The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

C.P. pamphlets Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1941

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0362798.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0362798.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0362798-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0362798-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0362798-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0362798-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0362798-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0362798-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0362798-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0362798.ris

Full Text

 'm:xx:xi
i
W   -
- 5ft *
&        5   :
 CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
Canadian Pacific Hotels set the standard for hotel accommodation in Canada. Each hotel is distinctive in appointment and
style, each has the same superb Canadian Pacific service.
In The Rockies
Banff Springs Hotel, A magnificent hotel in the heart of Rocky Mountains
Banff   Alhprta National Park,  backed by three splendid mountain
£>anil, AID ena ranges.  Alpine climbing, motoring and drives on good
roads, bathing, hot sulphur springs, golf, tennis, fishing, boating, and riding. Open May 15 th to September 30th, 280 rooms, European
plan.     13^ miles from station.    Altitude 4625 feet.
Chateau Lake Louise, A ,wonderful hotel facing an exquisite Alpine Lake
y 1^ t .„•_- AlK^-r+o *n Roc^y Mountains National Park. Alpine climb-
.LaKe .LOUlSe, AlDena,      ing with Swiss Guides   pony trips or walks to Lakes
in the Clouds, Saddleback, etc., drives or motoring
to Moraine Lake, boating, fishing. Open June 1 st to September 30th. 265 rooms,
European plan.    3K miles from station by motor railway.    Altitude 5670 feet.
Emerald Lake Chalet, A charming Chalet hotel situated at the foot of
«^o»-  17.*Q1^    "D n Mount    Burgess,    amidst    the    picturesque    Alpine
near *ieid,  tS.K,. scenery   of   the   Yoho   National   Park.     Roads  and
trails to the Burgess Pass, Yoho Valley, etc. Boating
and fishing. Open June 15th to September 15th. Accommodation for 70 people.
American plan.     7 miles from station.     Altitude 4066 feet.
Glacier  HoUSe, I™    t^ie   l*eart   °f    the   Selkirks.    Splendid   Alpine
i^i__«   _.    r> n climbing  and  glacier-exploring,  driving,  riding and
Glacier,  J3.^. hiking.    Open June  15th to September  15th.      86
rooms,      American plan.      13^  miles from station.
Altitude 4086 feet.
Hotel   SicamOUS, Junction for the orchard districts of the Okanagan
QtVatnmio   "R P Valley,   and   stop-over   point   for   those   who   wish
Oicamoub, X>.^. to see the Thompson and Fraser canyons by day
light. Lake Shuswap district offers good boating,
and excellent trout fishing and hunting in season. Open all year. 61 rooms,
American plan.    At station.    Altitude 1146 feet.
The Pacific Coast
Hotel Vancouver, The largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, over-
VanroilVPr   B C looking  the  Strait of Georgia,  and serving equally
Vancouver, n.    . ^e business man anJ the tourist.     Situated in the
heart of the shopping district of Vancouver. Golf,
motoring, fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer excursions. Open all year. 488
rooms.    European plan.     3^ mile from station.
EmpreSS  Hotel, A. luxurious hotel in this Garden City of the Pacific
Virtnrifl    B P Coast.    An  equable  climate  has  made  Victoria  a
L        d,  .D.l/. favorite    summer    and    winter    resort.     Motoring,
yachting, sea and stream fishing, shooting and all-
year golf.    Open all year.    278 rooms.     European plan.    Facing wharf.
The Prairies
Hotel  Palliser, A.   handsome   hotel   of   metropolitan   standard,   in
CfllfXflTV    Alberta t^1*8  ProsPerous   c^y   °f  Southern   Alberta.    Suited
o4* J »  All)end equally to the business man and the tourist en route
to   or   from   the   Canadian   Pacific   Rockies.    Good
golfing and motoring.    Open all year.     298 rooms.     European plan.     At station.
Royal Alexandra Hotel, A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada,
MiTi-n-nino.fr    Ti/rn-ni+r\Ua appealing to those who wish to break their  trans-
Winnipeg,   Manitoba        c£ntine?*al    journey.    The   centre    of    Winnipeg's
social life.    Good golfing and motoring.    Open all
year.    389 rooms,  European plan.    At station.
Eastern Canada
Place  Viger Hotel, A charming hotel in Canada's largest city.    Open
Montreal,   Que. all year.     114 rooms.
Chateau   FrontenaC, A  metropolitan  hotel  in  the  most  historic  city of
OuebeC    Que. North America.    Open all year.     324 rooms.
McAdam  Hotel, A   commercial    and   sportsman's   hotel.    Open   all
McAdam, N.B. year-   ,5 rooms.
The  AlffOnQUin The   social   centre   of   Canada's   most   fashionable
a*     n~.A~~„rr*    TVT "D seashore  summer  resort.    Open June  20th  to Sep-
St. Andrews, N.B.        tember 30th    2i9 rooms.
ANDREW  ALLERTON,   GENERAL  SUPERINTENDENT,
CANADIAN   PACIFIC   HOTELS,  MONTREAL.
Camps and Hotels reached by Canadian Pacific
Lake Wapta Camp, A  rustic  bungalow  camp  in  Yoho  National  Park,
tt     +        -p r\ near the Great Divide:—Open June 15th to beptem-
-tleCtOr, tf.C. ber 15th.     (Operated by Miss Dodds.)    Also smaller
camps at Lake O'Hara and Yoho Valley.
Lake Windermere Camp,A bungalow summer camp in the beautiful Columbia
T «l^rv U7J«/l«««fl»fl   "D n Valley.        Open    June    15th    to    September    15th.
Lake Windermere, B.C.(0peryated b£ InveJrmere Hotel Co.)
Hotel  InCOla A   commercial   and   tourist   hotel.    Open  all   year.
Tt~~4.:~4-~~,    T>,r« 62 rooms,     (Owned   and    operated    by  Okanagan
Penticton, B.C. Hotel Co#)
Cameron Lake Chalet, A holiday hotel in the big-tree forests of Vancouver
Cameron Lake, B.C. Island.    Open  May   1st to September 30th.
W (Printed in Canada)
 m
Va
The Inner Harbor, Victoria: Parliament Buildings in centre, Empress Hotel on left
ONE of the most attractive regions of the Pacific
Northwest—whether the end sought is scenery,
climate, sport, or merely flower-perfumed idleness—
is encompassed within the picturesque and rugged shores
of the magnificent island that lies off the mainland of
British Columbia and takes its name from its eighteenth-
century discoverer. Reposing in splendor on the bosom
of the grand old Pacific Ocean, and reached within a few
hours by a delightful trip from Vancouver city or Seattle,
this treasure island presents a tourist playground of easy
access that is unsurpassed by any section of the continent.
As large in area as the country of Denmark, it contains
so vast a variety of incomparable attractions that not
inaptly has it been termed "The Island of a Thousand
Miles of Wonderland."
THAT intrepid navigator, Captain George Vancouver
of the British navy, discovered it in 1792, two
centuries after the Greek navigator masquerading
as Juan de Fuca, in the service of Spain, was credited with
the discovery, for there is historical doubt whether the
latter ever even sailed the waters tributary to the island.
Two sentences from Captain Vancouver's Journal will
well serve to-day:
"To describe the beauties of the region will, on some
future occasion, be a very grateful task to the pen of a
skilful panegyrist. The serenity of the climate, the
innumerable   pleasing   landscapes,   and   the   abundant
fertility that unassisted Nature puts forth, require only
to be nourished by the industry of man with villages,
mansions, cottages and other buildings to render it the
most lovely country that can be imagined/'^
THESE predictions have come true. The first step
was the founding by the Hudson's Bay Company
in 1843 of what is now the delightful city of
Victoria, at the southern end of the island. Pretty little
towns and rural communities dot the island for 175 miles.
Settlement and capital have flowed in—have developed
the fertile lands, the rich mines and the heavy forests
with which Vancouver Island is so well endowed, and
have created prosperity and contentment.
Most of all, Vancouver Island is endowed with a
wonderful climate, tempered by the ocean breezes and
warm Japan Current, a climate that has extremes neither
of heat nor of cold, in which roses bloom almost up to
Christmas. That is why Victoria, variously known as the
Garden City, the City of Sunshine, and the Evergreen
City, has become so favorite a winter resort.
rpO   the sportsman, Vancouver Island offers super
lative attractions.   Wonderful shooting and fishing
are to be obtained almost everywhere, at very
few places very remote or inaccessible. The Island has
a thousand miles of fine motor roads, threading magnificent scenery. Golf, bathing, canoeing, sailing, polo and
tennis are there to suit the varying mood.
Page One
A-
 Victoria >
v
ICTORIA, the largest city of Vancouver
Island, is charmingly situated at the southern
end of the Island.
There is an enticing welcome to the traveller entering its harbor—-the blue-tinted Sooke Hills, the Little
Saanich Mountain, the snow-capped Olympic Mountains on the mainland, and then, entering the square
Inner Harbor, a foreground of beautiful trees, shrubs,
and flower-gardens, with the Parliament Buildings
rising from lawns on the right, the ivy-covered Empress Hotel right ahead, the city at the left, and the
old cathedral on the hill above.
Victoria is the Evergreen City of Canada—a city
of flowers, hydrangeas, roses, hedges, oak trees, holly,
bungalows, gardens, trim boulevards, and delightful
parks. Its mild climate makes it a haven of content,
in summer as in winter, for while zero weather is unknown there, so also is excessive heat. The characteristic beauty of its residential district has made it distinctively a home city—a spot favored, incidentally,
by those who have acquired a sufficiency of this world's
goods and wish to work no more. Nevertheless, Victoria's enterprising business district, composed of imposing stores and tall office buildings, speaks of a rich
commerce drawn from the vast resources^of Vancouver Island.
VICTORIA has within its boundaries, or within
easy access, many beautiful parks. Chief of them
is Beacon Hill Park, comprising some 300 acres
laid out as recreation grounds and pleasure gardens
and containing many interesting monuments and
relics. Magnificent views of the sea and the Olympic
Mountains can be obtained from here. Gorge Park is
a popular pleasure resort, with boating, bathing,
picnic  grounds,  and open-air entertainments.
The principal bathing resorts within easy reach of
Victoria, in addition to the Gorge, are Foul Bay, Cadboro Bay, Cordova Bay, Brentwood Beach, Willows,
and Shoal Bay. These can be reached either by
street car or by automobile. Sight-seeing automobiles make frequent trips during the season. Cadboro
Bay is near Uplands, a charming residential section.
THE EMPRESS HOTEL
AT Victoria, overlooking the Inner Harbor, is the
Empress Hotel of the Canadian Pacific—an
hotel of stately architecture, hospitable spirit,
spacious atmosphere, and social warmth. This is the
westernmost of the chain of Canadian Pacific hotels
that spans Canada from coast to coast and offers to
the traveller the highest standard of hotel service.
Page  Two
PARLIAMENT BUILDING
VICTORIA is the provincial capital of British
Columbia and the seat of government. The
Parliament Building, which is amongst the
finest in America, both for architecture and situation,
is a handsome structure overlooking the Inner
Harbor. In the eastern block is the Provincial
Museum, very complete and interesting, and containing a large assortment of specimens of natural
history, native woods, Indian curios and prehistoric
instruments. The Provincial Library is a fine one.
Its historical prints, documents, and other works,
especially regarding the Pacific Coast, are of great
value and interest. In the old legislative buildings
on Superior Street is a Mineral Museum.
OBSERVATORY
VICTORIA'S unequalled climate and its low
range of temperature guided the choice of Observatory Hill (formerly Little Saanich Mountain)
for the site of the great Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. This was completed in 1918, the new telescope, which has a 72-inch reflector, being the largest
in the world. The observatory is reached by interurb-
an car, and is open daily. Another observatory, the
Meteorological, is situated in Gonzales Hill, near
Foul Bay.
BRENTWOpD
BRENTWOOD is a charming resort situated on
Saanich Inlet, fifteen miles from the city, and
reached by street car or au tomobile. There is a
modern country hotel here, beautifully finished in Old
English style, and with excellent facilities for boating,
bathing, tennis, billiards, and other recreations.
THE BUTCHART GARDENS
NEAR Brentwood are the beautiful sunken gardens of Mr. R. P. Butchart, unsurpassed on
the Pacific Coast, which are open to visitors
on certain days of the week.
ESQUIMALT
FOUR miles from Victoria, Esquimalt was for
many years Great Britain's only naval station
on the Pacific Coast. The Dock Yard has now
been handed over to the Canadian Government, and
is the base on the Pacific Coast for the Canadian
and Imperial navies.
OAK BAY
OAK BAY is one of the principal residential
districts of Victoria.   With an excellent hotel,
it has facilities for boating and some fine walks
along the sea front.
"1
 Page Three
7-r
 Motoring * QolEi n$
MOTORING
CONSIDERING the size of Vancouver Island,
there are possibly more good motor trips
radiating from Victoria than any other place
in America. The motor roads are excellent, the
drives north to Campbell River, Port Alberni,
Sproat and Great Central Lakes being among the
most spectacular in the world. Automobile owners
from the United States who wish to tour Vancouver
Island can bring their cars into Canada for one
month without any formalities beyond the signing
of a registration card at point of entry, and if it is
desired that longer stay be made, the usual bond is
arranged.    Among the most popular trips are:
Victoria, Marine Drive and Mount Douglas Park,
25 miles;
Little Saanich Mountain Observatory and Brentwood
33 miles,
Tour of Saanich Peninsula, 45 miles;
The^famous Malahat Drive to Shawnigan and Duncan
(Island Highway), 41 miles;
Nanaimo, via Parksville to Cameron Lake, 40 miles
—over Albreni Summit, 57 miles;
The Grand Island Highway Tour—Victoria, Duncan,
Nanaimo, Cameron Lake, Port Alberni, Qualicum
and Campbell River, and the entire Georgian
Circuit International Tour, the greatest and most
complete scenic tour on the continent.
Automobiles. There are many garages from which~cars can be
hired. Rates, usually $3.00 per hour for 5-passenger cars, $3,50 per hour
fcr 7-passenger cars. Special arrangements can be made for a two or three
day trip. There are several auto liveries providing cars without drivers
at reasonable rates for those who wish to diive themselves.
Boats. Canoes, Etc. W Victoria Harbor has exceptional facilities for boating, including a run (4 miles) to the Gorge. Boats and canoes
can be hired from the Gorgeway boathouse at $2.50 a day, or 50 cents the
hour. Motor boats can be hired from the same place by special arrangement. Boats and canoes can also be hired from the Oak Bay boathouse and
Cadboro Bay^ boathouse, the rates being the same.
Riding.*3** Very excellent hacks can be hired at 'The Willows," and
there are some very beautiful roads along which people can ride, not very
much frequented by motor cars. These include the University road, the
Cadboro Bay road, and the road running around Mount Tolmie. Rates for
horses are $3.50 the first hour, $1.50 the second, and $1.00 the third.
Special rates will be made to board people's own horses.
_ Tennis. There are''four grass tennis courts, the chief of which is
the Victoria Lawn Tennis Court. Members of any recognized tennis club
can obtain visitors' privileges.
CLIMATE
ACCORDING to figures supplied by the Meteorological Office of the Dominion Government,
the lowest point reached at Victoria during the
year of 1921 was 16° Fahrenheit in the month of December, while in only two months, July and August,
was any higher point reached than 75 °. The mean in
the hottest summer month of August was 58°, \vhile
Page Four
the mean over the whole year was 49°. The winter
months of January and February show mean temperatures of 40 and 41, although temperatures in both
months were recorded as high as 55°. No wonder
that the grass is always green and that spring comes
early in this equable and delightful climate.
GOLFING
EVER since 1893, Victoria has had its golf links.
There is no better known club or course in the
Dominion than the Victoria Golf Club, with its
famous greens at Oak Bay at the southern end of Vancouver Island. Many of the holes skirt the shore of
the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The view from the third
short hole across the strait to the snow-clad Olympic
range of mountains in Washington is magnificent.
Another remarkably fine course in Victoria is
that of the Colwood Golf and Country Club. In
addition to its excellent standing as a links, the
course is exceptionally beautiful, possessing many
fine oak trees as well as a number of groves of fir.
The United Service Golf Club has a 9-hole course
at Esquimalt and an 18-hole course in construction
at Uplands.
GUESTS of the Empress Hotel have, upon payment of regular green fees, privileges at the
Colwood   Golf   and   Country Club.    Application should be made to the Manager of the hotel.
COLWOOD GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB, VICTORIA
18 holes,f-6,291 yards, Grass greens, President, J, A, Sayward,
Secretary, R, Genn, 61 1 Sayward Block, Victoria. Eight miles by rail or
jitney, Women can play every day, Visitors' charges: $1.00 per day,
$5,00 per week, $12,50 per month.   Sunday play permitted with caddies.
UNITED SERVICE GOLF CLUB, ESQUIMALT
9holes,2,840 yards, Grassgreens, President F. G. Fowkes; Secretary-
Treasurer, E. D. Freeman. Women can play at all times. Visitors'
charges: 50c, per day, $1.00 Saturday and Sunday, $5,00 per month,
Twelve minutes by street car line.   Sunday play permitted with caddies-
UNITED SERVICE GOLF CLUB, UPLANDS
18 holes, 6080 yards, grass greens.    Same officers,    Women can play
every day,   Visitors charges, not yet fixed.    Twelve minutes by street car.
VICTORIA GOLF CLUB, VICTORIA
18 holes, 5,395 yards, Grass greens, President, Col, A, W. Jones;
Secretary, Capt, J, V, Berks, 2J^j miles by electric cars, 10 minutes from
car terminus, Women can play every day except Sundays, Visitors'
charges: $1.50 per day, $2,50 Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, $30.00
per month; ladies, $12.50 per month,   Sunday play permitted with caddies.
NANAIMO
A new golf club is in process of formation here, but it is not expected
that the links will be in a condition to play on this year.
QUALICUM BEACH
9   holes,   2842   yards.     Grass  greens.     President,   Gen,   H,   Money;
Secretary-Treasurer,   G,  A,   N,   Kitching,     Women  can  play   all   times,
Visitors* charges: $1.00 per day, $4,00 per week.    Sunday play permitted
with caddies.
\
 Page Five
m
 It* East Coast
THE East Coast of Vancouver Island is served by
the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway, a subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific, which runs in a northerly direction, within a close distance most of the
time of the coast line, for 140 miles to Courtenay,
nearly half-way up the Island. Branches run also to
Cowichan Lake and to Port Alberni, and an extension
of the main line is projected from Courtenay to Campbell River. This line carries the visitor through a succession of rich agricultural, lumbering, and mining
regions, and through magnificent, rugged scenery.
Colwood, eight miles beyond Victoria, is a thriving
little settlement of truck and poultry farmers, and the
station for the Colwood Country Club. Continuing
through a country wooded on one side and more or
less open on the other, the Langford and Goldstream
Lakes are passed. The line rises gradually to Malahat,
which is the summit of the railway crossing the Malahat
Range and from which there is a prolonged view of Todd
Inlet and the Saanich Arm. The Malahat Drive (in view
from the railway) crosses this mountain.
SHAWNIGAN LAKE is a beautiful sheet of water
that provides excellent fishing. On its shore is
the comfortable Strathcona Lodge, from which a
splendid view of the lake can be obtained. Shawnigan
is a small settlement at the northerly end of the lake.
Cobble Hill, the next station, is a prosperous dairying
district. Cowichan, the station for Cowichan Bay, is
one of the best places for salmon trolling in the island.
Duncan is the centre of a beautiful and prosperous
agricultural, fruit-growing and poultry-raising region,
with numerous charming residences, and is largely
populated by retired English people, many of the residents   supplementing their incomes by farming.
Duncan is the principal point for fishing the
Cowichan and Koksilah Rivers—the former one of
the best fishing waters in British Columbia, where
excellent steelhead can be taken on the fly. A
branch line runs twenty miles northwesterly, through a
busy logging country with an enormous output, to Cowichan
Lake. The waters of this lake teem with gamy trout, and
the forests bordering its shores harbor enough feathered and
furred game to fill the hunter's fondest dreams.
SOMENOS and Westholme are the agricultural
and lumbering settlements. Chemainus has one
of the largest sawmills in the province, and is a
good stopping point for fishing on the Chemainus River. Ladysmith, on Oyster Bay, is an important coal
mining town, as also are Cassidy, South Wellington,
Nanaimo, and Wellington.   Nanaimo, overlooking a
Page Six
beautiful bay, is the second largest city of Vancouver
Island, the fourth largest in the province, and, owing
to its proximity to the mainland, one of the main arteries of the island trade. It is the distributing centre
for coal, and headquarters of prosperous agricultural
and herring fishing interests. It has a direct Canadian Pacific steamer service to Vancouver.
The line continues through heavily wooded country to Nanoose Bay, around the southern shore of
which it runs. Parksville Junction is the centre of a
substantial mixed farming district, with excellent fishing and bathing. With a beautiful beach, it is becoming a favored seaside resort. It is the junction point
for the branch to Port Alberni, some forty miles distant in a westerly direction. This branch runs through
a magnificently wooded country, practically untouched by the hand of man, to Cameron Lake, which has
very good trout fishing and shooting. A pretty
and comfortable chalet owned by the railway company provides  accommodation for visitors.
From Cameron Lake the line skirts the foothills of
Mount Arrowsmith (6,000 feet high), the grandest mountain
of the island. Port Alberni and its associate town Alberni
look out on the majestic waters of the Alberni Canal, a deep
and mountain-skirted arm of the Pacific capable of giving
anchorage to an immense volume of shipping.
RESUMING the journey northward from Parksville, a six-mile rim brings the traveller to Qualicum Beach, a popular summer resort that has
one of the finest bathing beaches for children on the
East Coast. There is good fishing and shooting in the
vicinity. The next point of importance reached is Union Bay, shipping point for the coal mines at Comox
and Cumberland, which have a very heavy production.
Through a diversity of seashore and woodland
scenery, Courtenay, the present terminus of the
line, is reached. It is the centre for the agricultural
business of the Comox Valley, the largest farming
and most productive region of the Island. A big
Returned Soldier Settlement has been established at
Merville. There are very extensive timber interests
adjacent to the valley, making it an attractive location for future settlers as the timber is removed and
land cleared. Campbell River, ranking in fame as a
salmon-fishing water with Cowichan, is north of Courtenay.
It can be reached by steamer from Vancouver or by motor
boat or automobile from Courtenay. A combination of
steamer, motor and rail from Vancouver to Campbell River
and back again makes a wonderful round-trip. Near by is
Strathcona Park, a new Provincial Park of nearly 800 square
miles.
 -
 JCL
Hunting & Fishing
PRACTICALLY speaking, all the lakes and
streams of Vancouver Island contain trout of
some kind or other—chiefly rainbow or cutthroat. Very large trout are caught by trolling in the
bigger lakes, but there is no trout water on the Island
where the fish will not take the fly. In the heat of
midsummer, when the rivers are low, excellent
sport may be had with sea-trout in the estuaries.
Of the several varieties of salmon, there are only
two of particular appeal to the sportsman, the Coho
and the Spring. The latter, known by several aliases,
such as King, Tyee and Chinook, are the better
table fish, and attain to greater weight. There are
various localities off Vancouver Island where fifty
pound Springs are common; twenty or thirty pound
fish are ordinary in any of the estuaries when the
springs are running.
In February and March there is a run to the river, but the
big run comes in August, September and October. The
Cohoes have a small run in May and June, and are very
game at that time, but the main run comes during the latter
part of September, when they play more on the surface. The
fall Coho averages about nine pounds in weight.
That the British Columbia salmon will not take the fly
is a fallacy which has been disproved. Both Spring salmon
and Cohoes are caught with a fly every season by anglers
who know how and when to use the fly.
The other fish which are plentiful in Vancouver Island
waters are steelheads, a combination of salmon and trout,
which run from the sea in the winter months; and char, very
handsome fish attaining a large weight and giving very fine
sport on spooning tackle or a salmon fly. It is found chiefly
at the outlets of the larger lakes.
The principal rivers for the fly fishermen on the East Coast are the
Cowichan River, Koksilah River, Chemainus River, the Englishman's
River, Little and Big Qualicum, the Courtenay, the Oyster River (between
Courtenay and Campbell River), and Campbell River. On the West Coast
there are the San Juan River, the Gordon, the Ash, the Stamp, the Drinkwater, etc.
The principal trolling places are Victoria Harbor, Saanich Inlet, Cowichan Bay, Ladysmith Harbor, Campbell River, the Alberni Canal, and the
many inlets on the West Coast of Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island is wealthy in both furred and feathered game. The
varieties include black-tail deer, black bear, cougar, wolves, pheasants,
grouse, snipe, quail, ducks and geese.
Any hotel, guide and other rates quoted in this booklet are not
necessarily guaranteed by the Canadian Pacific Railway.
NEAR VICTORIA
Shooting. Just outside Victoria, along the Saanich
Peninsula and the B.C. Electric Railway, there is excellent
shooting to be had in the proper seasons. Pheasants, grouse
and quail are easily obtainable. Excellent deer shooting may
be had within fifteen or twenty miles of the city. The Sooke
and Malahat districts may be specially mentioned.
Fishing. In Victoria harbor, and just outside, very good
trolling for salmon can be obtained. The best spot is what
is known as Brotchie Ledge. The season is open practically
the year round for different species of salmon—Tyee, Cohoes,
and Grilse. The best season for Springs is January and February,
and again in June and July. There is an early run of Cohoes in March and
April, and again in August and September, continuing until the end of the
year with Springs and Grilse.
Page Eight
GOLDSTREAM
Goldstream, ten miles from Victoria, is the stopping place
for Langford Lake.    This lake is one of the only two waters
in the whole of British Columbia where bass can be obtained.
There is fair shooting in the vicinity.
BRENTWOOD
The fishing is exactly the same as at Victoria, and the
hotel management has always one or two men on hand who
are willing to act as guides. The shooting is quite good, and
quite a number of deer can be obtained; also, the hunting is
not difficult. Reached by B.C. Electric or motor, rate for
latter $4.00.
SOOKE
Sooke is a small village on Sooke Harbour, south of
Victoria, and is reached by a stage leaving the corner of
Douglas and Fort Streets twice a day; return fare $2, also
reached by motor $5. There is very good fishing both trout and
salmon, and at the mouth of the Sooke River excellent steelheadj;fishing
can be obtained in February and March.
Shooting. Deer, bear and birds can be easily obtained. Guides
can be obtained at the hotel. The hotel manager, Major Nicholson, is
an experienced hunter and fisherman and can give all information.
SHAWNIGAN LAKE
Boats and canoes can be hired from the hotel, motor boats
also (rate for the latter, $2.50 per hour.) The hotel manager,
M. A. Wylde, is one of the best fishermen and hunters on
Vancouver Island, and an authority on the fishing^in the
district.
Fishing. Excellent trout fishing can be had on the lake. The
seasons are from March 15th until the end of June, and from September
to October, when the fly fishing is very good. Fish can be obtained^all the
summer by trolling, but the bestjfly fishing is in September.
Shooting. Within a short distance from^ the hotel excellent
grouse, pheasant, quail and duck shooting can be had in their respective
seasons. In the hills at the back of the hotel, there is some very good deer
shooting, and black bears are obtainable in the earlier spring.
DUNCAN
Principal point for fishing the famous Cowichan J and
Koksilah Rivers.
Shooting. Excellent shooting can be obtained, and the
pheasant shooting is very good indeed, but owing to there
being many settlers it is necessary to obtain the permission
of the owners of the different farms. They, however, will
usually give this. Deer and bear shooting can be had at the
back of the hills.
Fishing. The Cowichan River is within a quarter of a mile from
the town, and in January and February excellent steelhead fishing can be
obtained. The best flies to use are the big Silver Doctor or Jock Scott, but
the favorite way of taking these fish is with spoons, either by using a
, Si wash, Phantom, Devon or Minnow. It is, however, absolutely unnecessary to use these lures, as the fish will usually take the fly. In the spring
the fly trout fishing is very good indeed and continues good practically
the whole season.'
COWICHAN LAKE
Railway service from Duncan twice weekly. On the days
when the train does not run, a stage runs, fare $2.
Shooting. Bear and deer, to say nothing of birds. One
of the best known guides on the Island is available, Ken
Gillespie, who charges $10.00 per day, and can make all
arrangements to shoot the celebrated Cowichan Rapids.
Indians are available with canoes, and the cost of shooting
these rapids, or going very nearly 20 miles by canoe, is $1 5.00.
Fishing. The fish in the lake are very similar to those at Shawnigan, but are considered to be slightly better. The fish average good size
and it is no exception to get them up to three pounds.
 Page Nine
—
 COWICHAN BAY
Reached either from Cowichan station, or from Duncan
by stage or motor car.    Excellent bathing and boating, boats
being available for $2.00 a day up.
fe Fishing. The fishing, which is practically all trolling, is
exceptional; and during the months of August, September and
October, the trolling for Cohoes is excellent. Fishing tackle
and men to row the boats can be obtained on application at
the hotel, usual rate per day for a man and boat being $7.50.
In the vicinity are some wonderful walks.
Shooting. There is very fine bear and deer shooting in the hills
behind the hotel, and although there are no regular guides, the hotel
management can usually procure one.
KOKSILAH RIVER
Three miles from Duncan, flowing into Cowichan Bay.
The fishing is similar to that of the Cowichan River, with the
exception that in the spring there is wonderful sea trout
fishing to be had.
NANAIMO
The Nanaimo Lakes, some twenty miles distant by motor
car (usual rate $10.00) has very good fishing in the spring and
the fall, although not in the summer except for trolling.
There is very good fishing in the Chemainus River, some
twenty-five miles south of Nanaimo, but there is poor accommodation at Chemainus itself.
PARKSVILLE
Noted for its bathing beach. There is very excellent deer
shooting, as well as bird shooting behind Parksville. There
are no guides available, but the hotel management will always
do their best to get parties reliable guides. Boats can be hired
at the hotel.
The Parksville Garage, operated by Rushton Bros., makes a specialty
in running visitors out to Englishman's River and French Creek. Both
these gentlemen are enthusiastic fishermen, and will give people all the
information that is necessary.
QUALICUM BEACH
Shooting. Just at the back of the E. & N. line, and off
the Parksville road, is a very good stretch of country for deer
shooting.   There are very few bear in this district, but a large
amount of small game.
Fishing. The Little Qualicum River"*runs into!Whiskey Creek.
The fishing at this point, while good in spring, is very uncertain, but in the
fall salmon (cohoes) can be killed with a fly. There is a very good annex
in connection with the hotel, and also a store within an easy distance, and
accommodation can be obtained at the annex from $1.00 a day up.
COURTENAY
There is good fishing here in the Toslum or Courtenay
River, the upper reaches of which are very good for cougar
hunting. An old logging railway runs up to Wolf Lake,
which in the spring and fall is very good for bear shooting.
There is a very good trail, easy to go along.
Excellent sport, both fishing and hunting, can lbe obtained at Wolf
Lake. Automobiles can be hired at the Courtenay garage, and there are
several_private cars for hire.
CAMPBELL RIVER
Campbell River is noted for two things—its salmon fishing
and its bear shooting. Campbell River can be reached from
Vancouver by steamer, or from Courtenay by motor boat or
automobile. Automobile route, 30 miles; rates for party of
four, $3.50 each; six or more, $3.00 each; one person $10.00.
(Rates not guaranteed by C.P.R.) Arrangements for the trip
in either direction should be made with C. Thulin, proprietor
of the Willows Hotel, Campbell River.   Boats are for hire in
Page Ten '
Hunting & Fishing
conjunction with the hotel, the rate of which is $3.00 a day.
The fishing and hunting in this district is exceptional. The fish are
very large and varied. From Campbell River it is possible to fish in
Quinsam River, and to get, by means of the International Logging Railway,
right into the Quinsam Lakes country—-an extremely beautiful piece of
hunting and fishing country. It is rather hard in places to get there, but
jt is ideal for people who wish to rough it, as there are marked trails, and it
is not necessary to have guides.
Following the river along, in which the fishing is good nearly all the
•time, Campbell Lake is reached. The fishing is very good here, and in the
spring excellent fishing can be had with a fly, the fish running very big
indeed.
There is a motor road which runs along to Forbes Landing, where there
is a small and comfortable hotel, where pack ponies can be obtained by
previous arrangement to go into Buttles Lake.
BUTTLES LAKE
Buttles Lake is practically in the centre of Vancouver
Island, and runs through Strathcona Park. Before arriving
at Buttles Lake, however, is the Upper Campbell Lake, and
where the Campbell River flows out of Buttles Lake the fishing is exceptional.
The bear hunting is very good, and there are lots of deer.
It is possible to take a wagon to within twelve miles of Buttles
Lake, when it is necessary to pack in. This can be done by
ponies, although it is somewhat slow going. Just at the head
of the lake there is a large and well-built cabin, erected by the Provincial
Government for the benefit of campers.
Buttles Lake has undoubtedly produced some of the biggest trout that
have ever been taken on the island. There are several places, and several
rivers and streams running into the lake, the chief of which are]Wolf Creek,
Felwood Creek, at the extreme southern end, Mirror Lake, and Glazier
Creek.
CAMERON LAKE
Tents and boats can be hired from the hotel. Excellent
bear and deer shooting, and very good fishing. Where the
little Qualicum flows out of the lake is a favorite spot for fly
fishing.
At the west end of the lake, where Cameron River flows
into the lake, the fishing is very good for about a mile, but
after that distance it is not good. From here Cameron Lake
is practically under the shadow of Mount Arrowsmith. This
mountain is within easy access of Cameron Lake, and a very enjoyable
trip can be made by going along the trail which runs from the west end of
the lake, around Mount Arrowsmith, into Alberni. This trail is still good
and arrangements can be made at the hotel for the hire of an outfit.
ALBERNI
Best centre for fishing, hunting and camping on the whole
Island, and it is extremely doubtful whether there is another
place in Canada to equal it. Bear, deer and cougar are all
easily obtainable.
SPROAT LAKE
At Sprout Lake, there is a fisherman and hunter's cabin,
operated by Miss Wark. Arrangements can be made to hire
tents, camping outfits, and boats. The rate for a complete
camping outfit, with a boat, is $15.00 a week.
The fishing is very good indeed, and there are innumerable
rivers and streams running into the lake, all of which contain
fish. The country surrounding this and Great Central Lake
abound with game. The chief are deer and bear, and Miss
Wark makes a specialty of arranging hunting parties, and
providing guides.
At the west end of Sproat Lake, there is the Taylor River, which is
undoubtedly a very fine hunting ground for black bear. The fishing is
exceptional.
In the late fall, good duck shooting can be obtained. Grouse—blue and
willow—are very numerous indeed.
Sproat Lake is ten miles from Alberni, and the cost by motor car to
either Sproat or Great Central Lake is $5.00.
{Continued on Page 16)
 Page Eleven
—
 'Bie'West Coast
THE West Coast of Vancouver Island can be
reached  by   Canadian   Pacific  steamers   that
leave Victoria every ten days, making stops at
a number of small points as far as Port Alice, near
the northern end of the Island.
This trip is a very interesting one, introducing the
traveller to a wild and picturesque country somewhat
off the beaten track of visitors, to a rugged and
deeply-indented coast line, and to mountainous
and heavily-timbered slopes that drop sheer into the
water. The West.Coast can indeed be called the
Canadian Norway. Little villages are found along
the fiord-like bays and inlets, devoted to fishing and
lumbering; Indian settlements, too, and interesting
Indian folk-lore and totem poles. This wild land is
the last unmodernized West on the continent—a country
without railways, automobiles, moving pictures, or electric
light; for all intents and purposes the same as it was a
hundred years ago.
THE first port of call after leaving Victoria is
Port Renfrew, at the head of the Port San
Juan Inlet and at the mouth of the San Juan
and Gordon Rivers. This is a busy salmon-canning
town with some extremely good sporting advantages
—trout and salmon fishing, bear and deer shooting,
and goose, duck and brant shooting. Clo-oose is a
small Indian village. Banfield, on Cape Beale, is an
Imperial Government cable station, the landing
point for the cable to Australia and New Zealand.
Uchucklesit has salmon and herring canning plants.
Swinging into the Alberni Canal, the largest
"fiord'' of the West Coast, running inland some thirty
miles, we reach Port Alberni. There are really two
towns here, two miles apart—Alberni, the "old town,"
and Port Alberni, the "new town." In addition to
this steamer route, they can also be reached from
Victoria by rail by the branch of the E. & N. which
runs westward from Parksville Junction (see page 6.)
Port Alberni is the head quarters of the Barkley Sound
herring fleet, an important fish-packing centre, and a
thriving lumbering town, with one of the largest areas of
standing timber on Vancouver Island tributary to it.
From it can be reached very easily the Great Central Lake
and Sproat Lake.
RETRACING its way, the steamer strikes the
open ocean again and heads towards the northwest, calling at Sechart, Ucluelet, Tofino and
Clayoquot.    Not the least interesting thing about
Page Twelve \
these remote little settlements is the remarkable
way in which the coming of the steamer galvanizes
them into life. One moment the scene is deserted,
uninhabited; but the blast of the siren will bring
a whole flock of eager small craft into the bay,
apparently from nowhere. Clayoquot, on Vargas
Island, is one of the oldest and most important deep-
sea fishing harbors on the West Coast. It is a fine
spot for goose and brant shooting; and it also has in
Long Beach, reached down the Browning Passage,
a beautiful beach set amidst wonderful scenery.
Nootka, on a magnificent gull-haunted arm of the
sea known as Nootka Sound, is one of the oldest settled districts of the West Coast. Friendly Cove, as a
playful tourist remarked, is the home of tame Indians
and very wild totem poles. These curiously crested,
highly-coloured poles, standing along the main street
or over the graves of dead warriors, are almost as mysterious to the white man as the Druidical stones, but
to the coast Indian they are as important as the Social
Register. The pole tells the tale of the chieftain whom
it commemorates—his name, clan, social status and
mighty deeds—truly a family tree! Frequently, the
totem pole—of ten erected by the chief's successor in
office—would take from two to three years to make
and would cost the equivalent of from five to a thousand dollars. The Indians work in the Salmon and herring plant, which is one of the largest in British Columbia,
and also ply a busy trade with the visitors in brightly
coloured baskets and mats. It was at Friendly Cove that
Captain Vancouver took formal possession of the coast in
the name of Great Britain.
LEAVING Kyuquot, a whaling station, and
passing desolate Solander Island, a rock of
Gibraltar-like proportions that is the haunt
of gulls and sea-lions, we head almost due west,
round Cape Cook, and then turn north towards
Quatsino Sound, which, entering, we traverse to
the village of Quatsino, a very old white settlement, the inhabitants of which are engaged in mixed
farming, logging, fishing and trapping. A mile or so
away is situated the Indian settlement of the same
name. At Quatsino, we double back along the
Sheltered Southeast Arm to Port Alice, at the
extreme southern end of the inlet. Within the last
few years there has been created at Port Alice, where previously there was no sign of human life, a very busy town
revolving around the large pulp and paper mill that has
been established there. The product of this mill is marketed
principally in the Orient.
 ;
Page Thirteen
I
 Jkdtistrkl -Tramspbrtatioii
ALTHOUGH we are here considering Vancouver
Island primarily from the standpoint of the
holiday tourist, a word will not be amiss
regarding its industrial resources and potentialities.
The Island has enormous resources—mineral, forest, fishery,
and agricultural—which as yet are only partially developed.
It contains, for example, almost a quarter of the standing commercial timber of Canada. The most important
varieties are Douglas fir, red cedar, hemlock, balsam, spruce,
and yellow cedar or cypress. Important lumbering industries have been developed at many places, notably at
Chemainus, Duncan, Courtenay and Port Alberni; while at
Port Alice there is a large pulp and paper mill shipping
principally to the Orient.
THE mineral resources of Vancouver Island are
extremely rich, and include coal, iron, salt,
marble, sandstone, zinc and cement material.
The coal mines have been well developed, and at
Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Cassidy, South Wellington,
Nanaimo, and Cumberland are producing heavily.
The last two are the biggest producing regions,
Cumberland shipping over 75,000 tons a month.
Ladysmith has a smelter. Important deposits of iron
occur at several points along both the east and west coasts.
Abundant water-power is found in many parts of the
province; the largest developed is on the Puntledge River,
near Courtenay, with a capacity of 12,000 h.p.
VANCOUVER Island shares, too, in the great
volume of fishing enterprises conducted on the
Pacific Coast. Amongst the varieties of fish
caught are salmon, halibut, herring, cod, crabs, and
oysters. Several fish packing plants are located at
Port Alberni and down the Alberni Canal to the
outlet at Barclay Sound. There has also been
created a successful whaling industry, with stations at
Kyuquot and Rose Harbor, on the west coast.
CANADIAN PACIFIC BRITISH COLUMBIA
COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICES
Vancouver to Victoria, twice daily.
Seattle to Victoria, once daily.
Vancouver to Nanaimo, twice daily.
Victoria to Union Bay and Comox, once weekly.
Vancouver to Union Bay and Comox, three times a week.
Victoria to West Coast, three times monthly.
Vancouver to Campbell River and Alert Bay, once weekly.
Same sailings in "reverse direction.
Time Tables for dates and times.
See Current
AGRICULTURE is in a flourishing state in the
southern end of the island, though elsewhere
it has to some extent been retarded by the
necessity   of   clearing   the   land
first.   The   climate   of   the   Island is
such as to make agriculture somewhat
of an idyllic occupation, and to concentrate   most   attention   upon   the
raising of vegetables and small fruits.
From the  Island come some  of the
finest strawberries of this continent,
their production per acre being very
heavy.    Dairying is also carried on to
a  large  and  very successful  extent,
as well as sheep breeding and chicken-
raising.    In some parts of the Island
grain is being cultivated. Princess   Patricia
Page Fourteen
ESQUIMALT & NANAIMO RAILWAY
Victoria to Duncan, Nanaimo and Wellington, twice daily.
Duncan to Cowichan Lake, twice weekly. ; x, ^J
Wellington to Courtenay, daily except Sunday.?i \
Parksville Jet. to Port Alberni, three times weekly.
Same trains in reverse direction: See Current Time Tables.
CIRCLE TOURS ON VANCOUVER ISLAND
The following combined rail and steamer tours can be
made on Vancouver Island :|
Victoria to all points onfthe E. & N., returning bysame route.
Victoria to all points on the E. & N., returning from Nanaimo
to Vancouver, thence to Victoria or Seattle.
Victoria to Campbell River via E. & N. to Nanaimo, thence
steamer   to   Vancouver,   thence   steamer   to   Campbell
River.
Victoria to Comox via E. & N. to Nanaimo, thence steamer
either direct or via Vancouver.
Victoria to Port Alice, either by direct steamer or via E. &
N. Ry. to Port Alberni, thence steamer.
From   Vancouver,   Victoria   can   be   reached   by   direct
steamer or via Nanaimo, thence via E. & N.
Vancouver to all points on the E. & N., either via Victoria or
via Nanaimo.
Vancouver   to   Comox,   direct   or   via   Nanaimo,   returning
direct or via E. & N. to Victoria.
Vancouver to Campbell River and Return.
This Tour is one of the finest
on Vancouver Island. Route is
from Vancouver to Campbell
River by steamer, thence to
Courtenay by automobile (30
miles), thence E. & N. to Nanaimo and return to Vancouver
by steamer; or E. & N. Courtenay to Victoria.
Triangular route Vancouver-
Victoria-Seattle can be combined
with all tours.
Fares for tours range from $5.00
to $40.00, according to itinerary.
 Page Fifteen
**~-r
 'ft 2
/0-"
Hunting
{Continued from Page 10)
GREAT CENTRAL LAKE
Great Central Lake is very similar to Sproat Lake, and
there is a very good sporting place, the Ark, run by Joe
Drinkwater, who is a well-known guide and hunter. He
has a limited amount of accommodation, his rates being $4.00
a day, and has also "small arks" with sleeping accommodation, stoves and everything a camper requires, which he will
move to any part of the lake. The cost of these is $1.00 per
day per head. Mr. Drinkwater will also supply food. At
the west end of Great Central Lake Mr. Drinkwater has five
excellent cabins, which he rents out on the same terms.
At the head of the lake is Drinkwater Creek, which runs into the lake
just opposite the cabins. This river has very excellent fishing, and has
probably been photographed more than any other river on the island.
It is possible to go from here along the bed of this river over the mountains,
and get into the south end of Buttles Lake. This is a very magnificent
piece of country, and, although somewhat hard going, is quite accessible.
The guides that can be obtained for this particular trip are Jack and Tom
Clark, who live in old Alberni, and whose rates per day are $7.50.
At Alberni itself, there are the Stamp and the Ash Rivers, which are
noted for their big fish. They are within easy walking distance. The
fishing is best in the spring and the fall, and the fish average two or three
pounds.
THE ALBERNI CANAL
The Alberni Canal is a sheet of water running inland some
thirty miles, and is particularly noted for its salmon trolling.
Boats and men can be obtained at the Somas Hotel for $6.00
a day. The best time for trolling is from March to October.
There are several small motor boats at Alberni which can be chartered on
application to either the garage or the hotel, and the usual rate is $15.00
a  day including a man.
Amonest the good spots are Cous Creek, China Creek, and Nahmint
River and Lake.
PORT RENFREW
The fishing here is extremely good: trout, steelhead and
salmon can all be obtained in their respective seasons.    There
is very good bear and deer shooting and exceptional goose,
duck and brant shooting.
Guides. Mr. B. Robinson has been a resident of this district for
many years, and knows the country thoroughly.   He is thoroughly reliable,
and his charges are $10.00 per day, including tents.
CLAYOQUOT
Clayoquot, on the Vargas Island, is the best place on the
whole of Vancouver Island for goose and brant shooting.
There are three motor boats for hire from Mr. Dawley, who
operates the hotel. There are many small rivers and streams
in which fishing can be obtained, and the hunting is extremely
good.
THE NIMPKISH RIVER TRIP
This trip, which has only recently come into prominence,
is undoubtedly one of the most magnificent that can be made
on the Island.    The visitor takes the Canadian Pacific boat
& Fishing
from Vancouver to Alert Bay, where Indians with small
motor boats and canoes can be obtained. He then goes
across to the mouth of the Nimpkish River, along the river
into the Nimpkish Lake. At the south end of the lake he goes
to the Nimpkish River again and poles as far as the canyon,
a distance of some thirty miles. All this country, although
wild and more or less unexplored, is fairly easy going. The
fishing is exceptional and steelheads up to 20 pounds can be
taken on a fly.
Mr. Haliday, the Indian Agent at Alert Bay, is always
willing to make arrangements to have Indians meet any
party. The Indians' rate of pay is $6.00 per day, including
their canoe. It is necessary to take camping outfits and food
from Vancouver.
Bear and deer are very numerous, and in the fall there are large numbers
of ducks. Cougar also can be obtained, but it is necessary to have dogs.
The scenery is magnificent, and very varied. The time required for this
trip is roughly speaking about eight or nine days, but arrangements can
be made with the Indians to take parties in and fetch them at a specified
date.
There are two very good guides available for this district. One is Mr.
Smith ("Cougar Smith,") and the other Mr. A. Bryan Williams (former
Chief Game Warden for the province) 1 170 Georgia Street West, Vancouver. Mr. Williams knows this district very well, and is prepared to take
parties in there, his charges being $10.00 a day.
TACKLE AND EQUIPMENT
Principal flies to use in Vancouver Island waters are the
Cowichan Coachman, Grizzly King, Professor, Silver Doctor,
Jock Scott, Dusty Miller, Montreal Grouse and Claret, Teal
and Yellow, Thunder and Lightning, and Heckhampeckum.
Fine tackle should be used in the majority of cases, and a
powerful rod. Of course, when trout fishing, it is not uncommon to get in a large steelhead or salmon.
The steelhead season runs from November 15 to March 15, the trout
season from March 15 to November 15, and there is no closed season for
salmon.    Waders are necesary for shooting and fishing.
A 30-30 rifle will be found heavy enough for any game there is on the
Island, and a 12-gauge shot gun is all that is necessary. One should have
a pair of thick corduroy trousers and a heavy mackintosh coat when it is
necessary to go through the bush.
CLEARANCE FOR AUTOMOBILES
The clearance for automobiles plying between Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle and Nanaimo is as follows:
Princess Louise 7 feet 10 inches
Princess Charlotte 6    ' 2
Princess Victoria 6     ' 0
Princess Adelaide 6     ' 1
Princess Alice  . 5     ' 9
Princess Royal 5     ' 6
Princess Mary 6     ' 8
Princess Patricia* 6    ' 3
Charmer 7    ' 2
*CIearance at Nanaimo slip 5 feet 8 inches only.
Has clearance sufficient to handle large limousines which cannot be
handled on the Princess Patrica.
Page Sixteen
Printed in Canada
^^_
 Hotels and Boarding' Houses on Vancouver Island
,3 o      ^
ALBERNI (E. & N.)
Arlington D.A. McKenzie. . A 30    3.75
(See also Great Central Lake and Sproat Lake.)
ALERT BAY (Steamer from Vancouver)
McLean Hotel  A
>»
3
V
fe
s
o
.2 ^
2 mile
BEVAN(4^ miles from Cumberland)
BevanlHotel R. Yates	
BRENTWOOD (Suburb of Victoria)
Brentwood F. Hiscock EBC
CAMERON LAKE (E. & N.)
Cameron Lake
Chalet Mrs. A. M. Monks AS
3.00
50    2.50
11 miles
10    4.00 up 26.50 up Adjoins
CAMPBELL RIVER (Station, Courtenay, E. & N.)
Forbes J. Forbes   ABC   16    3.75        23.00
Willows Inn C. Thulin     E     100    1.50 up  	
CEDAR (Station, Nanaimo)
Wheat Sheaf E. Wahle     A       12    2.50        	
CHEMAINUS (E. & N.)
Horseshoe Bay Inn.A. E. Collyer.
Lewisville E. Howe	
38 miles
28 miles
AB
A
4.00 up 25.00 up
3.25        14.00
6 miles
H mile
x/i mile
3.00        17.50
1.50
1.50
CLAYOQUOT (Steamer from Victoria)
Clayoquot W. Dawley   AC      12
COURTENAY (E. & N.)
Courtenay Hotel. .R. B. Dixon     E       30
Riverside R. B. Dixon     E      33
COWICHAN BAY (E. & N.)
Buena Vista F. Saunders     A       20    4.25        25.00
CUMBERLAND (from Royston, E.& N.)
Cumberland W. Merrifield...      E 30
King George V. Bonora  AC 40
Union W. Jones     A 28
DUNCAN (E. & N.)
Quamicham W. Morgan     E       35
Tzouhalem Mrs. A. I. Price..    E       41
GREAT CENTRAL LAKE (Station, Alberni)
Ark Hotel J. A. Drinkwater. ACB    16
Small Arks J. A. Drinkwater.    E
KOKSILAH (E. & N.)
Koksilah W. C. FerneyhoughA
1.00 up 7.00
3.00 14.00
3.00        15.00
1.50 up
1.50 up
4.00        21.00
1.00 	
LADYSMITH (E. & N.)
Abbotsford A. J. McMurtrie..    A
Bayview. J. D. Giovando.. .    E
New Western A. Mahle     A
Pretoria Turk & Matt....    A
Travellers Mrs. H.A. Wanless AB
LAKE COWICHAN
Cowichan Lake.. . H' Hodgson E
Riverside C. A. Janes ECB
LITTLE QUALICUM (Station, Dashwood)
Hashwood House.. P. L. GOOD     A
NANAIMO
Globe Mrs. A. Gordon..    A
Windsor J. Fox     A
44
35
35
32
32
24
17
2.50
2.50
1.75
3.00
3.00
3.50
2.00
1.50
12.00
12.50
14.00
H mile
y% mile
2 J! miles
\i mile
4 miles
4 miles
Close
50 yards
11 miles
11 miles
50 yards
3 blocks
1 block
3 blocks
2 blocks
14 mile
1 mile
7    3.50        17.50      200 yards
3.00
3.75 up
20.00
XA mile
600 yards
NANOOSE BAY (E. & N.)
Arlington A. Guenlette.
I s
& £
6 "c3
fc Q
15 3.00
3
<u
fe
18.00
.2 rt
S       fc       Q £ Qw
A       15    3.00        18.00      100 yards
OAK BAY (Suburb of   Victoria)
Oak Bay J. A. Virtue     A       22    6.00 up 40.00 up 3^miles
PARKSVILLE (E. & N.)
The Island Hall.. .Miss W. Philpot.. AS      28    5.00       32.00        IK miles
Rod & Gun Mrs. Muir     A       22    4.50        28.00        1 mile
PORT ALBERNI (E. & N.)
Beaufort J. Wyatt     A
King Edward J. E. Cullen     A
Somas J. E. Doyen AB
PORT RENFREW
Boarding House... San Juan Box
Factory     A
QUALICUM BEACH
Qualicum Beach.. .F. Masarati  AS      50    5.00
Sunset Inn     A       ..    5.00
36
70
3.25              500 yards
3.00        12.00       2 blocks
4.00 up 25.00 up Opposite
2.00
32.00
20    2.50
15.00
30    4.00        25.00      20 miles
SHAWNIGAN LAKE (E. & N.)
Strathcona Lodge. M. A. Wylde ASBC 40    4.00 up 24.00 up At Statio n
SIDNEY (Street car from Victoria)
Sidney P. N. Fesler     A
SOOKE HARBOR (Stage from Victoria)
Sooke Harbor G. Nicholson     A
SOUTH WELLINGTON
Alexandra Hotel.. .A. C. Carpenter. .    A
SPROAT LAKE (Station, Alberni)
Kletsi Lodge Miss J. E. Wark..
UNION BAY (E. & N.)
Nelson  Fraser & Home. .
Wilson Hotel J. & A. Wilson.
2.50
ASC     10    4.00 up 24.00 up 7 miles
E       40    1.50 up 30.00 up Adjoins
A       20    3.50        20.00      200 yards
VICTORIA
Empress Hotel.
Can. Pac. Ry....
278
Balmoral Miss L. Tulley...
Brunswick Hotel. . J. W. Smalley... .
Dallas. Mrs. W. Allison..
Dominion S. Jones	
Douglas S. Hireen	
Glenshiel Inn Miss J. Mollison..
James Bay Mrs. Allen.
King Edward S. W. Hurst     E
Manitoba M.C. Carlisle     A
Metropolis E. P. Barnhart.. .
Portland W. N. Tomkins. .
St. James Hotel.. .F. C. Willows	
Strathcona F. J. Martin	
Vernon Mrs. J. H. Han-
bury     E
Westholme J. W. Thompson..  EB
WELLINGTON (E. & N.)
Somerset Agnes Medrich.. .    A
E
E
AB
EB
E
A
EB    100
64
60
60
107
100
40
EB 120
EC 60
EB 100
EB
1.00
.75
2.50 up
1.50 up
1.00 up
3.00 up
1.25 up
1.00
1.00 up
1.50 up
1.00
1.00
1.50 up
  Facing
Wharf
4.00        10 min.
4.00     500 yards
12.00 up 5  min.
     10 blocks
6.00 up 4 blocks
21.00 up 5 min.
15.00 up 5 min.
5.00        	
6.00 up 5 blocks
7.00 up Close
       }/i mile
       6 blocks
       4 blocks
45    1.00 up    6.00 up 6 blocks
96    1.50 up    7.00 up 6 blocks
7    3.00        18.00        Imin.
A—American Plan E—European Plan
B—Sends Booklet C—Cottages to Rent
S—Open in Summer (sometimes extending into Fall), only.
 •• v:::V*C •'••■.;.''•';•'•'••'•'•': •.:-'--
•pl^^^
/*§£*'7*    L                                                         'A A
x^m§m
J
LEGEND         1
'.
A	
3...
Bh...
 ttoh/s
 ....Bear
 Boats for Hire
C...
CP...
 Coc/gar
.  Camping Places *
a.,..
 Deer
G	
.6.5...
..^...Garage
.... Creese & Brant
■ da.,..
 . Guides
S,...
.......... Salmon F/shing
■S.0...
 *. Small Game
T .....
.......... TroutFish ind
-—7
s
r1
 CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
OFFICERS OF THE TRAFFIC DEPARTEMENT
W. R. MacInnes. .... Vice-President In Charge of Traffic .....'  Montreal
C. E. E. Ussher Passenger Traffic Manager Montreal
W. B. Lanigan Freight Traffic Manager Montreal
Sir G. McLaren Brown.K.B.E., European General Manager London, Eng.
C. B. Foster Assistant Passenger Traffic Manager Montreal
C. E. McPherson Assistant Passenger Traffic Manager Winnipeg
W. G. Annable Assistant Passenger Traffic Manager, Ocean Traffic Montreal
W. H. Snell General Passenger Agent Montreal
G. A. Walton General Passenger Agent Winnipeg
H. W. Brodie General Passenger Agent Vancouver
Wm. Ballantyne .... General Passenger Agent, Ocean Traffic Montreal
H. G. Dring European Passenger Manager London, Eng.
Geo. C. Wells Assistant to Passenger Traffic Manager ,. .Montreal
W. C. Bowles Assistant Freight Traffic Manager Montreal
W. M. Kirkpatrick, M.C, Assistant Freight Traffic Manager Winnipeg
H. E. Macdonell Special Freight Traffic Representative    .Montreal
E. N. Todd General Foreign Freight Agent... Montreal
R. E. Larmottr General Freight Agent Montreal
C. E. Jefferson General Freight Agent Winnipeg
A. O. Seymour General Tourist Agent Montreal
J. O. Apps General Agent Mail, Baggage and Milk Traffic Montreal
J. M. Gibbon General Publicity Agent Montreal
PASSENGER AGENCIES
Adelaide Aus. .Australasian United S. Nav. Co., Ltd.
Antwerp. .Belgium .. W. D. Grosset, Agent 25 Qua! Jordaens
Atlanta Ga. . .E. G. Chesbrough, Gen'l Agent Pass'r Dept. .49 N. Forsyth Street
Auckland NZ.. .Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand. Ltd.
Belfast. . .Ireland .. Wm. McCalla, Agent 41-43 Vlcto-ia Street
Birmingham..Eng. . .W. T. Treadaway,  Agent 4 Victoria Square
Boston Mass. . .L. R. Hart, Gen'l Agent Pass'r Dept 405 Boylston Street
Brandon. . . .Man. . .R. Dawson, District Passenger Agent Smith Block
Brisbane. . . .Aus.. .Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Bristol Eng. . .A. S. Ray, Agent 18   St. Augustine's Parade
Brussels ..Belgium. .C. DeMey  98   Boulevard Adolphe-Max
Buffalo .... .N.Y...D. R. Kennedy,   Gen'l Agt. Passenger Dept., 160 Pearl Street
Calgary .. . .Alta. . .J. E. Proctor,   District Passenger Agent C.P.R. Station
Chicago III. . .T. J. Wall, General Agent Pass'r Dept 140 South Clark Street
Christiania, Norway, Eivind   Bordewick,   General   Agent Jernbanetorvet 4
Cincinnati. . .Ohio . .M. E. Malone, General Agent Pass'r Dept 430 Walnut Street
Cleveland. . . .Ohio. .G. B. Burpee, General Agent Pass'r Dept.. . .1040 Prospect Ave.
Detroit . .. .Mich.. .W. Mcllroy, General Agent Pass'r Dept.. . .1239 Griswold Street
Duluth . . . .Minn. ..D. Bertie, Trav. Pass. Agent, Soo Line Depot.
Dundee. ..Scotland. .H. H. Borthwick,  Agent 88 Commercial Street
Dunedin N.Z..Union S.S Co. of New Zealand, Ltd. „
Edmonton. . .Alta. .C. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent 10012 Jasper Avenue, East
Fort William, Ont. . .A. J. Boreham, City Passenger Agent 404 Victoria Avenue
Glasgow, Scotland . .M. L. Duffy, Agent 25    Bothwell    Street
Halifax N.S.. .J. D. Chipman, City Passenger Agent 117 Hollis Street
Hamburg,GERMANY..C. F. A. Flugge, Agent Alsterdam   24
Hamilton. .. .Ont. . .A. Craig, City Passenger Agent Cor. King and James Street
Havana Cuba . .Santamaria y Ca., San Ignaclo 18
Havre .   .   .France. J. M. Currle & Co  .2 Rue Pleuvry
Hong  Kong,China..T. R. Percy, Cen'l Agent Pass'r Dept., Can. Pac. Steamships, Ltd.
Honolulu. . . .H.L..Theo. Davis & Co.
Juneau.. . .Alaska..J. L. McCloskey, Agent
Kansas City.. Mo.. .R. G. Norris, City Pass'r Agent, 614 Railway Exchange Bldg.
Ketchikan, .Alaska. .F. E. Ryus, Agent
Kingston..Jamaica ..George & Prandy.
Kingston Ont. . .F. Conway, City Freight and Passenger Agent
Kobe Japan .. A. M. Parker, Passenger Agent, Canadian Pacific Steamships, Ltd.
Liverpool. . . .Eng. . .Thos. McNeil, General Agent, Royal Liver Building, Pier  Head
[Wm. Baird, Asst. European Pass'r Mgr.\  62-65   Charing   Cross,
London., ..  Eng. {C. E. Jenkins, Booking Agent         J S.W.I
{G. Saxon Jones, City Agent 103 Leadenhall Street, E. C. 3
London Ont. . .H. J. McCallum, City Passenger Agent 161 Dundas Street
Londonderry . .Ire .. J. A. Grant, Agent 50 Foyle Street
Los Angeles.. .Cal. .A. A. Polhamus, Gen'l Agent Pass'r Dept. .605 South Spring St.
Manchester.. .Eng .. J. W. Maine, Agent 1 Mount Street
Manila P.I.. .J. R. Shaw,     Agent 203    Roxas    Building
Melbourne. . .Aus.. .Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand, Ltd Thos. Cook & Son
Milwaukee. . .Wis.. .F. T. Sansom, City Passenger Agent 68 Wisconsin Street
Minneapolis, Minn..A. G. Albertsen, General Agent Pass'r Dept., 611—2nd Ave. South
Mojl Japan. .Wurui Shokwai (Holme, Ringer & Co.)
Mnn+..Aai 0™  iR- G. Amiot, District Passenger Agent Windsor Station
iviontreai.. . .que. |c F Lydon, City Passenger Agent 141-145 St. James Street
Moosejaw.. .Sask. .. A. C. Harris, Ticket Agent, Canadian Pacific Station.
Nagasaki. . .Japan..Holme, Ringer & Co.
Nelson B.C... J. S. Carter, District Passenger Agent.. . Baker and Ward Streets
New York... .N.Y.. .F. R. Perry, General Passenger Department Agent
Canadian Pacific Bldg., Madison Ave. at 44th Street
North Bay ,. .Ont. . .L. O. Tremblay, Travelling Passenger Agent..87 Main Street W.
Ottawa Ont. . .J. A. McGill,   General  Agent Passenger Dept.    83 Sparks Street
Paris France . .A. V. Clark, Agent 7 Rue Scribe
Philadelphia .. .PA...R. C. Clayton,  City Passenger Agent 629 Chestnut Street
Pittsburg  . .   .Pa. ..C. L. Williams,   Gen'l Agent Passenger Dept..340 Sixth Avenue
Portland . . . .Ore .. W. D. Deacon, General Agent Passenger Dept 55 Third Street
Prince Rupert.B.C. .W. C. Orchard, General Agent n     ,
Quebec Que. . .C. A. Langevln,   City  Passenger Agent Palais Station
Regina Sask. .. G. D. Brophy, District Passenger Agent, C.P.R. Station
Rotterdam.HoLLAND.J. Springett,   Agent 42    Coolsingel
St. John ...   .N.B.. .N. R. DesBrlsay, District   Passenger Agent 40 King Street
St.Louis MO...E. L. Sneehan, General Agent Passenger Lept.,420 Locust Street
St. Paul .. . .Minn. .B. E. Smeed, Gen'l Agt., Passr. Dept., Soo Line. Robert & Fourth
SanFrancisco.CAL. .F. L. Nason,   General Agent Passenger Dept.. .675 Market Street
Saskatoon   . .Sask..W. E. Lovelock,   City Ticket Agent 115 Second Avenue
Sauit Ste. Marie, Ont. J. O. Johnston, City Passenger Agent.
Seattle Wash. . .E. F. L. Sturdee, General Agent Pass'r Dept...608 Second Avenue
Shanghai. ..China..A. H. Tessier, Gen'l Agt. Pass'r Dept., Can. Pac.Steamships, Ltd.
Sherbrooke . . .Que . J. A. Metivier, City Passenger Agent 74 Wellington Street
Skagway . .ALASKA. .L. H, Johnston, Agent . .   ■   ■_     ..
Southampton.ENG.. .J. Gardner 14 Canute Road
Spokane. . . .Wash. .E. L. Cardie, Traffic Manager Spokane International Railway
Suva Fiji. .Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand, Ltd.
Sydney Aus..Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand, Ltd.
Tacoma . .. .Wash. .D. C. O'Keefe, City Passenger Agent 1113 Pacific Avenue
t«-««** nwm /w- B- Howard,   District   Passenger  Agent 1 i tcw Street E
Toronto °NT \ Wm. Fulton, Asst. District Passenger Agent f 1 KinS btre®J *•
Vancouver ., .B.C.. .F. H. Daly. City Passenger Agent 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria . . . .B.C...L. D. Chetham, City Passenger Agent..1102 Government Street
Warsaw . . .Poland ..W. J. Wyatt, Passenger Agent 117 Marszalkowska
Washington..D.C.C. E. Phelps, City Passenger Agent 1419 New York Avenue
Winnipeg . . .Man. .J. W. Dawson, Dist. Pass'r Agt. Cor Portage Ave. & Main Street
Yokohama ..Japan. .G. E. Costello, Gen'l Agt. Pass. Dept., Can. Pac. Steamships, Ltd.
 t
Sfsr                     1
HLfl                  .•■■'■■■)
llf;- ■ AAAmm^ u%,              MM:-x a ;
Ami              IHrv
■"""  ---"
\     'H           IP'
^            jgjl
■-•    ■* +  !
:--
'%       -AXXXAA^-tototo-to '
i Mr'
*'--•     '                ■ '■■ 1
i
a .:
^B
■■■ ■•■■' A'XAA
f T
S»    :■-$
^^KSSBSSk
W^^.
 ;$
ICOUVER ISLAND
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
Canadian (?
 1. VICTORIA, B. C. Leaving Victoria, the beautiful Capital
City of British Columbia, in the evening, steamship proceeds through
the Strait of Juan de Fuca, with the snow-capped Olympic Mountains
of Northern Washington, on the left, arriving at Port Renfrew in
the early morning hours.
2. PORT RENFREW Port Renfrew is situated at the head
of San Juan Inlet and at tiie mouth of the San Juan and Gordon
Rivers, a small but beautifully situated village, the principal industries being logging and salmon canning. There is excellent trout
and salmon fishing in season, and good opportunities for shooting
bear, deer,  goose, duck or brant.
3. BAMFIELD Shortly after leaving Clo-oose we pass Cape
Beale, marking the entrance to Barkley Sound, and arrive at Bamfield, an Imperial Government cable station, being the terminus of
the "All-Red" cable to Australia and New Zealand via Fanning
Island. Bamfield was named after W. G. Bamfield, who came to
the West Coast on the H.M.S Constance in 1846 and was later
appointed Indian Agent. The longest portion of the "All-Red"
cable lies between Bamfield and Fanning Island—3,540 miles. The
cable was first successfully laid in 1902, but with the rapidly
increasing business of later years it was found necessary to lay
an additional cable. Bamfield is the Lifeboat Service station for
the West  Coast.
4. UCLUELET Ucluelet Harbour is a well sheltered inlet,
about five miles long, situated at the west end of Barkley Sound
and protected from the Pacific swell by several outlying islands.
It is the base of a large fishing fleet and has several fine lakes and
small rivers in the vicinity, which offer good sport to the angler.
Ucluelet proper lies on the west side of the harbour, while directly
across on the east side is Port Weeks. Ucluelet wharf on the west
side is at the end of the now partially completed Ucluelet-Long
Beach-Tofino road, which when completed, will be an extension to
the Vancouver Island main highway, giving access to Long Beach,
twelve miles long and one-quarter wide, probably one of the finest
ocean beaches in North America.
5. CLAYOQUOT SOUND Three hours' steaming from
Ucluelet brings us into Clayoquot Sound, a name taken from the
Indian word, "Another" or "Different." Calls are first made at
Tofino; then at Clayoquot on Stubbs Island, two miles across the
Sound. Clayoquot is situated on a long, half-moon, white sand
beach, running out to a long spit, and a pleasant walk of about a
mile through the woods brings one to the open ocean on the other
side of the island. Clayoquot is the headquarters for a large fishing fleet. On leaving Clayoquot, a call is made at the Roman Catholic Indian Mission School at Kakawis and several fishing plants in
Matilda Creek before proceeding to Nootka.
6. NOOTKA SOUND This sound, one of the largest and
most beautiful on the West Coast, was discovered by Capt. James
Cook in 177 8, who landed at Friendly Cove, a charming inlet at the
entrance to the Sound, named by the Indian "Yukquot" or "Yucu-
at," derived from "Yukwitt" to blow with wind; "Aht," people or
village, meaning "a village exposed to the wind." Nootka is probably the most interesting historical port on the West Coast of North
America. Captain Cook first named the Sound "King George's
Sound," this being later changed to Nootka. He was hospitably
received by Chief Maquinna of the Nootka Indians. Friendly Cove
was again visited in 17 88 by Lieut. John Meares, in the ship Felice,
who erected a small trading post and built in the same year the
first vessel to be built on the West Coast of America. A small
Roman Catholic Church now stands on the spot where this vessel
was built. It was at Friendly Cove that Capt. George Vancouver
met Bodega y Quadra, the Spanish Commander, and formally took
possession of tlhe lands for Great Britain in August,  1792.    A few
miles farther up the Sound is
Nootka Cannery where, after a
brief stop, the steamship proceeds through a beautiful narrow passage between the mountains, called Tahsis Canal.
7. ESPERANZA INLET This large inlet
was also discovered and named by Capt. Cook in
177 8. Calls are made in the Inlet at Ceepeecee,
Port Tahsis, Zeballos and Espinosa, before passing
again into the open sea en route to Kyuquot Sound.
8. ZEBALLOS is now a regular port of call on this enthralling
trip and holds interest as the newest and fastest growing mining
camp in Western Canada. Gold has lured men from far and near
to this fabulously rich district and in less than three years a small
gold camp with half a dozen prospectors' shacks has become a town
with hospital, wharf, hotel and several producing mines.
9. KYUQUOT SOUND A call is sometimes made at Cachalot, a former whaling station, now converted into a fish reducing
plant—one of the largest on the coast. Calls are also made at
Chamiss Bay, and at the Indian Village of Kyuquot. There being
no wharf at the latter port, landing is made by boat. Passing a
maze of rocky islands at the entrance of the Sound, the ship now
rounds Cape Cook, off which point may be seen Solander Island,
the home of a large colony of sea lions.
10. QUATSINO SOUND The first call is at Winter Harbour, near the entrance on the north side; then a few miles farther
on Quatsino Village. The ship then proceeds down the southeast
arm to Port Alice, the terminus of the voyage and the site of a large
pulp mill. After a stay of several hours at Port Alice, the homeward voyage commences. Before leaving the Sound a call is sometimes made at Spry Camp, at the extreme end of the northwest arm,
which is entered  through  a beautiful  narrow tidal  channel.
XtoX'&AXAmXX^^XA
liPl^«»x«s:;;;:'!;x-?;
'      ' ■•-■■-^•■-v~'
 WEST
yCOAST
NDIANS
A BC
***
BORIGINES, little spoiled by nearly
two centuries of contact with the
hite man, and who still follow
the handicrafts and customs of their
tribal ancestors, add interest to your
West Coast of Vancouver Island cruise.
Though their living habits have been
altered by association with whites, and
they prefer "store clothes" to home-made
skins and hides, hardy braves of the
Nootka and Kwakiuti tribes still preserve their ancient cunning. They can
fell a giant cedar from the forest, cut
it into lengths and burn it out to make
their primitive but efficient dug-out
canoes.
In these cumbersome-looking craft
they perform prodigious feats of seamanship. Along this coast
with its deep bays, rocky inlets and treacherous winds and tides
from the open Pacific, they paddle from inlet to village in all
kinds of weather. White sailormen are continually amazed at
their skill and daring, but his canoe is the Indian's livelihood,
and skill with a dugout is one of the first things he must acquire.
At Kyuquot village, the journey is enlivened by the sight
of Indians, colorfully attired, putting out in their picturesque
dugouts to take off mail and baggage from the steamship.
Totem poles, those fearsome, brilliant-hued relics of Indian
lore, are seen to advantage on the West Coast. At Friendly Cove
particularly are some fine specimens. One of them in fact is
interpreted to include a figure representing Captain James Cook,
who, with Lieutenant Bligh (later captain of the ill-fated
Bounty), first visited Friendly Cove in  1778.
West Coast Indians, too, are noted for their skill in the
weaving of baskets, and offer their wares for sale to visitors
at various wharves along the route.
For some years the strange practice peculiar to these tribes
of shaping the head of an infant by strapping a board across his
forehead has been discontinued, but a few examples resulting
from this custom are to be noted among older members of the
tribes.
Equally fascinating customs, however, are revealed in other
ways. On the shore of the Tahsis Canal, through which the
ship proceeds north from Nootka Inlet, may be seen an Indian
grave, surmounted by a small house and surrounded by a tiny
stockade.
This is a method of burial still practiced by Indians of the
district.
Cheerful, carefree, courageous and friendly, West Coast
Indians are encountered all along the West Coast route, adding
pleasure and  interest  to the voyage.
 T TISTORICALLY the oldest,
Captain Vancouver
but in development one of
the newest parts of British Columbia, Vancouver
Island's scenic West Coast can be called one of the
Dominion's last frontiers.
Here is a rugged coastline, frequently compared
with Norway's, which is without automobiles and,
except for a few small industrial communities, without roads and electric lights.
Captain James Cook sailed up the West Coast in
1778, made his headquarters in Friendly Cove, and
in 1788 Lieutenant John Meares, also of the British
Navy, visited Nootka with two small ships, and built
a trading post.
These early explorations of the West Coast were
fraught with adventure and bloodshed as Britain
warred with Holy Spain for this North American
prize. Lieutenant Meares and his men were captured
and imprisoned by Spaniards; Spain and England
hovered on the brink of war, but after sharp diplomatic exchanges, promises and threats, this rich and
beautiful land was ceded to England by the terms of
the Nootka convention, by which Spain agreed to
acknowledge Britain's sovereignty in Northwest
America.
Britain sent out Captain George Vancouver to
take formal possession, in 1792, at Nootka, and the
record of his meeting with the gallant Spanish commander, Bodega y Quadra, is an interesting portion
of Captain Vancouver's log.
Along the coastline today English and Spanish
names alternate . . . Bamfield, Port Alberni, Kildonan,
Tofino,   Refuge   Cove,   Hesquiat,   Winter   Harbor,
Quatsino, Hecate, Espinosa, but there too the Indians,
of the Nootka and Kwakiuti tribes, perpetuate the
days of their glory in names like Ucluelet, Clayoquot,
Kakawis, Ahousat, Tahsis, and Chamiss Bay.
Perhaps Vancouver had some vision of the thousands of tourists destined to visit this glorious land
in years to come, for his journal reveals this acknowledgment of the beauties and charms of this coastline:
"To describe the beauties of the region will, on some
future occasion, be a very grateful task to the pen
of a skilled panegyrist. The serenity of the climate,
the innumerable pleasing landscapes and the abundant fertility that unassisted Nature puts forth,
requires only to be nourished by the industry of man,
with villages, mansions, cottages and other buildings
to render it the most lovely country that can be
imagined."
Industry has come—sawmills, mines, a bustling
seaport at Port Alberni, cable stations and fish canneries, but the West Coast remains for the most part
as it was in its historic past, and has yet to fulfill
Captain Vancouver's prophecy of mansions.
 mam*
SPECIAL
FEATURE C
VANCOUVER ISLAND
S.S. "PRINCESS NORAH"
June 28 to July 5,1941
Sailing from Vancouver 2:00 p.m. and
Victoria 11:00 p.m., Saturday, June 28,
and due to arrive Vancouver on return
at 9:00 a.m., Saturday, July 5.
Local steamer connecting from Seattle.
Fare from Vancouver *rr a a
or Victoria      .....     ?5500
Fare from Seattle___       $60#0°
(Including berth and meals) Minimum
Pfe
Rooms 1, 2,  3, 4,  5, 6, 7,  8, 9,  10,  11,  12,  14,  15
carry premium of $10.00 per berth and $20.00 per
room in addition to minimum fare.
Rooms 122, 124, 127, 129 carry premium of $30.00
per room in addition to minimum fare.
Calls are made at the ten principal ports on the
West Coast and cruise is then continued around
the Island, with next call at Alert Bay. This is
the first port of call of our Alaska steamers and
the Indian village and totem poles at this place are
always of interest to the tourist.
The return route is by the "inside passage,"
through Johnstone Strait, Seymour Narrows and
the Gulf of Georgia, with a day spent in cruising
to the head of Knight Inlet, one of the most beautiful fiords on the Pacific Coast.
Call is made the following day at Comox, Gateway
to the beautiful Comox Valley, scenically and agriculturally the finest on Vancouver Island, where
the evening is spent and steamer sails at midnight
for Vancouver.
 WEST COAST VANCOUVER ISLAND SERVICE       SUNSET CRUISE SAILINGS      1941
(pcUvex£u£e,
BC. COAST
STEAMSHIPS
Victoria, B. C, at 11 p. m.
Princess Norah," June 1-11-21, July 6-16-26,
August 6-16-24, September 1-11-21
'Princess Maquinna," July 1-11-21, August 1-11-21
FORMATION    FOR
PASSENGERS
Read Down
First Day
Second Day
Ports of Call
Lv.  VICTORIA ... ©Ar.
"    Port Renfrew    "
"       ©(DCarmanah      "
«     ©Clo-oose    "
"   Bamfield „. ,  "
"      ©Sarita Bay —1  "
"    ©Ecoole  . "
"    Kildonan    "
"    ©Green Cove  "
"    ©Nahmint    "
Read Up
Eighth Day
Seventh Day
Third Day
Fourth Day
"       ©Franklin River      "
"       ©Underwood Cove     "
«     ©Port Alberni    "
" _. ©Toquart   (Lucky Creek)..  M
M    Ucluelet    "
«     ©Port Albion    "
(Ucluelet  Arm)
«  Tofino    '«
"       Clayoquot      "
."      ©Kakawis    "
"     Ahousat   "
"      ©Sydney  Inlet      "
"     ©Refuge Cove   "
"    ©Hesquiat  ...- "
"   Nootka Cannery  "
"      ©Danzig Mines —   "
«    ©Muchalat    "
"      Ceepeecee    ,   "
" .... © Hecate  «c
"     ©Esperanza Hotel    "
"    Zeballos    ...  "
"    ©Tahsis Saltery    "
"      ©Espinosa   ......  "
"     ..   ©Markale     "
"       ©Chamiss Bay      "
"    .....  ©Kyuquot Village©   w
"     ©Winter Harbour    "
"    ©Quatsino  Village   "
"     Coal Harbour    "
"       ©Jeune Landing      "
"      ©Spry Camp    "
Ar    PORT ALICE    Lv.
NOTE: Where no date is shown
steamship does not call.
QCall made when business offers.
■j ^oat Landing.
'1 made Northbound each trip,
und call will be made if busing    wafers.
0 Steamship will not sail Northbound prior to 11:59 p.m. on advertise! date.
©Call at Kyuquot made only during
months  April   to   September,  inclusive.
©Call  only by special arrangement.
©Arrival time at Victoria is approximately 1:00 p.m., being governed by
weather and tidal conditions and .the
amount of freight business to be transacted. CONNECTIONS ARE NOT
GUARANTEED.
Sixth Day
Fifth Day
CONNECTIONS                                         them  to  separate seat  in  dining saloon,  but if                                         BERTH LIGHTS
Passengers  may  leave  Seattle  on  the Company's          separate   berth   is   required,   charge  will   be  the          An berths on Princess Norah are equipped with
regular steamship   at   9:00   a.m.   day   of  sailing,          same  as   for  children   between   five  and   twelve          electric berth light.
due Victoria   12:50 p.m.,  and may  return from          years of age.                                                                                            TT^_   *,.T^ ^^T ,-* „„,T»t„T/, „„,.-«,„
\r- +                a„  , ./,«'         /_ * „„, n C+Mtr,           ^...,             ,                            ,            ... ,            .   ,                  HOT AND COLD RUNNING WATER
Victoria on regular 4:3 0 p.m. (or 5 p.m.; steam-          Children under two years of age will be carried
ship day of arrival of West Coast steamship.                 free when  accompanied  by parert  or guardian.          Al1 rooms on hoth steamships have hot and cold
Passengers   may   leave   Vancouver   on   the   Com-                             EXCLUSIVE USE OF R<loMS                             rUnning "^ " "^ "^
pany's   regular   steamship   at   10:30   a.m.,   due                            EXCLUSIVE USE OF ROOMS                                                                     uATHc
Victoria   2:40  p.m.,   returning  on  regular   1:45          Two full fares, plus full premiun (if any) will                                                    ISA 1Mb
p.m. or 12 midnight steamship day of arrival of          be  charged  for exclusive use  of any  two-berth          Passenger should apply to Steward or Stewardess
West Coast steamship.                                                                 room during the tourist season, an! Selling Agent          for use of public baths.
will stamp or write across face   >f ticket "EX-
STOPOVERS                                            CLUSIVE USE" and amount collated.                                                                   BARBERS
Round-trip   tickets   do   not   permit   stopover   at                                 THREE-BERTH ROC MS                                 Steamships carry barbers.
CHILDREN'S FARES                                     ©The company reserves the right to berth three                                         MEAL SERVICE
Children   five   years   of   age   and   under   twelve          passengers in any room containinj   double lower,          In  addition   to  breakfast,   luncheon  and  dinner,
years will   be  charged  half minimum  fare  plus          sm«le uPPer  and  s°fa  be*th'  whsn  same 1S not          light refreshments are also served in dining saloon
full premium  (if any).                                                              occupied by married couples.                                                  at 10.30 pm   without extra charge.
Children two years of age and under five will be          ©Three   persons   cannot    be   accommodated    in          Table reservations should  be made with  Second
charged $6.60 round trip, which fare will entitle          rooms where no rate is shown.                                               Steward on embarkation.
f J-L**ims)l                     «   «      fi*%*%*«.*^*i*iM    ^f ^n ft if il     * mmA ift«/MM rtiT^ft*                                ROUND TRIP FARES
Minimum Return Fare from Victoria, $42.90 (Beth and Meals Included)
Berth
Rate
One
Adult
For
2 in
Room
©   ©
For
3 in
Room
(a)   Rooms
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15—Single bed  (3ft. wide),
single upper and sofa berth, shower bath and toilet.   (See Note 1.)
Summer Sailings, June 1-Sept. 5, inc.
$   52.90
$105.80
$148.70
Spring and Fall Sailings
48.90
97.80
140.70
w
<&
0
( b )   Rooms
100,  103—Double lower and single upper berths.
All Year
42.90
85.80
(c)   Rooms
102,   104,  105,   106,  107,  108,  109,   110,  111,  112,   114,  115,   116,
117,   118,   119,   120,   121,   123,   125—Double   lower,   single  upper
and sofa berth.     (See Note  1.)
All Year
42.90
85.80
128.70
„>f
122,   124,   127,   129—De  luxe  rooms  each  with  twin  beds   (3   ft.
! wide), tub bath and toilet.
Summer Sailings, June 1-Sept. 5, inc.
115.80
Spring and Fall Sailings
105.80
	
(e)   Rooms
•    \
12 6,  128,   131—Double lower,  single upper and sofa berth.     (See                                      ..
Note 1.)
42.90
85.80
128.70
(f)   Ro<|ms
132,  134,  135,  137—Single lower and single upper berth.                                                     All Year
42.90
85.80
(g)   Roims
13 0, 133, 13 6, 13 9—Single lower and single upper berth - Bibby Rooms                                 All Year
42.90
85.80
(h)   Rooms
13 8,  140,  141,  142,  143,  145—Single lower, single upper and sofa                                      ..
berth.    Deck entrance.     (See Note 1.)
42.90
85.80
128.70
144    14-6.   147.   149 Single  Inwer and  sinele unoer  berth.                                                                All  Year
42.90
85.80
'           '
©The Cojnpany reserves the right  to berth  three passengers  in a three-berth room where not occupied by married couple.
©IMPORTANT—Three persons cannot  be accommodated in rooms where no rate is shown.
DIMENSIONS OF BERTHS—Uppers, 6 ft.  3   in. x  2  ft.   6 in.;  Single Lowers,  6 ft.  3   in. x   2 ft.  6 in.; Double powers, 6 ft.  3   in. x 3   ft.  6 in.;  Sofas,  6  ft.  3  in.
Fifth Day
x 2  ft.  6 in.
UPPER
DECK
ilium
¥
Mi
□ D
STEAMER "PRINCESS NORAH"
29 '<^l/2
r-i^Ak
Z3D
J"
M?/cA
LOWER
DECK
Sfc
f/t
iff
//O   V08
^OA£l
S. S. "PRINCESS MAQUINNA" ACCOMMODATION
Minimum Return Fare from Victoria, $42.90 (Berth and Meals Included)
(a)   Rooms
(b)   Rooms
(c)   Rooms
(d)   Rooms
(e)   Rooms
39, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46
5, 6, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 2:
ROUND TRIP
FARES
7, 9,  14, 15, 16,  17, 18, 1^, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 40—Double lower and single
upper berths.
47, 48, 49,  5 0,  5 2—Double lower and single upper berths.   Deck entrance only.
-Single lower and single upper berths —Inside rooms.
1, 2, 8,  10—Single lower ind single upper berths—Outside rooms.
3,  4—Single lower and single upper berths—Outside rooms.
Berth
Fare
One
Adult
$42.90
42.90
Berth
Fare
Two
Adults
$85.80
DIMENSIONS! OF BERTHS—Lower Berths,  6  ft.  x 3   ft.  6 in.;  Upper and Single Lower Berths,  6 ft.  x  2  ft.  6 i
CL_3>  <C
<CZ>
STJEAMER "PRINCESS MAQUINNA'
PROMENADE
DECK
&
"*%¥.   j°
:x
r-9
X<rr*\
_ /r~"eA~'r„   ..
 i r
ti -"*•
o! a^l**
v-t)
m
m
S3
^MF^
s m
UPPER
DECK
 FOR RESERVATIONS
Apply to Nearest Canadian Pacific Agent
or to
PASSENGER AGENTS IN THE UNITED STATES
ATLANTA,   GA.
950 Oitz.  & Southn.  Nat
Bk. Bldg.
40 5 Boylston St.
BOSTON   MASS.
BUFFALO,   N.  Y.
CHICAGO,   ILL.
CINCINNATI,   0.
CLEVELAND,  0.
DALLAS, TEXAS
DETROIT,   MICH.
HONOLULU,  T.H.
INDIANAPOLIS,   IND
KANSAS  CITY,   MO.
LOS ANGELES,  CAL.
MEMPHIS,   TENN.
MILWAUKEE,  WIS.
MINNEAPOLIS,   MINN. 611  2nd Ave.  South
NEW YORK,   N. Y.
W. A. Shackleford
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
L  R.  Hart
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
W. P. Wass
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
T. J. Wall
Gen.   Agt.,   Rail Pass'r
L. P. Dooley
City Passenger Agent
G.  H. Griffin
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
P.  G. Jefferson
Dist. Pass'r Rep.
M.  E.  Malone
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Agents
A. C. Nieman
Trav. Pass'r Agent
R.  G.  Norris
City Pass'r Agent
A. D. Macdonald
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
P.  D. Salmon
Dist. Freight Agent
1014 Warner Theatre Bldg. Wm. C.  Giese
Gen. Agent, Soo Line
22 Court St.
71  E.  Jackson Blvd.
201  Dixie Terminal Bldg.
1010   Chester  Ave.
1304 Kirby Building
1231  Washington Blvd.
Travel Department
Merchants  Bank Bldg.
201-2 Waldheim Bldg.
513 West 6 th St. .
92 5 Exchange Bldg.
Can. Pac.  Bldg.,
Madison Ave. at  44th
803  W.   0.  W.  Building
OMAHA,   NEB.
PHILADELPHIA,   PA.
PITTSBURGH,   PA.
PORTLAND,  ORE.
ST.   LOUIS,   MO.
ST.   PAUL,   MINN.
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 152 Geary St.
SEATTLE,   WASH. 1320  4th Ave.
SPOKANE,  WASH. Old National Bank Bldg.
WASHINGTON,  D. C.     14 th and New York Ave N.W.
5th Floor,  1500 Walnut
St. Building
Koppers Bldg., 4 4 4 - 7 th Ave.
626  S. W.  Broadway
418 Locust St.
4th and St. Peter Sts.
H.  M. Tait
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
J. E. Roach
Gen.  Agt.,  Rail Pass'r
H. J.  Clark
Trav.   Pass'r Agent
E.  A.   Kenney
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
W.  N. McKendry
City Pass'r Agent
W.  H.  Deacon
Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
G.  P.  Carbrey
Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
H. J.  McCauley
City Ticket Agent
S.  E.  Corbin
Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
E.  L. Sheehan
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
E. S. McPherson
Spokane  Inter'l  Riy.
C.  E.  Phelps
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
PASSENGER AGENTS IN CANADA
BANFF,   ALTA.
CALGARY,  ALTA.
MONTREAL, QUE.
MONTREAL, QUE.
NORTH   BAY,   ONT.
OTTAWA,  ONT.
QUEBEC,   QUE.
REGINA,  SASK.
SAINT JOHN,  N.  B.
TORONTO,  ONT.
VANCOUVER,   B.  C.
VICTORIA, B. C.
WINNIPEG,  MAN.
Canadian  Pacific  Station
Canadian  Pacific  Station
Windsor Station
201 St. James St. W.
87 Main St.  W.
83 Sparks St.
Palais  Station
Canadian  Pacific  Station
40 King St.
Can. Pac. Bldg.,
King and Yonge
434  W. Hastings St.
1102 Government St.
Main and Portage
E. Officer
Special  Passenger Rep.
J. W.  Dawson
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
P.  E.  Gingras
Dist. Pass'r Agent
F. C.  Lydon
Gen.  Agt.,   Rail Pass'r
R. Y. Daniaud
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
J.  A.   McGill
Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
C. A. Langevin
Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
J. C.  Pike
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
C. E. Cameron
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
R.  Niven
Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
F.   H.  Daly
Gen.  Agt., Pass'r Dept.
R. J. Burland
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
E. A. McGuinness
Gen. Agt., Pass'r Dept.
2S5 7—15M
LITHO IN CAI ADA
 I
VANCOUVER fSLAND
I'
Canadian (roci^ic
 ■)C
CANADA   CANADA
VANCOtJVER
ISLAND
W' u     .    A
■Ik  '
WM,
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
CANADIAN PACIFIC
CANADIAN PACIFIC
 DELIGHTFUL   CANADIAN   MOTOR  TRIPS
H
ERE are a few of the more popular regions on Vancouver Island and the British Columbia mainland that are easily available by motor, with attractive accommodations at hotels and resorts:
SOOKE:
22 miles from Victoria by motor, rail or public
stages. Excellent salmon and trout fishing,
sandy beach, boating, bathing, horseback, tennis,
bowling greens, hiking up Mt. Shepherd. Good
hotel accommodations.
SHAWNIGAN LAKE:
27 miles from Victoria. Famous for trout fishing. One of the most popular, easily accessible
fishing locations on Vancouver Island.
COWICHAN BAY:
36 miles from Victoria on the main Island Highway. A countryside district with cattle, poultry,
hatcheries and seed farms. Neighboring rivers
and sea afford fine salmon and trout fishing.
Salt water bathing.    Modern hotel.
NANAIMO:
The distributing centre for the north end of
Vancouver Island. 77 miles from Victoria by
road. Golf, fishing. Steamship connections
three times daily with Vancouver.
NEWCASTLE ISLAND RESORT:
A 754-acre island near Nanaimo. Sandy beaches,
pavilion for dancing, bath house, picnic ground
with covered tables, sports and recreation
ground. Served daily by Canadian Pacific
steamships from Vancouver.
PARKSVILLE BAY:
100 miles from Victoria; 23 miles from Nanaimo. Sea bathing, splendid beach. Good hotel
accommodations.
SPROAT and
GREAT CENTRAL LAKES:
104 miles from Victoria in the heart of the
mountain district. Fine scenery, trout fishing
(trolling and fly).    Good hotel.
CAMERON LAKE:
113 miles from Victoria on the
lake shore in the Arden forest.
Boating, bathing, fishing, hiking,
mountain climbing. Near Cameron Lake Falls.
QUALICUM BEACH:
108 miles from Victoria. Golf, sandy beach, fishing, tennis, hiking up Mt. Arrowsmith, horseback.    Hotel and resort accommodations.
PORT ALBERNI:
129 miles from Victoria at the head of the Alberni Canal. Fishing, boating, bathing, sightseeing trips.    Excellent hotel accommodations.
COMOX:
150 miles from Victoria. Seafront region with
fine view and climate. Golf, salmon and trout
fishing, warm sea bathing, tennis, boating, hiking, hunting.
CAMPBELL RIVER.-
176 miles from Victoria. Centre of a wonderful
region for hunting, salmon fishing, hiking, boating and bathing. Headquarters of the Tyee
Club of British Columbia. Northern gateway to
Strathcona National Park.
FORBES LANDING:
184 miles from Victoria. Entrance to Strathcona National Park. Fly fishing. Deer, bear,
willow and blue grouse are plentiful. Boats,
launches, pack horses available. Good hotel
accommodations.
STRATHCONA NATIONAL PARK:
An alpine area of unrivaled beauty, in the central portion of Vancouver Island. Snow-topped
peaks and glaciers, streams and lakes, beautiful
scenery.    800 square miles in area.
GROUSE MOUNTAIN:
16 miles from Vancouver, over beautiful Grouse
Mountain Highway. A scenic mountain playground where outing sports abound. Fine
accommodations.
HARRISON HOT SPRINGS:
A short distance by paved highway from Seattle or Vancouver.
Golf, tennis, bowling, shooting,
fishing, hiking, medicinal springs.
Excellent accommodations.
Printed in Canada—McB.-C.—1932—316
&S9*>*
 r
CANADA'S "EVERGREEN   PLAYGROUND" AFFORDS
RECREATION  AND  PLEASURE  FOR   EVERYONE
V
ICTORIA . . . Vancouver . . . Vancouver Island . . .
the British Columbia mainland — here, indeed, is an
"Evergreen Playground" dedicated to the enjoyment of
vacationists and travelers from every clime!
Scenic attractions of world-wide renown . . . every type
of outdoor activity and recreation . . . fine hotels and
resorts . . . wonderful climate, all combine to provide an
ideal vacation locale.
"Princess" liners from the Lenora Street Dock in Seattle
and Pier D in Vancouver carry travelers to Victoria in
just four hours—a delightful inland water cruise in itself.
Victoria's famous Empress Hotel affords a hospitality and
an atmosphere of warmth and comfort unequalled.    The
city is a typically British community that offers many interesting   features,   including   the   Parliament   Buildings,
Butfchart Sunken Gardens, Provincial Museum and Library, Mineral Museum, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, and Crystal Gardens natatorium and promenade.
From Victoria to Vancouver is a short jaunt that may be made over
three routes:   (l)j Direct via "Princess" liners;  (2)  Via motor to Nanaimo, and then by auto ferry to Vancouver;  (3)  Via motor to Sidney,
and then by auto ferry to Steveston, on the mainland.
-Astrophysical Observatory
Triple Falls, Strathcona
National Park!
3—In Butchart's Gardens
4—The Empress Hotel
5—In The Lagoon
6—Crystal Gardens
7—Siwash Rock
Vancouver, a city of 247,000 residents, has the Hotel Vancouver as the centre
of its social and business life. Here, too, are many sightseeing features—Stanley
Park, the Marine Drive, English Bay, Capilano Canyon and Lynn Canyon. This
city is the Pacific Coast terminal for the Canadian Pacific "Empress" liners to
Honolulu and the Orient, and the transcontinental
trains that travel East via Banff, Lake Louise and the
Bungalow Camps in the Canadian Rockies. From
Vancouver, one may return to the United States on a
"Princess" liner direct to Seattle, or via motor over
the paved Pacific Highway across the international
border at Blaine and thence via Bellingham and
Everett to Seattle.
Throughout this "Evergreen Playground" are constant opportunities to enjoy outdoor recreations.
Victoria and Vancouver, as well as some of the Island
resorts, have many fine golf courses. Streams and lakes
are plentifully stocked with trout, salmon and other members of the finny tribe. Excellent indoor and outdoor
swimming is available. There is boating, tennis, horseback
riding, hunting in season, hiking and mountain climbing,
and many other activities.
In short, whatever your pleasure, it may be gratified here!
8—Grouse Mountain Chalet
(Copyright J. Wardlaw)
9—"The Lions"
10—Hotel Vancouver
11—Stream Fishing ^
12—Year Round Golf
sXxa:
 CANADIAN  PACIFIC PRINCESS  LINERS TO CANADA
■■■■■
/~jTROM Seattle to Vic-
f^f1 toria and Vancouver
. . . from Sidney, on
Vancouver Island, to Steveston, on the British Columbia
mainland . . . from Nanaimo
to Vancouver—these are the
routes served by Canadian
Pacific "Princess" liners, operating every day of the year.
The Seattle-Victoria-V ancouver service is maintained
by the "Princess Kathleen"
and "Princess Marguerite."
These liners are fast,
modern vessels that afford luxurious accommodations, fine service and a delightful cuisine. Each ship
has sleeping accommodations
for more than 400 passengers,
including a number of de
luxe rooms and suites with
private baths and lavatories.
The public rooms and lounges
are comfortably furnished,
and the cruise aboard these
liners is a vacation feature
in itself.
The Steveston-Sidney service and the Nanaimo - Vancouver service is maintained
by fast motor ferries operating on convenient time schedules, as designated on the
page below. Connections with
automobile bus routes on
Vancouver Island and B. C.
Electric trains on the mainland are made by the steamship operating on the Steves-
ton-Sidney route.
RAILROADS
FERRY ROUTES
HIGHWAYS;,,;,,,,
Canadian Pacific
B. C. COAST STEAMSHIP
SERVICE TO
VICTORIA^
VANCOUVER
AND OTHER
CANADIAN POINTS
C^li LL of the ships on
^ /A these routes provide
ample space for passenger automobiles of any
size. The "Princess Kathleen" and "Princess Mar-
gtierite" for instance have
room for fifty cars, and the
ships on other routes are
equally spacious. Loading and
unloading is merely a matter
of driving on and off over
wide level runways — as easy
as taking your bag!
These services, without exception, have been planned
and arranged for the utmost
convenience of tourists and
vacationists, and every effort
is constantly expended to
cater to the comfort and
pleasure of passengers aboard
any of the liners. Ticket and
automobile reservations on any
of the ships may be arranged
through Canadian Pacific
ticket offices anywhere, or
may be obtained at the Canadian Pacific dock in each
city.
Wherever you would go
in Canada's "Evergreen Playground," you will find transportation provided by Canadian Pacific — the world's
greatest travel system. A
large share of the enjoyment
of any vacation is provided
by the delightful cruises
offered by the steamships in
the "B. C. Coast Service."
The complete time schedule
and additional information
pertaining to the summer
service on each of these
routes, fares, automobile rates,
etc., appears on the lower
part of this page.
NOTE: The map of the British Columbia territory above, and the strip map of the motor route up the Pacific Coast, have been prepared with the sole purpose of showing the motor routes and highspots of this territory in simple graphic
form.    They are not to be construed as technically perfect;  rather,  they  merely  depict  motor and  steamship routes,  mileage shown  between  arrows,  and distinguishing  points  and  activities  throughout  the  region.
 TIME  SCHEDULES
SEATTLE -VICTORIA-VANCOUVER
"Princess Kathleen" and "Princess Marguerite"
Double Daify Service
Lv. Seattle    9:00 a.m.     Lv. Victoria   1:45 p.m.
Ar. Victoria  12:45 p.m.    Ar. Vancouver   .... 5:45 p.m.
Lv. Vancouver     12 Noon 7:30 p.m.
Ar. Victoria      4:00 p.m.      11:40 p.m.
Lv. Victoria  5:30 p.m.        1:00 a.m.
Ar. Seattle     9:30 p.m.        7:30 a.m.
SEATTLE-VANCOUVER DIRECT
Lv. Seattle  11:30 p.m.     Ar. Vancouver   .... 8:00 a.m.
Passenger Automobiles Any Size
VANCOUVER-VICTORIA
"Princess Elizabeth," "Princess Joan"
DAILY SERVICE
Lv. Vancouver    12 Md't     Lv. Victoria  12 Md't
Ar. Victoria  7:00 a.m.     Ar. Vancouver    7:00 a.m.
Automobile Clearance 7 ft., 6T/2 in.
VANCOUVER - NANAIMO
Effective May 20 to June 23, inclusive
Steamships "Princess Elaine," "Princess Joan" and
"Princess Elizabeth"
LEAVE VANCOUVER LEAVE NANAIMO
11:00 a.m. Daily 8:00 a.m. Daily
2:00 p.m. Daily 2:15 p.m. Daily
5:45 p.m. Daily 6:00 p.m. Daily
Effective June 24, 1932
Steamships "Princess Elaine" and "Princess Victoria"
LEAVE VANCOUVER LEAVE NANAIMO
9:00 a.m. Daily except Sun-       8:00 a.m. Daily
day (Calling at Newcastle     12 Noon, Saturday only
Island) 2:15 p.m. Daily, except
11:00 a.m. Daily Sunday
5:45 p.m. Daily, except 7:00 p.m. Daily, except
Sunday Sunday
9:00 p.m.  Sunday only 8:00 p.m. Sunday  only
(Running time 2 hours 20 minutes)
Automobile clearance "Princess Elaine," 9 ft.  10 in.;
"Princess Victoria," 7 ft. ^ in.
VANCOUVER-NEWCASTLE ISLAND
Effective June 24, 1932
Steamships "Princess Victoria," and "Princess Elaine"
LEAVE VANCOUVER       LEAVE NEWCASTLE IS.
9:00 a.m. Daily, except 6:30 p.m. Daily, except
Sunday Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday only      6:00 p.m. Sunday only
7:15 p.m. Sunday  only
E. & N. RAILWAY CONNECTIONS
Steamship from Vancouver 11 a.m. connects at Nanaimo
daily except Sunday with trains  for  Cameron  Lake,   Port
Alberni, Courtenay and way points; for Victoria and points
south, daily.
Steamship from Nanaimo 2:15 p.m. connects with train
from Port Alberni, Courtenay and Cameron Lake daily except Sunday; from Victoria and points south, daily.
1—Princess Kathleen
Princess Marguerite
2—De Luxe Stateroom
3—Smoking Room
4—Dining Room
5—Princess Victoria
-Motor Princess
7—Princess Elaine
L-c
CANADIAN AND UNITED STATES CUSTOMS REQUIREMENTS
In order to bring the car back into Canada duty free on return journey, it must
be registered with Customs Officer at port of exit when leaving Canada.
Residents of United States, owners of automobiles of American manufacture, are
ljiot required to report to United States Customs at port of exit, and on return
Journey to United States, State registration card will be accepted as establishing
American origin and ownership of such automobiles.
If the automobile is to remain in  Canada less than sixty days   (ninety days in
the  United  States),   touring  permit  is  obtainable  from   Customs   Officer  at port  of
entry allowing the car to be run for sixty days   (ninety days in the United States)
without securing Customs bond or depositing duty.
If more than sixty-day stay is planned in Canada, an extension for a further
period, not exceeding thirty days, may be obtained, without bond or deposit, upon
application to Customs Department.
TIME SCHEDULES
STEVESTON-SIDNEY (Victoria)
Effective June 24, 1932
M.S. "Motor Princess"
Daily Service
Lv.  Steveston     9:30 a.m.     Lv. Sidney      4:30 p.m.
Ar.  Sidney   12:30 p.m.     Ar.  Steveston     7:30 p.m.
Automobile  Clearance 9 feet 6 inches.
CONNECTIONS AT STEVESTON
leave   Interurban  Station,   Davie
From  Vancouver—Trains
St., at 8:00 a.m. daily.
For Vancouver—B.C. Electric trains leave at 8:00 p.m. daily.
CONNECTIONS AT SIDNEY
For  Victoria—Auto  Busses  leave  at  2:00  p.m.  daily.
From   Victoria—Auto   Busses   leave   3:00   p.m.   daily.
Running time 45 minutes.
AUTOMOBILE RATES
ONE WAY
Seattle—Vancouver $4.50 $5.50 $6.50
Seattle—Victoria  4.00    5.00    6.00
Victoria—Vancouver  4.00    5.00    6.00
Nanaimo—Vancouver  3.50    4.50    5.50
Steveston-Sidney  3.50    4.50    5.50
ROUND TRIP
£>2
58.10
7.00
7.00
6.00
6.00
22 OS
£9.90 $11.70
9.00 10.80
9.00 10.80
8.10 9.90
8.10     9.90
CIRCUIT TOUR—Automobiles may be checked for CIRCUIT
TOURS on any two or more of above routes or for through movement
at  10%  less than combination of one-way rates.
Rates made are wheelbase measurements, as follows: Up to 115
inches; from 116 to 125 inches; over 125 inches. (Exclusive of
passenger   fares.)
The times of arrival and departure will be followed as closely as
possible, but are subject to tidal and weather conditions, and to change
without notice.
PASSENGER FARES
One Way
Round Trip
30-day
$4.50
7.75
9.00
4.50
2.70
2.70
..$5.00
Seattle to Victoria  $2.50
Seattle to Vancouver  (no stopover
Victoria)  4.25
Seattle to Vancouver (stopover)    5.00
Victoria to Vancouver   2.50
Vancouver to Nanaimo   1.50
Steveston to Sidney   1.50
CIRCUIT TOUR  PASSENGER  FARES
Seattle to Victoria and Victoria to Vancouver 	
Seattle to Victoria and Nanaimo to Vancouver   3.60
Seattle to Victoria and Sidney to Steveston   3.60
Vancouver to Nanaimo and Victoria to Vancouver   3.60
Vancouver to Nanaimo and Sidney to Steveston   2.70
Vancouver to Victoria and Sidney to Steveston   3.60
Above   fares   apply   in   either   direction,   tickets   will   be
limited to 30 days.
H.   W.   SCHOFIELD
District  Passenger  Agent,  B.   C.   Coast  S.   S.   Service
Vancouver, B. C.
E. F. L. Sturdee
General Passenger Agent
Vancouver, B. C.
C. D. Neroutsos
Manager B. C. Coast Service
Victoria, B. C.
C. H. Bowes
Asst. Genl. Pass. Agt.
Vancouver, B. C.
  Historical
Facts
XA>.
AS-miAA:
About the
West Coast
HE West Coast may well be called
the Canadian Norway, with its rugged
and deeply indented coast line, and
mountainous, heavily-timbered slopes that
drop sheer into the water. Little villages
are found along the fiord-1 ike bays and
inlets, devoted to fishing and lumbering;
Indian settlements, too, and interesting
totem poles with curious Indian folklore.
It is a country without railways, automobiles, moving pictures or electric light; to
all intents and purposes the same as a
hundred years ago, with the exception of
a few modern fishing plants at isolated
and widely-separated ports along the
coast.
Historical interest in the West Coast centres on Nootka Sound, which
was first visited by Captain James Cook in 1778, who made Friendly
Cove, at the entrance to the Sound, his headquarters for further exploration. Lieutenant John Meares visited Nootka in 1788 with two ships,
constructing a small trading post. He and his men were later captured
and imprisoned by Spaniards, which action nearly precipitated war between England and Spain; but after numerous diplomatic exchanges an
agreement was reached called the Nootka
Convention, by the terms of which Spain
formally acknowledged England's sovereignty  in   Northwest America.
Captain George Vancouver was sent
out by the British Government in 1792 to
Nootka to take formal possession of the
territory, and the record of his meeting
with the Spanish Commander, Bodega y
Quadra, will be found in the book of
Captain Vancouver's voyages. Two sentences from his journal with reference to
the West Coast are of particular interest:
"To describe the beauties of the region
will, on some future occasion, be a very
grateful task to the pen of a skilful
penegyrist. The serenity of the climate,
the innumerable pleasing landscapes and
the abundant fertility that unassisted
Nature puts forth, require only to be
nourished by the industry of man, with
villages, mansions, cottages and other
buildings, to render it the most lovely
country that can be imagined."
 1.   VICTORIA, B. C.
Leaving Victoria, the beautiful  Capital  City  of  British
Columbia,   in   the   evening,
steamship proceeds through
the Strait of Juan de Fuca, with
the snow-capped Olympic Mountains of Northern Washington, on the
left,  arriving  at   Port   Renfrew   in   the
early morning hours.
2.      PORT RENFREW     Port Renfrew is situated at the head of San Juan Inlet and at the mouth of the
San  Juan  and Gordon  Rivers,  a  small  but  beautifully  situated
village,   the   principal   industries   being   logging   and   salmon   canning.
There is excellent trout and salmon fishing in season, and good opportunities
for shooting bear, deer, goose, duck or brant.
Points of Interest on the West Coast
and interesting ports of call included on the Sunset Cruises Vancouver Island
3. BAMFIELD Shortly after leaving Clo-oose we pass Cape Beale, marking the
entrance to Barkley Sound, and arrive at Bamfield, an Imperial Government cable station,
being the terminus of the "All-Red" cable to Australia and New Zealand via Fanning
Island. Bamfield was named after W. G. Bamfield, who came to the West Coast on the
H.M.S. "Constance" in 1846 and Was later appointed Indian Agent. The longest portion
of the "All-Red" cable lies between Bamfield and Fanning Island—3,540 miles. The cable
was first successfully laid in 1902, but with the rapidly increasing business of later years
it was found necessary to lay an additional cable. Bamfield is the Lifeboat Service station
for the West Coast.
4.      UCLUELET     Uclulet Harbour is a well sheltered Inlet,
about five miles long, situated at the west end of  Bark
ley   Sound   and    protected    from    the    Pacific    swell
by  several  outlying  islands.    It  is  the  base  of a
large fishing fleet and has several fine lakes
and small rivers in the vicinity, which offer
good sport to the angler, and some
delightful gardens. Ucluelet pro
per lies on the west side of
the  harbour,  while  directly    across    on
the   east   side   is
Port Weeks. Ucluelet
wharf on the west side
is at the end of the now
partially completed  Uclue
let-Long  Beach-Tofino road,
which when completed, will be
an extension of the Vancouver Island main highway,
giving access to Long Beach, twelve miles long and
one-quarter wide, probably one of the finest ocean
beaches in  North America.
5.     CLAYOQUOT SOUND  Three hours'
steaming from Ucuelet brings us into Clayoquot
Sound, a name taken from the Indian word,
"Another"   or   "Different."    Calls   are   first   made
at Tofino; then at Clayoquot on Stubbs Island, two miles across the Sound. Clayoquot is
situated on a long, half-moon, white sand bsach, running out to a long spit, and a pleas-i
ant walk of about a mile through the woods brings one to the open ocean on the othe^
side of the island. Clayoquot is the headquarters for a large fishing fleet. On leaving
Clayoquot, a call is made at the Roman Catholic Indian Mission School at Kakawis and
several fishing plants  in Matilda Creek before proceeding to Nootka.
NOOTKA SOUND   This Sound, one of the largest and most beautiful on the
Coast, was discovered  by Capt.  James Cook in 1778, who landed at Friendly Covej
a charming inlet at the entrance to the Sound, named by the
Indians "Yukquot" or "Yucuat," derived from "Yukwitt" to!
|%.
blow with wind; "Aht," people or village, "meaning a
village exposed to the wind."   Nootka is probably
the   most   interesting   historical   port  on   the|
West Coast of North America.   Captain!
Cook  first named  the Sound  "King
George's Sound," this being later
changed   to   Nootka.    Hej
was hospitably received
by Chief Maquin-i
na of the Nootka
Indians.    Friendly
Cove was again visited
in 1788 by Lieut. John
Meares, in the ship "Felice," who erected a small
trading post and built in the
same year the first vessel to
be built on-the West Coast
of America. A small Roman
Catholic Church now stands
on the spot where this vessel
was built. It was at Friendly Cove
that Capt. George Vancouver met
Bodega y Quadra, the Spanish Commander, and formally took possession of
the lands for Great Britain in August, 1792.
A few miles further up the Sound is Nootka Cannery where, after a brief stop, the steamship proceeds
through a beautiful narrow passage between the mountains,
called Tahsis Canal.
7. ESPERANZA  INLET     This large Inlet was also discovered and
named by Capt. Cook in 1778.   Calls are made  in   the   Inlet at  Ceepeecee,   Port
Tasis,   Zeballos   and   Espinosa,   before   passing   again   into   the  open   sea   en   route  to
Kyuquot Sound.
8. KYUQUOT SOUND A call is sometimes made at Cachelot, a former whaling station, now converted into a fish reducing plant—one of the largest on the coast. Calls
are also occasionally made at Chamiss Bay, and at the Indian Village of Kyuquot. There
being no wharf at the latter port, landing is made by boat. Passing a maze of rocky
islands at the entrance of the Sound, the ship now rounds Cape Cook, off which point may
be seen Solander Island, the home of a large colony of sea lions.
9. QUATSINO SOUND The first call is at Winter Harbour, near the entrance
on the north side; then a few miles further on Quatsino Village. The ship then proceeds
down the southeast arm to Port Alice, the terminus of the voyage and the site of a large
pulp mill. After a stay of several hours at Port Alice, the homeward voyage commences.
Before leaving the Sound a call is made at Spry Camp, at the extreme end of the northwest arm, which is entered through a beautiful narrow tidal channel.
 CANADIAN
PACIFIC
west Coast Vancouver island service
SUNSET   CRUISE
SAILINGS
1938
Four and One-half days of cruising.   Steamships are scheduled
to reach Victoria about 1 p.m. on the fifth day.
FROM VICTORIA
Round Trip
Fare
39
Including all meals
and berth in any
standard   stateroom.
ii
S. S. "PRINCESS NORAH
f
Leaves Victoria, B. C.
11.00 p.m. on Saturdays
July 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; August 6, 13, 20, 27; September 3
3 S/tmr 6/rrx/r a*d
Y&Z6C6L& 0ou*±£ Cam* JSrrn-*
egg a*>
Promenade     Deck
Upper £>eck
ARRIVING   AT   CEEPEECEE
SAILING SCHEDULE
Victoria   -   Nootka   -   Port Alice and Way Ports
Leave Victoria, B.C.# 11 p.m., on July 2, 9, 16, 23, 30;
August 6, 13, 20, 27; September 3
Read
Down
Ports of Call
Read Up
Sat. 11.00 p.m. Lv... .
VICTORIA   .   .
.Ar.®
Thurs. 1 p.m.
Sun.
a.m.   " .
. Port Renfrew  .
..Ar.
Thurs. a.m.
//
a.m.   "...
..    Bamfield
a
Wed. p.m.
//
a.m.   "...
. . . Ucluelet
a
"    p.m.
//
p.m.   "...
. . . . Tofino	
a
"    p.m.
a
p.m.   "...
p.m.   "...
.  Clayoquot  . . .
a
"    p.m.
"    a.m.
a
Nootka Cannery .
a
Mon.
a.m.   " . .,
. Ceepeecee  .
a
"   a.m.
a
a.m.   " .
a.m.   "...
. .   Port Tasis  . . .
a
"   a.m.
"
. Zeballos . . ..
a
a.m.
//
a.m.   "...
®Tasis Saltery  .
a
"    a.m.
a
a.m.   "...
. .   ©Espinosa   . ..
a
Wed. a.m.
a
p.m.   "...
. .   ©Markale   . . .
a
Tues. p.m.
a
p.m    "...
CDChamiss Bay
(D Kyuquot Village
a
p.m.
a
p.m.   "...
©Winter Harbour
a
a
p.m.   ".....
Quatsino Village
a
Tues.
a.m.   "...
©Jeune Landing
a
"    p.m.
//
a.m.   "...
. . Spry Camp . . .
a
#/
a.m. Ar.. . .
. . . Port Alice . . .
. ..Lv.
Tues.  1  p.m.
©Call made when business offers.     ©Boat Landing.
©Arrival time at Victoria is approximate, being governed
by the weather and tidal conditions, and amount of freight
business to be transacted.
NOTE:—Where no date is shown, steamship does not call.
The times of arrival and departure at intermediate ports will
be followed as closely as possible, but are subject to tidal and
weather conditions and to change without notice.
h»
SCENE   ON   WEST   COAST.   VANCOUVER   ISLAND
FARES
West Coast Vancouver Island Service
Minimum Return Fare from Victoria to Pgrt Alice, $39.00
(Berth and Meals Included)
/    ^
/V^TORIJ
S.S. "Princess Norah"
Accommodation
ROUND TRIP FARES
Berth                      ®    ®
Rate          For          For
One           2 in         3 in
Adult        Room       Room
Rooms  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7, 8,         ■      .'
O   m   11    17    li   K      Summer   Sailings,
y,  iu,   ■■#,■■*#i%  "3      June 21 to Sept. 1
Single  beds   (3  feet           inclusive.
wide)    single   upper
$ 49.00
$ 98.00
$137.00
!"d  "Vr* A               Spring and Fall
Shower bath and                    Sailings
toilet (See note 1)
45.00
90.00
129.00
Rooms  122,    124,    127,    129     Summer   Sailings,
Deluxe    rooms   each     June 21 to Sept. l
with    twin    hoMc     <*              Inclusive.
108.00
feet  wide)   tub   bath        Spring and Fall
and toilet                               Sailin*s
98.00
Rooms 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110,
111, 112, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119,
120, 121, 123, 125, 126, 128, 131 Double
lower, single upper and sofa berth  (see
note 1)
Rooms   138,   140,   141,   142,   143   145   Single
lower, single upper and sofa berth  (See
note 1)
39.00
78.00
117.00
Rooms   100, 103 Double lower and single upper
berths
Rooms   132, 134, 135, 137, 144, 146, 147, 149
Single lower and single upper berths
Rooms   130,   133,   136,   139   Single   lower  and
single upper berth—Bibby rooms
39.00
78.00
INFORMATION     FOR     PASSENGERS
we
CONNECTIONS
Passengers may leave Seattle on the Company's regular steamship at
9:00 a.m. day of sailing, due Victoria 12:50 p.m., and may return from
Victoria on regular 4:30 p.m. (or 5 p.m.) steamship day of arrival of
West Coast steamship.
Passengers may leave Vancouver on the Company's regular steamship at
10:30 a.m., due -Victoria 2:40 p.m., returning on regular 1 :45 p.m. or
12 midnight steamship day of arrival of West Coast steamship.
STOPOVERS
Round-trip tickets do not permit stopover at way ports.
CHILDREN'S FARES
Children1 five years of age and under twelve years will be charged half
minimum fare plus full premium   (if any).
Children two years of age and under five will -be charged $6.60 round
trip, which fare will entitle them to separate seat in dining saloon, but
if separate berth  is required, charge will  be  the same as for children
between five and twelve years of age.
Children under two years of age will be carried free when accompanied
by parent or guardian.
EXCLUSIVE USE OF ROOMS
Two full fares, plus full premium  (if any)  will be charged for exclusive
use of any two-bertn room during the tourist season, and Selling Agent
will stamp or write across face of ticket "EXCLUSIVE USE" and amount
collected.
THREE-BERTH ROOMS
©The company reserves the right to berth three passengers in any room
containing double lower, single upper and sofa berth, when same is not
occupied by married couples.   ©Three persons cannot be accommodated
in rooms where no rate is shown.
BERTH LIGHTS
All   berths  on   "Princess   Norah"are equipped with  electric berth  light.
DIMENSIONS   OF   BERTHS — Uppers   6'3"x2'6";   Single   Lowers,
6'3"x2'6";  Double Lowers,  6'3"x3'6";  Sofas,  6'3"x2'6".	
PRINCESS   NORAH   AT   NOOTKA
For Reservations
Apply to nearest Canadian Pacific Agent
or to
PASSENGER AGENTS IN THE UNITED STATES
ATLANTA,   GA.
BOSTON,   MASS.
BUFFALO,   N. Y.
CHICAGO,   ILL.
CINCINNATI,   0.
CLEVELAND,  0.
DALLAS,  TEXAS
DETROIT,   MICH.
HONOLULU,   T.H.
INDIANAPOLIS,   IND.
KANSAS CITY,  M0.
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
MEMPHIS,  TENN.
MILWAUKEE, WIS.
MINNEAPOLIS,  MINN.
NEW YORK,   N. Y.
OMAHA,   NEB.
PHILADELPHIA,   PA.
PITTSBURGH,   PA.
PORTLAND,   ORE.
ST. LOUIS, M0.
ST.  PAUL,   MINN.
SAN  FRANCISCO, CAL.
SEATTLE,  WASH.
SPOKANE,  WASH.
TACOMA, WASH.
WASHINGTON, D. C.
404   Citz.   &  Soutlin.   Nat.
Bk.  Bldg.
4 05  Boylston St.
22   Count St.
71   E. Jackson  Blvd.
201  Dixie Terminal Bldg.
1010  Chester Ave.
1212   Kirby  Building
1231   Washington  Blvd.
Travel  Department
Merchants Bank Building
201-2  Waldheim  Bldg.
621  So.  Grand Ave.
30  Porter Building
1014 Warner Theatre Bldg.
611   2nd  Ave.   South
Can.   Pac.  Bldg.,
Madison Ave.  at  44th
803  W.  0.  W.  Building
1500  Locust  Street
Koppers Bldg.,  444   7th Ave.
626 S. W. Broadway
418   Locust St.
Fourth and Cedar
152 Geary St.
1320  4th Ave.
Old National Bank Bldg.
1113   Pacific   Ave.
14 th and New York Ave. N.W.
W. A. Shackleford
(Jen.   Agt.,   Pass'r  Dept.
L.  R.   Hart
(Jen.  Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
W. P. Wass
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
T. J. Wall
Gen.   Agt.,   Rail   Pass'r
A.   D.  Macdonald
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
G.  H.  Griffin
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
P.   G.  Jefferson
Dist.  Pass'r  Rep. .
M.   E.   Malone
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
Theo.   H.   Davies  &  Co.
Agents
D. W. Allan
Trav.  Pass'r Agent
R.  G.   Norris
City  Pass'r  Agent
W.  Mcllroy
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
P.   D.  Salmon
Dist.   Freight  Agent
J.  A.   Millington
Gen.   Agt..   Soo   Line
H.   M.  Tait
Gen.   Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
J.  E. Roach
Gen.  Agt.,   Rail  Pass'r
H. J.  Clark
Trav.   Pass'r Agent
E. A.  Kenney
Gen.   Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
W.   N.  McKendry
City  Pass'r  Agent
W.  H.   Deacon
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
G.   P.  Carbrey
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
W.  H.  Lennon
Gen.   Agt.,   Rail,  Soo  Line
S. E. Corbin
Gen.   Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
E. L. Sheehan
Gen.   Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
E.  S.  McPherson
Spokane  Inter'l  Riy.
L.   N. Jones
City   Pass'r  Agent
C.  E.  Phelps
Gen. Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
BANFF, ALTA.
CALGARY, ALTA.
MONTREAL,  QUE.
MONTREAL,  QUE.
NORTH   BAY,  ONT.
OTTAWA,  ONT.
QUEBEC, QUE.
REGINA,   SASK.
SAINT JOHN, N.B.
TORONTO,   ONT.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
VICTORIA,   B.C.
WINNIPEG,   MAN.
PASSENGER AGENTS IN CANADA
Canadian  Pacific  Station
Canadian  Pacific  Station
Windsor Station
201   St. James St.  W.
8 7  Main St.  W.
83   Sparks  St.
Palais  Station
Canadian   Pacific  Station
40 King St.
Can. Pac. Bldg.,
King and Yonge
434   W.  Hastings  St.
1102  Government St.
Main and Portage
E. Officer
Special Passenger  Rep.
J.  W.  Dawson
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
P.  E.  Gingras
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
F. C.  Lydon
Gen.  Agt.,  Rail Pass'r
R. Y.  Daniaud
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
J.  A.   McGill
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
C.  A.   Langevin
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r  Dept.
J. C.  Pike
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
C.  E. Cameron
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
G. D.   Brophy
Dist.  Pass'r Agent
F.   H.   Daly
Gen.  Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
J.  Macfarlane
Gen.   Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
E.  A.   McGuinness
Gen.   Agt.,  Pass'r Dept.
HOT AND COLD RUNNING WATER
All rooms on both steamships have hot and cold running water in each
room.
BATHS
Passengers should apply to Steward or Stewardess for use of public baths.
BARBERS
Steamships carry barbers.
MEAL SERVICE
In  addition   to breakfast,   luncheon  and  dinner,   light  refreshments  are
also served in dining saloon at 10 p.m. without extra charge.
Table reservations should be made with Second Steward on embarkation.
 Indians «/ the
WEST  COAST
THE Indians of the West Coast of Vancouver Island are principally of the
Nootka and  Kwakiutl tribes, the former predominating.   Although  the
influence of civilization has had much to do with changing the mode
of living of these aborigines, much remains to show that in earlier days they
were a highly cultured race, enjoying a  normal and happy existence and
making the best use of the means of living which nature had put into their
hands.
Even today the dugout canoes, cut from a single log of fir, are the most seaworthy of small craft,
and widely used up and down the coast.    At Kyuquot Village, Indians come out through the surf
in their canoes, to take off mail and baggage from the steamship.
Still remaining are many examples of Indian totem poles for which the natives of the North
West Pacific Coast have always been noted.   At Friendly  Cove,   near   the  entrance   of   Nootka
Sound, are several interesting examples of this weird  Indian art.   The grotesque figures of the
totem poles symbolize characters and events in the legendary history of the tribes, and some
more  recent examples have been  interpreted to include a figure representing  Captain James
Cook, who, with   Lieutenant  Bligh   (later Captain Bligh of H.M.S. "Bounty" fame), first visited
Friendly Cove in  1778.
The Indians of this district are still noted for their
skill in basket weaving and offer their
wares  for  sale  to   tourists  at  various
wharves along the way.
The strange practice of shaping the head by
means of strapping a board across the child's forehead has been discontinued, but a few examples
resulting from this unusual custom are to be found
amongst the older members of the tribes.
On the shore of the Tahsis Canal, through
which the ship proceeds north from Nootka Inlet,
may be seen an Indian grave, surmounted by a
small house and surrounded by a tiny stockade;
a method of burial which is still common with
the Indians of the district.
On   the   whole   a   jovial   and   carefree
people,   these   Indians   offer   an   interesting
study.  Many opportunities for meeting these
people are afforded to travellers during this
leisurely and picturesque cruise along
the Pacific Coast.
BASKETS    FOR   SALE

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0362798/manifest

Comment

Related Items