St. W F. H. Daly ± Dist. Pass'r Agent
VICTORIA,  B.  C 1102  Government St L.  D.   Chetham Dist. Pas
WINNIPEG,   MAN Main & Portage E. A.  McGuinness Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
H.  Parlett,
Agent*  American Ry.- Exprei
Walla Walla,  Wash.
3    v Q ♦ t
Page Sixteen
1903       -rftSttow   Printed in Canada

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0362815/manifest

Comment

Related Items