The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

Lakes and rivers services Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1967

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0362787.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0362787.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0362787-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0362787-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0362787-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0362787-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0362787-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0362787-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0362787-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0362787.ris

Full Text

 adi;
*i
ti.
7»ftJftftft fflftS'nftft.ftft=ft:ftft^-ft:ftft
I__l Ra//
 ■ ■
i   t
> :
"PRINCESS  OF ACADIA" — 6787  GROSS  REGISTER   TONS,  LENGTH  358  FT.,   BREADTH  62  FT.
"Princess of Acadia", operating between Saint
John and Digby, provides the most direct east-west
route between Nova Scotia and Quebec, Ontario,
Western Canada and the U.S. A large, modern ship,
she accommodates 120 automobiles — offers fast
service, spacious passenger accommodation, attractive observation lounge, meal service, limited
day stateroom accommodation.
1969 Schedule
SPRING and SUMMER
Atlantic Local Time
Daily Ex. Sunday               Sunday only
April 28 - October 25      June29-September7
Lv. SAINT JOHN                      1040                     1040
Ar. DIGBY                                 1325                     1325
Lv. DIGBY                                  1700                      1700
Ar. SAINT JOHN                       1945                     1945
(FALL AND WINTER SCHEDULES ON APPLICATION)
Regular Passage Fares
Passengers                                     One Way
Up to June 14 and
after Sept. 30                         $3.25
June 15 to Sept. 30               3.75
Round Trip
$5.85
6.75
Automobiles (pleasure cars)
When accompanied by at least one passenger *$16.00
holding valid passage ticket. each way
*$17.50—June 15 -Sept. 30 Fares are subject to change
Personal effects only may be carried in automobiles and the
Canadian Pacific cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage of
articles left in the automobiles. It is not necessary to empty tanks.
NO ADVANCE RESERVATIONS FOR AUTOMOBILES.
Trailers
When used for touring or pleasure purposes, trailers
will be handled between Saint John and Digby.
Due to limits of the ship's clearance, trailers cannot
exceed 7' in height, 8' in width and 18' in length.
For rates, consult your CP Rail agent.
Passengers, automobiles, and trailers are accepted at
ship side as follows:
Saint John — On day of sailing only, from 0930 to 1015.
However, during period June 15 to Sept.
15 inclusive, from 0830 to 1015.
Digby — On day of sailing only, from 1445 to 1545.
SPECIAL ONE DAY PASSENGER EXCURSION FARE
FROM SAINT JOHN, N.B. TO DIGBY, N.S. AND
RETURN.
Up to June 14 and after Sept. 30 $3.50
June 15 to Sept. 30 4.00
 r#*N
The
route to
History...
Plying the waters of the mighty Bay of
Fundy, which boasts some of the
highest tides in the world, the Princess
of Acadia offers travellers an exciting
glimpse into Canada's history.Saint John,
her home port, is located in New Brunswick, aptly called Canada's picture
province, and is the oldest incorporated
city in Canada. The safe harbour was
discovered by Samuel de Champlain and
leads to the world famous Reversing Falls
of the St. John River.
The Princess of Acadia sails daily through
the Digby Gut en route to Digby harbour,
snuggled cozily on the water of Annapolis
Basin, the area where Champlain founded
the first permanent settlement in Canada.
Here the rock-ribbed cliffs of Nova Scotia
give way to the surge of the Fundy and
allow entrance to the pastoral Annapolis
Valley, gateway to the province that is
Canada's ocean playground.
YOUR AGENT IS ANXIOUS TO SERVE YOU       1969 Printed in Canada
 GutaoUan (/hdtfic
w
PRINCESS OF ACADIA"
OF
FUNDY
between
Digby, Nova Scotia
 U                         • i ■ ■■■■■■■
[I' i loiS i IBB
■■■ * i    i • ■
!■   Ililllli
i    V •
1   ll'l
.._—~.	
"PRINCESS OF ACADIA" - 6787 GROSS REGISTER TONS, LENGTH 358 FT., BREADTH 62 FT.
"Princess of Acadia", operating between Saint John and Digby,
provides the most direct east-west route between Nova Scotia and
Quebec, Ontario, Western Canada and the U.S. A large, modern ship,
she accommodates 120 automobiles — offers fast service, spacious
passenger accommodation, attractive observation lounge, meal service,
iimited day stateroom accommodation.
1967 SCHEDULE
SPRING AND SUMMER
Atlantic Standard Time
TRAILERS: When used for touring or pleasure purposes, trailers will
be handled between Saint John and Digby.
Due to  limits of the ship's clearance,  trailers cannot  exceed 7'  in
height, 8' in width and 18' in length.
For rates, consult your Canadian Pacific agent.
Passengers, automobiles, and trailers are accepted at ship side as
follows:
Daily Ex. Sunday
Sunday only
Apr. 30-Oct. 28
June 25 to Sept. 3
Lv. SAINT JOHN
9:45 A.M.
9:45 A.M.
Ar. DIGBY
12:30 P.M.
12:30 P.M.
Lv. DIGBY
4:00 P.M.
4:00 P.M.
Ar. SAINT JOHN
6:45 P.M.
6:45 P.M.
(FALL AND WINTER SCHEDULES ON APPLICATION)
REGULAR PASSAGE FARES
Passengers
One Way
Round Trip
Up to June 30 and after
Aug. 31
$2.90
$5.25
July and August
3.25
5.85
SAINT JOHN
On day of sailing only until
9.00 A.M., A.S.T.
DIGBY
On day of sailing only until
2.45 P.M., A.S.T.
SPECIAL ROUND TRIP PASSENGER FARES
Weekend (all season) $5.05
One Day Excursions (June 19—Sept. 5) 3.50
AUTOMOBILE RESERVATIONS
Reservations should be made as much in advance as possible. No
refund can be made unless reservation is cancelled three hours prior
to departure of the ship.
Payment in full to be made when reservation confirmed.
REQUESTS FOR AUTOMOBILE RESERVATIONS WILL BE GIVEN
PROMPT ATTENTION BY YOUR NEAREST CANADIAN PACIFIC
AGENT, OR BY:
77 Germain Street
ConcLoUanGkciUc
Saint John, N.B.
Telephone: 3-1305
AUTOMOBILES (PLEASURE CARS)
When accompanied by at least one passenger $15.00*
holding valid passage ticket. each way
*$16.00 during July and August. Fares are subject to change.
Personal effects only may be carried in automobiles and the Canadian
Pacific cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage of articles left
in the automobiles. It is not necessary to empty tanks.
 Plying the waters of the mighty Bay of Fundy,
which boasts some of the highest tides in the
world, the Princess of Acadia offers travellers
an exciting glimpse into Canada's history. Saint
John, her home port, is located in New Brunswick,
aptly called Canada's picture province, and is
the oldest incorporated city in Canada. The safe
harbour was discovered by Samuel de Champlain
and leads to the world famous Reversing Falls
of the St. John River.
The Princess of Acadia sails daily through the Digby Gut on
route to Digby harbour, snuggled cozily on the waters of Annapolis
Basin, the area where Champlain founded the first permanent
settlement in Canada. Here the rock-ribbed cliffs of Nova Scotia
give way to the surge of the Fundy and allow entrance to the pastoral
Annapolis Valley, gateway to the province that is Canada's ocean
playground.
|    COMFORT IS E
ALLOWING HOTELS:         1
NSURED AT THE
*The Algonquin            St. Andrews by-the-Sea, N.B.   |
(a Canadian Pacific hotel)
*0pen Summer
only
Admiral
Beatty Hotel
Saint John, N.B.
(owned and operated by Admiral Beatty Hotel Co.)
Reservations   may   be   arranged
through   the   following   i
Canadian Pacific agents:
Halifax, N.S.
K. H. Ott
1547 Barrington St.
Digby, N.S.
C. H. Hersey
Digby Wharf
Quebec, Que.
J. R. Patenaude
Palais Stn.
|   Montreal, P.Q.
M. Filiatrault
215 St. James St. W.
Montreal, P.Q.
B. D. Guenette
Windsor Stn.
|   Ottawa, Ont.
F. H. Fox
83 Sparks St.
Toronto, Ont.
W. E. Morgan
King & Yonge St.
|   Boston, Mass.
G. L. Wanamaker
80 Boylston St.
New York, N.Y.
J. J. Trainor
581 Fifth Ave.
Washington, D.C.
J. A. C. Blair
1504 K St. N.W.
Philadelphia, Pa.
W. J. Holman
Room 237 Blvd. Bldg., 1819    1
John F. Kennedy Blvd.
Chicago, III.
J. G. Guiton
29 South LaSalle St.
Detroit, Mich.
R. Stetter
1249 Washington Blvd.
Cleveland, Ohio
M. T. Jackson
1838 Union Commerce
Bldg.
Saint John, N.B.
E. E. Barge
75 Germain Street
ton
fzJBffwVk
TRAINS/TRUCKS/SHIFS/PLANES/HOTELS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS
WORLD'S   MOST   COMPLETE   TRANSPORTATION
YOUR AGENT
IS ANXIOUS TO SERVE YOU
1967
 Cana^^Uac^
w
PRINCESS OF ACADIA"
BAY of
E R
DY
x  Y
SERVICE
Saint John, New Brunswick
Digby, Nova Scotia
Always  carry Canadian  Pacific  Express  travellers  cheques
 "Princess of Acadia", operating between Saint John and Digby, provides
the most direct east-west route between Nova Scotia and Quebec,
Ontario, Western Canada and the U.S. A large, modern ship, she accommodates 120 automobiles — offers fast service, spacious passenger
accommodation, attractive observation lounge, meal service, limited day
stateroom accommodation.
FARES
(Not including Stateroom Accommodation)
REGULAR FARES
One Way    — $2.90
Round Trip — $5.25
Weekend     — $5.05
Special   One   Day   Fares
June 22 to Sept. 8 incl.
Round Trip—$3.50
1964 SCHEDULE
SPRING AND SUMMER
Atlantic Standard Time
Daily Ex. Sunday Sunday only
May 11 — Oct. 24       June 28 to Sept. 6
SAINT JOHN 10.00 A.M.     10.00 A.M.
DIGBY 12.45 P.M.     12.45 P.M.
DIGBY 4.15 P.M.      4.15 P.M.
SAINT JOHN    7.00 P.M.      7.00 P.M.
Fares are subject to change
(FALL AND WINTER SCHEDULES ON APPLICATION)
Limited number of day occupancy staterooms on sale between Saint
John and Digby.
Requests for automobile reservations will be given prompt attention by
nearest Canadian Pacific agent.
AUTOMOBILE RATES AND RESERVATIONS
Rate for pleasure cars, when accompanied by at least one passenger
holding valid passage ticket, $15.00 each way between Saint John and
Digby.
TRAILERS: When used for touring or pleasure purposes, trailers will
be handled between Saint John and Digby.
Due to limits of the ship's clearance, trailers cannot exceed 7' in height,
8' in width and 18' in length.
For rates, consult your Canadian Pacific agent.
Payment in full to be made when reservation confirmed.
Reservations should be made as much in advance as possible. No refund
can be made unless reservation is cancelled three hours prior to departure of the ship. Passenger automobiles are accepted at ship's side
as follows:
On day of sailing only
until 8:15 AM AST. Wharf
ticket office open 7:00 AM
Qoint  l^hn   AST  t0  11:0°  PM  dai!y
oaini JOnn   except Sunday.  Sundays
June 28 — Sept. 6 from
7:00 AM to 12:00 noon and
4:00 PM to 8:00 PM AST.
Week days and Sundays,
Digby
until
2.45
p.m.
A.S.T.,
day o
f sail
ng.
QUEBEC •y
■111!
Personal effects only may be carried in automobiles and the Canadian
Pacific cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage of articles left
in the automobiles. It is not necessary to empty tanks.
For automobile reservations apply to your nearest Canadian Pacific
Office; or direct to:
Canadian (fudfiic
Saint John, N.B.
Telephone: 3-1305
 Plying the waters of the mighty Bay of Fundy,
which boasts some of the highest tides in the
world, the Princess of Acadia offers travellers
an exciting glimpse into Canada's history. Saint
John, her home port, is located in New Brunswick,
aptly called Canada's picture province, and is
the oldest incorporated city in Canada. The safe
harbour was discovered by Samuel de Champlain
and leads to the world famous Reversing Falls
of the St. John River.
The Princess of Acadia sails daily through the Digby Gut on
route to Digby harbour, snuggled cozily on the waters of Annapolis
Basin, the area where Champlain founded the first permanent
settlement in Canada. Here the rock-ribbed cliffs of Nova Scotia
give way to the surge of the Fundy and allow entrance to the pastoral
Annapolis Valley, gateway to the province that is Canada's ocean
playground.
NEW   BRUNSWICK   and   NOVA   SCOTIA   resorts   are
well served  by CANADIAN   PACIFIC HOTELS:
The Algonquin St. Andrews by-the-Sea, N.B.
The Digby Pines Digby, N.S.
*0pen Summer only
At Saint John comfort is ensured by
Admiral Beatty Hotel Saint John, N.B.
(owned and operated by Admiral Beatty Hotel Co.)
Reservations   may   be   arranged
Canadian Pacific agents:
Halifax, N.S.
Digby, N.S.
Montreal, P.Q.
Toronto, Ont.
Boston, Mass.
New York, N.Y.
Washington, D.C.
Philadelphia, Pa.
Chicago, III.
Detroit, Mich.
Buffalo, N.Y.
Cleveland, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
Atlanta, Ga.
Saint John, N.B.
K. H. Ott
C. H. Hersey
M. Filiatrault
W. E. Morgan
R. G. Williamson
J. J. Trainor
J. A. C.Blair
W. J.Holman
J. J. Brown
R. Stetter
G. L. Wanamaker
M. T. Jackson
J. G. Guiton
JL F. Nelson
M. F. Flower
through   the   following
381 Barrington St.
Digby Wharf
215 St. James St. W.
King & Yonge St.
80 Boylston St.
581 Fifth Ave.
1504 K St. N.W.
Fidelty Phil. Trust Bldg.
39 South LaSalle St.
1249 Washington Blvd.
Bank of Buffalo
Bldg. 17 Court St.
1038 Union Commerce
Bldg.
203 Dixie Term.
416 Palmer Bldg.,
41 Marietta St..
75 Germain Street
ionGwctfic
TRAINS/TRUCKS/SHIPS/PLANES/HOTELS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS
WORLD'S   MOST   COMPLETE   TRANSPORTATION   SYSTEM
YOtTR AGENT
<t
IS ANXIOUS TO SERVE YOU
 GREAT
Ll  ff Iff «
AKES
anadian Pacific
 Misiorlc,  i   /j\
'    (^"ecroicux< \JOJd
CAPTURE the thrills that surround a delightful voyage
of the Great Lakes by sailing into the golden west
across Georgian Bay. Glamorous tales are told of this
now famed Summer Waterway. In 1615, Champlain and
his Indian friends blazed a trail to this Bay by way of
Lake Nipissing and French River thinking to find a path
to the Orient. That path was never completed, but in
its stead is a story of Indian warfare, the martyrdom of
Jesuit missionaries and the pluck and resourcefulness of
explorers, fur traders and lumbermen. Over 30,000
islands dot the shores of Georgian Bay — islands among
the oldest known to geologists. Of these the first easterly
group is the Christian Islands — Faith, Hope and Charity
— now Indian reservations of the Ojibway race. Far in
the distance are the Blue Mountains of Collingwood, and
to the right a group of rocky islands — the Westerns,
where stands a friendly lighthouse. There is gentle beauty
in the tree-clothed slopes of the shores, a sharp contrast
to the rocky pine-clad islands. Canoes, yachts and sailboats ply to and from the mouth of the Severn River —
summer cottages and camps form colourful patches along
the shores. Westward is Bruce Peninsula where stands
Cabot Head, the lime stone cliffs extending to Cape
Hurd, and what looks like a flower pot stuck in the waters
is Flower Pot Island. High on its rocky cliffs is perched
a lighthouse. Still westward close to the boundary line
is Cove Island. Midnight, the stars grow brighter, the
moon  sheds silver spangles across the  bay.
Banish life's cares by the
unique experience of an
Inland Ocean cruise
 /^'^2y' ''     *
M f*]c/W||
"THE boat train from Toronto arrives at Port McNicoll
in a  little over two  hours.    There in the   harbor
rides majestically a great white ship of the  Canadian
Pacific fleet— the S.S. Assiniboia or the S.S. Keewatin.
The dock is a lovely flower garden except for the path
from train to ship. Back of this  attractive  foreground
are the huge grain elevators which line the waterfront.
Baggage is quickly transferred to staterooms and the
immaculate liner gently  glides away with a group of
happy voyagers .leaning on the brass rails of the Sun
Deck waving good-byes.  There  is an  urge to linger
up there in the exhilarating breeze, but the bugle calls
for a welcome and tasty dinner.
Train-side is ship-side at Port McNicoll
v„f,
m
 y^n
v/rcm.
^V ANCING in the moonlight 'til midnight to the rhythm
*^ of the ship's orchestra, or a quiet game of bridge in
the cosy lounge with a pleasant interlude for light refreshments. You are amazed et your appetite and the superb
service. As if the flamboyant sunset and the silvery moon
weren't enough, great shafts of lights from the Aurora Borealis
sometimes turn the heavens into one vast temple. Meanwhile the ship sails into Lake Huron, the second largest of
the Great Lakes, 207 miles long and 101 miles wide.
Sheltering the shores and forming the picturesque North
Channel is Manitoulin Island. This island once the scene of
fierce warfare between the Hurons and Iroquois, now boasts
prosperous farms and summer homes. After eight hours
refreshing slumber you glance out of your porthole—it might
be mid-ocean! A brisk stroll on deck with seagulls
sheeling overhead — then breakfast.
The
seagull—
a fellow-
traveller
A wonderful
treat for the
tiny tots
Your route
across the
Great Lakes
 HERE is a friendly atmosphere in the dining
saloon, and you are actually losing count of how
many courses to your breakfast. Your waiter beams
too ! Through the diamond paned windows you
glimpse the change in the landscape. Here is the
prettiest and most frivolous bit of water you ever
hope to see. On each side of the river, which is
the International Boundary and also the channel
proper, are stretches of sandy beaches trimmed with
rows of birch and poplar. Everybody on deck in
summer sports togs, lazily enjoying the scenery or
joining in the games on the upper Sun Deck.
Route-map of
St. Mary's River
 Mid-morning, and the great white ship cruises through
the narrow channel towards the Soo. The captain
stands at the bridge. An officer pauses to tell you
we have passed Frying Pan and Pipe Island, and that
the old chimneys and magazine on St. Joe Island are
all that remain of the historical fort. Now the country
takes on an urban guise — heavy smoke rises in the
distance. Eagerly you watch the shoreline. On one
side stands a mighty smelter pouring molten metal
from its furnaces. Even the "littlest" on board is
fascinated. Then the ship docks at Sault Ste. Marie
where time is well spent in touring this attractive city.
Enjoy a promenade on the spacious Sun Deck
 -/^ke Sti>|-
QAILING still westward, the ship enters the Soo Canal. <
the ship until she towers the city. A thrilling sight! /
lock a shrill whistle sounds, and the stately liner heads for I
world's largest lake. Absurd look the tiny craft that cut aci
truly wonderful are the big ungainly freighters. Every earner
On one side is the famous Bascule bridge that opens like a ja<
 u&ruonr -
Gushing water lifts
*iS she passes the
Lake Superior, the
ross the bows, and
■a on board clicks,
ck knife.
IT is not long before you realize how majestic this lake is with its sparkling clear
water, bold rugged shores and wonderful climate. It is afternoon and you
partake of tea in the Veranda Cafe. Far away on both shores are mining and
lumbering towns, with some of the deepest copper mines in the world on Keeweenaw
Peninsular. Ship life is very agreeable — the bugle sounds for dinner — and
the chef excels himself again ! Another stroll around the deck until the glorious
sunset keeps you hugging the ship's rail.
 fort y^ililom'-pcfri fir&wr
EVERYONE has been warned to rise early for the
magnificent sunrise, and you are glad not to have
missed the view of Silver Islet, once a famous silver
mine sunk 1,200 feet below the level of the lake, also
Thunder Cape rising almost perpendicularly. The captain
himself points to the "sleeping giant" on top of the Cape,
and tells its story. The ship passes close to Welcome
Island — a lighthouse guards the Twin Cities of Fort Wiliam
and Port Arthur, where stand the terminal elevators with
their enormous bushel capacity. This is the gateway to
the West. It is a popular resort ground — only a short
distance away are the Kakabeka Falls, a great picnic spot.
At Chippewa Park, established on an ancient Indian
Reserve, is a Zoo inhabited by wild animals and birds
native to those virgin forests — bear, moose, fox, cranes,
loons and herons. But your baggage is packed, the
ship slowly approaches the dock. Your lovely inland
voyage is over.   The gangplank is approaching.
 cm
ibb&ocki&r
A NOTHER thrill in store — the Canadian
Rockies, a paradise for play in the Roof
Garden of the World. Gorgeous snow-capped
peaks, sky-piercing ranges encircling lovely
jewelled lakes. Mountains that you can ride to
the timber line. Glaciers, tumbling waterfalls,
great canyons, foaming torrents, trails for hiking,
and luxurious hotels and rustic bungalows where
you can loaf and play. Capital of this vast mountain empire is Banff Springs Hotel, with its warm
sulphur and cool fresh water swimming pools, mile-
high golf and tennis courts—built for sports lovers.
Lake Louise, probably the finest gem ever seen is
forty miles from Banff along a scenic motor road.
The Chateau Lake Louise stands by the lake.
On its margin grows a perfect Alpine flower
garden.
Baronial Banff Springs Hotel — overlooking the
Valley of the Bow
 [hefj Irfonc Great \gkex f^ouie
(Adapted from the notes of Captain James McCannel,
Master of the Canadian Pacific Steamship "Assiniboia")
THE five "Great Lakes" of the North American continent
(Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario) are really
fresh-water inland seas. They are drained ultimately
by the St. Lawrence River, which — with its tributaries —
flows to the Atlantic Ocean with the waters of a basin nearly
500,000 squares miles in size. 2,200 miles is the distance
from the head of Lake Superior to tide-water in the Gulf of
St. Lawrence.
From time immemorial these waterways were traversed by
Indians in their birch bark canoes, sometimes in peace and
often in war. The first white men to visit these inland seas
came up by river and lake in the birch bark canoes of the Indians,
which were light in construction and easily carried over the
portages. In 1615 Samuel de Champlain journeyed from
Montreal by way of the Ottawa River, Lake Nipissing and the
French River to the Georgian Bay and landed in what is now
known as Penetanguishene Bay. He was soon followed from
time to time by other explorers who had penetrated further
westward and sometime during the summer of 1623 Etienne
Brule arrived at what is now Sault Ste. Marie, and was the first
white man to gaze on Lake Superior, the largest and finest
body of fresh water in the world.
In 1649 Fathers Brebeuf and Lalemant were tortured and
murdered by the savage Iroquois near Georgian Bay, and
further away — near the Blue Mountains of Collingwood —
Fathers Daniel and Gamier met a similar fate. A short distance
from Port McNicoll a beautiful shrine has been erected to
commemorate the death of these martyrs. Now, during the
summer, thousands of pilgrims visit this shrine. Farther down
the Bay is the site of a former military and naval station, selected
in 1796 by Governor Simcoe and occupied by some of the
most famous regiments  of the line.
Radisson and Groseillers made a survey of Lake Superior
in 1660 and 1661 and about the same time the Jesuits established their first mission on this lake. Some years later Joliet
was sent to investigate the copper deposits reputed to exist
there, and in 1678 Du Lhut established a fur trading post on
the present site of Fort William.
With the arrival of settlers, first from France, and later from
the British Isles, fwho usually located along the shores of the
lakes and rivers] it was soon found that the canoes were not
large enough to take care of the growing commerce of the
new world, and consequently they began building sail boats,
which increased in size as the trade warranted.    In the early
years of the last century men began to build steamboats of
various types and designs, as it was found that sail could not
always give the service necessary, and by the middle of the
century it was a race between sail and steam, as to which would
be supreme. Sailormen looked with disdain on steamboats
and did not take kindly to that mode of propulsion, but eventually steam succeeded in driving sailing ships out of business.
During the '60's and '70's sailing ships reached their zenith
and from that time on began to decline. We find in the early
70's there were over 1,400 sailing vessels registered in Canada
and the United States, and from 1848 to 1875 many of these
made successful ocean voyages clearing from lake ports with
grain, square timber, lumber, staves, spars, copper and silver
ore for British ports. One brig, the "SEAGULL", loaded
farm implements at Toronto for Cape Town, and during the
same years British and Norwegian ships came up to the
Great Lakes ports.
To the west of the Great Lakes were two great fur-trading
companies. The Hudson's Bay Co., receiving the goods necessary
for the trade, transported them from England in their own ships
to York Factory and then sent them inland by canoe and York
boats. The North West Co., composed largely of Highland
Scots from Montreal, was a great rival to the former, and every
spring brigades of canoes were loaded at Lachine and these
hardy voyageurs paddled every mile of navigable water, coming
up by the Ottawa River, Lake Nipissing, the French River,
coursing along the shores of Georgian Bay, the North Channel,
Soo River, around the north shore of Lake Superior to the
Grand Portage,- and then loaded into the north canoes, which
were much smaller, and carried by lakes and rivers to the remote
posts on the western plains. At the rapids and waterfalls all
this freight had to be unloaded and carried across on the backs
of the men; a very laborious work. These two Companies
were merged in 1821.
Today the scene is changed. The steamship now carries
on the work, and modern skill has succeeded in designing a
class of vessel most suited to the trade. The white-sided, Clyde-
built steamships of the Canadian Pacific Great Lakes fleet
maintain a convenient service between Port McNicoll and
Fort William for the passenger and freight trade. Travellers
wishing to make a trip by the Great Lakes will be well repaid.
There is no finer trip anywhere in the world than from Port
McNicoll to Fort William on one of the staunch Canadian Pacific
steamers, a distance of 542 miles over an enchanting lake and
river route.
This booklet describes a westbound cruise from Port McNicoll to Port Arthur and Fort William—
the voyage in the opposite direction follows the same interesting route and is equally attractive.
 WORLD-WIDE SERVICE
• Great Britain and Europe
AIR - LINE ROUTE . . . Frequent sailings via the short St. Lawrence Seaway
from Montreal and Quebec (summer) . . . Saint John, N.B., and Halifax, N.S.
(winter) ... to and from British and Continental ports . . . the majestic Empress
of Britain and other great Empress, Duchess and "Mont" ships of the CANADIAN
PACIFIC fleet set new standards of trans-Atlantic service.
FAST FREIGHT SERVICE provided by Empress, Duchess, "Mont" liners and
"Beaver" cargo ships.
• Canada and United States
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (comprising 21,235 miles of operated
and controlled lines) reaches from the Atlantic to the Pacific, across Canada
and into the United States. The main line, Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles,
passes through the heart of the famous Canadian Rockies, with their crowning
jewels of Banff, Lake Louise and Emerald Lake, unsurpassed as vacation resorts.
Modern and comfortable trans-continental and local passenger train services
link the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural regions and holiday
resorts. Fast and efficient freight service. Convenient coastal and inland steamship
services.    Builds and operates own sleeping, dining and parlor cars.
•  Honolulu, Orient and South Seas
Regular sailings  to  and  from  Vancouver and  Victoria  providing  convenient
passenger and freight schedules.
DIRECT EXPRESS ROUTE TO ORIENT . . . swift sister ships.    Empress of
Asia and Empress of Russia . . . Yokohama in 10 days flat!
VIA HONOLULU . . . The mighty Empress of Japan and her running mate,
Empress of Canada, make Honolulu in 5 days, Yokohama in just 8 days more.
SOUTH SEAS . . . Canadian Australasian Line fast modern liners to Honolulu,
Fiji, New Zealand and Australia.
PRINCIPAL
• Round-the-World
ANNUAL WORLD CRUISE on the famous Empress of Britain, perfectly timed
to see world-renowned beauty spots at their best . . . Other attractive cruises
to Mediterranean — East and South Africa — South-America, West Indies,
Norwegian Fjords, etc.
INDEPENDENT ROUND-THE-WORLD TOURS, choice of over 200
itineraries ... 179 offices maintained throughout the world to assist
CANADIAN PACIFIC patrons.
• Hotels, Express, Communications
HOTELS ... A chain of comfort across Canada from Atlantic to Pacific . . .
Fifteen hotels in leading cities and resorts, including Chateau Frontenac, Quebec;
Royal York, Toronto; Banff Springs; Empress Hotel, Victoria . . . Eight chalet-
bungalow camps in the Canadian  Rockies and at Ontario fishing resorts.
COMMUNICATIONS AND EXPRESS . . . owned and operated by the
CANADIAN PACIFIC . . . trans-Canada Service . . . world-wide connections . . . travellers   cheques — good   the   world   over.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Canadian Pacific Agencies
Atlanta, Ga	
Banff, Alta. (Summer)
Boston, Mass	
Buffalo, N.Y 	
Calgary, Alta	
Chicago, 111	
Cincinnati, Ohio	
Cleveland, Ohio	
Dallas, Texas	
Detroit, Mich	
Edmonton, Alta
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
.H. C. James 404 C. & S. Nat'I Bk. Bldg.
.J. C. Pike Canadian Pacific Station
. L. R. Hart 405 Boylston St.
. W. P. Wass 22 Court Street
. G. D. Brophy Canadian Pacific Station
.T. J. Wall 71 East Jackson Blvd.
. S. E. Corbin 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
.G. H. Griffin 1010 Chester Ave.
. P. G. Jefferson 1212 Kirby Bldg.
. M. E. Malone 1231  Washington Blvd.
. C. S. Fyfe  Canadian Pacific Building
Fort William, Ont  H. J. Skynner 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont W. C. Tully 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S A. C. MacDonald 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont  A. Craig Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T. H. Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris 709 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal  W. Mcllroy 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis J. A. Millington 1014 Warner Theatre Bldg.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait 611 2nd Ave. South
MrmtrPfli  Hup /p- E- Gingras Windsor  Station
Montreal, Que lF c Lyd*n 2Q1 gt   Jameg   St   w
Moose Jaw, Sask T. J. Colton Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson, B.C N. J. Lowes Baker and Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y J. E. Roach Madison Ave.  at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont R. Y. Daniaud 87 Main Street West
Ottawa, Ont J. A. McGill 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont J. Skinner 343 George St.
Philadelphia, Pa E. A. Kenney 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. A. Shackelford Koppers Bldg., 444 7th Ave.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon 626 S.W. Broadway
Prince Rupert, B.C W. L. Coates
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin Palais Station
Regina, Sask J. W. Dawson Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John, N.B C. B. Andrews 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo G. P. Carbrey 418 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn  W. H. Lennon Fourth and Cedar
San Francisco, Cal	
Saskatoon, Sask	
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.
Seattle, Wash	
Sherbrooke, Que	
Skagway, Alaska	
Spokane, Wash	
Tacoma, Wash..
F. L. Nason 152 Geary St.
.R. T. Wilson 115 Second Ave.
.J. O. Johnston 529 Queen Street
.E. L. Sheehan 1320 Fourth Ave.
.J. A. Metivier 91 Wellington St. North
.L. H. Johnston
.E. S. McPherson Old National Bank Bldg.
L. N. Jones 1113   Pacific   Ave.
>King and Yonge St?.
Toronto. Ont {M&Ve /
Trois Rivieres, Que J. A. Tourville 1262 Notre Dame St.
Vancouver, B.C F. H. Daly 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria, B.C J. Macfarlane  1102  Government  St.
Washington, D.C C. E. Phelps 14th and New York Ave., N.W.
Windsor, Ont W. C. Elmer 142 Ouellette Ave.
Winnipeg, Man E. A. McGuinness Main and Portage
EUROPE
.. W. D. Grosset 25 Quai Jordaens
. .H. T. Penny 24 Donegall Place
.. J. R. W. Taylor 4 Victoria Square
. .T. W. Thorne 18 St. Augustine's Parade
. .G. L. M. Servais 98 Blvd.  Adolphe-Max
. .A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
.. W. H. Boswell 25 Bothwell St.
,. T. H. Gardner Alsterdamm   9
. .M. L. Duffy Pier Head
/C. E. Jenkins 62-65 Charing Cross
' \G. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall   St.
. R. L. Hughes 31 Mosley St.
. .a.S. Craig -J4 Moaley at.
.A. V. Clark  24  Blvd. des Capuclnes
.J. Springett Coolsingel   No.  91
. H. Taylor Canute   Road
ASIA
. E. Hospes Opposite Blake Pier
Antwerp, Belgium	
Belfast, Ireland	
Birmingham, England.
Bristol, England	
Brussels, Belgium ,
Dublin, Ireland	
Glasgow, Scotland	
Hamburg, Germany	
Liverpool, England
London, England	
Manchester, England	
Newoastle-on-Tyne, Eng.
Paris, France	
Rotterdam, Holland	
Southampton, England..
Hong Kong, China.
Kobe, Japan	
Manila, P.I	
Shanghai, China...
Yokohama, Japan. .
. W. R. Buckberrough 7   Harima-machi
. G. R. Razavet 14-16 Calle David
. A. M. Parker The Bund and Peking Road
. .B. G. Ryan 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, FIJI
Adelaide, S. Aus  Macdonald.  Hamilton   & Co.
Auckland, N.Z., A. W. Essex, Traffic Agent for New Zealand, G.P.R., 32-34 Quay St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald,  Hamilton   & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z. Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Fremantle, W. Aus Macdonald,  Hamilton   & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic H. F. Boyer, Freight and Pass'r Agent, C.P.R., 59 William St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Perth, W. A Macdonald, Hamilton,  & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W., N. R. McMorran, Traffic Agent for Australia. C.P.R., Union House
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z., G.A. Glennie, Freight and Pass'r Agent, C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always   Carry   Canadian   Pacific   Express   Travellers'   Cheques
GOOD THE WORLD OVER
Printed in Canada. 1936
 lii. mm
$'" •./..
''mi.
Canadian Pacific
 CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CANADIAN!
PACIFIC
Canadian  Pacific
GREAT LAKES
Steamship  Service
SUMMER 1936
First trip from Port McNicoll June 20 and from Fort William June 24
between   PORT McNICOLL - SAULT STE. MARIE
PORT   ARTHUR     -     FORT   WILLIAM
via GEORGIAN BAY - LAKE HURON - ST. MARY'S RIVER
WHITEFISH BAY - LAKE SUPERIOR - THUNDER BAY
Whether you take a Great Lakes cruise as a trip in itself, or as a delightful interlude in your rail journey across the continent, the
voyage between Port McNicoll and Fort William is memorable. During the summer the great white ships of the Canadian Pacific
fleet provide each week two westbound sailings from Port McNicoll, and two eastbound sailings from Fort William and Port Arthur.
Trans-Canada passengers have the advantage of travelling via this attractive diverse route (representing about one-fifth of the total mileage)
at no extra passage fare, and only a small charge for meals and berth.
SOME ATTRACTIONS OF CANADIAN PACIFIC
GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIPS
"KEEWATIN" AND "ASSINIBOIA"
• These staunch white ships were built on the Clyde.
• AH rooms have running water, and lights in each berth.
• Deluxe rooms, some with twin beds, are available at a small extra charge.
• Excellent cuisine and service.
• Steamships carry orchestras, for dancing and dinner music.
• Facilities for deck sports, including shuffle board, bull board, deck quoits, bucket quoits and deck golf.
• The rear portion of the upper deck, including the Veranda Cafe, is  enclosed,  providing  an   ideal   observation   room,  as  well  as
extra space for dancing.
• Steamships carry barbers and hairdressers.    Valet service is also available.
• Trains at Port McNicoll and Fort William go direct to ship's side.    No cross-town transfers.
SIGHTSEEING EXCURSIONS
Interesting sightseeing trips are available at Sault Ste. Marie, Port Arthur and Fort William during stop-overs of
Canadian Pacific steamers.
(1)
 PASSENGER FARES - ADULTS & CHILDREN
The Canadian Pacific S.S. "Keewatin" and S.S. "Assiniboia/* that link the rails of the transcontinental trip, operate in passenger
service from June 20 to Sept. 16 Westbound and June 24 to Sept. 19 Eastbound, both dates inclusive. Through fares via the Great
Lakes Steamships between Fort William and points west thereof and Toronto and points reached through Toronto, are the same as by
rail, but additional amounts will require to be paid as follows for meals and berth on lake steamship, and separate meal and berth ticket
obtained from  Canadian  Pacific  Agent:
BERTH IN
Outside Room      Inside Room
♦Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William   $10.00 $9.00     ]
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie        5.00 4.50     \     In Each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William        5.00 4.50     J
* Includes following meals :—
WESTBOUND — Dinner after embarking at Port McNicoll, and ail meals up to and including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port Arthur or Fort William.
EASTBOUND — Lunch after embarking at Fort William or Port Arthur, and al! meals up to and including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port McNicoll.
(Breakfast, at 75c, served on board steamer at Fort William on morning of sailing)/
PORT TO PORT PASSAGE FARES
First Class adults' fares :—                                                                               One Way Round Trip
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William   $24.25 $43.50
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie, Ont      11.50 20.00
Between Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. and Port Arthur or Fort William..     12.75 23.50
Meals and Berth
Extra,   as   shown
above.
Children five years or over and under twelve will be charged half fare and half the separate meal and berth charge, provided
each child shares a berth with an adult or two half fare children are berthed together.
For children under five years of age, when accompanied by parent or guardian or sharing berth with an adult or an older child,
no charge will be made, except that children under five occupying seats at table will be charged as follows for meals:
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William   $ 4.00
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie        2.00
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William        2.00
In Each Direction
(a) If a child under five occupies a berth by itself it must be charged full meal and berth rate of $9.00 or $10.00 between Port
McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William, or $4.50 or $5.00 between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie or between Sault Ste.
Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William.    It will not be required to pay anything for transportation.
(b) Two children under five occupying a berth together will be charged the same as one child under five — see clause (a) above
— and for the second child, if occupying a seat at the table, the amount stated in second paragraph above according to distance. No
charge for transportation.
(c) Two children under five travelling in same party will not be given separate berths even on payments as per clause (a).
(d) One child between five and twelve travelling on a half-fare ticket will require to pay half the meal and berth rate shown
in clause (a), if sharing berth with an adult or a child of twelve years or over.
(e) Two children between five and twelve berthed together and each holding half fare ticket, will require to pay one full meal
and berth charge as shown in clause (a).
(f) If one child between five and twelve holding half-fare ticket occupies a berth by itself or shares it with a child under five
years of age it will require to pay full meal and berth rate of $9.00 or $10.00 or $4.50 or $5.00 according to distance travelled and
type of accommodation (inside or outside) — except that a child of half fare age (i.e., between five and twelve) in three-berth room
with two adults will be required to pay only half the full meal and berth charge, according to the distance travelled.
(CONSULT ANY TICKET AGENT FOR FULL INFORMATION)
REDUCED AUTOMOBILE RATES
Automobiles, accompanied by one or more passengers each paying full first class fare,
will be carried :
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William $12.00
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie        7.00
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William      7.00 4
In Each Direction
The charge for a camp automobile trailer Will be the same as for an automobile.
It is not necessary that tanks be drained of gasoline.
(2)
BAGGAGE
150 lbs. of baggage will be carried free on
each adult ticket and 75 lbs. on each half
ticket. Steamer trunks not more than 14
inches in height may be placed in staterooms. Passengers will find it more convenient to allow trunks to be placed in the
baggage room on board where they can be
made readily accessible if desired, unless
bonded.
 ITINERARY OF GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIP SERVICE
and connecting train services
STEAMSHIPS "KEEWATIN" & "ASSINIBOIA"
WESTBOUND
Lv. Toronto	
Ar. Port McNicoll	
Lv. PORT McNICOLL
Ar. SAULT STE. MARIE
Lv. SAULT STE. MARIE
Ar. PORT ARTHUR....
Ar. FORT WILLIAM...
Lv. Fort William
Ar. Winnipeg..
Ar. Calgary	
Ar. Banff	
Ar. Vancouver.
C.P. Boat Special
Steamship
C.P.R. train
1.30 pm E.T.
4.40 pm E.T.
5.00 pm E.T.
11.30 am E.T.
12.30 pm E.T.
6.45 am E.T.
* 7.50 am E.T.
••
No
1
7.35
am
CT.
7.45
pm
C.I.
10.10
pm
M.I.
1.30
am
M.I.
10.30
pm
P.I.
#No. 3
9.35 pm CT.
8.45 am CT.
7.45 am M.T.
11.10am M.T.
9.00 am  P.T.
EASTBOUND
Wed.   Sat.
Thu.   Sun.
Fri.     Mon.
Daily
* Connection made at Fort William with No. 1.
**Cafe Parlor Car operated in train No. 1, Fori William to Calgary,-   through  Sleeping
Car Winnipeg-Vancouver.
# Through Sleeping Cars operated between Fort William and Vancouver in train  No.  3.
Dining Car facilities on this train.
Lv.   Vancouver	
Lv.   Banff	
Lv.   Calgary	
Lv.   Winnipeg	
Ar.  Fort William	
Lv. FORT WILLIAM...
Lv. PORT ARTHUR ...
Ar. SAULT STE. MARIE
Lv. SAULT STE. MARIE
Ar. PORT McNICOLL.
Lv.   Port McNicoll	
Ar. Toronto	
C.P.R. No. 4
Steamship
CP. Boat Special
7 15
pm
P.T.
5.50
pm
M.I.
8.30
pm
M.I.
7.15
pm
C.I.
•6.00
am
C.I.
12.00
n'n
E.T.
1.30
pm
E.T.
9.30
am
E.T.
1.30
pm
E.T.
8.30
am
E.T.
8.45
am
Ll.
11.30
am
E.T.
Daily
Sat.    Wed.
Sun.   Thu.
Mon. Fri.
* Occupancy at Fort William until 8.00 a.m. in Winnipeg - Fort William
sleeper operated to connect with each sailing.
Breakfast, at 75c, served on board steamer at Fort William on mornings
of sailing.
Parlor Cars and Coaches operated in Boat Special train   between  Toronto and  Port McNicoll.
Standard Time governing rail and steamship schedules :
E.T. — Eastern  Time;    CT. — Central  Time,-    M.T. — Mountain  Time;    P.T. — Pacific Time.
SEE CURRENT TIME TABLE FOLDERS FOR PARTICULARS OF EQUIPMENT OPERATED AND COMPLETE TRAIN SERVICE
WESTBOUND
STEAMER
EASTBOUND
Lv.
PORT McNICOLL
(5.00 pm)
SAULT STE. MARIE
(Ar. 11.30 am)
(Lv.  12.30  pm)
PORT ARTHUR
(Ar. 6.45 am)
FORT WILLIAM
(Ar. 7.50 am)
Lv. FORT WILLI AM
(12.00   noon)
Lv. PORT ARTHUR
(1.30 pm)
SAULT STE. MARIE
(Ar. 9.30 am)
(Lv. 1.30 pm)
Ar.
PORT McNICOLL
(8.30 am)
Sat.        June    20
Wed.     June    24
Sun.       June    21
Thurs.    June    25
Sun.       June    28
Thurs.    July       2
Sun.       July       5
Thurs.    July       9
Sun.       July     12
Thurs.    July     16
Sun.      July     19
Thurs.    July     23
Sun.      July     26
Thurs.    July     30
Sun.       Aug.     2
Thurs.    Aug.     6
Sun.       Aug.     9
Thurs.    Aug.   13
Sun.       Aug.   16
Thurs.    Aug.   20
Sun.       Aug.   23
Thurs.    Aug.   27
Sun.       Aug.   30
Thurs.    Sept.      3
Sun.      Sept.     6
Thurs.    Sept.   10
Sun.       Sept.   13
Thurs.    Sept.   17
Mon.    June    22
Fri.        June    26
Mon.    June    29
Fri.        July       3
Mon.    July       6
Fri.        July     10
Mon.    July    13
Fri.        July     17
Mon.    July     20
Fri.        July    24
Mon.    July     27
Fri.        July     31
Mon.    Aug.     3
Fri.         Aug.     7
Mon.    Aug.   10
Fri.         Aug.   14
Mon.    Aug.   17
Fri.         Aug.   21
Mon.    Aug.   24
Fri.         Aug.   28
Mon.     Aug.   31
Fri.        Sept.      4
Mon.    Sept.      7
Fri.        Sept.   11
Mon.    Sept.   14
Fri.        Sept.   18
   "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Wed.    June    24
Sat.        June    27
Wed.    July       1
Sat.       July       4
Wed.    July       8
Sat.       July    11
Wed.    July    15
Sat.        July     18
Wed.    July     22
Sat.       July    25
Wed.    July    29
Sat.        Aug.     1
Wed.    Aug.     5
Sat.        Aug.     8
Wed.    Aug.   12
Sat.        Aug.   15
Wed.    Aug.   19
Sat.        Aug.   22
Wed.    Aug.   26
Sat.        Aug.   29
Wed.    Sept.     2
Sat.        Sept.      5
Wed.    Sept.     9
Sat.        Sept.    12
Wed.    Sept.   16
Sat.       Sept.   19
Thurs.    June    25
Sun.      June    28
Thurs.    July       2
Sun.       July       5
Thurs.    July       9
Sun.      July     12
Thurs.    July    16
Sun.      July    19
Thurs.    July    23
Sun.       July     26
Thurs.    July     30
Sun.       Aug.     2
Thurs.    Aug.     6
Sun.       Aug.     9
Thurs.    Aug.   13
Sun.       Aug.   16
Thurs.    Aug.   20
Sun.       Aug.   23
Thurs.    Aug.   27
Sun.       Aug.   30
Thurs.    Sept.     3
Sun.      Sept.     6
Thurs.    Sept.   10
Sun.       Sept.   13
Thurs.    Sept.   17
Sun.      Sept.   20
Fri.        June    26
Mon.     June    29
Sat.        June    27
Wed      July       1
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        July       3
Mon.    July       6
Sat.        July       4
Wed.    July       8
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        July     10
Mon.    July     13
Sat.        July     11
Wed.    July     15
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        July     17
Mon.    July     20
Sat.        July     18
Wed     July     22
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        July    24
Mon.    July     27
Sat.        July     25
Wed.    July     29
Sat.        Aug.     1
Wed.     Aug.     5
Sat.        Aug.     8
Wed.    Aug.   12
Sat.        Aug.   15
Wed.     Aug.   19
Sat.        Aug.   22
Wed.    Aug.   26
Sat.        Aug.   29
Wed.    Sept.      2
Sat.        Sept.      5
Wed.    Sept.      9
Sat.        Sept.    12
Wed.    Sept.   16
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        July     31
Mon.     Aug.     3
Fri.         Aug.     7
Mon.     Aug.   10
Fri.        Aug.   14
Mon.     Aug.   17
Fri.         Aug.   21
Mon.     Aug.   24
Fri.         Aug.   28
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        Sept.      4
Mon.     Sept.      7
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
.. ."KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        Sept.    11
Mon.    Sept.    14
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        Sept.    18
Mon.    Sept.    21
Before and after the regular Great Lakes passenger season, as shown above, special sailings between Port McNicoll, Sault Ste. Marie
and Port Arthur and/or Fort William are frequently arranged to provide for  freight shipments.    Passengers will be accommodated
on such sailings, when space is available.
(3)
 Steamships "KEEWATIN" and "ASSINIBOIA"
S.S.   "Keewatin"
u
<
5
p]i^xajjl.
ID    Oil
PU
u
=3
r\
■□ti
ho
__tJ
>!:
TST,
Captain F. H. DAVIS
Purser C. S. MIERS
S.S. "Assiniboia"
Captain JAS. McCANNEL
Purser GEO. BETHUNE
CLYDE - BUILT
Speed      --------15 knots
Gross Tonnage ------ 3880
Net Tonnage         2486
Length 350 ft.
Breadth         43 ft.
Depth  15 ft.
DECKS :   Main, Upper and Sun Deck.
A  indicates Upper Berth/    B Lower Berth;    C Sofa Berth.
UPPER DECK —All Rooms except 1 and 5 have three berths each.
Room 1 has four berths and a long seat. Room 5
has two berths and a long seat.
MAIN DECK— All Inside Rooms except 101 and 149 have two
berths and a long seat; Rooms 101 and 149 have
two berths and a short seat only.
All Outside Rooms except 166, 168, 171, 173
and 175 have three berths each; Rooms 168,171
and 175 are Parlor Rooms with bathroom attached.
Rooms 166 and 173 are Parlor Rooms with twin
beds and private bathroom.
Room 177 has three berths with bathroom attached.
(4)
Printed in Canada 1936
 C*„M»AH PACF.C W**,^^
to
S, 5- Hlberta
DINNER
SOUP
Puree of Vegetable
FISH
Boiled Lake Trout—Egg Sauce—Chipped Potatoes
ENTREES
Chicken Patties Ox-Tongue—Tomato Sauce
Banana Fritters—Sauce
JOINTS
Roast Beef—Brown Gravy Loin of Lamb—Mushrooms
Corned Beef—Cabbage
VEGETABLES
Boiled and Mashed Potatoes                  Stewed Corn
Tomatoes
SALAD
Mayonnaise of Salmon—Onions
PASTRY
Rice Pudding—Wine Sauce
Lemon Pie                               Peach Pie
DESSERT
Pineapple Sherbet
Nuts               Raisins
Tea
Assorted Cake
Water Biscuits               Cheese
Coffee
GINGER  ALE
SODA          -
20c.                SELTZER WATER      -       -      20c.
20c.       1       APOLLINARIS WATER       -      25c.
Children occupying seats at first table
will be charged full fare
ScAco£/\
 Speedy Canadian Pacific Freighter
, C.-S. BEAVERFORD and her sister ships are the
° great transportation company's answer to the
demand  for  regular  express freight  service  across
the  North Atlantic     These  ships  have   _
new  high  levels  for   speed   and   efficiency  in  this
particular   phase   of   the   Canadian   transportation
scene.
 V?>^      LAKE SUPERIOR DIVISION ^Cfo>
wifJJkjL mij/LTLdm^	
 /jUba^^L	
SUBJECT TO THJL CONDITIONS  ENDORSED HEREON UNTIL
December 31 "J 1913 unless otherwise ordered.
Not good unless
Countersigned by
E.Tobin.
^7  President      ^^
 15
No.  F
tfQQD TQ RIDE ON FREIGHT TKAiNa.
Countersigned
This pass is not transferable and
may be cancelled at any time; and
the person using it assumes all risk
of accident or damage to person or
property, whether caused by the
negligence of the Company's servants
or otherwise.
THIS PASS WILL BE HONOURED
ONLY   BETWEEN
CHALK RIVER, MUSKOKA, SAULT STE. MARIE
and PORT ARTHUR, anil on the
Intervening Branches
 0^PACF.CRA,LwAVCoAto
Pass
"Employed as .Ij-_LI3
Between b>t/3>t#2;
Until
LAKE SUPERIOR DIVISION
JMy
Not Good  Unless
Countersigned  by
nSs
 No. L S D
203
CONDITIONS
This Pass is only to be issued to an Employee of
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company and is Not
Transferable, and may be cancelled at any time, and the
person using it assumes aft'risk, of accident or damage
to person or property, whether caused by the negligence
of the Company's servants or otherwise.
Countersigned:
 QomJxom. GU$ic
STEAMSHIP SERVICE
BY THE
BAY OF FUNDY ROUTE
S.S. PRINCESS HELENE
LENGTH 340 FT. BREADTH  52 FT. TONNAGE 4000
RADAR  EQUIPPED SPEED  19 KNOTS •
PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION  500
Daily Except Sunday
Between
Saint John, N.B. and Digby, N.S.
42   NAUTICAL   MILES
H. I. SAUNDERS
District passenger agent
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
SAINT JOHN, N.B.
1950
 Stateroom -   s.S. PRINCESS HELENE -Flan
PASSENGER FARES
(Not including Stateroom Accommodation)
One Way       .... $2.60
Round Trip 4.70
Every stateroom is outside or has a porthole.
Tickets for berth or stateroom accommodation to be
occupied overnight at Saint John en route to
Digby must be picked up before 9.00 p.m. A.S.T.,
day before sailing.
Passengers holding berth or stateroom tickets may
board Princess Helene any time after 7.30 p.m., A.S.T.,
at Saint John in the evening before sailing.
In the summer months there is a very heavy demand
for sleeping accommodation from Saint John to
Digby. So that as many requests as possible may be
satisfied exclusive occupancy of rooms by one
person has to be discouraged.
Requests for berth or stateroom accommodation will be given prompt
attention by your nearest Canadian Pacific agent
OR
from Saint John to Digby
City Passenger Agent, Wharf Agent,
40 King Street, Reeds Point Wharf,
Saint John, N.B. Saint John, N.B.
from Digby to Saint John
Purser, "Princess Helene",
Digby, N.S.
SCHEDULE
Daily Except Sunday
WINTER AND FALL
Leave SAINT JOHN . . . 7.45 A.M., A.S.T.
Arrive DIGBY . ." . . 10.45 A.M., A.S.T.
Leave DIGBY ... . 3.45 P.M., A.S.T.
Arrive SAINT JOHN   .       .       .        6.30 P.M., A.S.T.
SPRING AND SUMMER
(May 1st to September 23rd, 1950)
Leave SAINT JOHN   .       .       . 7.30 A.M., A.S.T.
Arrive DIGBY      .... 10.30 A.M., A.S.T.
Leave DIGBY      .... 3.15 P.M., A.S.T.
Arrive SAINT JOHN   .       .       . 6.00 P.M., A.S.T.
DINING ROOM SERVICE
Attractive  meals at table d'hote and  a  la  carte
prices are available in the Dining Saloon.
STATEROOM RATES
ROOM
NUMBER
BERTHS
IN
ROOM
Night Occupancy
Day Trip
Berth
One
Psgr.
only
Two or
More
Psgrs.
Room
Rate
1-2-3-4-5-6
7-8-14-15-16
17-22-23-29-30
35-37-39-40-41
Lower
Upper
Sofa
3.00
2.00
1.50
5.00
6.50
3.50
9-10-11-12
18-19-20-21
31-32-33-38
Lower
Upper
Settee
2.50
2.00
1.25
4.50
5.75
3.00
34
36
Lower
Upper Sofa
Shower
Toilet
-
6.00
8.00
4.00
DeLuxe
Bedrooms
24-25-27
2 S. Beds
Sofa
Shower
Toilet
-
7.50
10.00
5.50
Suite
26-28
Sold only
as One
Unit
2 S. Beds
Sofa and
Show'r Toil't
Sitt'g Room
with Sofa
-
10.00
13.00
7.50
 THE PLEASANT WAY
TO NOVA SCOTIA
The Canadian Pacific steamship Princess Helene,
operating across the Bay of Fundy, offers eastbound
and westbound travellers the finest, fastest and
most direct route between points in Nova Scotia and
Quebec, Ontario, Western Canada and
the United States.
Built like an ocean liner, the Princess Helene gives
speed, spaciousness and comfort to the Saint John-
Digby Service. Public Rooms are large, airy and
bright and are equipped with comfortable
furniture. Staterooms are available for night
occupancy by passengers boarding the ship at
Saint John after 7.30 p.m., A.S.T.
New Brunswick and Nova Scotia resorts are well
served by Canadian Pacific Hotels:
*the Algonquin St. Andrews-by-the-Sea, N.B.
*the pines Digby, N.S.
* lakeside inn Yarmouth, N.S.
t cornwallis inn Kentville, N.S.
At Halifax and Saint John comfort is ensured by
fLORD nelson hotel       Halifax, N.S.
(operated by the Lord Nelson Hotel Co., Ltd.)
f ADMIRAL BEATTY HOTEL   Saint John, N.B.
(owned and operated by Admiral Beatty Hotel Co.)
* Open Summer only. f Open all year.
 S.S. PRINCESS HELENE
BAY OF FUNDY SERVICE
AUTOMOBILE RATES AND RESERVATIONS
Rate for pleasure cars, regardless of size or weight,
when accompanied by at least one passenger—
BETWEEN
SAINT JOHN and DIGBY
$10.00 EACH WAY
Payment in full to be made when reservation
confirmed. Due to limited automobile accommodation
available, reservation must be made well in advance
and confirmed. No refund can be made unless
reservation is cancelled three hours prior to
departure of the ship. Cars are accepted at ship's
side as follows:—
SAINT JOHN DIGBY
On previous evening and up to Until 2 p.m. A.S.T.,
6 a.m. A.S.T., day of sailing. day of sailing.
The Canadian Pacific cannot accept responsibility for
loss or damage of personal property left in the
automobiles. It is not necessary to empty tanks.
For automobile reservations apply to your nearest
Canadian Pacific office: or
City Passenger Agent, Wharf Agent,
40 King Street, Reeds Point Wharf,
Saint John, N.B. Saint John, N.B.
Wharf Agent,
Digby, N.S.
Gwwu&a^
NS THE WORLD
 Canadian Pacific
GREAT LAKES
Steamship Service
SUMMER HOLIDAY SEASON
1956
First trip from Port McNicoll and Fort William June 9th
Last trip from Port McNicoll and Fort William Sept. 8th
between PORT McNICOLL - SAULT STE. MARIE
PORT ARTHUR - FORT WILLIAM
via GEORGIAN BAY - LAKE HURON - ST. MARY'S RIVER
WHITEFISH BAY - LAKE SUPERIOR - THUNDER BAY
Your Great Lakes voyage by Canadian Pacific liner will be memorable. As a cruise holiday, or a
restful interlude in a rail journey across the Continent, this unusual trip is surprisingly inexpensive.
There are two sailings in each direction every week.
(Timetable on Page 4)
SOME FEATURES OF CANADIAN PACIFIC
GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIPS
"KEEWATIN''  AND "ASSINIBOIA''
Clyde-built, automatic sprinkler equipped.
Highest class service and cuisine.
All rooms have hot and cold running water; lights in each berth.    All inside rooms have electric fans.
Upper and lower berths equipped with luxurious spring-Oiled mattresses.
Each ship has seven attractive de luxe rooms with private bathrooms—Ave equipped with twin beds and two with double bed.
All public and private bathrooms have tile flooring, built-in bathtubs and showers.
Deck sports include shuffieboard, bull board, deck quoits, table tennis.
Dancing and Observation Lounge—with large observation windows, lounge facilities and polished oak dance floor.
Recorded music for dancing.    On deck—Morning Bouillon—Afternoon Tea.    Room service at a smail additional charge.
Barber, Handy Shop, Entertainment Steward, Motion Pictures.
There is passenger accommodation available on all sailings before and after the holiday season.
Holiday Season only.
Steamship special trains operate during Summer
AM facilities offered iubfect to change without notice.
 Steamships "KEEWATIN'' and "ASSINIBOIA'
UPPER   DECK
MAIN   DECK
PASSENGER FARES - TRANSPORTATION, BERTHS AND MEALS
The Canadian Pacific SS. "Keewatln" and SS. "Asslnlbola", link the rails of the transcontinental trip, and operate in passenger service from
Jsine 11 to September 10. Through first class fares via the Great Lakes Steamships between Fort William and points west thereof and Toronto and
points reached through Toronto, ore the some as by all rail, and only a small additional amount will require to be paid, as follows, for meals and
berth on lake steamship, and separate meal and berth ticket obtained from Canadian Pacific Agent.
BERTH IN
fDe Luxe Room    Outside Room    Inside Room
♦Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William  $58.00 $22.00 $1 S.00
B«twe©n Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie    11.00 9.00      \ In each Direction
detween Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William    11.00 9.00
♦includes following meals:— tSold at room rate and minimum two aduit passage fares.
WESTBOUND—Dinner after embarking at Port McNicoll, and all meals up to and including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port Arthur or Fort William.
EASTBOUND—Lunch after embarking at Fort William or Port Arthur and all meals up to and including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port McNicoll.
(Breakfast is served on board steamer at Fort William on morning of sailing $ 1.25 and $ 1.50).
PORT TO PORT PASSAGE FARES
First Class adults' forest-
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William....
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie	
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William.
One Way
$27.00
13.40
13.60
Round Trip
$46.60
24.10
24.50
Meals and Berth Extra,
as shown above.
Children five years or over and under twelve will be charged one-half the passage fore and one-naif the separate meal and berth charge
provided each child shares a berth with an adult or two half fare children are berthed together.
For children under five years of age, when accompanied by parent or guardian or shoring berth with an adult or an older child, no charge
will be made, except that children under five occupying seats at table will be charged as follows for meals:
Outside Room       Inside Room
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William  $ 11.00 $9.00 1
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie  5.50 4.50 \ In Each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William  5.50 4.50 J
if a child under five occupies a berth by itself, aduit meals and berth rates will be charged.    It will not be required to pay anything for transportation.
GLYDE-BUILT
Speed  15 knots
Gross Tonnage  3880
Net Tonnage  2486
Length  350 ft.
Breadth  43 ft.
Depth  15 ft.
DECKS:
Main, Upper and Sun Deck.
A indicates Upper Berth,        B Lower Berth,        C Sofa  Berth,        W Indicates Wardrobe.
Upper and  Lower Berths equipped with spring-filled mattresses.
UPPER DECK—Each room except 1, 4, 5 and 6 has two berths and one sofa berth. Room 1 has
four berths and a long seat. Rooms 4 and 5 have two berths and a long seat. Room 6 Is De
Luxe Room with twin beds and private bathroom.
MAIN DECK—All inside Rooms except 101 and 149 have two berths and a long seat, Rooms 101
and 149 have two berths and a short seat only.
Each Outside Room except 166,168, 171, 173,175 and 177 has two berths and one sofa berth,
Rooms 168 and 177 are De Luxe Rooms with double bed, sofa berth and private bathroom.
Rooms 166, 171, 173 and 175 are De Luxe Rooms with twin beds and private bathroom. Room
176 Is a four-berth outside room,
AUTOMOBILE RATES
Automobiles accompanied by one or more passengers paying regular normal first class adwlt passage fare (see Note), and not intended for
sale, delivery, or demonstrating purposes, will be carried on Great Lakes Steamships on payment of the following charges:—
NOTE.—This applies also for one or more passengers paying regular Commercial Travellers' first class passage fare.
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William      $27.00
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie        16.00
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William        16.00
Moderate charges for motorcycles, also for automobile trailers or house cars, according to over-all length.
Reservations for space for automobiles, trailers or house cars, etc., should be made In advance, and delivery at port of embarkation should be
mcsde at least one hour in advance of sailing time.    It Is not necessary that tanks be drained of gasoline.
Refunds cannot be arranged unless automobile space is cancelled at least three hours before sailing from any port.
BAGGAGE
150 lbs. of baggage will be carried fr-»e on each adulJ ticket and 75 lbs on each half ticket. Steamer trunks not more than 14 inch©* In height
may be placed in staterooms. Passengers will find it more convenient to allow trunks to be placed In the baggage room on board where they can
be made readily accessible if desired, unless bonded.
In Each Direction
(2)
(FOR FURTHER INFORMATION SEE YOUR TRAVB AGENT OR NEAREST CANADIAN PACIFIC OFFICE)
FARES AND CHARGES ARE SHOWN HEREIN FOR INFORMATION ONLY AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
(3)
 II
u
Inland-Sea
CRUISES
SS. "ASSINIBOIA" and SS. "KEEWATIN"
PORT McNICOLL — FORT WILLIAM
AND RETURN
(Juno 9th through September 8th)
SPECIAL ALL-EXPENSE PARES
INSIDE ROOM—$80.00
OUTSIDE ROOM—$90.00
Indude
Passage, Port McNicoll—Fort William
and return:
Berth and meals aboard ships
Hotel room and meals In
Fort William.
GREAT LAKES  HOLIDAY
Within the usual summer vacation limits pleasant and
Interesting holidays can be planned with the
Canadian Pacific Great Lakes service as a basis.
Sailing on Saturday by the Assiniboia, a pleasant itinerary
can Include time in Port Arthur and Fort William
with visits to He Royale and Kakabeka Falls; Kenora for
the Lake of the Woods and Devil's Gap Lodge;
the great city of Winnipeg and the famous beaches on
Lake Winnipeg; returning by the same ship
on the second Tuesday.
For visits to the East, the Canadian Pacific Great Lakes liner
Keewatin offers a similar opportunity.    Departure
from Winnipeg Friday night lands the holiday-maker
in Port McNicoll ready to include Bala and the
Muskoka Lakes in an Eastern visit to Toronto, Niagara Falls,
and the famous Peach Belt.    The return trip can be
made by either liner.
These itineraries can be extended by using ship in one
direction and train along the spectacular North
Shore of Lake Superior on the return journey which
may also include stopovers at fishing points along the
North Shore and famous French River.
TIME TABLE and   ITINERARY
STEAMSHIPS "ASSINIBOIA" AND "KEEWATIN
WESTBOUND
Lv.  Toronto	
Ar. Port McNicoll..
Train No. 703
12.01 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday
3.00 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday
"Assiniboia"
Lv.   Port McNicoll.      ET Saturday
Ar. Sault Ste. Marie  Sunday
Lv.   Sault Ste. Marie  Sunday
Ar.  Port Arthur  Monday
Ar. Fort William     ET Monday
Lv.  Fort William.
Ar. Winnipeg. ..
3.15 p.m.
9.45 a.m.
11.45 a.m.
6.30 a.m.
7.45 a.m.
Train No. 53
7.40 a.m. CT
7.00 p.m. CT
"Keewatin"
Wednesday
Thursday
Thursday
Friday
Friday
EASTBOUND
Train No. 8
Lv.  Winnipeg  7.30 p.m. CT
Ar. Fort William  5.30 a.m. CT
"Assiniboia" "Keewatin"
Lv.  Fort William     ET Tuesday 12.30 p.m. Saturday
Lv.   Port Arthur  Tuesday 2.00 pjn. Saturday
Ar. Sault Ste. Marie  Wednesday 9.00 ajn. Sunday
Lv.  Sault Ste. Marie  Wednesday 12.30 p.m. Sunday
Ar. Port McNicoll     ET Thursday 8.00 a.m. Monday
Lv.  Port McNicoll.
Ar   Toronto	
Train No. 704
8.15 a.m. ET Monday, Thursday
11.15 a.m. ET Monday, Thursday
EQUIPMENT
Train No. 703
Coaches Toronto-Port McNicoll
Parlor Cars Toronto-Port McNicoll
Train No. 53
Coaches Fort William-Winnipeg
Parlor Car (Monday and Friday) Fort William-Winnipeg
Meal Service Fort William-Winnipeg
Train No. 8
Coaches Winnipeg-Fort William
♦Sleeping Cars Winnipeg-Fort William
(occupancy at Fort William until 9.00 a.m. ET)
Meal Service ..Leaving Winnipeg
Train No. 704
Coaches Port McNicolf-Toronfo
Parlor Cars     Port McNiccii-Toronto
ET-
EXPLANATION OF SIGNS
-Eastern Time CT—Central Time
*Placed at ship's side Sailing Days.
FOR TRAIN SERVICE BETWEEN WINNIPEG AND VANCOUVER CONSULT CURRENT TIME TABLE FOLDERS
(4)
5646
 Canadian Pacific
GREAT LAKES
Steamship Service
SUMMER HOLIDAY SEASON
1953
First  trip   from Port   McNicoll   and   Fort  William   June   13
ast bept.  5
between PORT McNICOLL - SAULT STE. MARIE
PORT ARTHUR - FORT WILLIAM
via GEORGIAN BAY - LAKE HURON - ST. MARY'S RIVER
WHITEFISH BAY -  LAKE SUPERIOR - THUNDER BAY
Your Great Lakes voyage by Canadian Pacific liner will be memorable. As a cruise
holiday, or a restful interlude in a rail journey across the continent, this unusual trip is
surprisingly inexpensive. There are two sailings in each direction every week.
(Timetable on page 4)
SOME FEATURES OF CANADIAN PACIFIC
GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIPS
"KEEWATIN"   AND   "ASSINIBOIA"
Clyde-built, automatic sprinkler equipped.
Highest class service and cuisine.
All rooms have hot and cold running water; lights in each berth. All inside rooms have electric fans.
Upper and lower berths equipped with luxurious spring-filled mattresses.
Each ship has seven attractive de luxe rooms with private bathrooms—five equipped with twin beds and two withfdouble bed.
All public and private bathrooms have tile flooring, built-in bathtubs and showers.
Deck sports include shuffleboard, bull board, deck quoits. Ping-pong table indoors.
Dancing and Observation Lounge—with large observation windows, lounge facilities and polished oak dance floor.
Recorded music for dancing. On deck—Morning Bouillon—Afternoon Tea. Room service at a small additional charge.
Barber, Handy Shop, Entertainment Steward, Motion Pictures.
There is passenger accommodation available on all sailings before and after the holiday season. Steamship special trains operate during
Summer Holiday Season only.
All facilities offered subject to change without notice.
 Steamships "KEEWATIN" and "ASSINIBOIA**
MAIN   DECK
PASSENGER FARES - TRANSPORTATION, BERTHS AND MEALS
The Canadian Pacific SS. "Keewatin" and SS. "Assiniboia," link the rails of the transcontinental trip, and operate in passengef
service from 'June 13 to September 5. Through first class fares via the Great Lakes Steamships between Fort William and points west
thereof and Toronto and points reached through Toronto, are the same as by all rail, and only a small additional amount will require to
be paid, as follows, for meals and berth on lake steamship, and separate meal and berth ticket obtained from Canadian Pacific Agent.
BERTH IN
fDe Luxe Room  Outside Room   Inside Room
"Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William $58.00 $20.00 $16.00     \
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie    10.00 8.00       >ln each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William   10.00 8.00     J
"Includes following meals:— fSold at room rate and minimum two adult passage fares.
WESTBOUND—Dinner afar •mbarking a! Por! McNicoll, and all meals up to and Including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port Arthur or Fort William.
EASTBOUND—Lunch after embarking al Port William or Port Arthur and all meals up to and including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port McNicoll.
(Breakfast is served on board steamer a? Fort William on morning of sailing $1.25 and $1.50.)
CLYDE-BUILT
Speed 15 knots
Gross Tonnage        3880
Net Tonnage        2486
Length      350 ft.
Breadth        43 ft.
Depth        15 ft.
DECKS:
Main, Upper and Sun Deck.
[PORT TO PORT PASSAGE FARES
First Class adults' fares:—                                                                                                 One Way Round Trip
Between Port McNicoll end Port Arthur or Fort William         $27.00 $48.60
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie           13.40 24.10
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William           13.60 24.50
^ Meals and Berth
> Extra, as shown
J above.
Children five years or over and under twelve will be charged one-half the passage fare and one-half the separate meal and berth
charge, provided each child shares a berth with an adult or two half fare children are berthed together.
For children under five years of age, when accompanied by parent or guardian or sharing berth with an adult or an older child, no
charge will be made, except that children under five occupying seats at table will be charged as follows for meals:
Outside Room   inside Room
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William          $10.00 $8.00      ^
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie  5.00 4.00        >In Each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William   5.00 4.00       J
.       If a child under five occupies a berth by itself, adult meals and berth rates will be charged. It will not be required to pay anything
for transportation.
A Indicates Upper Berth;     B Lower Berth;*;    C Sofa Berth; ^^W indicates Wardrobe.
Upper and Lower berths equipped with spring-filled mattresses.
UPPER DECK—Each room except 1, 4, 5 and 6 has two berths and one sofa berth. Room 1
has four berths and a long seat Rooms 4 and 5 have two berths and a long seat. Room 6
is De Luxe Room with twin beds and private bathroom,
MAIN DECK—All Inside Rooms except 101 and 149 have two berths and a long seat; Rooms
101 and 149 have two berths and a short seat only.
Each Outside Room except 166, 168, 171, 173, 175 and 177 has two berths and ore®
sofa berth; Rooms 168 and 177 are De Luxe Rooms with double bed, sofa berth and
private bathroom. Rooms 166, 171, 173 and 175 are De Luxe Rooms with twin beds
and private bathroom;.
AUTOMOBILE RATES
Automobiles accompanied by one or more passengers paying regular normal first class adult passage fare (see Note), and not
Intended for sale, delivery, or demonstrating purposes, will be carried on Great Lakes Steamships on payment of the following charges:-""
NOTE.—This applies also for one or more passengers paying regular Commercial Travellers' first class passage fare.
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William j     $27.00    \
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie       16.00     >ln Each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William       16.00    J
Moderate charges for motorcycles, also for automobile trailers or house cars, according to over-all length.
Reservations for space for automobiles, trailers or house cars, etc., should be made in advance, and delivery at port of embarkation
should be made at least one hour in advance of sailing time. It is not necessary that tanks be drained of gasoline.
Refunds cannot be arranged unless automobile space is cancelled at least three hours before sailing from any port.
BAGGAGE ^ Jg
150 lbs. of baggage will be carried free on each adult ticket and 75 lbs. on each half ticket. Steamer trunks not more than 14 inches
in height may be placed in staterooms. Passengers will find it more convenient to allow trunks to be placed in the baggage room on
board where they can be made readily accessible if desired, unless bonded.
(2)
(FOR FURTHER INFORMATION SEE YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR NEAREST CANADIAN PACIFIC OFFICE)
FARES AND CHARGES ARE SHOWN HEREIN FOR INFORMATION jONLY AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
(3)
 "Inland-Sea"
CRUISES
by
SS. "ASSINIBOIA" and SS "KEEWATIN"
PORT McNICOLL —
AND RETURN
FORT WILLIAM
(June 13 through September 5)
SPECIAL ALL-EXPENSE FARES
INSIDE ROOM—$80.00
OUTSIDE ROOM—$90.00
Include
Passage, Port McNicoll—Fort William
and return:
Berth and meals aboard ship:
Hotel room and meals in
Fort William.
GREAT   LAKES   HOLIDAY
Within the usual summer vacation limits pleasant and
interesting holidays can be planned with the
Canadian Pacific Great Lakes service as a basis.
Sailing on Saturday by the Assinoboia, a pleasant itinerary
can include time in Port Arthur and Fort William
with visits to He Royale and Kakabeka Falls; Kenora for
the Lake of the Woods and Devil's Gap Lodge;
the great city of Winnipeg and the famous beaches on
Lake Winnipeg; returning by the same ship
on the second Tuesday.
For visits to the East, the Canadian Pacific Great Lakes liner
Keewatin offers a similar opportunity. Departure
from Winnipeg Friday night lands the holiday-maker
in Port McNicoll ready to include Bala and the
Muskoka Lakes in an Eastern visit to Toronto, Niagara Falls,
and the famous Peach Belt. The return trip can be
made by either liner.
These itineraries can be extended by using ship in one
direction and train along the spectacular North
Shore of Lake Superior on the return journey which
may also include stopovers at fishing points along the
North Shore and famous French River.
TIME  TABLE  and   ITINERARY
STEAMSHIPS "ASSINIBOIA" AND "KEEWATIN"
WESTBOUND
lv. Toronto	
Ar. Port McNicoll.
Train No. 703
1.00 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday
4.15 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday
"Assiniboia"
Lv. Port McNicoll  ET Saturday
Ar. Sault Ste. Marie  Sunday
Lv. Sault Ste. Marie  Sunday
Ar. Port Arthur  Monday
Ar. Fort William  ET Monday
Lv. Fort William.
Ar. Winnipeg	
4.30 p.m.
11.00 a.m.
12 noon
7.00 a.m.
8.15 a.m.
Train No. 1
7.50 a.m. CT
7.45 p.m. CT
"Keewatin"
Wednesday
Thursday
Thursday
Friday
Friday
EASTBOUND
Lv. Winnipeg. . .
Ar. Fort William.
Train No. 4
7.30 p.m. CT
5.45 a.m. CT
"Assiniboia"
4.00 p.m.
5.15 p.m.
Lv. Fort William  ET Tuesday
Lv. Port Arthur  Tuesday
Ar. Sault Ste. Marie  Wednesday    12.15 p.m.
Lv. Sault Ste. Marie  Wednesday     2.00 p.m.
Ar. Port McNicoll  ET Thursday
"Keewatin"
Saturday
Saturday
Sunday
Sunday
8.30 a.m.    Monday
Lv. Port McNicoll.
Ar. Toronto	
Train No. 704
8.45 a.m. ET Monday, Thursday
11.50 a.m. ET Monday, Thursday
EQUIPMENT
Train No. 703
Coaches Toronto-Port McNicoll
Parlor Cars Toronto-Port McNicoll
Train No. 1
Coaches Fort William-Winnipeg
Parlor car (Monday and Friday) Fort William-Winnipeg
Meal Service Fort William-Winnipeg
Train No. 4
Coaches Winnipeg-Fort William
♦Sleeping Cars Winnipeg-Fort William
(occupancy at Fort William until 9.00 a.m. ET)
Train No. 704
Coaches Port McNicoll-Toronto
Parlor Cars Port McNicoll-Toronto
EXPLANATION   OF   SIGNS
ET—Eastern Time CT—Central Time
♦Placed at ship's side Sailing Days.
FOR TRAIN SERVICE BETWEEN WINNIPEG AND VANCOUVER CONSULT CURRENT TIME TABLE FOLDERS
(4)
5345
 ~l
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
Canadian  Pacific
GREAT LAKES
Steamship  Service
SUMMER 1940
First  trip   from  Port  McNicoll   and  Fort William  June 15
between PORT McNICOLL - SAULT STE. MARIE
PORT ARTHUR      -       FORT WILLIAM
via GEORGIAN BAy - LAKE HURON - ST. MARY'S RIVER
WHITEFISH BAY  -   LAKE SUPERIOR  -  THUNDER BAY
Whether you take a Great Lakes cruise as a trip in itself, or as a delightful interlude in your rail journey across the continent, the voyage
between Port McNicoll and Fort William is memorable. During the summer, the great white ships of the Canadian Pacific provide a
westbound sailing FROM PORT McNICOLL EACH WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY and an eastbound sailing FROM FORT
WILLIAM AND PORT ARTHUR EACH TUESDAY AND SATURDAY. As an alternate route for the trans-Canada passenger,
a trip via the Great Lakes will prove most attractive and surprisingly inexpensive.
SOME FEATURES OF CANADIAN PACIFIC
GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIPS
"KEEWATIN" AND "ASSINIBOIA"
Clyde-built.
Highest class service and cuisine.
All rooms have running water; lights in each berth.
Each ship has seven attractive de luxe rooms with private bathrooms — five equipped with twin beds and two with double bed.
All public and private bathrooms have tile flooring, built-in bathtubs and showers.
Deck sports, including shuffleboard, bull board, deck quoits, bucket quoits and deck golf.
The Dancing and Observation Lounge — with large observation windows, lounge facilities and polished oak dance floor.
Orchestras for dancing and dinner music.
Barber, hairdresser, manicurist and valet service available.
SIGHTSEEING EXCURSIONS
Interesting sightseeing trips are available at Sault Ste.  Marie, Port Arthur and Fort William during stop-oven of
Canadian Pacific steamships.
(1)
 Steamships "KEEWATIN" and "ASSINIBOIA
//
S.S. "Keewatin
Captain J. P. PEARSON
Purser W. A. PAXTON
UPPER   DECK
"Assiniboia"
Captain. . . F. S. MIDDLETON
Purser P. HAMILTON
M7\IN   DECK
PASSENGER FARES — TRANSPORTATION, BERTHS AND MEALS
The Canadian Pacific S.S. "Keewatin" and S.S. "Assiniboia," link the rails of the transcontinental trip, and operate in passenger
service from June 15 to September 14. Through first class fares via the Great Lakes Steamships between Fort William and points west
thereof and Toronto and points reached through Toronto, are the same as by rail, and only a small additional amount will require to
be paid, as follows, for meals and berth on lake steamship, and separate meal and berth ticket obtained from Canadian Pacific Agent:
BERTH IN
Outside Room     Inside Room
       $10.00 $9.00
  5.00 4.50
^Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William.
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie.
5.00
4.50
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William	
* Includes following meals : —
WESTBOUND — Dinner alter embarking at Port McNicoll, and all meals up to and including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port Arthur or Fort William.
EASTBOUND — Lunch after embarking at Fort William or Port Arthur, and all meals up to and including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port McNicoll.
(Breakfast at attractive prices is served on board steamer at Fort William on morning of sailing).
in Each Direction
A indicates Upper Berth;     B Lower Berth;     C Sofa Berth;      W indicates Wardrobe.
UPPER DECK — Each room except 1, 4, 5 and 6 has two berths and one sofa berth. Room 1
has four berths and a long seat. Rooms 4 and 5 have two berths and a long seat. Room 6
is De Luxe Room with twin beds and private bathroom.
MAIN DECK — All Inside Rooms except 101 and 149 have two berths and a long seat; Rooms
101 and 149 have two berths and a short seat only.
Each Outside Room except 166,168,171,173,175 and 177 has two berths and one sofa
berth; Rooms 168 and 177 are De Luxe Rooms with double bed, sofa berth and private
bathroom. Rooms 166,171,173 and 175 are De Luxe Rooms with twin beds and private
bathroom.
PORT TO PORT PASSAGE FARES
First Class adults' fares : — One Way
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William  $24.25
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie      11.50
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William  12.75
Round Trip
$43.50
20.00
23.50
Meals and Berth
Extra, as shown
above.
Children five years or over and under twelve will be charged half fare and half the separate meal and berth charge, provided each
child shares a berth with an adult or two half fare children are berthed together.
For children under five years of age, when accompanied by parent or guardian or sharing berth with an adult or an older child, no
charge will be made, except that children under five occupying seats at table will be charged as follows for meals :
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William  $4.00    1
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie  2.00    \ In Each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William  2.00    J
If a child under five occupies a berth by itself, adult meal and berth rates will be charged.   It will not be required to pay anything
for transportation.
(2) (CONSULT ANY TICKET
CLYDE - BUILT
Speed  15 knots
Gross Tonnage  ..... 3880
Net Tonnage ...... 2486
Length  350 ft.
Breadth  43 ft.
Depth      15 ft.
DECKS:
Main, Upper and Sun Deck.
SPECIAL EXCURSIONS
Circle Cruises are operated during the season at attractively reduced, all-inclusive   fares;  in addition, bargain   excursions are
frequently operated, in each direction, between Toronto-Sault Ste. Marie, and between Fort William-Port Arthur and Soo.
REDUCED AUTOMOBILE RATES
Automobiles, accompanied by one or more passengers each holding valid first class ticket, will be carried
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William        $12.00    1
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie  7.00    } In Each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William  7.00    J
Moderate charges for automobile trailers or house cars, according to overall length.
Reservations for space for automobiles, trailers or house cars should be made in advance, and delivery at port of embarkation should
be made at least one hour in advance of sailing time.
It is not necessary that tanks be drained of gasoline.
BAGGAGE
150 lbs. of baggage will be carried free on each adult ticket and 75 lbs. on each half ticket.      Steamer trunks not more than 14
inches in height may be placed in staterooms.    Passengers will find it more convenient to allow trunks to  be placed in the baggage
room on board where they can be made readily accessible if desired, unless bonded.
AGENT FOR FULL INFORMATION) (3)
 1940 SAILINGS and ITINERARY-STEAMSHIPS "KEEWATIN" and "ASSINIBOIA"
with connecting train services
WESTBOUND
STEAMER
EASTBOUND
Lv.
PORT McNICOLL
(5.00 pm)
SAULT STE. MARIE
(Ar. 11.30 am)
(Lv. 12.30 pm)
PORT ARTHUR
(Ar. 6.45 am)
FORT WILLIAM
(Ar. 7.50 am)
Lv. FORT WILLIAM
(12.00 noon)
Lv. PORT ARTHUR
(1.30 pm)
SAULT STE. MARIE
(Ar. 9.30 am)
(Lv. 1.30 pm)
Ar.
PORT McNICOLL
(8.30 am)
Sat.       June     15
Wed.    June     19
Sat.       June     22
Wed.    June     26
Sat.       June     29
Wed.   July        3
Sat.       July        6
Wed.    July      10
Sat.       July      13
Wed.   July      17
Sat.       July      20
Wed.    July      24
Sat.       July      27
Wed.    July      31
Sat.       Aug.      3
Wed.    Aug.      7
Sat.       Aug.    10
Wed.    Aug.    14
Sat.       Aug.    17
Wed.    Aug.    21
Sat.       Aug.    24
Wed.    Aug.    28
Sat.       Aug.    31
Wed.    Sept.       4
Sat.       Sept.       7
Wed.    Sept.     11
Sat.       Sept.     14
Sun.      June     16
Thurs.   June     20
Sun.      June     23
Thurs.   June     27
Sun.      June     30
Thurs.   July        4
Sun.      July        7
Thurs.   July      11
Sun.      July      14
Thurs.   July      18
Sun.      July      21
Thurs.   July      25
Sun.      July      28
Thurs.    Aug.      1
Sun.      Aug.      4
Thurs.    Aug.      8
Sun.      Aug.    11
Thurs.    Aug.    15
Sun.      Aug.    18
Thurs.    Aug.    22
Sun.      Aug.    25
Thurs.    Aug.    29
Sun.      Sept.       1
Thurs.    Sept.       5
Sun.      Sept.       8
Thurs.   Sept.     12
Sun.      Sept.     15
Mon.    June     17
Fri.        June     21
Mon.    June     24
Fri.       June     28
Mon.    July        1
Fri.       July        5
Mon.    July        8
Fri.       July      12
Mon.    July      15
Fri.       July      19
Mon.    July      22
Fri.       July      26
Mon.    July      29
Fri.        Aug.      2
Mon.    Aug.       5
Fri.        Aug.      9
Mon.    Aug.    12
Fri.        Aug.    16
Mon.    Aug.    19
Fri.        Aug.    23
Mon.    Aug.    26
Fri.        Aug.    30
Mon.    Sept.       2
Fri.        Sept.       6
Mon.    Sept.       9
Fri.        Sept.     13
Mon.    Sept.     16
 .."KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
.... .."KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"...   ....
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
Sat.       June     15
Tue.      June     18
Sat.       June     22
Tue.      June     25
Sat.       June     29
Tue.      July        2
Sat.       July        6
Tue.      July        9
Sat.       July      13
Tue.      July      16
Sat.       July      20
Tue.      July      23
Sat.       July      27
Tue.      July      30
Sat.       Aug.      3
Tue.      Aug.      6
Sat.       Aug.    10
Tue.      Aug.    13
Sat.       Aug.    17
Tue.      Aug.    20
Sat.       Aug.    24
Tue.      Aug.    27
Sat.       Aug.    31
Tue.      Sept.       3
Sat.       Sept.       7
Tue.      Sept.     10
Sat.       Sept.     14
Sun.      June     16
Wed.    June     19
Sun.      June     23
Wed.    June     26
Sun.      June      30
Wed.    July        3
Sun.      July        7
Wed.    July      10
Sun.      July      14
Wed.    July      17
Sun.      July      21
Wed.    July      24
Sun.      July      28
Wed.    July      31
Sun.      Aug.      4
Wed.    Aug.      7
Sun.      Aug.    11
Wed.    Aug.    14
Sun.      Aug.    18
Wed.    Aug.    21
Sun.      Aug.    25
Wed.    Aug.    28
Sun.      Sept.       1
Wed.    Sept.       4
Sun.      Sept.       8
Wed.    Sept.     11
Sun.      Sept.     15
Mon.    June     17
Thurs.   June     20
Mon.    June     24
Thurs.   June     27
Mon.    July        1
Thurs.   July        4
Mon.    July        8
Thurs.   July      11
Mon.    July      15
Thurs.   July      18
Mon.    July      22
Thurs.   July      25
Mon.    July      29
Thurs.    Aug.      1
Mon.    Aug.      5
Thurs.    Aug.       8
Mon.    Aug.     12
Thurs.    Aug.    15
Mon.    Aug.    19
Thurs.    Aug.    22
Mon.    Aug.    26
Thurs.    Aug.    29
Mon.    Sept.       2
Thurs.    Sept.       5
Mon.    Sept.       9
Thurs.    Sept.     12
Mon.    Sept.     16
Before and after the regular Great Lakes passenger season,  as shown above, special sailings between Port McNicoll, Sault Ste. Marie and
Port Arthur and/or   Fort William are frequently arranged to provide for freight shipments.     Passengers will be accommodated on such
sailings, when space is available.
WESTBOUND
Lv.  Toronto	
Ar. Port McNicoll	
Lv. PORT McNICOLL.
Ar. SAULT STE. MARIE
Lv. SAULT STE. MARIE
Ar. PORT ARTHUR .
Ar. FORT WILLIAM.
Lv.  Fort William.
Ar. Winnipeg. ..
Ar. Calgary	
Ar. Banff	
Ar. Vancouver...
C.P. S.S.^ Special
Steamship
C.P.R. train
1.30 pm E.T.
4.40 pm E.T.
5.00 pm E.T.
11.30 am E.T.
12.30 pm E.T.
6.45 am E.T.
7.50 am E.T.
(6.50 am CT.)
(See Note A)
No. 1
8.00 am
8.00pm
10.15pm
1.35 am
10.30pm
No. 3
10.05pm
9.00 am
7.50am
11.10am
8.35 am
No. 7
10.25pm
9.20 am
8.45 am
11.40 am
8.55 am
CT.
CT.
M.T.
M.T.
P. T.
Wed. Sat.
Thu.   Sun.
Fri.     Mon.
Daily
EASTBOUND
Standard Time governing rail and steamship schedules: E.T. - Eastern Time;
Lv.   Vancouver.	
Lv.   Banff	
Lv.   Calgary.	
Lv.   Winnipeg	
Ar. Fort William	
Lv. FORT WILLIAM...
Lv. PORT ARTHUR....
Ar. SAULT STE. MARIE
Lv. SAULT STE. MARIE
Ar. PORT McNICOLL..
Lv.   Port McNicoll (Dock)
Ar. Toronto	
CT. - Central Time;    M.T.
C.P.R. train
Steamship
CP. S.S.t Special
■ Mountain Time;
(See Note B)
No.4
7.15pm
5.35pm
8.15pm
6.45pm
5.25am
No. 8
7.35pm
[6.15 pm
(8.55pm
7.05pm
5.45
P. T.
M.T.
M.T.
CT.
CT.
12.00 n'n E.T.
1.30 pm E.T.
9.30 am E.T.
1.30 pm E.T.
8.30 am E.T.
8.45 am E.T.
11.30 am E.T.
P.T. - Pacific Time
Daily
Sat.     Tue.
Sun.    Wed,
Mon. Thu.
NOTE A : —
TRAIN No. 1 :
Connects with steamers arriving Fort William.
During July and August, on arrival days of steamers at Fort William, air-conditioned
standard sleeper is operated through to Banff, where car is parked for occupancy
until 8.00 a.m. On same days, air-conditioned dining car is operated from Fort
William to Winnipeg.
Cafe-Parlor car carried from Fort William to Calgary.
Observation-Lounge car operated Fort William to Winnipeg, on arrival days of
steamers.
Also carries coaches and  ourist sleeper Fort William to Vancouver.
TRAIN No. 3:
June 23 to September 8 (ex Fort William) — carries only coaches, tourist sleepers
and diner.    Balance of year, carries all classes of equipment.
TRAIN No. 7:
Operates June 23 to September 8 (ex Fort William) only. Carries standard
sleepers and diner.   (No coaches or tourist sleepers).
NOTE B : —
TRAIN No. 4;
June 23 to September 7 (ex Vancouver) — carries only coaches,,
tourist sleepers and diner. Balance of year, carries all classes of equipment.
TRAIN No. 8:
Operates June 23 to September 7 (ex Vancouver) only. Carries
standard sleepers and diner.   (No coaches or tourist sleepers).
Occupancy al Fort William until 8.00 a.m. in air-conditioned Winnipeg*
Fort William sleeper, operated daily. r
Breakfast at attractive prices, is served on board steamer at Fort William
on morning of sailing.
Coaches and air-conditioned Parlor Cars operated in Steamship Special train between Toronto and Port McNicoll.
SEE CURRENT TIME TABLE FOLDERS FOR PARTICULARS OF EQUIPMENT OPERATED AND" COMPLETE TRAIN SERVICE
(4)
  Great Lakes Steamship Service
Canadian Pacific Railway
DIAGRAM OF STEAMSHIPS "ASSINIBOIA" AND "KEEWATIN"
r
MAIN DECK
UPPER DECK.—All Rooms except 1 and 5 have three berths each.   Room 1 has four berths and a long seat.   Room 5 has two
berths and a long seat.
MAIN    DECK.—All Inside Rooms except 101 and 149 have two berths and a long seat; Rooms 101 and 149 have two berths and a
short seat only.
All Outside Rooms except 166, 168, 171, 173 and 175 have three berths each.
Rooms 166, 168, 171, 173 and 175 are Parlor Rooms with bathroom attached.
Room 177 has three berths with bathroom attached.
SAILINGS
-Sault Ste. Marie—Port Arthur—Fort William Service
Through Tickets may only be issued commencing and ending with—
First Trip Westbound from Port McNicoll, May 23 Last Trip Westbound, September 26, 1931
First Trip Eastbound from Fort William, May 23 Last Trip Eastbound, September 26,  1931
Steamships "Keewatin" and "Assiniboia" do not carry any second class passengers
Port McNicoll-
Steamships  "Keewatin"  and  "Assiniboia"
WESTBOUND (Read Down)
Sat.
Wed.
12.30 p.m. E.T
3.40 p.m.     "
4.00 p.m.     "
Sun.
Thurs.
10.30 a.m.     "
12.00 noon    "
Mon.
Fri.
6.30 a.m.
8.00 a.m.     "
A7.30a.m.  C.l
A6.35 p.m.     "
Lv. TORONTO (Union) Rail
Ar. PORT McNICOLL   "   .
Lv. PORT McNICOLL S.S.... Ar.
Ar. SAULT STE. MARIE. . .  "   .
Lv. SAULT STE. MARIE ..."   .
Ar. PORT ARTHUR   "   .
Ar. FORT WILLIAM    "   .
Lv. FORT WILLIAM Rail.
Ar. WINNIPEG   "   .
EASTBOUND (Read Up)
Ar.
11.15 a.m. E.T.
Mon.
Fri.
Lv.
8.20 a.m.    "
"
"
Ar.
8.00 a.m.    "
"
"
Lv.
1.00 p.m.    "
Sun.
Thurs.
Ar.
9.00 a.m.    "
"
"
Lv.
1.30 p.m.    "
Sat.
Wed.
Lv.
Ar.
12.30 p.m.    "
®10.00a.m. CT.
(<
<«
Lv.
^lO.OO p.m.    "
Fri.
Tues.
'June 26 to Aug. 10. Boat Special leaves Fort William 7.30 a.m. Fridays and Mondays and connects at Winnipeg with train 1, "The
Imperial."    Prior to June 26 and after Aug. 10 train 1, "The Imperial," will be held for connection with steamer.
0June 12 to Sept. 4. Boat Special leaves Winnipeg 10.00 p.m. Fridays and Tuesdays. Prior to June 12 and after Sept. 4 passengers
leave Winnipeg by train 4, "The Dominion," at 6.30 p.m. Passengers may board steamer after 3.00 p.m. at Port McNicoll and 10.00 a.m
at Fort William.    E.T. Eastern time.    CT. Central Time.
Owen Sound—Sault Ste. Marie—-Port Arthur—Fort William Service
Through Tickets may only be issued during season of navigation commencing and ending with—
First Trip Westbound from Owen Sound, May 4 Last Trip Westbound, September 21,  1931
First Trip Eastbound from Fort William, May 7 Last Trip Eastbound,   September 26, 1931
Steamship "Manitoba"
WESTBOUND
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
5.10 p.m. E.T.
9.40 p.m. "
9.40 p.m. "
4.40 p.m. "
4.40 p.m. "
1.30 p.m. "
2.30 p.m.
A8.50 p.m.
8.15 a.m.
CT
Lv. TORONTO (Union) Rail. . .  Ar.
Ar. OWEN SOUND    "   ...Lv.
Lv. OWEN SOUND S.S Ar.
Ar. SAULT STE. MARIE....   "   . ...Lv.
Lv. SAULT STE. MARIE ... .   "   . . . Ar.
Ar. PORT ARTHUR    "   ...Lv.
Ar. FORT WILLIAM    "   ... Lv.
Lv. FORT WILLIAM Rail. . . Ar.
Ar. WINNIPEG    "   ./..Lv.
EASTBOUND
11.20 a.m.
7.00 a.m.
6.00 a.m.
10.30 a.m.
10.30 a.m.
1.00 p.m.
12.00 noon
5.50 a.m.
©6.30 p.m.
E.T.
CT.
Saturday
a
n
Friday
Thursday
<<
Wednesday
A Connection, westbound, at Fort William, train 3, "The Dominion."   Eastbound, at Fort William, train 4, "The Dominion."    Passengers
may board steamer after 10.00 a.m. at Fort William.    E.T. Eastern time.   CT. Central time.
m
Printed in Canada
1931
  Great Lakes Steamship Service
Canadian Pacific Railway
S.S.
"Assiniboia"
Dining Room S.S. "Keewatin"
Lounge S.S. "Assiniboia"
 Great Lakes Steamship Service
Canadian Pacific Railway
Easy Transfer
Port McNicoll
S.S. "Keewatin" Breezing Along!
On Sunny Decks'"
L
 Great Lakes Steamship Service
Canadian Pacific Railway
N crossing Canada, about one-fifth of the total mileage may be spent in a delightful trip through the Great
Lakes without additional cost to the traveller.
The Canadian Pacific S.S. "Keewatin" and S.S. "Assiniboia," that link up the rails of the transcontinental trip, operate from May 24 to September 27, both dates inclusive.   Through fares via the Great
Lakes Steamships between Fort William and points west thereof and Toronto and points reached through
Toronto, are the same as by all rail, but additional amounts will require to be paid as follows for meals
and berth on lake steamship, and separate meal and berth ticket obtained from Canadian Pacific Agent:—
Between Port McNicoll or Owen Sound and Fort William   $10.00
Between Port McNicoll or Owen Sound and Sault Ste. Marie       5.00
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Fort William       5.00
Children five years or over and under twelve will be charged half fare and half the separate meal and berth
charge, provided each child shares a berth with an adult or two half fare children are berthed together.
For children under five years of age, when accompanied by parent or guardian or sharing berth with an adult
or an older child, no charge will be made, except that children under five occupying seats at table will be charged as
follows for meals:
Between Port McNicoll or Owen Sound and Fort William     $4.00
Between Port McNicoll or Owen Sound and Sault Ste. Marie       2.00
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Fort William         2.00
(a) If a child under five occupies a berth by itself it must be charged full meal and berth rate of $10.00 between Port McNicoll (or Owen Sound) and Fort William, or $5.00 between Port McNicoll (or Owen Sound) and
Sault Ste. Marie or between Sault Ste. Marie and Fort William. It will not be required to pay anything for transportation.
(b) Two children under five occupying a berth together will be charged the same as one child under five—
see clause (a) above—and for the second child, if occupying a seat at the table, the amount stated in Section 2 according to distance.    No charge for transportation.
(c) Two children under five travelling in same party will not be given separate berths even on payment as per
clause (a).
(d) One child between five and twelve travelling on a half-fare ticket will require to pay half the meal and berth
rate shown in Section 3, clause (a), if sharing berth with an adult or a child of twelve years or over.
(e) Two children between five and twelve berthed together and each holding half fare ticket, will require to pay
one full meal and berth charge as shown in Section 3, clause (a).
(f) If one child between five and twelve holding half-fare ticket occupies a berth by itself or shares it with a
child under five years of age it will require to pay full meal and berth rate of $10.00 or $5.00 according to distance
travelled—except that a child of half fare age (i.e., between five and twelve) in three-berth room with two adults will
be required to pay only half the full meal and berth charge, according to the distance travelled.
Automobiles, accompanied by one or more passengers each paying full first class fare, will be carried:
Between Port McNicoll or Owen Sound and Fort William   $25.00
Between Port McNicoll or Owen Sound and Sault Ste. Marie     16.25
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Fort William     15.00
It is not necessary that tanks be drained of gasoline. The limit of height of automobiles for ready handling
is 6 feet  1 inch, but cars in excess of this are handled by deflating the tires or removing them entirely.
Life on board the "Keewatin" and her sister ship, the "Assiniboia," is conducive to full enjoyment of the
panoramas that nature unfolds. The dining saloons, that extend the width of the boats, are provided with large
plate glass windows, and diners are served a fresh view with each course of the meal. There is an abundance of
deck space for promenading, especially on the boat deck, while the verandah cafe with its piano provides for dancing.
These vessels offer accommodation equal in style and beauty to the ocean liner. Large and airy cabins, a
delightful ladies' ordinary, large and finely fitted up smoking rooms and the verandah cafe, where afternoon tea is
served, are features of the vessels.   A number of rooms are fitted with shower baths.
The passenger equipment is of the most sumptuous character. The main and upper decks are furnished for
the accommodation of 300 first-class passengers, and aft of the main entrance in each ship are five cabins de luxe,
which may be obtained at small additional cost. The drawing rooms are tastefully finished in white enamel and gold,
while the dining rooms are framed in American walnut and with Circassian walnut panels.
The huge rectangular bevelled glass windows, with large dome skylight overhead, give excellent light and
ventilation. The smoking rooms on the after end of the deck-house are tastefully designed and framed in light oak,
with carved panels.
No trouble at ports, no transfer charges or waiting—trains at Owen Sound, Port McNicoll and Fort William
run alongside ships. Hand baggage transferred by ship's crews. Checked baggage handled through, or may be
claimed for use on shipboard and rechecked before disembarking.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., and Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., are on opposite sides of the St. Mary's River, which is
about half a mile wide at that point. The Canadian Pacific Great Lakes Steamships use the Canadian Soo Canal
and dock on the Canadian side of the river, but passengers who hold tickets for Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., and their
baggage are transferred free of charge to the ferry dock and thence by ferry across the river. Passengers purchasing
tickets for Sault Ste. Marie should be asked whether their actual destination is Sault Ste. Marl3, Ont., or Sault Ste.
Marie, Mich., and their tickets made to read accordingly.
Passengers should be told if they desire to stop over at Sault Ste. Marie to inform the Purser.
Parlor cars are attached to trains shown on inside of title page between Toronto and Owen Sound, and Toronto
and Port McNicoll. Parlor and Dining Cars on day trains between Fort William and Winnipeg. Sleeping and
Dining Cars on night trains between Fort William and Winnipeg.
E. F. L. STURDEE, H. R. MATHEWSON, GEO. A. WALTON,
General Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent,
Vancouver, B.C Winnipeg, Man. Montreal, Que.
L_
 0^*pw,F,CM,uwy«>««,*y
US
pxtakinzt ffimxx
Orange Juice Tomato Juice
Stewed Prunes Half Grapefruit
Rolled Oats Cream of Wheat Bran Flakes
Shredded Wheat Corn Flakes Grape Nuts
 o	
Fried Lake Fish
Ham Bacon
Omelette Eggs to order
French Fried Potatoes
 o	
Corn Bread Toast
Griddle Cakes
Honey Marmalade Jam Maple Syrup
Tea Coffee Cocoa
S.S. Keewatin
 CANADIAN   PACIFIC   HOTELS
FROM SEA TO SEA
• THE DIGBY PINES   -      -
• LAKESIDE INN - - -
CORNWALLIS INN -      -
• THE ALGONQUIN - <
McADAM HOTEL - -
CHATEAU FRONTENAC
THE ROYAL YORK -      <
• DEVIL'S GAP LODGE    *
THE ROYAL ALEXANDRA
THE SASKATCHEWAN -
THE  PALLISER -      '      -
• BANFF SPRINGS HOTEL
• CHATEAU LAKE LOUISE
• EMERALD LAKE CHALET
THE EMPRESS    '     *      *
'    Digby, N.S.
Yarmouth, N.S.
>      -      -      Kentville, N.S.
St. Andrews By-The-Sea, N.B.
'     McAdam,   N.B.
Quebec,   Que.
Toronto,   Ont.
' Kenora, Ont.
'    Winnipeg, Man.
' Regina, Sask.
Calgary, Alta.
'    Banff, Alta.
' Lake Louise, Alta.
*      -      -      Field, B.C.
' Victoria, B.C.
HOTEL VANCOUVER Vancouver, B.C.
(Operated  by the  Vancouver Hotel Company  Limited,  on  behalf of the Canadian  Pacific
and Canadian National Railway Companies.)
* These Hotels are open in Summer only.
 DINNER
Grapefruit Juice Fruit  Cocktail V-8 Vegetable Juice
Celery Sticks Queen Olives
Cheese Straws
Mulligatawny Consomme Royal
Poached  Lake Superior  Fish, Creole Sauce
Boiled  Canadian  Ham, Cabbage
Roast Sirloin of Beef  au Jus,  Horseradish
Roast Leg  of Lamb, Mint Sauce
Sliced Tomatoes Combination Salad Sliced  Cucumbers
Mayonnaise or French  Dressing
Boiled or Mashed  Potatoes Fresh Vegetables   in Season
Steamed Suet Pudding, Vanilla Sauce
Butterscotch  Pie Scotch Shortbread
Ice Cream Fresh  Fruits
Cheddar Cheese Stilton Cheese
Tea Milk Coffee
Bouillon will be served from 10.00 to 10.30 a.m. and Afternoon
Tea will be served from 4.00 to 4.30 p.m. in the OBSERVATION ROOM
of the PROMENADE DECK AFT.
Night   Lunches  served  to  staterooms  on   request.     Menu Card
available from  Bell  Boy.
 The Mounted"
The scarlet coat of "The Mounted" has been the symbol of law,
order and justice to Canadians since 1 873, twelve years4>efore
Canada's first transcontinental railway, the Canadian Pacific,
was built. In the western plains, during the 1 898
gold rush to the Yukon, and across the Dominion, the history
of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has been one of
tenacity, endurance and high courage. Organized as the
North-West Mounted Police, armed with horse, lance and
carbine to handle Indian unrest and protect settlers in the
North-West Territories, the Force maintained order during
the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway across the
Prairies. In 1904 the name of the Force became the
Royal North-West Mounted Police.
In 1918 it was entrusted with the enforcement of Dominion
legislation for Western Canada. In 1920 this jurisdiction
was extended to the whole of Canada, and the name was
changed to Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Headquarters
was transferred from Regina, still the Dominion Training Centre,
to Ottawa. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police
today enforces the laws against smuggling by land,
sea and air, is responsible for the suppression of traffic in
narcotic drugs and exercises supervision over aliens. Use is
made of every known scientific aid to police protection in
its well-equipped laboratories.
Just as "The Mounted" played an heroic part in the carving
out of a new democracy on the western frontier so, today,
it plays its part in the preservation of that democracy at home.
The smart constable pictured overleaf on the steps of the West Block
of the Parliament Buildings at Ottawa is as characteristic of the
Dominion as is the Peace Tower in the centre of the colour photograph.
1959
 $%T*™1W$**^
A CITY GREAT IN MANUFACTURING. TRADING AND FINANCE
CAPITAL OF THE WEALTHY PROVINCE OF ONTARIO
AND "QUEEN CITY" OF CANADA
 "GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIP SPECIAL5'
BREAKFAST
A  LA  CARTE
Berries with Cream  35 Chilled Cantaloupe (Half) 30
Orange Juice  35 Sliced Orange  20
Bananas, Whole (Two)  25 Orange, Whole  15
Stewed Prunes with Cream   30 Stewed Rhubarb  25
Baked Okanagan Apple  15 with Cream  .25 Sliced Banana with Cream.  25
CEREALS WITH MILK  20    WITH CREAM   30
FISH
Fish Cakes   40   with Bacon   50
Smoked Lake Winnipeg Goldeyes  70
Grilled Lake Superior Whitefish or Trout, Maitre d'Hotel  .70
FROM THE GRILL
Sirloin Steak 1.50 Small Sirloin Steak 1.00
Broiled Ham  65 Lamb Chops (I) 45   (2)  85
Bacon (3 Strips) 35    (6 Strips)  65 One Strip Bacon when served with other orders I 5
SPECIALS
Buttered Mushrooms on Toast  75
Calf's Liver with Bacon...;   65
Griddle Cakes with Bacon 70
Fried Tomatoes with Bacon  60
Corned Beef Hash with Poached Egg  65
WholeWheat or Raisin Bread French Toast   30   with Canadian Honey..:  55
ROUT
EUR
2 Di
I
SHEL1
SOUVENIR COPY OF THIS MENU CARD IN ENVELOPE READY FOR M,
 Canadian Pacific
Great Lakes Service
 STEAMSHIP  "ASSINIBOIA"
Length 350 feet
Clyde Built
3925   Gross   Tons
Breadth 43 feet 8 inches
Speed  15 Knots
Depth 26 feet 9 inches
E.    H.    RIDD,   COMMANDER
G.    A.    GERVAIS J.   L.    DELAHEY
Chief Engineer First Officer
M.   C.   TRACEY E.  J.  CADEAU
Purser Chief Steward
S.  F.  MALIN, Superintendent
THE   GREAT    LAKES |
The five "Great Lakes" of the North American Continent
are really fresh water inland seas. Drained ultimately by the
St.   Lawrence   River   into  the  Atlantic  Ocean.
Their  size  and   height  above  sea   level   is  as  follows:
Height above
Length Breadth Area Sea   Level
Miles Miles Sq.   Miles Feet
Superior           354 162 31,800 602
Michigan         316 118 22,400 581
Huron          207 101 23,200 581
Erie         239 59 10,000 572
Ontario         193 53 7,260 246
The drop in elevation, as will be seen from the above, is
most marked from Superior to Huron (21 feet) and from Erie to
Ontario (326 feet). The former is overcome by the Soo Canal
and the latter by the Welland Canal.
Parlor Car or Sleeping Car Reservations can be made
at the Purser's Office.
Applications should be made before reaching Sault Ste. Marie.
DECK SPORTS—Sun Deck
Shuffle Board, Bull Board, Deck Quoits
Souvenir copy of this Menu Card and envelope ready for mailing may be had
on  application  to  Chief Steward.
 EGGS, OMELETS, ETC.
BOILED   (one)  20    (two)   35 POACHED  ON  TOAST   (one)  20   (two)..— 40
FRIED   (ONE)  20    (TWO)   35 SCRAMBLED ..  35
BACON AND FRIED EGGS  65 HAM AND FRIED EGGS  65
OMELETS:  PLAIN    45 TOMATO OR CHEESE    50 HAM,   SPANISH  OR  BACON    60
BRITISH COLUMBIA POTATOES
FRENCH   FRIED,   LYONNAISE OR   HASHED  BROWNED 	
BREAD AND BUTTER SERVICE PER PERSON
RAISIN   BRAN   MUFFINS._  15 CREAM   TOAST  40
TOAST     15 WHITE  AND  GRAHAM   ROLLS    15
RY-KRISP   HEALTH   BREAD    15 RAISIN   BREAD  TOAST    15
MILK  TOAST._ _  30 HOT  BISCUITS   15
WHITE,   HOVIS,  WHOLE WHEAT AND  RAISIN   BREAD   15
PRESERVED FRUITS, MARMALADES, JAMS OR JELLIES 25
(in individual jars)
STRAWBERRIES                       CHERRIES                       RASPBERRIES PINEAPPLE
QUINCE JELLY                                               BRAMBLEBERRY JELLY CRABAPPLE JELLY
STRAWBERRY JAM RASPBERRY JAM
ORANGE OR  GRAPE  FRUIT   MARMALADE
GRIDDLE CAKES  WITH  CANADIAN   MAPLE  SYRUP 35
PRESERVED  FIGS 40   WITH   WHOLE WHEAT BREAD TOAST   55
INDIVIDUAL CANADIAN  COMB  OR  STRAINED  HONEY 25   WITH   HOT  BISCUITS   35
TEA, COFFEE, ETC.
COFFEE,  POT 25   (served with hot milk or cream)
TEA, POT  25 HORLICK'S   MALTED  MILK  20
COCOA,  POT   25 NESTLE'S   MILK  FOOD. .  25
INSTANT  POSTUM  25 INDIVIDUAL  SEALED  BOTTLE   MILK 15
TT is with pleasure and pride that we call attention to the TX7HEREVER  you   travel   on   the   Canadian
desire and willingness of all our employees to give their 'Pacific, you will find the same desire  to
utmost in service and special attention, and they as well maintain that excellence of service for which
as ourselves would appreciate your criticism as well as the Company has been noted for over forty
your commendations. years.
IT will be a great aid to the service and will avoid any possibility of mistakes if passengers will
*■ kindly ask for meal order blanks, and upon them will write their orders, because stewards
and waiters are not allowed to serve any food without a meal check.
W. A. Cooper, Manager, Sleeping, Dining, Parlor Cars,
Station Restaurants and News Service, Montreal.
MLING  MAY BE HAD ON APPLICATION   TO   DINING   CAR  STEWARD
 Toronto
Toronto is the focal point, tlie very
heart of the industrial, commercial and financial
activities of the Province of Ontario. More than
half the manufactured products of Canada, and 26
per cent of Canada's field crops, come from that
province.
But Toronto is a distributing centre of more than
provincial importance. Her commerce extends to
all these enormous territories, east and west, reached
by Canadian Pacific. The products of her factories
go beyond Canada's shores to the markets of i        jrld.
Toronto has immense manufacturing „ablish-
ments, large and ^mall, numbering over three tb usand,
and some of the largest cotiimercial houses ana banks
in the Dominion. With its towering sky scrapers
and imposing buildings, the city is distinctively
North American in the intensity of its activity and
energy; through its crowded streets throbs continually
a vast hum of business. Its harbor accommodation
is on a magnificent scale.
Toronto is also a centre of culture and learning.
Its universities and other educational institutions are
widely known; its charming residential districts, its
art galleries, libraries, churches and theatres very
effectively support its title of "Queen City". Nor
must Toronto's famous "Fair" be omitted from this
brief chronicle.
Founded towards the end of the eighteenth
century, Toronto owed its growth to the immigration
of United Empire Loyalists; and it was their sturdy
patriotism, and the undaunted tenacity of their descendants, that transformed Ontario from a wilderness
into what it is now, the most populous province of
Canada.
So widespread are her activities that transportation which "Spans the world" has become a vital factor
in Toronto's future. There is a bond of common interest linking the activities of the Queen City with
the greatest of the world's carriers—the
Canadian Pacific
 ;
7
•-
'■"...
■■■y.. y.  v.ftft'yft;
• 7"f ffs«||| ,ft||||;;g| ;i
ift^spliHKft:
.I
 Length 3,50 feet
STEAMSHIP "KEEWATIN"
Clyde Built
3,880 Gross Tons
Breadth 43 feet 8 inches      Depth 26 feet 9 inches
Speed 15 Knots
R.   JARMAN,   COMMANDER
W.  F.   IRVINE
Chief   Engineer
WM.  A.  PAXTON
PURSfcR
WM.    H.   KIRKWOOD
First Officer
H. W. ARBOUR
Chief Steward
JOSEPH BISHOP, Superintendent
THE GREAT LAKES
The five "Great Lakes" of the North American Continent
are really fresh water inland seas. Drained ultimately by the
St.   Lawrence   River  into  the  Atlantic  Ocean.
Their size and height above sea level is as follows:
Height above
Length     Breadth Area Sea Level
Miles Miles        Sq. Miles Feet
Superior.    354 162 31,800 602
Michigan    316 118 22,400 581
Huron    207 101 23,200 581
Erie.    239 59 10,000 572
Ontario    193 53 7,260 246
The drop in elevation, as will be seen from the above, is
most marked from Superior to Huron (21 feet) and from Erie
to Ontario (326 feet). The former is overcome by the Soo
Canal and the latter by the Welland Canal.
Parlor Car or Sleeping Car Reservations can be made
at the Purser's Office.
Application should be made before reaching Sault Ste,  Marie
DECK SPORTS—Sun Deck
Shuffle Board,   Bull Board,   Deck Quoits
Souvenir copy of this Menu Card and envelope ready for mailing
may be had on application to Chief Steward
The Wine and Beverage Card may be obtained from the Waiter
 LUNCHEON
Chilled Tomato Juice Sardines on Toast
Pickled New Beets Rose Radishes
Thick Ox Tail Soup Clear Consomme
Fried Superior Fish, Saratoga Chips
Individual Chicken Pie
Spaghetti with Tomato
Grilled Loin Steak, Mushroom Sauce
Assorted Cold Meats with Potato Salad
Sliced Tomatoes Head Lettuce
French or Mayonnaise Dressing
Baked Jacket or Boiled Potatoes
Cornflake Custard Pudding
Chocolate Cream Pie Compote of Pears
Ice Cream with Cake Cream Cheese
Canadian Cheese
Tea   or   Coffee
 ft/     ■     '    ■-        '    7;
teJL mm
The Great Lakes flotilla of the Canadian Pacific, S.S.
Assiniboia, S.S. Keewatin and S.S. Manitoba, ply romantic
and historic waters every summer season.
Every voyage is a cruise, and each makes an interesting
break in the transcontinental railway journey. Wherever
you go from the Great Lakes ports, Fort William, Port
McNicoll or Owen Sound, Canadian Pacific has a vaca-
tionland  awaiting  you.
Westward are the great prairies, the sunny Pacific
Coast, Alaska! And, another welcome break in your
journey, Banff Springs Hotel, world-famous mountain
hostelry operated in the heart of the Canadian Rockies.
(Cover reproduced from a painting by Leonard Richmond.)
  Length 3.50 feet
STEAMSHIP "KEEWATIN'
Clyde Built
3,880 Gross Tons
Breadth 43 feet 8 inches
Speed 15 Knots
Depth 26 feet 9 inches
W.   F.   IRVINE
Chief   Engineer
WM.  A.   PAXTON
Purser
R. JARMAN,  Commander
WM.    H.    KIRKWOOD
First Officer
H. W.  ARBOUR
Chief Steward
JOSEPH BISHOP, Superintendent
MILEAGE
Between   Port  McNicoll   and   Detour  Light,   the
entrance to St. Mary's  River , , 223  miles
Between   Detour  Light   (through  the   Lower   St.
Mary's   River)   and   Sault   Ste.   Marie     47 miles
Between Sault Ste. Marie (through the famous "Soo
Locks")  and Port Arthur or Fort William... 272 miles
Total  mileage  between   Port  McNicoll  and  Port
Arthur  or  Fort  William ......542 mile?
Parlor Car or Sleeping Car Reservations can be made
at the Purser's Office.
Application should be made before reaching Sault Ste,  Marie
DECK SPORTS—Sun Deck
Shuffle Board,   Bull Board,   Deck Quoits
Souvenir copy of this Menu Card and envelope ready for mailing
may be had on application to Chief Steward
The Wine and Beverage Card may be obtained from the Waiter
 DINNER
V6 Vegetable Juice Chilled Apple  Juice
Salted Almonds
Queen Olives Green Onions
Consomme a la Legumes Veal Mulligatawney
Steamed Red Salmon, Lemon Butter
Vanilla Fritter
Bodied Fowl; Celery Sauce
Roast Prime Ribs of Beef, Yorkshire Pudding
Baked Sugar Cured Ham, Cumberland Sauce
Salad a la Jardiniere, French or Mayonnaise Dressing
Boiled  or Mashed Potatoes Fresh Vegetable  in Season
Steamed Plum Pudding
Deep Blueberry iPie Ice Cream Cake
Canadian Cheese Cream Cheese
Tea   or   Coffee
 Hotilla of the Canadian Pacific, S.S. Assiniboia,
S.S.  i mc$-*5.S,  Manitoba,  ply  romantic  and  historic
voters   every     ...Timer   season.
Every voyage is a cruise, and each makes an interesting
break in the transcontinental railway journey. Wherever you
go from the Great Lakes ports, Fort William, Port McNicoll
or Owen Sound, Canadian Pacific has a vacationland awaiting you.
Eastward lies the great province of Quebec—symbolized
on the cover by Leonard Richmond's painting of historic Quebec
City and the famous Canadian Pacific hotel—Chateau Frontenac.
 Cascade Mountain from the Terrace
Canadian Pacific
Great Lakes Service
 STEAMSHIP "KEEWATIN"
Clyde Built
3,880 Gross Tons
Length 350 feet Breadth 43 feet 8 inches Depth 26 feet 9 inches
Speed  15 Knots
A. CAMPBELL, Commander
W.   F.   IRVINE T.  A.  SWALES
Chief Engineer First Officer
WM.  A.  PAXTON H.  W.  ARBOUR
Purser Chief Steward
S. F. MALIN, Superintendent
MILEAGE
Between Port McNicoll and Detour Light, the
entrance   to   St.   Mary's   River 223   miles
Between Detour Light (through the Lower St. Mary's River)
and   Sault   Ste.   Marie.....  47  miles
Between Sault Ste.  Marie (through the famous "Soo Locks")
and   Port Arthur or  Fort William 272  miles
Total mileage between Port McNicoll and
Port   Arthur   or   Fort   William 542  miles
Parlor Car or Sleeping Car Reservations can be made
at the Purser's Office.
Applications should be made before reaching Sault Ste. Marie.
DECK SPORTS—Sun Deck
Shuffle Board, Bull Board, Deck Quoits
Souvenir copy of this Menu Card and envelope ready for maiiing may be had
on application to Chief Steward.
 DINNER
Chilled V.8. Vegetable Juice Grapefruit Juice
Queen Olives Cheese Straws Celery Hearts
Ox-Tail a la Anglaise Consomme au Riz
Baked  Lake Superior Fish, Tomato Sauce
Boiled Sugar Cured  Ham with Spinach
Roast Sirloin  of Beef, Yorkshire  Pudding
Roast Young  Turkey,  Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
Club Salad Sliced Tomatoes
Mayonnaise or  French  Dressing
Boiled or Mashed  Potatoes
Fresh Vegetables  in Season
Steamed  Plum Pudding, Caramel  Sauce
Deep Cherry  Pie Ice Cream
Assorted  Cakes Fresh   Fruit
Imperial  Cream  Cheese Canadian  Cheese
Tea
Milk
Coffee
Bouillon
will be served from
10.00 to
10.30 a.m. and
Afternoon Tea
will  be served from
4.00 to -
4.30 p.m.
in the
OBSERVATION
ROOM of the PROMENADE DECK AFT.
Night Lunches served to staterooms on
request.
Menu
Card available
from Bell Boy.
 Cascade Mountain from the Terrace
No scenic artist could have designed a view as spectacular
as that which greets you from the greensward terrace that
borders the Riverview Lounge. In the immediate foreground
are the tumbling waters of the Bow Falls. Behind the falls
the shoulder of Tunnel Mountain masks the base of lordly
Cascade whose topmost peak towers 9,386 feet above sea
level. The circular floral cushion, so much admired by visitors,
usually features Nemesia in red, blue, yellow, orange and
pastel shades with an outer circle of Strumosa Compacta
and Jagetes.
 !   %
■/
ft
CanaciianGaaUc
GREAT LAKES
BoatTrip
Right in CANADA
5-Day Great Lakes Cruises from
Port McNicoll each Saturday and Wednesday
June 5 through September 8, 1965.
,«$
£_p
\
ft
1SS&.
New York
RATES   FROM
New York, N.Y.  -$136.15
Albany, N.Y.
Bridgeport, Conn.
Newark, N.J.
New Haven, Conn.
Philadelphia, Pa.
Port McNicoll, Ont.
$127.43
141.50
137.25
142.93
144.75
84.32
Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
Schenectady, N.Y.
Scranton, Pa.
Stamford, Conn.
Toronto, Ont.
$134.05
126.11
148.21
139.50
91.76
Gmadian (faajfic
MARCH 3, 1965.
(U.S.Funds)
1819 JOHN F.KENNEDY BLVD. ,PHILA., PA. --19103 - LOcust 8-6467
581 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK, N.Y.       - 10017 - PLaza  9-4433
 Canadian Oacitic
GREAT LAKES
CANADIAN PACJFIC_GREAT ;L>AKES_SIT|E^MSHIPS_
SS nASSINIBOIAM SS MKEEWATINn
FIVE     DAYCRUISES
Convenient train service from :-
Albany, N. Y. New York, N. Y. Schenectady, N. Y.
Bridgeport, Conn. Philadelphia, Pa. Scranton, Pa.
Newark, N. J. Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Stamford, Conn.
New Haven, Conn.
Sat. or Wedo Ar. Toronto A.M. EDT Train Canadian Pacific
Change Trains - Same Station
Lv. Toronto 1:01 P.M. EDT Train Canadian Pacific
Ar. Port McNicoll 4:00 P.M. EDT Train Canadian Pacific
Passengers detrain at shipTs   side
Sat. or Wed. Lv. Port McNicoll 4:15 P.M. EDT Ship Canadian Pacific
Cruise Georgian Bay, Lake Huron and St. Maryfs River
*Sun. or Thu. Ar. Sault Ste. Marie 10:45 A.M. EDT Ship Canadian Pacific
* Passengers have opportunity to attend Church Services ashore
Sun. or Thu. Lv. Sault Ste. Marie 12.20 P.M. EDT Ship Canadian Pacific
Ship passes through Soo Locks, thence cruises Lake Superior
Mon. or Fri. Ar. Fort William 8.45 A.M. EDT Ship Canadian Pacific
Breakfast on Ship
Transfer to Royal Edward Hotel for
Lunch, Dinner and Lodging
OPPORTUNITY FOR SHIPPING AND SIGHTSEEING
SIGHTSEEING DRIVES AVAILABLE
1.       Fifty mile drive of Twin Cities and to Kakabeka Falls, 128 feet in height - a rival of Niagara Falls.
Fare - $3.00
20        Fort William Harbor Cruise      Fare - $1. 50
These drives are not included in Cruise Fare - are optional at passengers own expense.
Tue. or Sat. At Fort William Royal Edward Hotel   -  Breakfast
Transfer to Ship - Lunch on Board
 Canadian Gactfic
GREAT LAKES
CANADIAN PACIFIC GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIP
Tue. or Sat. Lv. Fort William 1:30 P.M. EDT Ship Canadian Pacific
Cruise Thunder Bay, across Lake Superior
Wed. or *Sun. Ar. Sault Ste Marie 10:00 A.M. EDT Ship Canadian Pacific
* Passengers have opportunity to attend Church Services ashore
Wed. or Sun. Lv. Sault Ste. Marie 1:30 P.M. EDT Ship Canadian Pacific
Thu. or Mon. Av. Port McNicoll 9:00 A.M. EDT Ship Canadian Pacific
Breakfast on board Ship - Train for Toronto
departs from shipTs side
Thu. or Mon. Lv. Port McNicoll 9:15 A0M. EDT Train Canadian Pacific
Thuo or Mon. Ar. Toronto 12:15 P.M. EDT Train Canadian Pacific
Afternoon free in Toronto for shopping or sightseeing
Thu. or Mon. Lvc Toronto P. M. EDT Train Canadian Pacific
FARES INCLUDE:       All train (coach class) and ship transportation, Ontario taxes, meals and
berth in *INSIDE stateroom for two on ship, meals and #sharing double
room at Royal Edward Hotel in Fort William.   At Fort William, transfer
from Pier to Hotel and return.   Fares are quoted in U.S. Funds.
* Birth in OUTSIDE Stateroom on Ship - $9. 30 additional.
# Single room at Hotel - $1.50 additional.
NOT INCLUDED: Meals between starting point and Port McNicoll, sleeping or parlor car
space, gratutities and expenses of personal nature.
There are deck sports, music, dancing, entertainment, motion pictures, morning
bouillon, afternoon tea, etc.   All rooms have hot and cold running water.   Barber and Bar
services are available.   Deck chairs - free;   non-reserved.
For those desiring stopover at Toronto, Canadian Pacific!s Royal York Hotel is
suggested.   Daily European Plan rates for single with bath are $10.00 to $13.00 and for double
with bath $15c 00 to $18. 50.   (Canadian Funds)
For those motoring to Port McNicoll, insured storage is available at LeverTs Garage,
Port McNicoll, at rate of $3.00 for the duration of the cruise.
These Cruises are always exceedingly popular, therefore, early application is
recommended.
1819 JOHN F. KENNEDY BLVD. ,PHILA. ,PA.     19103 - LOcust 8-6467
581 FIFTH AVENUE,   NEW YORK, N. Y. 10017 - PLaza  9-4433
recumiiienueu.
CuiadianGuc^ic
MARCH 3, 1965
 SONGS FOR
HAPPY VOYAGERS
^3flsA
GREAT LAKES
SERVICES
S. S. ASSINIBOIA
S.S. KEEWATIN
 1. GOD  SAVE THE QUEEN
God save pur gracious Queen,
Long live our noble Queen,
God save the Queen !
Send her victorious,
Happy and glorious,
Long to reign over us;
God save the Queen !
2. O   CANADA
O, Canada! Our home and native land!
True patriot love in all thy sons command.
With glowing hearts, we see thee rise,
The true North strong and free
And stand on guard, O Canada,
We stand on guard for thee.
O Canada! Glorious and free!
We stand on guard, we stand on guard for thee,
O Canada! We stand on guard for thee.
3# THE MAPLE LEAF  FOREVER
In days of yore, from Britain's shore,
Wolfe, the dauntless hero came,
And planted firm Britannia's flag,
On Canada's fair domain.
Here may it wave, our boast, our pride,
And joined in love together,
The Thistle, Shamrock, Rose entwine,
The Maple Leaf Forever!
Chorus—
The Maple Leaf, our emblem dear,
The Maple Leaf Forever!
God save our Queen, and Heaven bless
The Maple Leaf Forever.
4# OLD FOLKS AT HOME
'Way down upon de Swanee River,
Far, far away,
Dere's wha my heart is turning ever,
Dere's wha de old folks stay.
Chorus—
All de world is sad and dreary,
Everywhere I roam;
Oh! darkies, how my heart grows weary,
Far from de Old Folks At Home.
All up and down de whole creation,
Sadly I roam,
Still longing for de old plantation,
And for de old folks at home.
5. BRING BACK MY BONNIE
My Bonnie is over the ocean,
My Bonnie is over the sea;
My Bonnie is over the ocean,
Oh! Bring Back My Bonnie to me.
Chorus—
Bring back, bring back,
Bring Back My Bonnie to me, to me,
Bring back, bring back,
Oh! Bring Back My Bonnie to me.
6. SILVER THREADS AMONG THE GOLD
Darling, I am growing old;
Silver Threads Among The Gold
Shine upon my brow today;
Life is fading fast away;
But, my darling, you will be, will be,
Always young and fair to me,
Yes! my darling, you will be,
Always young and fair to me.
Chorus—
Darling, I am growing old,
Silver Threads Among The Gold.
Shine upon my brow today,
Life is fading fast away.
7. BILLY   BOY
Oh, where have you been, Billy Boy, Billy Boy,
Oh, where have you been, charming Billy?
I have been to seek a wife,
She's the joy of my life,
She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother.
Did she bid you to come in Billy Boy, Billy Boy,
Did she bid you to come in, charming Billy?
Yes, she bade me to come in,
There's a dimple in her chin,
She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother.
8. GRANDFATHER'S   CLOCK
My Grandfather's Clock was too large for the shelf,
So it stood ninety years on the floor;
It was taller by half than the old man himself,
Tho' it weighed not a penny-weight more.
It was  bought on  the  morn  of the  day that  he
was born,
And was always his treasure and pride;
But it stopp'd short, never to go again,
When the old man died.
Chorus—
Ninety years without slumbering, (tick, tock, tick,
tock,)
His life seconds numbering, (tick, tock, tick, tock,)
It stopp'd short never to go again,
When the old man died.
"Ah
«f. **/73
 9. COMIN' THROUGH THE RYE
If a body meet a body, Comin' Thro' The Rye,
If a body kiss a body need a body cry?
Chorus—
Ev'ry lassie has her laddie,
Nane, they say, ha'e I;
Yet a' the lads they smile on me,
When Comin' Thro' The Rye.
If a body meet a body, Comin' frae the town
If a body greet a body need a body frown?
10. CAPTAIN JINKS
I'm Captain Jinks, of the Horse Marines;
I feed my horse on corn and beans,
I sport young ladies in their teens,
Tho' a captain in the army.
Chorus—
I teach young ladies how to dance,
How to dance, How to dance,
I teach young ladies how to dance,
For I'm the pet of the army.
1 1. JUANITA
Soft o'er the fountain,
Ling'ring falls the southern moon;
Far o'er the mountain,
Breaks the day too soon.
In thy dark eyes* splendour,
Where the warm light loves to dwell,
Weary looks, yet tender,
Speak their fond farewell.
Chorus—
Nita! Juanita,
Ask thy soul if we should part!
Nita! Juanita!
Lean thou on my heart.
13.    I'LL TAKE YOU HOME AGAIN,  KATHLEEN
I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen.
Across the ocean wild and wide;
To where your heart has ever been,
Since first you were my bonnie bride,
The roses all have left your cheek.
I've watched them fade away and die;
Your voice is sad whene'er you speak,
And tears bedim your loving eyes.
Chorus—
Oh! I will take you back again,
To where your heart will feel no pain,
And when the fields are fresh and green,
I'll take you home again, Kathleen.
14. ANNIE   LAURIE
Maxwelton's braes are bonnie, Where early fa's the
dew,
And 'twas there that Annie Laurie Gave me her
promise true;
Gave me her promise true; Which ne'er forgot
will be,
And for bonnie Annie Laurie, I'd lay me down
and dee.
15. THE LITTLE  BROWN CHURCH
There's a church in the valley by the wildwood,
No lovelier place in the dale,
No spot is so dear to my childhood
As The Little Brown Church in the vale.
Chorus—
Come to the church in the wildwood,
O come to the church in the dale
No spot is so dear to my childhood
As The Little Brown Church in the vale.
12. JOHN   PEEL
D' ye ken John Peel with his coat so gay,
D' ye  ken  John  Peel at the  break of the day,
D'   ye   ken   John   Peel  when   he's  far,  far  away,
With  his  hounds  and  his  horn  in  the morning.
Chorus—
T'was the sound of his horn brought me from my bed.
And the cry of his hounds which he oft-times led;
Peel's vView-hal-loo" would waken the dead,
Or the fox from his lair in the morning.
16# THE OLD RUGGED CROSS
On a hill far away stood an old rugged cross,
The emblem of suff'ring and shame;
And I love that old cross where the dearest and best
For a world of lost sinners was slain.
Chorus—
So I'll cherish The Old Rugged Cross,
Till my trophies at last I lay down;
I will cling to The Old Rugged Cross,
And exchange it some day for a crown.
 17. ABIDE WITH  ME
Abide With Me, Fast falls the eventide,
The darkness deepens, Lord with me abide!
When other helpers fail, and comforts flee,
Help of the helpless, oh, Abide With Me.
Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day;
Earth's joys grow dim, its glories pass away;
Change and decay in all around I see;
O Thou, who changest not, Abide With Me!
18. BELIEVE  ME   IF  ALL  THOSE   ENDEARING  YOUNG
CHARMS
Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms,
Which I gaze on so fondly today—
Were to change by to-morrow and flee from my arms,
Like fairy gifts fading away,
Thou would'st still be adored, as this moment thou
art;
Let thy loveliness fade as it will.
And around the dear ruin, each wish of my heart,
Would entwine itself verdantly still.
19. THE ROSE OF TRALEE
The pale moon was rising above the green mountain,
The sun was declining beneath the blue sea,
When I strayed with my love to the pure crystal
fountain
That stands in the beautiful vale of Tralee;
She was lovely and fair as the rose of the summer,
Yet 'twas not her beauty alone that won me,
Oh, no! 'twas the truth in her eyes ever dawning,
That made me love Mary, The Rose Of Tralee,
20. LOCH   LOMOND
Oh! ye'll take the high road, and I'll take the low
road,
And I'll be in Scotland afore ye,
But me and my true love will never meet again,
On the Bonnie, Bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.
21. HOME ON THE RANGE
Oh, give me a home where the buffalo roam,
Where the deer and the antelope play,
Where seldom is heard a discouraging word,
And the skies are not cloudy all day.
Chorus—
Home, Home On The Range;
Where the deer and the antelope play,
Where seldom is heard a discouraging word,
And the skies are not cloudy all day.
Oh, give me a land where the bright diamond sand
Flows leisurely down the stream;
Where the graceful, white swan goes gliding along
Like a maid in a heavenly dream.
22. BLEST BE THE TIE THAT BINDS
Blest Be The Tie That Binds
Our hearts in Christian love;
The fellowship of kindred minds
Is like to that above.
When we asunder part,
It gives us inward pain;
But we shall still be joined in heart,
And hope to meet again.
23. OH, MY DARLING CLEMENTINE
In a cavern, in a canyon,
Excavating for a mine,
Dwelt a miner, forty niner,
And his daughter Clementine.
Chorus—
Oh my darling, Oh my darling,
Oh My Darling Clementine,
You are lost and gone forever,
Dreadful sorry, Clementine.
Light she was and like a fairy,
And her shoes were number nine;
Herring boxes, without topses
Sandals were for Clementine.
24. OH   SUSANNA
I came from Alabama wid my banjo on my knee,
I'm g'wan to Lousiana My true love for to see,
It rained all night the day I left,
The weather it was dry,
The sun so hot I froze to death;
Susanna don't you cry.
Chorus—
Oh! Susanna Oh! don't you cry for me,
I've come from Alabama wid  my banjo on  my
knee.
25.   GIT ALONG LITTLE DOGIES (WHOO-PEE TI YI YO)
As I was awalking one morning for pleasure,
I spied a cowpuncher all riding alone,
His hat was thrown back and his spurs was a jingling,
And as he approached he was singing this song:
Chorus—
Whoopee Ti Yi Yo! Git Along, Little Dogies,
It's your misfortune and none of my own.
Whoopee Ti Yi Yo! Git Along, Little Dogies,
You know that Wyoming will be your new home.
It's early in  Spring that we round up the dogies;
We mark them and brand them and bob off their
tails,
We round up our horses, load up the chuck-wagon,
And then throw the dogies out onto the trail.
 26. LITTLE BROWN JUG
My wife and I live all alone,
In a little brown hut we call our own.
She loves gin, and I love rum,
Tell you what it isf Don't we have fun!
Chorus—
Ha! Ha! Ha! 'tis you and me,
Little Brown Jug Don't I love Thee
Ha! Ha! Ha! 'tis you and me,
Little Brown Jug Don't I love thee.
27. SWING LOW SWEET CHARIOT
Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,
Comin' for to carry me home!
Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,
Comin' for to carry me home!
I looked over Jordan and what did I see,
Comin' for to carry me home!
A band of angels comin' after me,
Comin' for to carry me home!
If you get there before I do,
Comin' for to carry me home!
Tell all my friends that I'm comin' too,
Comin' for to carry me home!
28. OH DEM GOLDEN SLIPPERS
Oh! Dem Golden Slippers! Oh! Dem Golden
Slippers!
Golden slippers I'm gonna wear because dey
look so neat.
Oh! Dem Golden Slippers! Oh! Dem Golden
Slippers!
Golden slippers I'm gonna wear, to walk de
golden street.
29#      SHE'LL BE COMIN' 'ROUND THE MOUNTAIN
She'll Be Comin' 'Round The Mountain When She
Comes,
She'll Be Comin' 'Round The Mountain When She
Comes.
She'll be steamin' and a puffin,
Oh Lawd, she won't stop for nothin',
She'll Be Comin' 'Round The Mountain When She
Comes,
She'll be drivin' six white horses when she comes,
She'll be drivin' six white horses when she comes,
She'll be drivin' six white horses,
She'll be drivin' six white horses,
She'll be drivin' six white horses when she comes.
30. THE   BOWERY
The Bow'ry, The Bow'ry;
They say such things and they do strange things
On The Bow'ry, The Bow'ry,
I'll never go there any more.
31.        OH   BURY  ME   NOT  ON  THE  LONE  PRAIRIE
Oh, bury me not on the lone prairie,
Where the wild kiyotes will howl o'er me,
Where the rattlesnakes hiss and the wind blows free,
Oh, Bury Me Not On The Lone Prairie.
32. THE  BAND  PLAYED ON
Casey would waltz with a strawberry blonde,
And The Band Played On;
He'd glide 'cross the floor with the girl he adored,
And The Band Played On;
But his brain was so loaded it nearly exploded,
The poor girl would shake with alarm.
He'd ne'er leave the girl with the strawberry curls
And The Band Played On.
33. OLD MACDONALD HAD A FARM
1. Old MacDonald Had A Farm, E - I - E - I - O!
And on this farm he had some chicks,
E-l-E-l-O!
With a chick, chick, here, and a chick, chick, there,
Here a chick, there a chick, everywhere a chick,
chick.
Old MacDonald Had A Farm, E - I - E - I - O!
2. Old MacDonald Had A Farm, E - I - E - I - O!
And on this farm, he had some ducks,
E-l-E-l-O!
With a quack, quack, here, and a quack, quack,
there,
Here a quack, there a quack, ev'rywhere a quack,
quack.*
With a chick, chick, here, and a chick, chick there,
Here a chick, there a chick, ev'rywhere a chick,
chick,
Old MacDonald Had A Farm, E-l-E-l-O!
* Each stanza repeats, after it has reached this
point, all the material of the preceding stanzas.
The fifth stanza in full would be thus:
With a rattle-rattle here, etc. Hoink-hoink here, etc.
Gobble-gobble here, etc. Quack-quack here, etc.
Chick-chick here, etc. Old MacDonald Had A Farm,
E-l-E-l-O!
3. Turkey (gobble-gobble).
5. Car (rattle-rattle).
4.  Pig (hoink-hoink).
 34. THE MORE WE GET TOGETHER
The More We Get Together, together, together,
The More We Get Together, the happier we'll be.
For your friends are my friends, and my friends are
your friends;
The More We Get Together, the happier we'll be.
35. GOOD  NIGHT  LADIES
Good-Night, Ladies! Good-Night, Ladies!
Good-Night, Ladies! We're goin' to leave you
now.
Chorus—
Merrily we roll along, Roll along, roll along,
Merrily we roll along, over the dark blue sea.
36. RED   RIVER  VALLEY
From this valley they say you are going,
I shall miss your sweet face and your smile,
Just because you are weary and tired,
You are changing your range for a while.
I've been thinking a long time, my darling!
Of the sweet words you never would say,
Now alas, must the fond hopes all vanish?
For they say you are going away.
Chorus-
Then come sit here a while ere you leave us,
Do not hasten to bid us adieu,
Just remember the Red River Valley,
And the cowboy who loved you so true.
37# AULD  LANG  SYNE
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And days of Auld Lang Syne?
For Auld Lang Syne, my dear,
For Auld Lang Syne,
We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet,
For Auld Lang Syne.
38# DE CAMPTOWN RACES
De Camptown ladies sing dis song,
Doo-dah, doo-dah!
De Camptown race track nine miles long,
Oh, doo-dah-day.
I came down dar wid my hat caved in,
Doo-dah, doo-dah!
Go back home wid a lot of tin,
Oh, doo-dah-day!
Gwine to run all night,
Gwine to run all day.
I'll bet my money on de bobtail nag;
Somebody bet on de bay.
39. SOME  FOLKS   DO
Some folks like to sigh,
Some Folks Do, Some Folks Do;
Some folks long to die,
But that's not me nor you.
Chorus—
Long live the merry, merry heart
That laughs by night and day,
Like the queen of mirth,
No matter what some folks say.
Some folks like to smile,
Some Folks Do, Some Folks Do;
Others laugh through guile,
But that's not me nor you.
40. THE OLD  OAKEN  BUCKET
How dear to my heart are the scenes of my
childhood,
When fond recollection presents them to view!
The orchard, the meadow, the deep tangled
wildwood,
And ev'ry loved spot which my infancy knew:
The wide-spreading pond, and the mill that stood
by it,
The bridge and the rock where the cataract fell;
The cot of my father, the dairy house nigh it,
And e'en the rude bucket that hung in the well.
Chorus—
The Old Oaken Bucket, the iron bound bucket,
The moss covered bucket that hung in the well.
41 # THE  SPANISH  CAVALIER
A Spanish Cavalier stood in his retreat,
And on his guitar played a tune, dear;
The music so sweet, would oft times repeat
The blessing of my country and you, dear.
Chorus-—
Oh, say, darling, say, when I'm far away,
Sometimes you may think of me, dear;
Bright sunny days will soon fade away,
Remember what I say, and be true, dear.
 42.                                        ALOUETTE
Alouette, gentille Alouette,
Alouette, je
te plumerai,
Je te plumerai la tete, je
te plumerai
le tete,
Et la tete, et la tete, O,
Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette,
je te
plumerai.
Alouette, gentille Alouette,
Alouette, je
te plumerai,
Je te plumerai le bee, je
te plumerai
le bee,
Et le bee, et le bee, Et la tete, et la tete,
o,
Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette,
je te
plumerai.
Alouette, gentille Alouette,
Alouette, je
te plumerai,
Je te plumerai le nez, je
te plumerai
le nez.
Et le nez, et le nez, Et le bee, et le bee,
Et la tete, et la tete, O,
Alouette, gentille Alouette,
Alouette, je
te plumerai.
Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai,
Je te plumerai le dos, je te plumerai le dos,
Et le dos, et le dos, et le nez, et le nez,
Et le bee, et le bee, et la tete, et la tete, O,
Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai.
Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai.
Je te plumerai les pattes, je te plumerai les pattes,
Et les pattes, et les pattes, et le dos, et le dos,
Et le nez, et le nez, et le bee, et le bee,
Et la tete, et la tete, O,
Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette, je te
plumerai.
Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai.
Je le plumerai le cou, je te plumerai le cou,
Et le cou, et le cou, et les pattes, et les pattes,
Et le dos, et le dos, et le nez, et le nez,
Et le bee, et le bee, et le tete, et la tete, O,
Alouette, gentille Alouette, Alouette, je te
plumerai.
The World's Greatest Travel System
(^4Uu£l04l6L^
 mmoMWM
EATI
LA_€__
Mi
__©iS@mMdia(g
LA
I
 Grea^t Lakes Steamship Service
THE   GREAT   LAKES.
"In all the world no trip like this"
■
Canadian Pacific Railway Steamship Express Train Leaving Toronto for Port McNicoll.
ATRIP across these greatest expanses of
fresh water in the world, on the palatial
ships of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, is a miniature ocean voyage with many
added attractions.    The charm and interest
of the trip is heightened by the
entrancing views which are  obtained of passing ships and also
by the  opportunity which  is
afforded  of passing through the
busiest locks in the world
at Sault Ste. Marie.    It is
a trip that appeals alike to
all  classes, there  being a
strange
fascination
about these
inland seas
that is alluring in the extreme.     The  oft-
repeated statement that "It is never too hot
nor too cold on the Great Lakes in summer,"
is true.   When the city's streets are scorching
with the torrid heat of the middle summer,
the breezes wafted over the Great
Lakes  are  cool   and   delightful.
The air is pure and exhilarating,
blue skies prevail, and there are
present  all   the  conditions   conducive to sound sleep and
healthy appetites.     From
the time the boats  leave
their   moorings   at    Port
McNicoll,
until they
reach the
docks   at
One of the Canadian Pacific Railway's Qreat Lakes Steamships.
 tf<
■
Canadian  Pacific  Railway
Canadian Pacific Railway Company's Grain Elevator, Port McNicoll, Ont.
Port Arthur and Fort William, there is not an uninteresting
minute in the trip. The view is constantly changing. From
the decks of the Canadian Pacific Railway steamships all the
varied shipping of the great inland waters can be inspected
as the various units pass and repass up and down the channel.
Giant freighters carrying grain from the head of the lakes to
Montreal, numerous passenger boats, their decks crowded
with happy vacationists, pleasure craft of all sizes, and a
variety of scenery, come and go in quick succession. One
lady passenger remarked "the only thing she regretted was
that she was unable to be on both sides of the ship at once,"
there was so much of interest to be seen.
Port   McNicoll,   the   eastern   terminus of the Canadian
Pacific Railway's line of Great Lakes steamships, is located   ;:
on Georgian Bay.    Passengers reach this port from Toronto  ,
by special steamships express trains which are run direct to
the ship's side.    Port McNicoll is not a big town.    In fact   \
it is only a year old, but it is one of the most important towns f
for its size in the Dominion.    During the last few years the
Canadian Pacific Railway have spent a huge sum of money in
making the town into a model terminus for their Great Lakes
steamships, and in this they have been very successful.   Here
is one of the largest and best equipped grain elevators on the
lakes, and several miles of broad deep-water wharves.    Here
are numerous huge freight sheds, flour sheds, etc., and the
many other large buildings necessary for a town which is not
only the terminus of  the  Canadian  Pacific Railway's lake
steamships, but is also an important point on the railway's
grain route to Montreal.
Leaving   Port   McNicoll,   the   route   winds   and   twists
through the island-dotted  waters  of  Georgian Bay.    Some
of the islands bear summer cottages or camping parties
the whole season long, whilst others are only temporarily
occupied. If the trip is begun on a Wednesday, the boat
will shape its course so as to call at Owen Sound, a
thriving town west of Port McNicoll. If a call at Owen
Sound is not to be included, the boat will keep its course
on through the waters of Georgian Bay and out into
Lake Huron.
Then follow several hours of solid enjoyment, while the
steamship travels steadily on its course. In a short time,
and all too soon, Sault Ste. Marie is reached. "The Soo" is
situated on the banks of the beautiful St. Mary's River, at a
point where the flow from Lake Superior to Lake Huron is
checked by tossing, tumbling rapids. It has within the last
ten years sprung from what lacked little of being a wilderness,
into a point of considerable importance as an industrial and
commercial center.
Perhaps the first thing to attract the visitor at the "Soo"
are the big locks which form the key to the passage from
Lake Huron to Lake Superior. From the time the ice goes
out in the spring, this is the busiest spot on the Great Lakes.
Here, hour after hour, it is possible to stand on the edge of
the locks and watch the great passenger and freight boats
pass through from one level to the other. The locks are
immense affairs. Historically they are famous as being built
on the site of the first lock on the American continent, a
structure which was built by the Northwest Fur Company in
1791, and which was burned in the War of 1812.
The^ present Canadian lock is the longest in the world. It
was built in 1888-95, and is nine hundred feet long and sixtv
feet wide.    The cost of construction was about $4,000,000.
/U
H?/fe
 Canadian Pacific Railway Steamship in Canadian Lock at Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.
During the season of 1911 there passed through the locks a
total tonnage of 41,653,488 tons, and each year the number
of boats operated on the lakes is increasing.
Of equal interest to visitors are the great industries of the
Lake Superior Corporation. These are the Bessemer Steel
Plant and Rolling Mills, Blast Furnaces, Pulp Mill, Sulphite
Mill, Algoma Iron Works, Car Shops, Veneer Mill, Charcoal
Plant, Power Plant, Reduction Works and Saw Mills. All
these industries, built on a big scale, are now working on a
good financial basis.
For one in search of natural scenic beauty, no place affords
greater opportunity than Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, for a few
hours' sail on St..Mary's River or a short trip on the Canadian
Pacific Railway will take him to scenes little altered from
the condition which prevailed a hundred years ago.
Sault Ste. Marie now has a population of about 15,000.
The surrounding country is rich in iron, copper, nickel, and
gold^ bearing quartz, which is being mined at a great profit.
Millions of acres of timber are within easy reach of the city. The
climate at the "Soo" is most delightful. The weather is steady
in winter. The summers are especially delightful, and when
heat all over the country has been very oppressive the people
of this vicinity are blessed with comfortable and refreshing
breezes from the adjacent waters. The nights are always cool.
^ After passing through these famous locks and up St. Mary's
River the broad expanse of Lake Superior unfolds to view
and one is reminded of the ocean, only the air is dryer, skies
bluer, and the atmosphere clearer.
The trip up Lake Superior is undoubtedly a  fine one,
there being much to interest and amuse.    The time passes
mmisimim'immiiii
ftft"ft.'ft""ft'ftft:"ftftft.ft ■■: '■■■',"
"immsssmsiM
The "Sleeping Qiant" at Entrance io Thunder Bay.
^mmmmmm^mmymmmmmmm^
 ft?:St!t:r
iiiiii	
^>^m%
anadian  raciiic  Kailway
Canadian Pacific Gnat Lakes Steamships.
=^2^-
 V \
OkZH
-8_w*^hS«>
<££x>!a&6/s
^
Gre,
^
tf^ce
A  N   '
| Otterburne
I rris
'^;?^6
.^y4f »* ^y 4?<g__ CANADIAN    /    p-f ithniaau.
^Sturgeon
Lake JVT
K_Hog<*,,li
Wabiskagami
O B A
fft/J __^    IgArnaud Marckland
RoseMJ feld
iEMERSON
#%^IPootf*^
. Noyes
. Orleans
Warroad
UZainy Lake y/qei»»* <P       <$?
4**
kBronson
K Karlstad
ft<^
' p.       Sturgeon Halls
ne Centre
HUNTERS
.  ISLAND
<£>v
Gall
w\
"vf
McKay
Lake
Powgulchuan
Lake
■'%
v
u«m° *? f m
SLATE IDS.       I, ^WOM/I^**^^   4?  $
Grand Portaga
**«^«e_.
<m
N. D A K.
Grand Marais *
^
_«*
FargoX
\Glyndon \
A -^ X,      ^        ^A, sy^^^O MAN'TOU ID. ^> ™
A                      ^eT0^ %>   ^^^a*^Keweenaw Point >-
 - - - *■ %£^>-F      /£^Sa Linden
Josephine Mine
MICHipicoten      HlchipieoteuJ
MAP OF THE GREAT LAKES
STEAMSHIP SERVICE AND
CONNECTING   RAIL   LINES
OB1    THE
CANADIAN PACIFIC RI.
" Indicates Double Track.
C-11
2?
EuenMine       gJS^^        \    <f     Q<s
Lake Wawalfes^^^^ j   £"      c$o
<_* /
. EnglehartN
J***
_S?"^*^*
CARIBOU ID.
*^  %©        ieechid.      i       Pangassin
Lake k
Wennabiguii
'*/„
_*° r
m
_.^__j_.^__*_
(Wadena \0^  *, %?A^     /^
<a^  ^ ~ e
^J^Parkersl /#»       // ^
• » Prairie ^V
V/>r?'//
^ ^*
forest   DUI
^Gordon    ^.Lv
\
<^
~£2^
s Quinze
.v* jry
a*^ ^*
*   Chaiining      7       ^> ^)
*^leN j^\ Hendricks Quarfy^ ,
«<&*
__^.^>4
L?>-^
«*.£<»
^utvi:
asla^;
*e^
n\e^
Bristol
/Pipestone
Lake Crystal
Winnebago\
Qlankatd
OwatC'iinar
\Dodge
\Center
Albert Lea/
^  Camp Douglas'
aCrosse
^(>Oc
Algert
*S^
^P»c^.
yvtvvv
«^
OS**"
y Ludingtdn
£y V\ pentwater\
^^
New
.Hampton
.Vtve°
,cv»w-
V
%S<*1
Covington^^oux CITY
[ Emelson
Algona \
Fort Dodge I
^JVIad
Ar
ioygan^
^MILWAUKEE
_ J    ^jt-l-B ■IMIIIII UN MO |1llllHllllir>      ,o°\ ?$_t^fi
SMuskego'a   /Howard City
;/r:^ev^s*
-^
e^
^
Grand|(
Haven|
yJVebster City
o\ W
Daytonl \jewell Jc.
Farley
DubucpieN
BsloitV V   vi#6      e^
(GRAND RAPIDS
Lansing^?
^Battle Creeks
*..
■^
CMapleton
.B.
Perry I
u, Savanna
Clinton!^/ i*01^
Humphrey
5077
-^
Ms Moines
N^ POOLE BROS. CHICAGO,
Oedar Rapids
West Liberi
Dav^
\mz€m
N. \Y.
piocklsland  \
2ksburg ^^^\Miian\ # ^ xP^      e^      lC -.*»""*^*'*'
Adrian^^        \        W    \ Ff?     f     A^~~~      ''
\~^^ MonroeJ7        N^   '^     1^-.-" ^ jgp
. LJT^ \   /// •'**"CC-" V ASHTABUJ^^
£n^
Ue*
^H^^^-^^oI TOLEC
N
^
'e^/er
VELAND
CitEVEL
Oil City c
Ridgwayy
Emporium I
 Grea4 Lakes Steamship Service
Canadian Pacific Great Lakes Steamships.
 ^^m^;yyyyy;0'm::
Canadian  Pacific  Railway
m m       ^JPBBP^W"?^?S^P
■■ 7.   "',,..■;■ >'ft -:■.-!-...■■■ ■■
Canadian Pacific Railway Station at Port Arthur.
quickly—almost too quickly, in fact. Eventually, almost
before one realizes it, the rocky outline of Passage Island is
seen, with Isle Royale to the left and, further to the right, the
Thunder Cape and Sleeping Giant, rising to the height of
1.400 feet, guarding the entrance to the splendid harbor of
Thunder Bay, on whose shores are the twin gateways of
Canada's Great West, Port Arthur and Fort William.
Port Arthur and Fort William have many attractions to
offer the visitor. Situated at the northern end of Canada's
great inland waterway, they are natural points of transshipment for the grain of Western Canada from freight car to
vessel. Here are situated the immense grain elevators of the
Canadian Pacific Railway, which are the largest in the world.
After you have seen these huge elevators, you are able to gain
some idea of the magnitude of the grain shipments from
Western Canada eastward. Both Port Arthur and Fort
William are lively, progressive cities, and are growing fast.
They have good transportation facilities, both by rail and by
water, and are destined to become big cities.
From these ports connection can be made by the Canadian
Pacific Railway for Winnipeg and Pacific Coast points, or
eastward to the mineral and lumber districts.
„>   .■'.; '.■.'-■ *,.j.**rt':-
Canadian Pacific Railway Grain Elevators at Fort William.
15
16
 Grea4; Lakes Steamship. Service
Port Arthur, On
C. P. R. GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIPS.
The five Great Lakes steamships of the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company are constructed to withstand a voyage
across the Atlantic Ocean, four of them having been built on
the Clyde. The latest additions to the fleet, the '' Assiniboia "
and "Keewatin," are very much like ocean liners, but with
four decks—main, awning, promenade and hurricane—they
stand far higher out of the water for their size than the ordinary liner. They each have accommodations for 300 passengers. Their gross tonnage is 4,300 tons, their principal
dimensions being: Length, 350 feet; breadth, 43 feet, 3 inches;
depth, 26 feet, 6 inches. They are divided into eight watertight compartments.
No ocean vessels, not even the best of the big liners, have
more luxurious accommodations than those provided on
the "Keewatin" and "Assiniboia." Spacious decks, large
and airy cabins, an elegant ladies' ordinary, and large and
finely fitted up smoking rooms, are features of these vessels.
There is also a big dining room on each vessel, capable of
accommodating over 150 at one sitting, and equal in appearance to that of an ocean liner.
The passenger equipment is of the most sumptuous
character. The awning decks are furnished for the accommodation of 198 first-class passengers, fitted in the latest style,
with patent folding berths, and aft of the main entrance in
each ship are five cabins-de-luxe, panelled in mahogany, each
with large brass bedstead and folding sofa. The drawing
rooms are tastefully finished in white enamel and gold, while
the dining rooms, which are capable of seating 150 persons,
are framed in American walnut, with Italian walnut panels.
The huge, rectangular bevelled glass, horizontal sliding
windows, with large dome skylight overhead, give excellent
light and ventilation. The smoking rooms on the after end
of the deck-house are tastefully designed and framed in
light formed oak, with carved panels. The other equipment
is of an equally elaborate and artistic character.
The ships are equipped with wireless telegraphic apparatus
and in fact they may be said to be an advanced type of steamship for the Great Lakes service, and their superb finish and
equipment has made them popular on this route and a credit
to the great transportation company to which they belong.
17
'■■Vi''ftftftft''.ftft':;ftft:ft;ft';ft:ftftft.'^:ftft:::ft:
SUMMER TOURS
From JUNE ist to SEPTEMBER 30th
Tickets will be sold, good for return till
October 31, 1912 (except where otherwise stated).
To Port Arthur and Fort William and Return.
C. P. R. Lake Route, both ways, or
C. P. R. Lake  Route  going,
returning, or vice versa:
Rail
To Sault Ste. Marie and Return.
Via Port McNicoll and Canadian Pacific Railway Great Lakes Steamers
both ways.
Via Owen  Sound and  Northern  Navigation  Co.   Limited, of Ontario,
both ways.
Via C. P. R. Lake Route going, returning via C. P. R. Rail, or vice versa.
To Mackinac and Return.
(About JUNE 17th to about SEPTEMBER 7th)
Via Owen Sound and Steamers of the Northern Navigation Co. of Ontario,
Limited.
Tickets not good after Steamers cease calling at Mackinac.
To Duluth and Return.
Via Lake Route throughout,  Canadian Pacific Railway
Great Lakes Steamships to Port Arthur, thence steamer.
To Western Points via Lake Route.
Tickets will be sold to Chicago, Duluth, Minneapolis, St. Paul,
Winnipeg, etc., etc., going via Lake Steamer routes, returning all-rail, and
vice versa, particulars of which will be furnished on application to any
agent of the Company. 	
For fares for trips quoted above apply to any Agent of the Company.
Meals and Berths on Steamships are included in First-class Fares.
Berth locations in Steamships can be secured through any Agent
of the Canadian Pacific Ry., or at tne office of the City Ticket Agent,
16 King Street East, Toronto.
Enjoying the Cool Breezes on Lake Superior.
 '    „  "  ^
anadian  Pacific  Jbiailway
I;;.:::!:,::
.-    ;.:,-:■:-:
Canadian Pacific Railway Yards at Fort William, Ont.
 25 Quai Jordaens
AGENCIES.
Adelaide Aus... Australasian United States Nav. Co. (Ltd.).,
Amoy" China. . Jardine, Matheson & Co	
Antwerp Belgium..Thomas McNeill, Agent.., ,
Auckland N. Z..Union S. S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)	
Baltimore Md. . Arthur W. Robson, Passenger and Tkt. Agent, 127 E. Baltimore St.
Battle Creek Mich. . E. C. Oviatt, Travelling Passenger Agent 363 Lake Ave.
Belfast Ireland. .Wm. McCalla & Co., Agents 41 Victoria St.
Bellingham Wash..W. H. Gordon, Passenger Agent 113-115 Holly St. W.
lt<.u4.... if.,, 5 F. R. Perry, General Agent, Passenger Dept 332 Washington St.
"08ton  I G. A. Titcomb, City Passenger Agent. 332 Washington St.
Brandon Man. .J. E. Proctor, District Passenger Agent	
Brisbane Qd. .The British India and Queensland Agency Co. (Ltd.)	
Bristol En_. .A. S. Ray, Agent 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Brockvllle Ont..Geo. E. McGlade,   C. T. A Cor. King St. and Court House Ave.
llufToln N V 5 G- H- Griffin, City Passenger Agent.... 302 Main St.
Muuuio rt-1-}C. S. Richardson, District Freight Agent 302 Main St.
(Thos. Cook & Son 9 Old Court House St.
( Gillanders, Arbuthnot & Co	
~. G. McNeillie, District Passenger Agent	
.Jardine, Matheson & Co	
{ Geo. A. Walton, General Agent, Passenger Dept 22. So. Clark St.
( W. A. Kittermaster, General Agent, Frt. Dept.. 230 So. La Salle St.
5 A. J. Blaisdell, General Agent,Passenger Department, 436 Walnut St.
} B. R. White (Freight) 407 Traction Building
Cleveland Ohio..Geo. A. Clifford, C. P. A Cor. Superior and West 3d Sts.
i»<>t—»n Miph S A« E- Edmonds, District Passenger Agent 7 Fort St. W.
(E. Olson,  District Freight Agent. 7 Fort St. W.
. Jas. Maney, Gen'l Passenger Agt., D. S. S. & A. Ry., Manhattan Bldg.
. Chas. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent 139 Howard Ave.
'. B. Winter, Ticket Agent 1515 Hewitt Ave.
Glasgow Scotland.. Thos. Russell, Agent 120 St. Vincent St.
Genoa  Italy. . H. Coe & Clerici, Agents Pizza San Matteo 15
Halifax N.S..J. D. Chipman, City Pass'r and Freight Agent 37 George St.
Hamburg Germany. .C. F. A. Flugge, Agent 8 Alsterdamm
Calcutta India)
Calgary Alta. ,
Canton China..
Chicago III. I
Cincinnati  Ohio \
Duluth Minn.,
Edmonton Alta. ,
E verett Wash.
Hamilton ■ Ont.-
. .China .,
...H. I.,
Kansas City Mo. ■
Hong Kong	
Honolulu	
Melbourne Aus.
Milwaukee Wis. ■
Minneapolis Minn .
Montreal Que. <
, Merriman, City Passenger Agent..
\ W. J. Grant, D. F. A., City Ticket Office. ...Cor. King and James Sts.
. D. W. Craddock, General Traffic Agent, China, etc	
. Theo. H. Davies & Co	
( Edward Merchant, Travelling Pass'r Agent 441 Sheidley Bldg.
\ L. C. Jack, Freight Agent 441 Sheidley Bldg.
Kingston Jamaica..George & Branday, Agents	
Kobe Japan..J. Rankin, Agent 14 A. Maye-machi.
Liverpool Ensland..F. W. Forster, Agent Roval Liver Building, Pier Head
t An;i A„ p„„  S H. S. Carmichael, G. P. A. \ 62-65 Charing Cross S. W. and
London iaro.^T j. Smith, Gen. Frt. Agt. f 67-68 King   William  St., E. C.
London .Ont...W. Fulton, City Passenger Agent 161 Dundas St.
Los Angeles Cal.. A. A. Polhamus, General Agent, Pass'r Dept... 609 South Spring St.
{ Union S. S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)	
\ Thos. Cook & Son	
5 F. T. Sansom, Passenger Agent 100 Wisconsin St.
\ A. G. G. Lauder, Freight Agent 913 Majestic Bldg.
.City Ticket Agent, Soo Line 410 Nicollet Ave.
< A. E. Lalande, City Pass'r Agent 238 St. James St.
\ E. J. Hebert, First Asst. Gen'l Pass'r Agent Windsor Station
Nagasaki Japan. .Holme, Ringer &Co	
Naples Italy. .H. Coe & Clerici, Agents Via' Agostino Depretis 22
Nelson B. C.. J. A. McDonald, District Passenger Agent	
New York N Y j W. H. Snell, Eastern Passenger Agent 458 Broadway
 I International Sleeping Car Co 281 Fifth Ave.
Niagara Falls N. Y. .D. Isaacs Prospect House
Ottawa Ontt. . George Duncan, City Passenger Agent 42 Sparks St.
Paris France..Aug. Catoni, Agent   1 Rue Scribe
Philadelphia Pa. .F. W. Huntington, Gen'l Agt., Pass'r Dept 629-631 Chestnut St.
Pittsburg Pa. . C. L. Williams, Gen'l Agent, Pass'r Dept.,Oliver Bldg., 340 Sixth Ave.
Portland Me. .Leon W. Merritt, Ticket Agent, Maine Cent. Rd Union Depot
Portland Ore i F- R- Johnson, General Agent, Pass'r Dept  .Cor. Third & Pine
         } (Multnomah Hotel.)
Quebec Que. . G. J. P. Moore, City Pass'r Agent 30 St. John St., cor. Palace Hill
Sault Ste. Marie.. .Mich, i ^. J. Atchison, City Passenger Agent 224 Ashmun St.
( W. C. Sutherland, Depot Ticket Agent 	
( W. B. Howard, District Passenger Agent  8 King St.
) W. H. C. Mackay, City Ticket Agent 49 King St.
5 W. M. Porteous, Freight Agent Room 428 Pierce Bldg.
( T. J. Barnes, City Passenger Agent 725 Olive St.
St. Paul Minn..L. M. Harmsen, City Ticket Agent, Soo Line 379 Robert St.
( G. M. Jackson, Gen Agent Pass'r Dept. )
San Francisco Cal. -j Fred L. Nason, City Ticket Aerent V 645 Market St. (Palace Hotel)
( W. W. Smith, District Freight Agent .. )
SonttlA Wash J E- E. Penn, General Agent, Passenger Dept .. . ?71Q o^™*  _--_
Seattle WASH' } J. W. Draper, General Agent, Freight Dept \m Second Ave'
Shangh al China. . A. R. Owen, Agent	
Sherbrooke Que..E. H. Sewell, City Passenger Apent  .6 Strathcona Sq.
Spokane Wash..T. J. Wall, Gen'l Agent, Passenger Dept 603 Sprague Ave.
Sydney Aus..Union S. S. Co. ofJ^ew Zealand (Ltd.)..
Tacoma Wash. .
Toronto Ont. ■
Trieste  Austria.
Vancouver B.C. '
Victoria B.C*
St. John N.B.
St. Louis Mo.-
w.S.Sn^^rtlXX.^'.::::: i16 Kh*street EMt
P. Christofidis, Agent Hotel de Ville
J. Moe, City Ticket Agent  434 Hastings St.
Chas. Millard, Depot Ticket Agent	
L. D. Chetham, City Pass'r Agent 1102 Government St.
Washington D. C.. A.L. Powell, City Pass'r and Frt. Agt.Bond Bldg., 14th St.and N.Y.Ave.
Winnipeg Man. .A. G. Richardson, City Pass'r Agent.. Cor. Main St. and Portage Ave.
Yokohama Japan.. W. T. Payne, Manager Trans-Pacific Line 14 Bund
I 1925 12
20         .*"""'
 Grea4: Lakes Steamship Service
^m<^m\ m;^mc
''"-■!i    *■ ■<' "ft"""' * ■ ft«»i;!S' ■ - •■■■"■-■      m sassft     ,,,,,,-
:■: :" ' '■•■■■■■■ '    ■ " ft    :."•  ■•
Upper Promenade Decks of the  Great Lakes Steamships.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY—Great Lakes Service
Steamships "Athabasca," "Keewatin," "Manitoba," "Alberta" and "Assiniboia."
Commencing May 6th, during May, June, July and August, and until further advised, there will be five sailings per week on the following schedule:
WESTBOUND
Toronto, Union Sta. (Rail) Lve.
Port McNicoll      "     Arr.
Port McNicoll, Steamer. . .Lve.
Owen Sound "        ..Lve.
Sault Ste. Marie     "       . .Lve.
Port Arthur "        . .Arr.
Fort William "        . .Arr.
"Athabasca."
Mon. 12.45 p.m.
Mon.    3.55 p.m.
Mon.    4.00 p.m.
'Keewatin.
Tues. 12.45 p.m.
Tues. 3.55 p.m.
Tues.    4.00 p.m.
Tues.
Wed.
Wed.
2.30 p.m.
1.00 p.m.
2.00 p.m.
Wed. 11.30 a.m.
Thur. 6.30 a.m.
Thur.   7.30 a.m.
Manitoba,"
Wed. 12.45 p.m.
3.55 p.m.
4.00 p.m.
10.30 p.m.
6.30 p.m.
4.30 p.m.
5.30 p.m.
Wed
Wed.
Wed.
Thur
Fri.
Fri.
"Alberta."
Thur. 12.45 p.m.
Thur.   3.55 p.m.
Thur.   4.00 p.m.
"Assiniboia."
Sat.     12.45 p.m.
Sat.      3.55 p.m.
Sat.      4.00 p.m.
Fri.
Sat.
Sat.
2.30 p.m.
1.00 p.m.
2.00 p.m.
Sun.
Mon.
Mon.
11.30 a.m.
6.30 a.m.
7.30 a.m.
E A ST-BOU ND
Fort William, Steamer
Port Arthur "
Sault Ste. Marie  "
Port McNicoll
Port McNicoll
Toronto, Union Sta
. .Lve.
. .Lve.
. .Lve.
,. . Air.
.. Lve.
Arr.
2.00 p.m.
3.00 p.m.
1.00 p.m.
11.30 a.m.
11.45 a.m.
3.15 p.m.
Tues.
Tues.
Wed.
Thur.
Thur.
2.00 p.m.
3.00 p.m.
12.00 noon
8.30 a.m.
8.45 a.m.
Thur.   2.00 p.m.    Fri.       2.00 p.m.    Sat.       2.00 p.m.    Sun.
Thur.   3.00 p.m.    Fri.       3.00 p.m.    Sat.       3.00 p.m.    Sun.
Fri.       1.00 p.m.    Sat.     12.00noon    Sun.      1.00 p.m.    Mon.
Sat.     11.30 a.m.    Sun.      8.30 a.m.    Mon. 11.30 a.m.    Tues.
Sat.     11.45 a.m.    Sun.     8.45 a.m.    Mon. 11.45 a.m.    Tues.
Sat.       3.15 p.m.    Sun.    12.00 noon    Mon.    3.15 p.m.    Tues.    3.15 p.m.    Thur. 12.00 noon
The Steamship Express Train will leave Toronto and Port McNicoll on boat days, and will carry a Parlor Car in both directions.
Connections will  be made at Fort William with Transcontinental Express trains to and from the West; for time, see current folders, Canadian
Pacific Railway. CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY'S GREAT LAKES SERVICE
Steamships "Assiniboia" and "Keewatin"
PROMENADE DECK
A indicates Upper Berth; 3 Lower Berth; C Sofa Berth.
PROMENADE DECK.—All Rooms except 3 and 6 have three berths each; Room 3 has two berths and a long seat; Room 6, two berths and alh
short seat only.
AWNING DECK.—All Inside Rooms except 101 have two berths and a long seat; Room 101 has two berths and a short seat only. |j
All Outside Rooms except 163, 165, 166, 167 and 168 have three berths each; Rooms 163, 165, 166, 167 and 168 are Parlor Roomslj
with bathroom attached.
21
22
 rj )
SPECIAL        7 CO/I Eastern Lines | y|| A Western Lines nii\ Western Lines
CIRCULAR   I t>9*f Port Arthur and East   III!! Man., Sask. & Alta. Divs.
670
British Columbia Div.
To Passenger Traffic Officers
General Passenger Agents
GREAT
Ticket Agents
h. w. BRODIE.
General Passenger Agent,
VANCOUVER
LAKES
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
1920
G. A. WALTON,
General Passenger Agent,
WINNIPEG
W. H. SNELL,
General Passenger Agent,
MONTREAL
C. E. McPHERSON,
Asst. Passenger Traffic Manager,
WINNIPEG
C. B. FOSTER,
Asst. Passenger Traffic Manager,
MONTREAL
 SAILINGS
Port McNicoll—Sault Ste. Marie—Port Arthur-
Fort William Service
Through Tickets may only be issued commencing and ending with—
First Trip Westbound from Port McNicoll, May 29th
First Trip Eastbound   from Fort William,   May 29th
Last Trip Westbound, October 2nd, 1920
Last Trip Eastbound,  October 2nd, 1920
Steamships " Keewatin " and " Assiniboia " do not carry any second-class passengers
Steamships "Keewatin" and "Assiniboia"
Westbound (Read Down)
Sat.
Sun.
Mon.
Thurs.
Fri.
affiftffi-   tf
M>iftff-   tf
laflpiibflfr "
12.30 p.m.    "
7.00 a.m.     *
8.30 a.m.     "
9.00 a.m. CT.
9.15 p.m.     "
Wedrm^^^^^^Lv.:.. r. . . ^TORONTO.:?  Ar
Ar PORT McNICOLL. . Lv,
Lv PORT McNICOLL Ar.
Ar SAULT STE. MARIE Lv.
Lv. .. ., SAULT STE. MARIE Ar.
Ar.. PORT ARTHUR Lv.
Ar. FORT WILLIAM....... Lv.
Lv FORT WILLIAM Ar.
Ar. WINNIPEG Lv.
EASTBOUND (Read Up)
rr.55-a:m. Err.
8.30 a.m. "
8.00 a.m. "
1.00 p.m. "
9.00 a.m. "
1.30 p.m. "
12.30 p.m.    "
11.00 a.m. CT.
10.45 p.m. "
Mon.
Sun.
Sat.
Fri.
Thurs.
Wed.
Tues.
Owen Sound—Sault Ste. Marie—Port Arthur—
Fort William Service
Through Tickets may only be issued during season of navigation commencing May 3rd and
ending about September 30th, from Fort William.
Steamship " Manitoba
ff
WESTBOUND
Monday
a
a
Tuesday
a
Wednesday
5.20 p.m. E.T.
10.45 p.m. "
10.45 p.m. "
6.00 p.m. "
6.00 p.m. "
3.00 p.m. "
4.00 p.m. "
Lv. . .TORONTO (Union Station) Ar.
Ar OWEN SOUND Lv.
Lv OWEN SOUND Ar.
Ar SAULT STE. MARIE Lv.
Lv. . . . . .SAULT STE. MARIE Ar.
Ar PORT ARTHUR. Lv.
Ar FORT WILLIAM Lv.
EASTBOUND
11.35 a.m. E.T.
6.35 a.m. "
6.00 a.m. "
9.00 a.m. "
9.00 a.m. "
1.00 p.m. "
12.00 noon "
Saturday
Fridav
Thursday
Connections made at FORT WILLIAM with Transcontinental Trains.
 -2BES
 WINNIPEG-
XENORA
PORT
ARTHUR.
FORT WILLIAfvV
SUNSET ON LAKE SUPERIOR
SAULT STrfMARIE
CHICAGO {
DETRC
TOLEDOj
c
BUFFALO
.CLEVELAND
PASSING A GRAIN  BOAT
 OWEN SOUND HARBOR
STEAMER PASSING THROUGH LOCKS, SAULT STE.  MARIE
 PORT ARTHUR
 MOST STRIKING VALUE
Does Not Actually Cost Any More to take " Great Lakes" Route than to
Travel "All Rail."
^^■pHE value a passenger places on a trip is not estimated until the journey has been completed.    A satisfied
/1       customer usually makes his satisfaction known to his acquaintances.    The value to the  Line  or office
^^^  responsible for planning the trip is very obvious.    Post yourself on   the   'Values"   you   can   give   your
"prospect" and create a "satisfied customer," which spells perpetual advertising.
The "Great Lakes" trip (about one-fifth the entire distance across the Continent) with all its added
values, delights, and health benefits, can be made for about the same actual cost as a trip via "all-rail" routes.
Regular first-class one-way tickets will be honored via "Great Lakes" upon payment of $5.00 and round-trip
tickets including all-year (9 months) or Summer Tourist Pacific Coast round-trip tickets upon payment of
$10.00. These amounts cover either one-way or round-trip between Owen Sound or Port McNicoll and Port
Arthur or Fort William, and tickets of similar class will be honored between points shown at amounts named:—
BETWEEN
Owen Sound or Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie.
Port Arthur or Fort William and Sault Ste. Marie. . .
Regular First-Class
One-Way
Tickets
.•r $2.50
2.50
Summer Tourist
Round-trip
Tickets
$5,. 00
5.00
As all first-class tickets honored via "Great Lakes" include meals and stateroom accommodation, sleeping
car fares and meals on train for that portion of the journey are saved; therefore trip can really be made at about
the same or lower cost than "all-rail," and all the features briefly enumerated below are gained:—
Comfort
Scenery and
Engineering Features
Maiine Traffic
Meals
Health Benefits
Passenger and Baggage
Transfer
No Trouble at Ports
Train Connections
and Equipment
Ticketing to
Sault Ste. Marie
Westbound
Reservations
Eastbound
Reservations
Further Detailed
Information
Cool, dustless, invigorating trip, permitting^ of uninterrupted refreshing sleep in commodious staterooms, fitted with individual electric berth reading lights. Cabins de luxe
can be obtained at small additional cost.
The beauties of the Georgian Bay, St. Mary's River, Thunder Bay, the Soo Canal and
the locks at Sault Ste. Marie.
Knowledge gained of enormous traffic on the Great Inland Seas. The traffic through
the Soo Canal in seven months is greater than that through the Suez Canal throughout
the entire year.
Large Dining Saloon—perfect ventilation—observation windows. Seating capacity,
115 persons. See page 3 for illustration of sample regular meals served and little special
"touches" given.
Spacious promenade decks, permitting clear view entire horizon—an exclusively C.P.
ship feature.
No transfer charges or waiting—Trains at Owen Sound, Port McNicoll and Fort William
run alongside ships. Hand baggage transferred by ships' crews. Checked baggage
handled through, or may be claimed for use on shipboard and re-checked before disembarking.
Parlor Cars are attached to trains shown on inside of title page between Toronto and
Port McNicoll. Parlor and Dining cars on "day" trains between Fort William and
Winnipeg. Sleeping and Dining cars on "night" trains between Fort William and
Winnipeg.        ..~	
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., and Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., are on opposite sides of the St.
Marys River, which is about half a mile wide at that point. The Canadian Pacific
Great Lakes Steamships use the Canadian Soo Canal and dock on the Canadian side
of the river, but passengers who hold tickets for Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., and their
baggage, are transferred free of charge to the ferry dock, and thence by ferry across the
river. Passengers purchasing tickets for Sault Ste. Marie should be asked whether
their actual destination is Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., or Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., and their
tickets made to read accordingly, the State or Province being shown in each case.
Passengers via Lake Route should be told that if they desire to stop over at Sault Ste.
Marie they should so inform Purser.
Apply to W. H. Polley, City Ticket Agent, Toronto.
Apply to Depot Ticket Agent, Winnipeg.
Obtain copy of "Great Lakes Folder."
PRINTED  IN CANADA

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0362787/manifest

Comment

Related Items