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Freighters Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1956

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 v.V'C.ANADIA'N       PACIFIC       SPANS       THE       WORLD   • ■ v
 ''ism
' .  ■■■      '■   ■■     ft' '  .  . : ■ ■.'■.'■.'
lltiiiiiiii
lllllllill
 **»
Built to carry your perishables at the
proper temperature, to get them
from Canada to London
without delay, to eliminate your
time-routing problems by
sailing every week . . .
Beaverdell, Beaverglen,
Beaverlake, Beavercove .   .   .
the 16-knot Canadian Pacific
cargo-liners are proud,
modern successors to the
fast ships that served
you well in pre-war days.
¥3
 Protection from transit
deterioration is a carrier's first
duty and a shipper's
greatest headache.
The Canada short-cut route
to Europe, northern
temperatures,
Canadian Pacific's modern
realistic "Beavers"
remove that headache.
 Port temperatures, speed of transfer from car to hold,
insulation and ventilation of refrigerated and
ordinary stowage holds, average sea and air
temperatures .   .   . these are prime considerations
in the transport of any type of commodities.
On all these counts the "Beaver" routes give the
right answers. Refrigerator readings are
automatically registered on the bridge at all times
—are continuously checked by the officers,
ensuring maintenance of proper
temperatures.
Canadian Government thermographs keep
records for shippers' protection.
 TEMPERATURE
MAINTENANCE
From automatic overhead ventilation and
temperature control in this modern
two-purpose car, to temperature controlled
automatically ventilated stowage
on the ship, your cargo goes with a
minimum of change.
-msiii/:
■ ■   r
usuff    rmm
itwt     'mm    mm mm
mmmmmm
t*rtwm
m&m
 PROFILE    PLAN
5
SPECIFICATIONS THAT INTEREST SHIPPERS
.    .
Length overall.
Breadth..	
Depth...... :fl
Deadweight cargo capacity:
gross tons	
497'3"
64'
42'8"
9,700
Cubic cargo capacity—Ordinary
Stowage cu.ff^P^?.;??^^^434,394
Cubic cargo capacity—Ref'r
Stowage cu. ft. . .      163,318
597,712
20 electric cargo winches; 30 derricks—capacities up to 10 tons; 6 cargo hatches with twin roller
type steel hatch covers; weather deck; service speed 16 knots; mechanical ventilation fitted
in all uninsulated holds and tween decks.
1 No. 1 Hatch 20 ft. 3 in. x 16 ft.
IA No. 1 Upper Tween Deck
IB No. 1 Hold
2 No. 2 Hatch 32 ft. x 19 ft. 2 in.
2A No. 2 Upper Tween Deck—Insulated
2B No. 2 Lower Tween Deck
2C No. 2 Hold
3 No. 3 Hatch 33 ft. 9 in. x 19 ft. 2 in.
EXPLANATION OF PROFILE PLAN
3A No. 3 Upper Tween Deck—Insulated
3B No. 3 Lower Tween Deck
3C No. 3 Hold
4 No. 4 Hatch 27 ft. 6 in. x 20 ft. 5 in.
4A No. 4 Upper Tween Deck
4B No. 4 Lower Tween Deck
4C No. 4 Hold
4D No. 4A Deep Tank
5 No. 5 Hatch 31 ft. 3 in. x 19 ft. 2 in.
5A No. 5 Upper Tween Deck—Insulated
5B No. 5 Lower Tween Deck—Insulated
5C No. 5 Orlop Tween Deck—Insulated
6 No. 6 Hatch 27 ft. 6 in. x 21 ft.
6A No. 6 Upper Tween Deck
6B No. 6 Lower Tween Deck—Dehumidified
6C No. 6 Orlop Tween Deck—Dehumidified
7 Special Cargo Space
 6
't&v^^m,
THE REAVER SHIPS
For more than 40 years Canadian Pacific tonnage has linked Canada and London.
Between wars, specially built cargo liners—the "Beavers"—plied in
direct regular weekly service between Canada and London.
These fast cargo liners met their deaths in World War II, but their
service now takes shape again—and more efficiently—with an entirely new fleet.
"Beaverdell", first of the new "Beavers", was launched on the Clyde
on August 27th, 1945. Her sisters, "Beaverglen", "Beaverlake" and
"Beavercove", will enable the new fleet to maintain the reputation
for reliable, regular weekly service created by the pre-war fleet.
Every week, on the unvaried and dependable schedule for which the
"Beavers" were rightly noted before they entered war service, their
successors, by the latest in navigation devices, up-to-date methods of
handling cargo from car to ship, by modern design, will provide quick,
safe and efficient carriage of cargoes between Canada and London.
 W$&3i
CAPTAINS ALL
\U
*j^\  The human element is paramount in the operation of a big ship.
Canadian Pacific Officers have served with distinction in the Royal and Merchant Navies in two wars.
Many who return to their peacetime "lawful occasions" as watch-keeping officers,
due to wartime expansion of fighting and merchant fleets, have held commands.
All have gained useful experience, added responsibility, greater knowledge.
Radar—in all its forms, sonic devices, electrical temperature tell-tales on the Bridge—
all these advances in science aid navigators in sea transport of peacetime cargoes.
But always the human element is paramount. Captains then or now, the men who guide fast,
regular, reliable "Beavers" play a vital part in transporting your cargoes.
re1!!
^i»«ja§.
lllllliftftlft
mOMmi&i
 REAVER ECONOMIES
Economy, not economics, is the concern of the business man.
If he operates with economy, economics takes care of itself.
The "Beaver" fleet provides:—
Economy of distance
Economy of time
Economy of handling
Economy of stowage.
/
 DIRECT
HANDLING
Contributing to "Beaver" economies
is the universal use
in Canada of Canadian Pacific tractor trailer equipment—
freight is handled between ship and railway car in one operation
  MODERN EQUIPMENT
As modern ashore as the "Beaver" is afloat is this
50-ton aluminum box car specially
developed for fast-freight movements.
11
,ftft:: 7        . .....,„.        im
  13
MONTREAL
Nearer Europe than any other large North
American seaport, is at the same time one
thousand miles inland from the sea. The port has
no tidal restrictions, and has ship's side
connection with all railroads. Canal and lake
water-borne systems . . . more than two
thousand miles in extent, reach Fort William,
Port Arthur, Toronto, Chicago, Detroit,
Sault Ste. Marie and Duluth.
King Edward Pier, equipped with four 500-ft.
double-deck sheds, Nos. 7, 8, 9, and 10, is the
terminal of the "Beaver" fleet. Twin sidings,
ample trucking space and grain conveyor loading
systems, assure speedy handling of
shippers' products.
 14
PORT OF SAINT JOHN
Winter port facilities protected from North Atlantic rigours by the Bay of Fundy
are provided in the City of Saint John's year-round harbour.
. ■ •■■■    ft. ■ .■,.■,■
 SAINT JOHN, N.R.
15
During the winter season, Saint John, New
Brunswick, land-locked in the Bay
of Fundy, is the Canadian Pacific port.
Warehouse accommodation, ample grain
elevators, through trackage on the piers
and the same efficient car-ship transfer systems
that characterize Montreal, expedite
your goods.
Direct connection with the fertile Province of
Nova Scotia is maintained by Canadian
Pacific Bay of Fundy Steamships and the
Dominion Atlantic Railway.
'
  PORT
OF
LONDON
The convenient, well-served Royal Albert Dock
is the London home of the new four-ship
"Beaver" fleet of fast freighters.
Warehouses, factories and markets serving
the whole British Isles are within trucking
distance of the Canadian Pacific terminal.
Cargoes unloaded there reach their final
destinations in a matter of hours by a
network of road, rail and canal systems.
Trans-shipment for ports all over the world,
in the Port of London, is as simple as
changing trains at a junction.
Ample refrigerated space at the berths assures
the shipper of perishables against
deterioration.
 18
ill?
^^:
PORT FACILITIES
On both sides of the Atlantic cargo-handling arrangements
meet shippers' requirements of ease and safety
of handling and speed—Montreal, Saint John and London
are accessible to production and consuming areas.
Floating cranes, harbour railways, truck-trailer trains,
grain-conveyor systems and fully-experienced,
trained staffs get your products there fast and undamaged.
/man?
■   9.
 HEAVY LIFTS
•     Montreal, London, Saint John—all
"Beaver" ports are well equipped
to handle your heavy lifts.
Mobile gantries, lift-trucks, floating
cranes of sufficient capacity to
provide for rapid handling are
available when they are needed.
Illustrated is a 75-ton floating
crane at Montreal.
-■'mi
 ~*m]
2©
WORLD TRADE
Bacon, beans, flour, machine tools, locomotives, farm
machinery, furniture, needles, scientific instruments, the
thousand and one items exchanged freely in normal
international trade must move rapidly and regularly.
Important to the transfer of goods between countries are
port facilities, regularity of arrivals and departure of cargo
vessels, close integration of land transportation systems with
the ocean carriers, railway switching connections,
warehousing and fueling installations. In these respects
on both sides of the ocean, facilitating equal access to trade
and raw materials of the world, the "Beaver" fleet serves well.
The combination of readily accessible ports, fast, regular,
well-operated oil-burning steamships establishes the
"Beaver" fleet as an integral link in the chain of world trade.
——^-—
 28_-t-. 7-',»4
Printed in Canada—1946
  Canadian Vessel Is Sold -fjfgfcf
The 9,000-ton immigrant ship
Beaverhrae has been sold by the
Canadian Pacific Steamships,
Ltd., to "Congar" Compagnia
Genovese d'Armamento of Genoa.
The Italian concern will operate the 800-passenger vessel
between Italy, Portugal and
South America. She will sail for
Italy from Canada near the end
of the month.
The Beaverbrae was the former
Hamburg-Amerika liner Huas-
caran. She was captured from
the Germans in 1945 in Norway,
where she had acted as a repair
and mother ship for Nazi submarines. The Germans relinquished her to Canada as part of
a reparations payment.
 i: v;":.7-
SISTER SHIP of two vessels which will ply the post-war
^ancouver-Orient run for Canadian Pacific Stedmships'
SS Empire Wilson/ above, which is now in Port of Van-
rer.    She is an exact duplicate of two ships recently
acquired by the CPSS to reopen Pacific travel which was
suspended during the war. The Empire Wilson, which
brought cargo from the Far East, has accommodation for
40 passengers and will have six passengers from British
Columbia on the outward voyage.
 RIDING HIGH in the water of the Burntisland
Shipbuilding Company yard at Burntisland,
Scotland, is the new Canadian Pacific cargo
vessel Beaverpine, launched June 18. The
6,000-ton vessel, which will make its maiden
voyage to Montreal later this year, was named
by Miss Janice Crump, daughter of N. R.
Crump, chairman and president, Canadian Pacific.	
 Canadian    t-       Tv,0     ot        (ng
"Baavercova ^    sWps    arc fl0
B«ve/.rred   *o   th-   tran, £       t.
^Ho'^r^cSas.PorU
 CANADIAN  PACIFIC FREIGHTER MAPLECOVE
 lilllii
(Canadian Pacific Photo)
THE BEAVERPINE, new 6,000-ton Canadian Pacific cargd
vessel, slides down the ways of the Burntisland Shipbuildf
ing Company in Scotland after being name on June 18 by
Miss Janice Crump.              )
 SOON two Canadian Pacific Beaver class cargo ships, like the Beavercove shown here,
will be operating in a revived trans-Pacific service of the line. CPS first began operating in the Pacific trade in 1886 and its "White Empress" fleet became famous |
in the years that followed, until World War II put an end to the service and also
to three of the four Empress ships. The four Beavers were the postwar replacements
of  these  losses  and  are  at  present  in  the  line's  Atlantic   service   to   British   ports.   I
 • Shown here,
The Canadian
Pacific freight-
S. S. Beaver -
ford. Five of
these sturdy
cargo carriers
went into service at the beginning of the
war. Four of
then)      h a v e
 The Beaverlake;
 The turbo-electric reheat installation of 9,000 S.H.P. installed!
in the C.P.R. cargo liner " Beaverglen " of 1946 achieved a consumption of 0 544 Ib./S.H.P. hr. Such a figure is not very
different from present day results achieved with less complication. The increasing difficulty of each step towards higher
efficiency emphasises the importance of designing for other]
equally desirable qualities
 Built  in  1943,   the  9,900-ton   " Beaverlodge"   was  acquired  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  to  supplement  the
" Beaverf ord" and " Beaverburn" on the company's London-to-Canada  service.    The  three  ships  replace
iwo faster  " Beaver "  cargo liners   transferred   to  the   Pacific
 Types   of  the  Year:   The  C.P.R.   Cargo Liner "Beaverburn,"  launched   by Messrs. William  Denny & Brothers,
Ltd.,  Dumbarton, on  September 27,   1027,  as   she  will appear  when  in service.   Five  vessels of   this type  are
under construction for the Canadian Pacific.
[Length, 495 ft. ; breadth, 61 ft. 6 in. ;  depth, 40 ft. 6 in. ; speed, 14 knots.    Carries 10,500 tons d.w. on 27 ft. draught.    Parsons single-reduction geared turbinesj;
four Yarrow watertube boilers and two Scotch boilers with mechanical stokers.     Twin screws.     Hall's refrigerating plant and Stones'   manganese bronze propellers.,j
 GOOD    MORNING*.
(umaJua*
BREAKFAST
CHILI..D GRABS FRUIT  JUICE
Compote of Prunes
Bran Flakes Rice Krispies
Grape    Nuts
CREAM    OF 1HEAT
Finnan Haddie   in Milk
EGGS:       FRIED,   TURNED OR   BOILED
To Order:     Poached
GRILLED CANADIAN BACON
Pan Fried Potatoes
HOT GAKES, MAPIE  SYRUP
TOAST: MUTE BROWN
Marmalade      Honey      Conserves
TEA CO FEE E COCOA
s.s.   "Beaverlodge",
IWedn.saay, -dune o,  1956 __
  DUNE R
7      sje      $    *    :)s
FRESH FRUIT     COCKTAIL
Mixed Olives    Radishes    Pearl Onions
CREME  OF  CORN
Grilled Dover Sole, Ma it re d* Hot el
Pineapple Fritters, Melba
EMINGE OF CHICKEN A LA KING
Cauliflower Polonaise
Creamed & Roast Potatoes
COLD
SLICED CUMBERLAND HAM
Salade Waldorf
COUPE HELENE
Fresh Fruit
COFIEE
3.s. "Beaverlodge",
Sunday, June 3, 1956
  DINNER    AU    REVOIR
sjc   ^     #    #    sfc % #    sfj   ;fc    :fc    5$c
(jHiaaia*
GRAM  FHCJIT AUX CERISE
Celery Rollmops Olives
CROUTE    AU POT
Halibut Steak,    Parsley Butter
Braised Ox Tongue,    Florentine
GRILLED SPRING CHICKBN,  AMERICAN
(Barbecue  Sauce)
Fresh Asparagus,     Flamande
Anna & Boiled Potatoes
COLD
CANADIAN BAM
Fresh Green  Salade
French    Dressing
PEACH    MSLBA
Fresh Fruit Mixed Nuts
COFFEE
s.s. MBea ver lo dgeft,
Tue stay, June 5, 1^56
 

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