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C. P. Coasters Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1996

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 THE
Co as/,
PRINCESS ALICE
ep'
£
VOLUME 10,    No.3
NEWSLETTER
WINTER  1996
MUG- UP t:me
with Merv Hughes
Is ths summer 1996 issue I made a comparison between the
sinking of the Empress ofIreland'and her loss of passengers
and losses on the Titanic.   I was only trying to point out the
magnitude of the loss not belittle the loss of life on either
ship. The figures I used were a
worst case scenario.
NEWS ITEMS: The Empress of Canada has undergone
another name change, last year she became the Apolloa. In
1972 she became Carnival Cruises Mardi Gras, then Olympic
in 1993, and in 1994 she was known as the Star of Texss for
her gambling vessel days. The Empress of Canada was
launched in 1960.
I am aware that different
numbers on the total loss on the
Titanic exist, some say 1635
(the number I used) - the
American Inquiry, 1517 - British Board of Trade, 1502 -the
British Inquiry, 1490.
Our congratulations to Mr.
H.C. (Bert) Lansdell of
Nanaimo, who attended the
Minor Baseball awards ceremony to present the 'Bert Lansdell Bursary' cheque to this
years winner and found himself
the recipient of an award. The
commissioner of Babe Ruth
Baseball awarded CP. Coaster
Bert Lansdell with the Baseball
B.C. Roll of Honour 'Diamond
Award'. Bert's dedication to
the game started back in 1932
when he lived in Victoria.
Congratulations also to John and Elsie Patrickson, longtime
CP. Coaster members, on their 50th Wedding Anniversary.
In Mr. Fred Skinner's article starting on page 11 of this issue
some eagle eyed readers will note some differences in spelling to
what one might call the norm, however that is not the case, you
are seeing the english spelling and we are happy to leave that
well enough alone.
NO ! NO ! It just seuM&like
JIMMY CAMPBELL on his bagpipes.
Apology to R.F. Outcault and BusterBwwv of 1904.
TORTURED CRUISE SHIP
SINKS.
The S.S. Prince George
which had been in tow to
China to be scrapped sank
during a storm while off
Dutch Harbor in the Aleutians. She was the last of the
coastal steam ships that cruised to Alaska from Vancouver. Since she was built in
Victoria in 1947 the S.S.
Prince George had seen
strandings, fires, and many
owners and is now finally at
peace.
Rumors  persist  that  the
Af. V. JLady Jtose (ex Union
C*  C     ?"*" **   —■ *-«    --..'.-.—1   ~~- -.
*j>.«*».   wv/.,'   ii.nr   uv ii^uxvU Ov'vjaa
after 50+ years of service.
{Info on the Lady Rose is
from the Ship's Log', the
newsletter of the World Ship
Society, Vancouver branch)
Christmas dinners will be held on the following dates;
Victoria, Dec. 7th., Nanaimo, Dec. 11th., Vancouver, Dec. 17th.
See your area Director for more information.
Tie very best in tbe coming Christmas season from all of
us here at The CP Coaster's Newsletter.
Fishing is a jerk on one end of the line waiting for a
jerk on the other end of the line.
 page
PLEASE SEND LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR TO:
Mr. Merv Hughes,
CP Coaster's Newsletter,
5488 Kenwill Drive,
Nanaimo, B.C. V9T 5M5
Canada
Phone (250) 758 3555
Dear Merv;
(From Capt. Hugh Halkett)
Hello Merv: RE: sister ships YARMOUTH & EVANGELINE.
Both were built by William Cramp & Sons of Philadelphia in
1927. 5002 Gross Tons, 380' x 56' Steamturbine 18 kn. 589
1st class passengers 162 2nd class. (They also built what was to
be KAHLOKE, later LANGDALE QUEEN of BC Ferries)
YARMOUTH Ran from Boston to Yarmouth. During the war,
served as an army transport. In 1947 returned to Boston -
Yarmouth service. In 1954 renamed YARMOUTH CASTLE.
In 1955 ran to Bahamas from Florida as QUEEN OF NASSAU.
1956 YARMOUTH CASTLE (again). At this time a pool was
added along with air conditioning in public rooms. Ran to West
Indies from New Orleans and Washington, D.C In 1958 back
on Boston - Yarmouth run as YARMOUTH (again). She was
then fully air conditioned with pass, capacity of 365. 1962 she
ran from San Francisco to Victoria for the Seattle World's Fair,
(pass, to Seattle on MARGUERITE or PATRICIA because of
Jones Act) She then went back to cruises out of Miami of 3 - 4
day duration. Laid up in Miami in April of 1966 and renamed
SAN ANRES. Sold in 1967 to Greek owners and renamed
ELIZABETH A. Laid up and never ran until 1979 in Piraeus
when she was scrapped.
EVANGELINE Originally chartered to Clydeline. 1928 she ran
from New York to Yarmouth. Became an Army Transport
during the war. 1946 returned to passenger service, refitted to
carry 306 1st class pass. Ran Boston to Yarmouth. 1964
renamed YARMOUTH CASTLE. As reported, on 13-11-65
she burned and sank in the Caribbean taking 87 lives.
Hope this clears up some of the confusion over these two
vessels.
Lome Campbell.
EDITOR;
As always, the summer edition of The CP Coasters is of great
interest to an old time B.C.C.S. hand and two references in Jack
Meredith's article on Canadian Pacific wartime managed ships
particularly caught my attention. Jack opines that perhaps "no
more than a score" of CP. Coasters folk will recall the three
"Alexander" vessels calling at Victoria during the 1930's. I can
qualify as one who remembers. As a young lad in Victoria I
belonged to the Rainbow Sea Cadet Corps that had their drill
hall near Rithet's wharf and on parade nights we were always
delighted if one of the vessels H.F., Ruth or Emma Alexander
happened to be in port and further pleased if we could see a
sailing or arrival. They were handsome ships despite their age.
In those days ships looked like ships! Our Sea Cadet Corps, at
the time, was commanded by Commander Tribe, a chef in the
Empress Hotel. We received seamanship instruction from
Captain Kirkendale who had been, or was, Harbour Master at
Victoria.
Of further interest to me in Jack's article was the mention that
Mr. F.S. Minnikin was an engineer aboard "Empire Woodlark"
ex "Emma Alexander" when Canadian Pacific took over her
management for wartime duties. Mr. Minnikin was Second
Engineer aboard the "Crystal Park" when I served aboard her
with Captain L.C Barry, O.B.E., commanding. Mr. Minnikin
used to tell me stories of when he served in the tropical heat
keeping the "old bucket of bolts" running! Perhaps Jack will be
interested to know that his article brought about memories from
many years ago.
As one who was present when the "Motor Princess" rammed
the dock in Sidney I was very much interested to read Fred
Skinner's account of what occurred on that occasion. As Chief
Engineer he would know while I, being Mate, was below for the
landing. We only knew that there had been an error or failure of
some kind from the usual landing routine. Thank you Fred and
best wishes. It is nice to know the actual facts after the passage
of so many yeais. I look forward to your article conceiiiLig the
Canadian-Australasian vessels "Aorangi" and "Niagara. I well
remember them calling at Vancouver and reading the articles in
the newspapers about their arrivals and departures. If I recall
correctly, one of the captains was named "Mickey" Hill.
For now, all the best and regards to former friends ashore and
afloat.
sincerely, Hugh
EDITOR; Hope you two had a great holiday in theYukon Hugh.
My thanks to you Lowe, you have indeed cleaned the murky
waters of die EVANGELINE and YARMOUTH CASTLE.
Two drunks saw a man siphoning gas from a car.
One said to the other, "I hope I never get that thirsty!'
 page 3
A HOLLIDAy CRUISE
With Bill Holliday
Bunkers
Taking on bunkers was a job no one liked to do, but it had to
be done.
I would always take the job seriously as I wanted no oil spills
on my watch. I knew the consequences of an oil spill on the
environment.
I always checked every valve myself as I would take no ones
word for it. I also checked as oil was coming aboard in case a
valve might be leaking and, I am pleased to say, I never had an
oil spill. But I have had my problems taking on bunkers.
One came on a very cold and frosty morning in the Port of
Vancouver while on the PRINCESS PATRICIA. I was a new
junior engineer on the ship, the chief engineer was Charlie
McKay and the second was Charlie Winkle.
When we took on bunkers that morning, the second was in the
office doing his paper work and as they started to get the shore
hose aboard I made sure everything down below was ready.
Word came down 'it's coming aboard', 'OK I'm all ready', I
thought. But a few minutes later the fireman comes after me, he
is having trouble, and I find we have no oil pressure to the
burners. I speed up the pump, open the bleed valves, start the
after stoke hold pumps, open the cross over valves, try the other
tank, still no oil pressure.
We are making black smoke, losing boiler pressure, and the
turbines are slowing down to the generators, so I sent word up
to the chief as to our problems. Chief McKay comes to the top
of the fidley casing and shouts down, ' What the heck are you
doing down there V Just then the generators trip out! A
dreaded blackout! The second and other engineers come down,
the electricians start the diesel power. They try everything I had
tried, but they could not get fuel oil pressure.
So after a conference was held the decision was made to
remove the manhole cover on the tank we were just filling. What
we saw was quite amazing. The bunker oil was all coiled around
like a snake in a semi solid state just like it was frozen or had
come out of a giant tooth paste tube. Now we knew why the
pumps would not work, bunker oil has to be quite hot to flow.
The ships bunker oil line from British America Oil Co. tanks
runs around pier BC and back to the tank circulating, to keep the
oil flow liquid and hot. On this cold frosty morning the oil was
not circulating, so when BA. started to pump the oil on board it
just pushed this cold plug of oil into our tank and pumps.
I did not feel too bad about it even though it happened on my
first bunkering of the PAT, as I was not to blame for the worst
thing an engineer can have, a complete blackout.
This method of taking on bunkers was changed the first time
we had a refit and an extra valve was fitted so taking on bunkers
wouldn't interfere with the steaming of the ship.
This gave the PRINCESS PATRICIA a day tank,
like most oil burning ships have.
V
In For Refit
Members in the hospital or
on the mend at home.
JIMMY GRANT, in
Mount St. Marys,  ,..>•-•
Burdett St., Victoria, BC
DANNY RIGG, in
Victoria General Hospital.
JOHN W. VITAL, in
hospital in Victoria.
A PICTURE
FROM THE
PAST.
f      George Cameron,
Ed Stewart.
Marge Dixon picture
 page 4
The End Of The Silent Time.
by Merv Hughes
On Feb. 1st.. 1999 the long established silent time as marked
on the wireless room clock will end and GMDSS will take
effect. Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS)
will drastically alter the familiar communications at sea which
had become so much a part of seafaring.
The use of Wireless Officers will end too as will the use of
morse code. So, with
an Officer holding a
GMDSS General
Operators Certificate
500 khz will no longer
be used. Instead a
number of automated
and digital systems will
handle traffic and distress calls.
The first wireless
room I would see was
on the Princess
MaguinnamA was the
domain of the Marconi
operator, Mr. Foote.
Mr. Foote also dabbled
in developing photographs and the smells
of that wireless room
were a mix of developer, fix, stop bath and
electronics    along    with
other exotic odours. It was in this radio room that I first saw the
radio room clock, a clock with red wedges radiating from the
centre at 15 - 18 and 45 - 48 minutes past the hour. These red
Art Morgan, W. O. Retired but still at the radio game as VE7AAT
segments marked the silent period, a time when all operators
listened for the weak signal of a ship sending a distress call, or
as we would say an SOS.
Under the new GMDSS regulations communications will be by
various automatic methods. These include satellite, terrestrial
radio telex and radiophone and Digital Selective Calling (DSC).
It is proposed that there will be seven frequencies set aside for
the use in sending a distress alert by ships' officers on DSC.
These seven frequencies will be monitored by computers on land
based stations and when a distress alert is detected an alarm will
be sounded to attract the operator's attention. This system would
be on watch 24 hours a day and has the ability to give the
receiving operator further information on the readout of the DSC
controller ; information such as the ship's identity, her position,
type of distress, etc. However the problems which have been
pointed out at this early date are ones which need to be
addressed, ie; a user complained that he received 57 false alarms
in a week. That unit is now turned off.   Each unit has a high
cost, from $60,000 to
$85,000(US). And who
is to look after and
maintain this equipment, the mates?
So, gone will be the
W/T alarm signal (12
four second dashes
separated by one
second spaces) which
was sent on 500 khz
and the warbling two-
tone R/T alarm signal
wh'oh was sent on
2,182 khz.
The last historic silent
period will be between
1145 - 1148 on January
31, 1999, unless an
'SOS' is heard, or a
ghostly 'CQD', the first
morse code distress sig-
nel used  until   1912,  it
will truly be the end of the silent time, {the TITANIC used both
CQD and SOS in her distress calls in 1912.)
Info from Sea Breezes & The World Wireless Beacon.
 page 5
CP COASTER'S  CLUB
The OFFICERS
President-   TomSoames
Vice/Pres-   HanyBurchill
Sec/Tres-   Leo Noakes
AREA DIRECTORS
Nanaimo- Jack Foster
Vancouver- Don Murray
Victoria- George Heron
PUBLICATIONS
-Merv Hughes
CP. Coaster's membership is
open to all employees and
former employees of B.C.
Coast Steamships.
For more information write;
Mr. T. Soames,
4628 198 C St.,
Langley B.C. V3A 5S4
THE NEWSLETTER CREW
PUBLISHER/EDITOR
Merv Hughes
ASSISTANT EDITOR
Jack Lenfesty
SUBSCRIPTIONS
Len Noakes
For subscription information
write to:
Mr. Len Noakes,   -"'
1905 San Pedro Ave.,
Victoria BC, Canada
V8N 2G7
NOTE
Please make
cheques & money orders
payable to CP COASTER'S
IT IS WITH DEEP SORROW
WE RECORD  THE PASSING
OF THESE FRIENDS
Mr. ED  MORGAN
July 24th., 1996
Lynnwood, Wash., USA
********
Captain LEO STEIL
Aug. 30th., 1996
Vancouver, BC
********
Do not stand at my grave and weep;
I am not there. I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autum's rain.
When you awaken
in the morning's hush.
I am the swift uplifting jush
of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry;
I am not there.   I did not die.
VICTORIA
COFFEE PARTY
is held the first Saturday
of each month at the
CHERRY BANK HOTEL
825 Burdett St., from
10:00 to 12:00
VANCOUVER
COFFEE PARTY
is held on the third
Tuesday of the month •
from 10:00 to 12:00
at the
METRO CENTRE HOTEL
on Kingsway in Burnaby
NANAIMO
COFFEE PARTY
;    is held theJuUsLMoiiasy
of each month at
CHARLIE'S
123 Commercial St.,
09:30 to 11:00
(if Mon. is a statutory holiday then
the coffee party will be on Tuesday)
 page 6
The Start To The End Of The Line.
C.P.R. B.C. COAST SERVICE
by Jack Meredith.
The Spring 1996 edition of the CP. Coaster's 'Newsletter',
under the title "END OF THE LINE" by Leonard McCann,
provides us with the sailings that brought the operations of the
C. P. R.'s British Columbia Coast Steamships in and out of
Vancouver to an end. On October 28th 1995, the afternoon
departure of the "Carrier Princess" and the morning departure
of the "Princess Superior" from Vancouver harbour marked
the completion of a long and memorable era of C.P.R. marine
activity into and out of the port. It was, indeed, the end of the
line.
Those of us who attended the May 21st 1996 Annual Meeting
of the C P. Coaster's in Vancouver were given photocopies of
the Manager's Log Book for May 15th 1903 in which Captain
James Troup entered the comments, under the Canadian Pacific
Navigation Company heading, that "All property operated by C
P. R. on and after this date May 15 1903. Fleet put under C P.
R. flag today". We could deduce from the Log Book that the
"START OF THE LINE" from Captain Troup's perspective
was on the 15th of May, 1903. On that date S. S. "Princess
Victoria" was in Vancouver as was the sternwheeler "R. P.
Rithet". The "Charmer" was en route from Victoria to
Vancouver and return and the sternwheeler "Beaver" was on
the ways in Vancouver. There is no doubt, however, that the
very experienced and capable Captain Troup managed and
operated the fleet as a C P. R. entity from the time of his
appointment as Manager on March 5th 1901 and that the
Canadian Pacific Navigation Company had existed only in name
since the purchase of a majority of it's shares (a controlling
interest) on January 12th 1901 by the C P. R.
Selective reference to the Manager's Log Books since that
time provide us with a glimpse of the size of the fleet and the
scope of operations on selected dates. We have chosen Tuesday,
May 21st 1918 ( a time of intense world conflict); Sunday, May
21st 1933 (a time of worldwide economic depression); Wednesday May 21st 1947 (a time of recovery from the effects of the
second world war); and May 21st 1976 (a time of declining
fortunes for the fleet).
Our thanks to Dr. Wallace Chung of Vancouver for providing
us with the reference material for this article.
S.S. PRINCESS MARY,    Vancouver, B.C.,   Tuesday, June 23rd., 1925
 page 7
T.OG ROOK Tuesdav. Mav 21st 1918
NAME
FROM
TO
EMPLOYED/
Prss Victoria
At Victoria
REMARKS
Prss Charlotte
Victoria
Vanc/Sea/Vic
Prss Adelaide
Victoria
Sea/Vanc/Vic
Prss May
Vancouver
Anyox
Prss Mary
Vancouver
Victoria
dep 11:45 p.m.
Prss Beatrice
Vancouver
Butedale
Prss Alice
Victoria
Vancouver
dep 11:45 p.m.
Prss Sophia
Victoria
Alaska
Prss Royal
At Victoria
Laid up
Prss Patricia
Vancouver
Nanaimo
(2 trips)
Prss Maquinna
Victoria
West Coast
Prss Ena
At Vancouver
Charmer
Victoria
Nanaimo/Union Bay/Comox/Powell
River
Tees
At Vancouver
B.C. Marine
Otter
Victoria
Gulf Islands
Nitinat
Vancouver
Esquimalt
with Transfer #4
Qualicum
Vancouver
Esquimalt
with Transfer #2
Nanoose
Esquimalt
Ladysmith/Vancouver
with Transfer #3
Ladysmith.)
Transfer #1
Transfer #6
Vancouver
Newport & rtn in tow of tug "Heno"
At Esquimalt
Transfer #7
At Genoa Bay
Scow #1
At Victoria
hired by Imperial Munitions Board.
Scow #2
At Victoria
-
Princess Mary
FALL AND WINTER SCHEDULES
In Effect October 16, 1911
British   j,   JSjT"*!      Steam
Columbia |fHL._jB^     Ship
Coast    j Service
THE
"PRINCESS" LINE
Van-    fe
couver
Victoria
Seattle
Upper Fra»er River
Queen Charlotte Island*
Nanaimo    Union    Comox
Gulf   IsUnds   Route
West Coast Vancouver Uland
British Columbia Coamt Canneries
m. w- aaooiE. i. w. «our
(7 IT bunker coal loaded on #3 at
Transfer No.3
 page 8
T.OG BOOK Sunday. May 21st 1933
NAME FROM TO
Prss Kathleen At Victoria
Prss Marguerite At Victoria
Prss Victoria At Nanaimo
Prss Charlotte Victoria Vanc/Sea/Vic
Prss Adelaide Pr Rupert Vancouver
Prss Alice Victoria Sea/Vanc/Vic
Prss Louise At Victoria
Prss Elizabeth Vancouver Nanaimo & rtn 10:00
Prss Joan Victoria Vancouver
Prss Mary Comox Powell River/Vane
Prss Norah Skagway Vancouver
Prss Maquinna Victoria Port Alice
Prss Patricia At Victoria Laid up VMD
Prss Elaine At Victoria Laid up
Prss Ena At Victoria
Nootka At Victoria Laid up Thetis Cove
Motor Princess At Victoria Laid up VMD
Charmer At Victoria Laid up Thetis Cove
Kyuquot Vancouver Ladysmith & rtn
Qualicum At Victoria Laid up Thetis Cove
Nanoose Vancouver James Island
Transfer #3 At Vancouver Laid up
Transfer #4 At Vancouver Laid up
Transfer #6 At Vancouver Laid up
Scow #1 At Victoria Laid up VMD
Scow #2 At Victoria Laid up VMD
EMPLOYED/REMARKS
Laid up
Laid up
Lay-over
2:15 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
Laid up
Vancouver Victoria Midnight
Midnight
arr 8:15 am; 13 pass & 14T cargo
dep 11p.m.
Out of comm—Thetis Cove
with Transfer #8
with Transfer #7
Princess Charlotte
Charmer
II     I lll»ll«IB    Illl
3f
Princess Kathleen
, ^jtei-tod-^-4,
Princess Norah
JWjfgg
Steam Tug Kyuquot
Princess Elizabeth
 page 9
LOG BOOK Wednesday, May 21st 1947
NAME
Prss Adelaide
Prss Alice
Prss Charlotte
Prss Elaine
Prss Elizabeth
Prss Joan
Prss Kathleen
Prss Louise
Prss Maquinna
Prss Mary
Prss Norah
Prss Victoria
Motor Princess
Nootka
Kyuquot
Point Grey
FROM
Pr Rupert
Vancouver
Seattle
Nanaimo
Victoria
Drydock Victoria
At VMD
At Vancouver
Chamiss Bay
Comox
Vancouver
Vancouver
Sidney
In Drydock
Ladysmith
Nanoose Bay
TO
Vancouver
Vic/Seattle
Vic/Vancouver
Vancouver & rtn      (2 trips)
EMPLOYED/REMARKS
ISSUED SEPTEMBER 2, 1941
Vancouver
dep midnight
dep 23:35
All Times Showr
In This Folder Ar
Pacific Standarc
PacificMonarch      Ladysmith
Scow #1 Newcastle Island
Scow #2 At Victoria
Victoria
Westview/Vanc
Pr Rupert
Nanaimo & rtn
Steveston & rtn
Vancouver & rtn
Vancouver & rtn
Vancouver & rtn
Shrine Excursion
Vane/Vic dep midnight
(2 trips)
with Transfer #9
with Transfer #3
with Transfer # 1
Bathing Float
Laid up
VANCOUVER - HEATTIX
VANCOUVER - VICTORIA
VANCOUVER - NANAIMO
VICTORIA - SEATTLE
PRINCE RUPERT
ALASKA
Vancouver   -   Powell River
Comox
Vancouver   -   Ocean Falls
Prince Rnpert
West Coast Vancouver
Island
Gclf Island!
Steveston    -    Sidney
NOTE:   The Point Grey and the Pacific Monarch were tugboats on charter to the company.
LOG BOOK May 21st 1976
NAME
Prss Patricia
Prss of Vancouver
Trailer Princess
Carrier Princess
Seaspan Doris
Haida Transporter
FROM
Skagway
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
TO
Vancouver
Nanaimo & rtn
Swartz Bay & rtn
Nanaimo & rtn
Nanaimo & rtn
Nanaimo & rtn
EMPLOYED/REMARKS
(3 trips)
Vanc/Swartz Bay (2 trips)
Princess of Vancouver
Carrier Princess
NOTE: The Seaspan Doris and the Haida Transporter were vessels on charter to die company.
*»
 page 10
In Search of Efficiency
by Fred Skinner
Royal Mail Motor Ship AORANGI
Union Steam Ship Company of New Zealand
In 1925 two Shipping Companies, one in the Southern
Hemisphere and the other at a similar latitude in the Northern
Hemisphere, made remarkable moves in ship design to improve
efficiency and cope with the growing demand for transportation
across the Pacific on the one hand and, on the other, meet the
obvious increase in demand for Automobile transportation from
and to the Mainland and Vancouver Island and adjacent islands.
For the Union Steamship Co. of New Zealand, the JR. M. S.
S. Niagara needed a partner in the Service under the Canadian
Australasian Flag from Sydney, Australia to Vancouver, B.C.,
with way ports, Auckland, Suva and Honolulu and Victoria on
the way north only.
The Company's research and experience indicated that it was
time to look seriously at Diesel propulsion' machinery: A fine
hull of 17,000 tons with a cruiser stern, four propellers directly
connected to four main engines, four thousand horsepower each,
of the Sulzer design, of the two stroke cycle and supercharged at
approximately 116 R.P.M., giving a service speed of 16 to 18
knots. This vessel was built and engined at the Fairfield Yards
on the Clyde in Scotland and was the largest Diesel powered
passenger vessel yet built. It was named the RJifJlf.S. Aorangi
(in the Maori language 'Cloud Piercer').
For the B.C. Coastal Service of the CP.R., Captain J. W.
Troup and a group of naval architects designed the first Diesel
 page 11
engined automobile ferry. It was built at Yarrows Ltd. in
Esquimalt in ninety days. Driven by two propellers directly
connected to six cylinder four stroke cycle, Mcintosh and
Seymour diesel engines, this vessel, called the Motor Princess,
was capable of a speed of 14 knots. One important omission
caused manoeuvring problems for the next twenty years.
And now we come to the connection between these two
vessels. Both were fitted with 'air blast' fuel injection systems.
The Aorangi was a school for young engineers to learn
firsthand about the operation of the air blast system, studied
during their studies and necessary for qualification. The valve
arrangements for the control of the air blast pressure, while
starting, soon becomes very fapuliar. For manoeuvring, absolute
control of this pressure is imperative. The MotorPrincess'had
neither the valves nor gauges for this purpose until 1946. The
storage air bottle was normally kept at 1,400 PSI with valve
opening directly into the blast injection line. Operation of the
Injection Valve during starting caused the high pressure air to
expand to much lower temperatures in the cylinder causing
ignition failure until the bottle pressure reached approximately
550 PSI. This pressure was not enough to increase power and
speed. The starting air used to try these starts would also turn the
propellers and the vessel would move away from its moorings -
a totally confusing and nerve racking situation for the Bridge
personnel. Before recommissioning in 1946, a Company
engineer, an ex-Aorangi Senior Engineer Officer, inspected the
Engine room and adequate valves and gauges were installed for
the move to Esquimalt where large 2,000 lb/sq. in. gauges and
healthy sized 'knock up' valves were mounted on each engine
control console. With this, manoeuvring troubles were over.
There had.been numerous mentions of the vibration 'inherent'
in the operation of the Motor Princess's main engines. Smooth
running is governed by equal amounts of fuel for each cylinder.
During the 1945 overhaul the twin check valves in the fuel
supply to each injector were found to be in a sad state. This
would allow the high pressure air at the injector to force back
some of the fuel. The Belleville Street Workshops helped restore
the valves to 'as new' condition. There was no more vibration.
A distortion test of the crankshaft webs revealed gross
misalignment. The engine bases were moved to give a near zero
deflection, and secured. The installation of a pyrometer,
switchable to individual exhausts, allowed full power runs to be
governed by the hottest cylinder. It also played an important part
in setting the fuel pumps for even power output and subsequent
control of vibration.
As most auxiliaries were steam operated, it was important to
maintain a steady steam pressure. Redesign of the floor of the
boiler combustion chamber to provide air in the correct areas for
a new design burner and a controlled pressure fuel pump, made
for much better control of the boiler operation. With a 12.5%
C02 flue gas the Motor Princess was running with a 'faint
haze' at the funnel top.
With Captain Johnny Campbell in command, full speed
emergency stops and reversals were carried out problem free,
but 'full power stops' and 'coasting' presented another problem.
The cooling to normal temperatures for manoeuvring would be
controlled satisfactorily if the engines were immediately reversed
and the power gradually brought down. Normal manoeuvring
was then possible.
Discussion with the Bridge resolved into two 'Standing
orders' sufficient to guarantee faultless manoeuvring. A 'Stand
By' order at an arranged distance from the dock would provide
time to reduce the power to 'normal' manoeuvring temperatures.
As the fuel was heavy 'Bunker C the fuel would be changed
over to Diesel oil for manoeuvring, at the same time. A 'Stop
Both Engines' at full power was regarded as an emergency stop
and engines would be stopped ready for the 'Astern' order to
follow, thus reducing heat gradually by keeping the engines
moving.
A 'Stop Both Engines' at full power followed by 'drifting'
was definitely not allowed, for obvious reasons.
From the first day of the 1946 season to the end of its
passenger carrying life, the Motor Princess had a system that
provided faultless manoeuvring.
V
About the only place two heads
are better than one is on a ship.
 page   12
PICTURES FROM THE PAST
S£?-~-xr ■   wf
( Sorry no dates on these pictures )
'Red' McGrath, Josie Brander, Brenda?, Herb White,
Kathy Powell, Kay Massey    Marge Dixon picture
Billy Muldrew, Cyril Gagnon, Alec Findlay, (?)
Marge Dixon picture
Can you help us with this photo? NITINAT alongside SIBERIAN ??, NEWCASTLE
This photo was in a packet sent to us by Mrs.T. Veitch and were from her father-in-law.
Ada Foster (top), Kay Williams
Marge Dixon picture
i*IGliS_ In an Acapulco hotel:
'The manager has personally passed all the water
served here.'
He was so unpopular they had to tie a porkchop around
his neck to get the dog to play with him.
 page 13
A Sentimental Journey
With pictures from NICK DYKSTRA.
• m
Back... not known, front L-R: not known, JEANNIE WOOD,
JEAN LUCAS (Luby), ANN YORK
Left - right: not known, JEANNIE WOOD, JEAN LUCAS (Luby)
JEAN LUCAS (nee Luby) Princess Elaine
 THERE ARE SOME LEFT.
they migrate up the Gulf of Georgia.
by Merv Hughes
As you drive north past Qualicum Bay, past Denman Island,
you come to the village of Royston and it is here that the
remains of the tugs NANOOSE and QUALICUM lie, both
placed there in 1946. It has been reported that these two were
the last of the CP Coast Steamships' steam tugs but that is not
correct as the KYUQUOT was the last, being sold for scrap in
1962.
Along with the CP vessels at the breakwater there are a number
of other ships, the steel clipper CZ2, (ex ISLAND FORESTER, ex PACIFIC FORESTER, ex JAMES DOLLAR, ex
OROTAVA, originally COMET), the great five masted
FOREST FRIEND, built in Aberdeen, Washington in 1919, the
1500-ton, World War I auxiliary schooner LAUREL WHA-
LEN, built in Victoria at Cameron-Genoa Mills Shipbuilding,
the steel hulled windjammer RIVERSIDE, and the SALVAGE
The 1624 ton Clipper Ship MELANOPE, launched in Liverpool in 1876 is seen here in far better days.
The breakwater that holds the remains of these tugs is also the
last resting (rusting ?) place of the MELANOPE, an old iron
and steel clipper ship that was used by the CPR to bunker the
great white Empresses in Vancouver with coal from the mine at
Union Bay. The job of towing the MELANOPE was done by
many tugs. The DOLA, the NANOOSE, and the QUALICUM
no doubt had their turn at this as well.
This breakwater was formed by a logging company to protect
the booming grounds from the prevailing south east swells as
KING, (ex ATR 13) along with others including vessels from
the Canadian Navy.
The loggers are all gone now and new housing developments
are fast changing the shore at Royston. How long this
breakwater will last is difficult to say as I understand there is a
move afoot by some who live in the area to have this 'eye sore'
broken up and taken away. Then there would truly be nothing of
our ships left.
 page  15
The First Canadian Merchant Marine Casualty of WWII
Anchor - Donaldson Line Turbine Steam Ship ATHENIA
Stewardess Hannah Baird of Verdun Quebec was lost on the
Donaldson Liner S.S. ATHENIA(l) which was sunk 10 hours
after war was declared on Sept. 3, 1939. The ship was sunk by
the action of the German submarine U30 200 nautical miles west
of the Hebrides in position 56° 44'N - 14° 05'W. 112 died.(4)
The turbine steamer S.S. ATHENIA was built for the Anchor -
Donaldson Line in 1921 by Fairfield of Glasgow, and launched
on Jan. 28, 1922. She was 13,465 GRT with 9,000 SHP and was
built to carry 516 cabin class and 1000 3rd. class passengers,
with a crew of 300. In 1933 the passenger accommodation was
changed to 314 cabin class, 310 tourist class, and 928 3rd. class.
In 1935 the owners changed their name to Donaldson Atlantic
Line and the ATHENIA with her sister ship the S.S. LETITIA
spent most of their time on the Glasgow - Montreal run.
The sinking cf the ATHEfcKA, the first Submarine victimof the
Second World War, was against the emphatic German order that
no action should be taken against passenger ships for the time
being. The sinking was denied on the German side during the
war. Of the 1400 civilian passengers aboard 118 died. (5)
The first Canadian Military casualty was on Sept. 10th. 1939,
seven days after the sinking of the S.S. ATHENIA.(l)
The U30 which torpedoed the ATHENIA was scuttled on 4
May, 1945 in Kupfermuhlen Bay.(2)
The U30 was commanded by Lieutenant Fritz-Julius Lemp
when she sank the ATHENIA and in a strange quirk of fate this
same commander was transfered to the U110, and on May 9,
1941, off the coast of Iceland he was caught when he attacked
an armed convoy and was forced to the surface where he and a
number of his crew were killed, and the U110 abandoned. The
destroyer H.M.S. BULLDOG was able to lower a whale boat
with armed crew and board the deserted submarine. Lieutenant
Lemp had failed to destroy his Enigma cipher machine and code
books! Seized by the British, they contributed to one of the
most significant intelligence breakthroughs of World War 11.(3)
While the ATHENIA was a British vessel she was on a regular
run to Montreal, and it is assumed that Stewardess Baird was on
board as a replacement crew member. Old timers claim that the
British ships- paid better than Canadian ships during the
depression, so replacing crew on a British vessel would be a
much sought after job.- "
(1) from 'The Red Duster'       (2) from the 'World Wide Web'
(3) from Time-Life books 'Seafarers 'series, (U-Boats)
(4) from 'Great Passenger Ships of the World', vol 2
(5) some sources claim 112, others claim 118 died.
Thanks to Captain Robert (Bob) McCoy for suggesting this most
interesting story and supplying info, from 'The Red Duster'.
Also thanks to Capt. George Lott for retrieval of
informadon on U30 & UIIO by computer from the
'World Wide Web 'at Iceland. Vj
 page 16
WHAT'S IN A WORD
Remember when hippie meant big in the hips,
And trip involved travel in cars, planes and ships?
When pot was a vessel for cooking things in,
And hooked was what grandmothers rug may have been ?
When neat meant well organized, tidy and clean,
And grass was a ground cover - normally green?
When acid etched metal instead of man's mind,
And the pill was a cure of a quite different kind ?
When groovy meant furrowed with channels and hollows,
And birds were winged creatures like robins and swallows ?
When union meant marriage of two, hand in hand,
And pickets were used to fence in one's land ?
When fuzz was a substance real fluffy like lint,
And bread came from bakeries - and not from the mint ?
When roll meant a bun, and rock was a stone,
And hang-up was something you did with a phone ?
It's crazy, man, crazy - but english it's not,
Methinks that our life style is starting to rot!
With apologies to an unknown author.
Thanks to Captain George Lott for the above.
My dog had worms, so the vet told me
to feed him lots of garlic.
Now his bark is worse than his bite.
A valiant young sportsman named Fisher
Once fished from the edge of a fissure.
A fish with a grin
Pulled the fisherman in;
Now they 're fishing tbe fissure for Fisher.
One day he drank some furniture polish by mistake.
He had a fine finish !
c.
P. COASTER'S
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 y
CANADIAN    PACIFIC    RAILWAY    COMPANY
British    Coluntia    Ccast    Steamship    Service.
Lctcria, B.C.  November 18th 1936.  b.
Td:-
Hariy Janes ^^uxragrt f5<k.t
 _S£S23?l§?j_5*-5»	
Fiease note that for payroll, pension and all
other purposes your permanent number is.. rr.,............, and no natter
-* ,
what your ship <&  departrent in the company^ sei*vice ;nay be that number
will always apply.
If and when transferred it will be your duty to
advise your new supervising officer what your number is and to see that
it is correctly shewn on the payroll^
Kindly acknowledge receipt by signing and
returning to me the attached duplicate of this letter*
K. W« McMirray.
M a n a g e r«
Enclos.
 FORM   102   Qim*
CANADIAN  PACIFIC RAILWAY  COMPANY
FILE OR CLAIM
Vancouver, July 9,  193 8.
Mr. Harry J. Murray,
Third Officer,
s.s. "Princess Louise"
Dear Sir:
Referring to conversation regarding your seniority as
Deck Officer.
I have to advise that upon investigation I find that
your promotion to Junior Officer on the "Princess Maquinna" was
only for the period of one trip, and that you were not given the
next permanent appointment as Junior Officer.
Therefore, your seniority will only date from when
you received your permanent appointment, which was on August 22nd,
1929, and the Seniority list now shows as below:
Fred E. Buroh
James M. Gillison
Harry J. Murray
July 7, 1929
July 7, 1929
Aug.22,  1929
Yours faithfully,
Marine Superintendent
 CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RAILWAY  COMPANY
BRITISH    COLUMBIA    COAST    STEAMSHIP    SERVICE
OFFICE   OF  THE   MARINE   SUPERINTENDENT
814003
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
April 2,   1928.
Mr. H. J. Murray,
Seaman,
PRINCESS ROYAL.
Bear Sir:
I have to acknowledge receipt of your
letter of March 31st applying for a position as
Junior Officer in this Company's steamers.
Please call and see me at my Office in
Vancouver on some convenient date, as., although
there are no vacancies at present, it is necessary
for me to have a personal interview with you before
any application can be considered.  When you call
at my office please bring this letter with you.
Yours fa
uMi
R\'7McM/D Marine Superintendent.
 'Xfffif'X
.ft
X
i
 Tromt- Mostar.   s.a.   a;":-:i ;C2.^: ..>i--. 'iOUiTiZ'i'K".
|gjj d..j.t.o.  pg£§ is&Jkz
;ubJooti-  Losa  of ghi? d.yto  ?.o   --.aejay .action.
Jata;«     Auauat   i?tb.   I3J2g
The  aiiip  left  Africa   3«aia  aa   par  i .atruosioaa  froa yoarsalf sad
;..J. 3.3. ,   at  1030  on  17th  Aagaat,  19^2,  wtta  froopa   sad  aquipsaeat,   our
de*t:.aatioa  boiag  yasaag^dta,   (Cyyrua).    Th*-follow!ag  ^hipa sar*  la
aoiapnay:- 3.3S. i«  Aatwerp  { ioauaodora)   »;;.i   vuraa  Doatroyara;  H.&.J*
Jii-iUfort,   Tetoott,   and    iaro.
•.ft.*r dlaeaargl-ig;  .ilot   (nt   3ooa)   speed  was   aet   far 9  kaota   uatil
and   of   asopt    ;'.;aaaal.
?ha   vidua 1   Ioo-.out3   a ;d   .\. >.   ^turners wara   pieced*
i.rrivod at, .tad of jMsspt -jti-triXial at 1246, ipas^ las r,aea ord«»*#d Tor
la iuota, Course 0.:0, i:-d .ig«*-i&g -«q 19 aoaaeaeed (aeoaad hour) (aa
oriarod  by -oisrsodaro),   v.   r :a^a dlajjraa of our  forxatioa   follows :-
1  J«jitroyf>r
1  Deatr.yer Antwerp 1  destroyer
■■yi:iC8J8  ^arfltuarita.
1330  to I33O,   Boat  Drill   fir   $a«  Troops was  asid,   tAs? «ors stud tared
at   t-iair ap-oiated  place*  aeariag  taeir  Lifebelts,   aati ;'ivea
l;straotioa.3   (sigaala explained,   rw «it   60  do   1.;  eaao  of ©aorgaaay,
ate)   by tha a Sip* a offlaera.
At 1^00   aourae was  nitarad   to O36  asd  aia-aig  ao^tiauad.
*astbar coaditioss at no tiao baiag; .Ligat viesterly breeze, al ight
3ea,   flaw   and   clear.
All want wail  uatil 1507,  waaa besvy oxpiosloa toois place,   sb&fcisg
tue   sbip vieleatly  froa  atea to  atcra,   followed  by  the  roar of
aeeapiag  ata&a  (   I «sa   fluag  acroaa my roosa -as; era   t waa  Just about
to  ait dowa &.sd work  aut'aa obeervatioa)•
I went  oa   tha  bridge  immediately,   the  Officer oa wateh tsformiag am
we bad beea bit  oa  tha   Jort  aldo about aaldahipe,  h«  bad already ruag
"itop'8 oa tha Sisgiseroom telegraphs aad was attessptiag to give tbe
Saergeaey al&aals  oa  tbe   bells aad   tiso  steaa ebistle,   these however
aad  beea  put  out  of aotioa  by the explosioa.
3so5ce was  billowi;i&  oat  of  fiaa   i'orward ato^eaold  ventilators,   and  tbe
aoaoaaodatioa on  tha   3c>at   3««lc •abnft  tha  officers  fjuertare,   tiiia waa
foliowad  by   fire,   wiiioh   bef?.->n   to  apra&d   rapidly   fore  and  aft   ^rougboat
t:so  abip,(wuiah bad »e*i.9hll«  awaHf, slowly ev-iuod  to  port  a..i   cois©
to  1   3tti;«d3till  baftdi.-,^   sbout   3outh  (1*0).
 I   at    )3C8   ^JiVa    »i>a    iruer    io   -»oauao;i   o.,^    «    *.._       . . ...	
orders   by  word   of a.-utb*     'ilia   -i   incb  gun  «a  aanr-ad   sad  i rsiaed   is
caao- op: ortunity for a j.iot   should uriae.
tha   Coafideutisl   lioo&a,   ^ailiag  Orders,   and   Coafideatial  Doaumeats
wsrs  placed la  woigated  bags   (Kapt   for  taia  purpoao),   dropped
overboard, end   saoi;   to  .>ln*.
UbS  ^baadea  ship evoiufcioa w»a  carried out ^raotioally %g at Drill,
boa5a  sad  buoy-i;:ey apparatus  placsd  iate  tbe  water   .3   laiokly 59
poaaibie,   aad   'i&oaa  Troops  aet   is  boats,   ordered   so   juxa,? ovarboard,
^at   onto,   or  bold   onto   »na  b»oyaaoy  apparatus,   and   :sa»ca   tor   *.bo
destroyer   (Haro),   waieb w*a   ^candl^g by  aioae   io,   ^o   pioic up
fbrae  of   6as   boata   oa   t&e   ;ort   oide ware   iJlowa   So   piseas   by  the
initial  explaaloa,   eobi^  doors ?fare  aioo  blowo   off,   and   tbe   Longitudinal
huicaa&da   oa   aba  upper  da';ks   i;s   tbe   port   i-d    starboard   pft aa a go way a
sere    .lao   'aloon  6pea,   **ad   "ire   r^jed   siirough   lata   t,bia   xoooaodatioa
froa  tba   atoxebalis*
,\t  1?30   sona   Cuel   oil  on   tbe  water   *loagaide   1..*   port   ^ida  of   tbe
sal?   took   rire,   as^iag  »  cor.a  derabla  blase atretoaiag   *,.-a   laa^th  of
:::-.a   3b i p.
3poa   «bia,   tbo   Offlaera  and  omw  aurriad   t..e   ?«a;«iai-,«#   :*roo pa   >var   tbe
at^rboard   Jida   ia   *ii  aaanera   ;;oajlble   {i.«i^^   .~ir»j  booe3  -'.a  ropau
L.. aoaa o^aaa;   teliiiU^   taost  ta  strike  ous   .Tros  *ba   ahlp  v.jw.<rlo   the
destroyer aa  move.
?.«   fire  bad   ay   tala  ^i^e  out  all   ae~aa   s>f  aoaauai jk tloa   oat wee a
Oiie  aid  of   tbe    -bip  asd   iba ouer,
T:«    suip waa  aoapietely *b=isdoaed  by 15*i.">»   **d   s^nte  iu  155^*
"?\o   oil  oa  '.be  aata?  buraed  itaelf out  abortiy  afterwards*
:v ry   praiao  1<j  due   %:i@   droops   for   *ae *ny   -uoy   Uebavad,   '-bare   aelag
ao  Ttsaic of any description*
Tbe   approxiaate  poaitioa  of tbe  Torpedo bit appears to   ;*»•  beea at
tbe  athwartahlpe  bulkhead  hetweeo Soa  2  »ud  3  fuel  oil   taaka  port  aide,
taeae  taaiia are 16   feet  deep,   it   is  aot  kaowa «:.a. bapeaed la the
caae  of No  3  fuel  oil  taa,k  aad   tbe   aj?ter  atoiccbolda*
3illiaa  Sutler   (   Assistant  -iagir;eer}   wna  an duty at  the  tiae,  0 ad  waa
ia  tie   forward   atokebold  aad   be   reporta:-
Tlio iaaer bulkbead of -lo 2 fu»i oil taaS opeaed up »ud flooded tha
forward atofeebold witb fuel oil, tbe floor latea in the stokebold
were dislodged by tbe  blast*
Butler •soaped  o-rar  tbe   treses aad  taaSctopa  to  the  ladder sad  &aiaed
'-he deak above,   be  was  staved froa severe  ateaa buras by tbe  oil in
which ba was covered.
I -ac ver^   proud  of  tbe  baU*viour of ay  orew,  both  "Snropeaa aad  Chinese,
?bey carried oat   taeir several  AuSlea uador aoat  tryiag ooadltloas,
aad   I «yaid aay full  goi of tbea swam for it.
[   si jh  pftrtiouiariy   %o   ->riaa  to   y-i-r  :aoiioe   tae   roliowlag:-
 2dw   rd   ^ew&r*,        pv<\   :»agii«*r.
Lillians   "larria,        6th   Sn&ioeer.
s.\o   iagloeers  on  duty ia   tbe   Kngineroo*,   for  their   preaeaoe  of aiad
it:   sarryiac out   7::eir  part   of   the  4riU   ta   atop  lag  tue   «&sia   oagioes.
TbU   *aa  doae   ia  darkness  all   Ugata   bei aS  out  daa  to   tbe   auxili«ry
sie«ssi  pipe  being fractured,   taus  etoppias *H   auxiliaries.
$ha  st««a froa this  pips was  blowing across  the   apper  part of the
2agioerooa at  tbe   forward  bulkbead,   -i&d  out   through eatrsaee  to
starboard aide of assse*
;i;id   t;ia   Engines"   aot   been  atop ad,   Lhera   ia   no  doubt   tba t   tbere
*ouid   bave   beea  a   yory   aeary   loaa   ,>f life.
JU^slay ^ottbowo,   Sle qtrlciattj
for bia  part,   io  at&rtitsg  up   ;ae   Saerejeaoy  Dyaaao,   aisus-ted  oa
taa   ooo5 Deck*
Jba   tor~oda   Srauk  eaa   aot   aaea  by  aayoae  axaept  oae   jf   toe   ^oldi
wbo  waa  looking  tarouga a   port  aole about   aaidaaipa,   por^ aide*
T"i«   aas* n  reflection   oa   tbe   water  to  taa   westward,   »ould   ..ao:a  a
'ifor-;odo   6r?»ok ooae-what difficult   so  see,
Li ye a  ^oat:-     ^ Chinese  crew,   a ;d ap roxiaa tdly  po   Troopa,   out of
a   total   of 112%  aouia  oa   board*
era
la   ooar.eotioa si to   'aoe   nbove,   t.iQ   fol^owiag   aussgaationa  are  offsred:-
Ali  uanacsasary woodwork,  especially veoeared,   should  ba  stripped
out*
3cr*sablios  oats  abouid   ia  ali   aaaes  be   fitted   to   tas    rails   right
round   tbe  abip,   tbia   is   considered aont  essential.
Troops  should  aot   be  allowed  to wear  their beavy boots  aj;d  puttee*
walla  ia dangerous waters,   (aoae  of  ua  tried  to   taice   tbeir   boots  *&&.
puttees   off  for   then wbea   ia   tb»   araxer,   tbia   waa  aost   diffiault}*
Cork lifebelts  abouid ba  3one  away with as  ©uob as   poasible,  aad
Kapok substituted*
Yours  faithfully,
ogd.  R. A*   Leicester,  Haster*
 i ptaln Aikman, R.D. R.M.R.
fanadian Pacific Steamships Ltd.
Montreal- P..^.  Canada. l^th September I9H2.
Dear Sir:
L033 of "PRINCESS MARGUERITE"
Herewith is a copy of the Report rendered by me to D.3.T.O. at Port Said.
Ibis will serve to give you tbe plain facts of the case, but, doubtless,
you will expect some elaboration for the Owners themselves.
The 3hip was lost as the result of a torpedo (fired from an enemy submarine)
hitting her in the fuel oil bunkers on tha port side-  The explosion unfortunately set fire to the fuel oil, and although the ship took ^9 minutes
in going down, she was a blazing mass before so doing.
Human Salvage:- The bare casualty figures speak for themselves.  They show
95"* of the Military and S&%   of the Crew as having been saved.  The Military
were composed of Europeans and Indians, numbering 999 ia all.  The Crew
consisted of 36 Europeans (including J  Naval Gunners) and ^9 Chinese.
As appears usual with the Embarkation Authorities, when they find that 2>00
have been carried effectively, they are inclined to put 900 on 'ooard on
a following occasion, and then 1000 and 30 on.  There was no 3aying what
the "ceiling" was eventually going to be in our case.
The loss of human life, undoubtedly, would have been even lass had not some
of the soldiers been most unwilling to go over the rails and commit themselves to the sea by jumping clear.  Many a swimmer will neither jump nor
dive at the best of times.
A few may have lacked faith in the life-saving properties of their cork
belts, having had no experience of them in other than a dry element.
These persisted in hanging on to the ropes suspended on the starboard side,
although they were told in a very audible manner that fuel oil on fire, was
creeping along the port side and soon would come around the bows and stern.
They appeared to visualize this as some dirty mess that any soldier could
tolerate, and not as a floating mas3 of flame that no one could face with
impunity.
Looking as they were, to starboard, this menace did not come within their
actual vision until, perhaps, very late.
In the Standing Orders of the ship(copiously distributed to the Military)
it was requested that Troops should remove their heavy footwear soon after
embarking, but this was not always carried out, and remained a matter for
enforcement by their own Officers.  Army boots can be quite an impediment
to a man in the water.  The apparent shortness of the voyage was inclined
to have a disarming influence.  Although it was most fortunate that the
enemy attack took place in good weather and brilliant sunshine, tha very
presence of these conditions may have lulled many a mind into a sense of
false security.
 place at zov,   speed in the darkness of a moonless night, and the ship was off
to sea again before any Boat Drill could, possibly, be held for the Troops-
'.'■Is   may be thankful that no emergency followed close upon the heels of such
loadings.
One O.C. Troops wrote a very pertinent Report on this subject, which we
brought to the notice of the E.3.0. at several Ports.
When one considers the risks that had been run, compared with that which,
eventually, was encountered in all actuality, it would appear to be a matter
for congratulation with all concerned that things happened as they did.
Although the Teasel remained afloat for nearly an hour, it was not possible
for S.M.3. "Hero" to come alongside, owing to the hundreds of men in the
water and the consequent risk of crushing many of them between the two
ships, thus adding to the loss of life.
Those of us in the water were thankful that no Depth Charges were dropped
at this time.  The effect of these on the human body can be, and usually is,
mo3t disastrous.
Material Salvage:-  This was practically nil.  Articles, Books, Records
and a comparatively small amount of money (about 120 Pounds) went down with
the ship.  Some of the Chinese brought away their savings in belts which
they appeared to wear permanently.
Na^al Inquiry:-  A routine Inquiry was held on board 3.M.S. "Arethusa" the
day following the incident.  Depositions were taken fromsoveral of us.
including myself.  I came away feeling that  the Officers conducting the
Inquiry had been satisfactorily impressed with tha part played by tha
ship ' 3 company.
General Remarks:-  During the process of rescue the R.A.F. maintained a good
watch overhead, and this kept at a safe distance any enemy planes that would;
undoubtedly, have had a go at bombing and machine-gunning us in the water.
There wa3 no chance of fighting the fire whatever, the auxiliary steam-pipe
«s fractured, this of course brought all auxiliaries to a stop, and, with
the Fuel oil on fire, the proposition was hopeless.
The ship, after being hit, took a 5 degree list to port and remained so
until she had settled down (on an even keel) almost to tbe naaeplates forward, she then rolled slowly over to port and sank.
With her disappearance, the fire, fortunately, went out.  There was still
plenty of fuel oil in her, I would say about 400 tons.
It will be recalled that these ships have a G.M. of between five and six
feet.  This will account in large manner for her remaining in a nearly
upright position as long as she did.
Of our 16 Lifeboats we got 10 away.  Three were blown to pieces and the
heat and fire were too intense to permit anything being done about the
remaining three.  About 50 of the 72 Buoyancy apparatus were got overboard,
but fire prevented any of tbe remainder being tackled.
The ammunition for the 4 inch gun fortunately did not go off, though flames
were licking round the magazine (which was just outside the after part of
the Smokeroom) when the 2nd Officer, Mr. Whitaker, and the 3rd Officer,
Mr. Appleyard, went overboard *(lp^0).
 A somewhat disconcerting feature was the speed with which every nook and
corner of the accommodation was filled with dense smoke.
Oerlikon Gun ammunition on the Bridge was commencing to explode, flames
were coming up No 1 Hatchway, and the seams in the deck on the Forecastle
Head were burning, when the 2nd Purser, Mr. Aimers, the 3rd Radio Officer,
Mr. Hazeldine, and myself jumped overboard - lp^+5*  The above two Officers
practically refused to leave me, and had to be ordered overboard somewhat
peremptorily.  They did excellent work in getting "balky" members of the
Troops overboard forward.  Mr. Wbitaker and Mr. Appleyard, previously mentioned, had remained "on the job" until driven out of the ship by the intense
heat and fire.
A3 regards the Mediterranean, I have every confidence in saying that, of
all theatres of War where Merchant 3hips are employed, this is the toughest
by quite a margin. As I
gone to you) I am unable
during the time spent in
south of Port Said, once
from Alexandria.
am without Records of any kind (they have already
to give you the number of Serials we completed
the Mediterranean.  I was only for three weeks
on a Commando Exercise, and once with Refugees
The last time (about July 9th) I passed through the Canal (Northwards), we
had the somewhat nove1 experience of having an ambulance accompany us along
the road at the Canal'.banks as far as the la3t station just below l3mailia.
About this time there had been a considerable number of mines dropped into
the Canal by hostile aircraft, hence the ambulance was for us.  Fortunately
it was not required.
We were never routed to Malta, though on two occasions we came vory close
to going on this run.  Had I been able to tow lp 3mall craft of a certain
type, at 16 knots, we would almost certainly have attempted the passage
in the last Convoy but one (June).
The 3hip was always at one of the following notices, two, four, six, eight,
or 12 hours, as the P.3.T.O.E. required.
I, naturally, feel very bitter about the los3 of this fine little vessel,
the only compensating feature being that she was "on the job" when she
"got it".
I remain, Dear Sir,
Yours   faithfully,
(sgd)      Richard  A.   Leicester.
MASTER.
 RES: (604) 985-8021
BUS: (604) 240-5357
FAX: (604) 687-1612
ff&.g&Z/
CORLETT MARINE LTD.
£*m
CAPTAIN ALLEN N. CAIRNS
Director - Marine Operations
 &9*Gt>*$Teg*   /nice/' .^
32 5~~ 4/^^-S
 THE
fff**P   ^f9
SS. ISLANDER
S
VOLUME 10, No. 2
NEWSLETTER
SUMMER         1996
MUG- UP TIME
with Merv Hughes
Boy, when I make a mistake I really make a dandy. On page 7
of our last issue I had the Prince George running into the
Princess Kathleen. It was, of course, the Prince Rupert which
ran into the Princess Kathleen. I have tried hard to find a way
to blame it all on my computer, but can not. All I can say is
sorry ! (see Off Course on
page 3.)
At our 1996 reunion the
Vancouver gang presented
me with a colour photo, all
mounted and framed and
with a brass plaque, showing my first ship, the
Princess Maquinna, arriving in Victoria Harbour. I
thank you all very much. It
hangs in our stairway landing for all who visit to see.
Just what happened to the
Evangeline, one of the
vessels the C.P.R. was
going to buy for the north
coast run ? The wooden
decks with no steel under-
decking had our Coast
Guard  upset and so they
refused her entry to Canada and that ended the sale. The
following is from SEA BREEZES magazine of Nov., 1995 . It's
all very confusing to me as I thought that there were two
vessels, the Evangeline and the Yarmouth Castle.
The 5002 GRT vessel, Evangeline, was built in 1927. In
1964, as the Yarmouth Castle she was sold to her second
Panamanian owners and on November 13, 1965 while on a
cruise from Miami to Nassau, fire, which proved to be her
undoing, broke out on the ship. TERRY WISE, a 23 year old (at
the time) Canadian third purser, was honoured 30 years later in
Apology to Rudolph Dirks, and THE CAPTAIN AND THE KIDS.
1995 by the US Coast Guard for his heroism during the fire
when he helped rescue a number of passengers from the blazing
ship. Mr. Wise was presented the Distinguished Public Service
Award which is the highest honour given by the US Coast
Guard to a civilian.
The Yarmouth Castle, ex Evangeline sank with a loss of 88
lives.
If you can add anything
to this strange twist in
names or if I have remembered incorrectly please let
us know.
The U.S. Lykes Line,
which has the cargo/passenger vessels with all the
'goal posts', has filed for
protection under chapter
XI of the U.S. bankruptcy
code.
Our thanks to Captain
Robert McCoy for donating a number of back years
of SEA BREEZES magazine to us. These go in
with a very large number
of back issues which Frank
Crocker gave us a few
years back. To round out
our collection we are looking for the issues April 91 to Jan. 95.
We are not going to try and reopen the Deck /Engine Room
rivalry which was a good part of steamboating in the past, how
ever Fred Skinner has written a very interesting 'other view' of
Captain Hugh Halkett's artical about the time the Motor Princess
slammed into the dock at Sidney. See page 12.
Mr. Fred Skinner has also written a piece on the Canada
Australia run vessels, it will be published in the winter issue.
For now the very best.
MERV
 page 2
PLEASE SEND LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR TO:
Mr. Merv Hughes,
CP Coaster's Newsletter,
5488 Kenwill Drive,
Nanaimo, B.C. V9T 5M5
Canada
Phone (604) 758 3555
To the Editor;
In the Spring 1996 edition of the "Newsletter" contributors
Ronald Neilson and Captain Hugh Halkett have clarified that
those Canadian Pacific seafarers decorated for their wartime
service in the "Princess Kathleen" and "Princess Marguerite"
were:-
"Princess Kathleen"
Captain L.C. Barry, OBE
Chief Engineer William Neilson, OBE
"Princess Marguerite"
Captain Richard Leicester, MBE
3rd Engineer Edward E Stewart, MBE
6th Engineer William B Harris, MBE
Were there any others ? Was Ch Engr Jack Whitworth of the
"Marguerite" decorated ? Can we assume that the decorations
were for personal wartime performances rather than "in
recognition of the contribution of the vessel and the crew during
the hostilities" as previously reported?
Jack Meredith
If you have an answer to Jack's quesdons please drop a note to
Jack or to 'Letters to tbe Editor', address as above.
Merv.
Do you play golf ?
If you do and you're heading to
the Penticton or Kaladen area
take along your 'Mashie' and
your 'Niblick' and play a round
at Ken Shillitto's TWIN LAKES
GOLF COURSE. Ken would
love to see you. And don't
forget to tell him you too are a
member of CP .Coaster's.
STEPHEN LEACQCK
I was just sitting down in my cabin when the
steward rapped, opened the door, and announced:
"Doctor Leacock? The Captains compliments, Doctor,
will you please come and have a look at the
second stewardess' knee?" I was off like a shot.
But it was no use. Another fellow got there ahead
of me. He was a Doctor of Divinity.
ASK MERV
Dear Merv;
Recently I purchased a second hand rowing
machine but when I tried it out I nearly drowned ! What could
be the problem ?
Ian McLaren,
Qualicum Bay
Dear Ian;
The former owner obviously sold it because of
this flaw. There is only one solution to this problem and that is
to learn to row a great deal faster.
Merv.
 A HCLLIDAy CRUISE
With Bill HoUiday
THIS INFERNAL GOUT.
Gout was a problem that several crew members of the BCCS
had and we were always on to them about living the good life
on rich food and drink.
Ed Moyes suffered mildly with it. We bought him a framed
picture we found in a junk shop in Victoria. It showed the owner
of a Plantation being pushed around in a basket chair with his
foot wrapped in bandages, talking to a Doctor and saying,
"How can I get on without this infernal gout ?". To which the
Doctor replies," Try working for sixpence a day and earn it."
But the person who suffered the most was a fireman called
Jimmy McAdam.
I was working on the Princess Marguerite in the stoke hold with
fireman Jimmy McAdam, a very nice, good natured Scot,
although he was always in pain with the gout. His shoes were all
cut away to try and ease the pressure points. He was taking all
kinds of pills that did him no good. We all felt sorry for him, to
see him hobbling along.
He was going on days off and some how or other we suggested
and he agreed to go to the hospital and not bother with the Sick
Mariners (1 think all they did was play golf)-
He went to the hospital and told the doctor who saw him that he
could not go on with this suffering and he told him he just felt
like jumping over the side of the ship at sea. The doctor said we
can't have you do that and made an appointment to see him the
next day and have a long conversation to see what we c;m find.
So when he saw the doctor the next day he wanted to know his
life story, all his sicknesses and any injuries he had had.
One of the injuries he received during the war was when he
was serving in die submarine service. They were loading
supplies onto the submarine when he slipped on a moving gang
plank while carrying a load of supplies, and he came down on
his elbow. The doctor said that they would start with that elbow
and he took x-rays of it and when he saw them said he didn't
like the look of it.
So he was booked in for an operation to open the elbow. He
had the operation and came back to work with boots on dancing
a jig. a new man.
The injured elbow had never healed properly and was the cause
O'f the gout. He felt so good he wrote out a cheque for a large
donation to the hospital, and by God Sir, he got the right doctor!
page 3
OFF COURSE
On page #7 pf our last issue I stated that the PRINCE
GEORGE was in collision with the PRINCESS KATHLEEN.
This is incorrect as it was, in fact, the PRINCE-RUPERT
and the PRINCESS KATHLEEN that made contact with each
other.
[■...■I WITH
 page 4
 page 5
ON TOUR WITH THE CP. COASTER'S
by Don Murray
Thanks to the organizational talents of Tom and Tina Soames,
35 CP. Coaster's sallied forth from Vancouver International
Airport on Reno Air's flight #420 the morning of Monday, May
6th. This provided us with a full day and a half (plus a full night
for the avid gamblers) to enjoy the excitement that Reno has to
offer. We would like to be able to report that many of us came
away with pockets filled with silver dollars and quarters ( and
nickels for the less venturesome) but it appears that only 'Speed'
Reeves with his $1,000 (U.S.) jackpot on the slot machines can
be listed as a big winner — but others tried very, very hard and
put in long hours pulling levers and pushing buttons. There were
other Reno winners:- for example, Joe De La Mare was able to
pick up the bill for two full-course roast beef dinners at the Cal
Neva - the bill came to a total of $3.58 (U.S.) for the two of
them.
There were a few others along with us. Doug Adlam and his
wife Belle made the trip. Doug got his start in the B.C.C.S. in
1937 as Brassboy on the "Princess Marguerite" and finished his
seafaring days as Captain of "Princess Marguerite II" on the
Seattle run for the B.C. Government Ferries. Bob Merideth (a
son of Jack Merideth) and his wife Sandra were with us - he is
a financial manager in B.C. Hydro.
From Reno we journeyed as a group by bus through the
Dormer Pass to San Francisco with a lunch stop in Auburn at a
restaurant that served humungous, mouthwatering meals that
could, if you saved room, be topped off with a large slice of
delicious homemade pie — only a few of us could respond to
the challenge. Our two day stay in San Francisco was in the
Travelodge at the famous Fisherman's Wharf, quite handy to the
trolley cars, the maritime museum, and some excellent shopping
and reasonably priced restaurants. Seagram's 7 Crown was on
sale at Safeway at $12.99 for 1 3/4 L.
On Friday afternoon we boarded Holland America's liner
"Statendam" for a three day luxury cruise up the coast to
Vancouver with a twelve hour stopover at Victoria. The
"Statendam" responded to our every whim; be it dining,
entertainment, music, four times around the prom deck for a
mile of walking, shopping, casinos or just dozing alongside the
heated swimming pools. Tina Soames was our entry at the ladies
golf tournament but she failed to come in as a winner by
chipping a ball into one of the liferings floating in the swimming
pool.
But even though we may not have won on the slot machines
and may not have won a shuffleboard or golf chipping
tournament, we were all winners on this tour — thanks again to
the efforts of Tom and Tina Soames. When we do something
like this again you can count on the Murrays being there — we
would sure like to see you there too.
GROUP PICTURE TAKEN ON M.V. STATENDAM MAY 11, 1996
BACK ROW- LEFT TO RIGHT
FRIENDS MARKED (F)
.ades.
FRED COULTER (F), ROD SLADE (F), DAVID BLADES, LORNE BAILEY (F), BERT WAIN (F), BILL HOLLEDAY,
JACK MERIDETH, 'SPEED' REEVES, ART SCHOPP.
MIDDLE ROW- f.FFT TO RfCrHT
GORDON TOLMAN, TOM SOAMES, JACK FOSTER, WALTER GERBER, EDA GERBER, SHIRLEY MERIDETH,
LOUISE VALLANCE, CAPT. JIMMY BELL, CAPT. JOE DE LA MARE, ALBERT TELLEY, BELLE ADLAM, CAPT.
DOUG ADLAM, DON MURRAY.
FRONT ROW- LEFT TO RIGHT
LINDA TOLMAN, TINA SOAMES, ELENA SLADE (F), ANN HOLT, DELORES WAIN (F), JOSEPHINE BELL,
JOYCE BAILEY (F), GRACE SCHOPP, ELENOR EVENS.
MISSING FROM PHOTO BOB MERIDETH (F), SANDRA MERIDETH (F), MAURICE ST. CYR, MARTHA ST. CYR,
BERT FOSTER (F), FREDA MURRAY.
 «**■
page 6
CP COASTER'S  CLUB
IT IS WITH DEEP SORROW
72<? OFFICERS
WE RECORD THE PASSING
VICTORIA
President-   TomSoames
OF THESE FRIENDS
Vice/Pres-   HarryBurcbill
COFFEE PARTY
Sec/Tres-   Z*a? Noakes
Mr. JIM FOULKES
AREA DIRECTORS
May 28th., 1996
is held the first Saturday
Nanaimo- Jack Foster
Vancouver, BC
of each month at the
Vancouver- Z?oo Murray
********
CHERRY BANK HOTEL
Victoria- George Heron
Mr. SID DIGBY
825 Burdett St., from
PUBLICATIONS
May 31st., 1996
10:00 to 12:00
-Merv Hughes
Vancouver, BC
CP. Coaster's membership is
********
open to all employees and
former employees of B.C.
Mr. JIMMY JOHN
VANCOUVER
Coast Steamships.
For more information write;
June 26th., 1996
COFFEE PARTY
Mr. T. Soames,
Nanaimo, BC
4628 198 C St.,
********
is held on the third
Langley B.C. V3A 5S4
1
Tuesday of the month
from 10:00 to 12:00
THE NEWSLETTER CREW
\«©
at the
PUBLISHER/EDITOR
Q^2\        ;
METRO CENTRE HOTEL
Merv Hughes
on Kingsway in Burnaby
ASSISTANT EDITOR
Jack Lenfesty
SUBSCRIPTIONS
NANAIMO
Len Noakes
For subscription information
We are sad within our memory,
COFFEE PARTY
write to:
Lonely are our hearts this day;
is held the_firsLMonday
Mr. Len Noakes,
For the ones we loved so dearly
of each month at
1905 San Pedro Ave.,
Have forever been called away.
CHARLIE'S
Victoria BC, Canada
We think of them in silence.
123 Commercial St.,
V8N 2G7
No eye may see us weep;
But many silent tears are shed
09:30 to 11:00
(if Mon. is a statutory holiday then
NOTE
When others are asleep.
the coffee party will be on Tuesday)
Please make
cheques &  money orders
pavah/eto  CP COASTER'S
 page 7
Wartime Ships Managed by the Canadian Pacific
By Jack Meredith
This is a story about the Canadian Pacific managed vessel, S.S.
"Empire Woodlark", ex "Emma Alexander", ex "Nanking",
ex "Congress".
A few C. P. Coaster's, perhaps no more than a score, will recall
the sleek, fast Admiral <
Line passenger / freight ?
vessel "Emma Alexander"
that, along with the "Ruth
Alexander", the "Dorothy
Alexander", and the "H.
F. Alexander", regularly
called into the port of
Victoria with passengers
and freight en route between San Francisco and
Seattle. The sea route between San Francisco and
Seattle via Victoria was a
thousand mile run that was
done in 39 hours steaming
time by the very fast "H.
F. Alexander'' and
''Emma Alexander"
which both cruised easily
at 25 knots. This is a very
good turn of speed when
you consider that the fastest Atlantic crossing in
1923 was 24.8 knots by
the United States Lines
"Leviathan" (America's
first super liner) and the
fastest in 1924 was 25.7
knots by Canard's "Mauritania".
The northbound voyage of the "Alexanders" from San
Francisco was popular with travelers continuing eastward by rail
from Vancouver with connections being made through the
B.C.C.S. Victoria to Vancouver night boat. Others voyaged
north from San Diego, Los Angeles and San Francisco on the
"Alexanders" to take passage on the white "Empresses" to the
EMMA ALEXANDER and H.F. ALEXANDER
Orient. The "Emma Alexander" and the "H. F. Alexander"
were widely known as the Speed Queens of the Pacific. Albert
Tilley, for one, remembers these ships arriving and sailing from
Rithet's Wharf in Victoria in the mid - 30s. Albert has provided
us with the photographs that accompany this story.
i
We wonder if any of our readers traveled as a passenger aboard
the "Emma Alexander" during its career on the Pacific Coast
from 1913 to 1935 ( with
the exception of a 7 year
period mentioned in following paragraphs)?
The vessel was built for
the Pacific Coast Steamship Company in 1913 by
the New York Shipbuilding Company of Camden,
New Jersey and was
christened the S. S.
"Congress". The ship
was 7,793 gross tons and
424 feet in length and had
three decks including a
lengthy boat deck. During
its early life it was the
flagship of the P. C. S.
Company until, in 1916, a
disastrous fire reduced the
"Congress" to a burned -
out hulk.
Rebuilt for service with
the China Mail Line the
vessel was renamed S. S.
"Nanking" for a 7 year
period until, in 1923, she
returned to the Pacific
Coast to join the Admiral
Line of the Pacific Steamship Company under the name S. S.
"Emma Alexander". But the savage rate wars of the late 1920's
and early 1930's, coupled with the increasing usage of
automobiles for north / south travel on the Pacific Coast cut
heavily into Pacific Steamship's revenues. The "Great Depression" became the final blow that brought the Company to its
knees. In 1935 the P. C. S. Company was taken over by the
 page 8
Dollar Steamship Company. Passenger service between San
Francisco and Seattle via Victoria was suspended in September
of 1935 and freight service was suspended in January of the
following year. A comeback try for the coastal passenger trade
in 1936 by the "Emma Alexander", the "H. F. Alexander",
and the "Dorothy Alexander" was a failure. The last Admiral
Line vessel steamed out of Puget Sound for San Francisco via
Victoria in September of 1936. The Admiral Line was dead.
Late in 1941, in Liverpool, England, Canadian Pacific
Steamships acquired the management of the "Empire Wood-
lark" (the ex "Emma Alexander", ex "Nanking", ex "Con-
to that, was an engineer officer aboard C. P.'s "Duchess of
York" which, of course, was also in war service.
Early in January of 1942 Mr. Minnikin's well - earned leave
from the "Duchess of York" was interrupted by orders from the
Company to proceed to Liverpool to join the engineroom staff
of the "Empire Woodlark" in their attempts to get the
antiquated boilers and machinery of that vessel into the best
possible shape in the shortest possible time. When the temporary
refit had been completed the steamship, with Marine Engineer
Minnikin aboard, loaded the men and equipment of the King's
Liverpool Regiment and sailed for Singapore. En route the
n >N
As the CONGRESS
As the'^EMMA ALEXANDER0
gress") for a troubled wartime career as a troop and passenger
transport, primarily in equatorial waters. The transfer of the ship
from United States to the British flag was made under the
provisions of a wartime lend / lease arrangement that saw many
mothbailed U. S. vessels similarly transferred to the United
Kingdom for war service.
Through the kindness of Captain Bill Williams, a retired C. P.
Atlantic Captain, and a past co - editor of "Timelink", a
publication that has recorded some of the maritime history of the
Canadian Pacific, we are able to provide you with a glimpse of
wartime life on the "Empire Woodlark". The information was
recalled by Mr. F. S. Minnikin who was a Canadian Pacific
junior engineer aboard the "Empire Woodlark" and who, prior
ships' steam generators broke down frequently, requiring off -
watch engineers and oilers to regularly work overtime to effect
repairs.
The ship's 10 Scotch boilers were located athwart ships in two
separate watertight boiler rooms. When the vessel rolled in a
seaway the water levels in the boiler gauge glasses went wild
making it difficult to get an accurate reading of water levels in
the boilers. It wasn't long before the crew were referring to the
"Empire Woodlark" as the "Empire Mudlark". The ships'
Bofors anti - aircraft guns were situated directly above the
vessels' electrical generators causing the decks supporting the
generators to shudder heavily whenever the guns were fired;
this, in turn, produced more repair work for the over - worked
 engineering staff.
Singapore fell to the attacking Japanese forces shortly before
the "Empire Woodlark" was able to make port, as planned,
with the King's Liverpool Regiment and their military equipment. Orders were received to turn about and proceed across the
Indian Ocean to Colombo and then north to Bombay on the west
coast of India. The oppressive heat made the crew and troop
deck accommodations unbearably uncomfortable. The troop
decks, battened down for complete blackout purposes, received
no cool air apart from that pulled in by forced - draught fans
and this added to the load on the ship's overworked and
obsolete generators. The vessel was not designed or fitted - out
for service in the tropics.
Upon arrival at Bombay The "Empire Woodlark" was in dire
need of major engine repairs and was ordered on to Karachi
where, in extreme heat, and with the questionable assistance of
shore - side workers, the starboard engine crankshaft was lifted
and taken ashore for retooling. It was at Karachi that electric
fans were provided for ventilation purposes in the accommodations. As soon as the engines were made ready the vessel sailed
southwest to Durban on the east coast of South Africa to
commence an Indian Ocean troop shuttle service between
Durban and Suez but with calls into other east African and
Persian Gulf ports. The engineroom and stokehold crews
suffered badly from the stifling heat, especially that of the
Persian Gulf in summer months, but the shipboard work was
always done and the crew were reliable. Durban became the
"Empire Woodlarks" home port. Voyages were made up and
down and across the Indian Ocean to ports of Africa and India
and to Mauritius; Polish refugees were transported to safe
havens; The Shah of Iran and his large entourage became
passengers; and troops of the East African Rifles were taken to
Majunga to commence the invasion of Madagascar.
The "Empire Woodlark" survived the war. After the cessation
of hostilities the ship was released from Canadian Pacific
management in 1945 and, in 1946, was loaded with chemical
weapons (primarily gas bombs) at Immingham in the U. K. and
was taken out to the deep part of the Atlantic Ocean and was
scuttled at the designated location.
page 9
EDITORS NOTES;
She was scuttled November 1, 1946 northwest of die Outei
Hebrides atposidon 059° OO'N 007° 40' W., approx. SO miles
NWoftbe Butt of Lewis.
She had double bottoms and ran 33 years on the origina*
engines.
^OWai^ourSeiVice   .
S. S.Emma Alexander
This munificent vessel, formerly the trans-Pacific
liner "Nanking," is now operated in regular service
between Seatde.Tacotna.Victoria.Vancouver.Saii
Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego—another
trans-oceanic vessel in Coastwise service.
Twin-bed «nt« with priv«« b-d* l«e« type doubUr
deek beds, telephone in every Katcroom, gles. mdoeed
r&wof the distinctive feature, of lha rw«l andher
^■WpTth. -H. F. AUxfdtr- and th. 'bah Alt*-
OMdtrrZhiA render Admir.1 Lin* .onr.ee .upenor to
any -^"»«"- «errice ia the worid.
TRAVEL-BY-WATER-fi~* out for younelf ju* how
good hie! SUgutr and frequent ~Zw&.
605 Hastings St., West. Vancouver. B. C.
901 Government St., Victoria. B. C.
PACIFIC STIAHSH1PC0.
 page 10
CANADA'S WORST MARITIME DISASTER
BY MERV HUGHES
The collision and resulting loss of the Empress of Ireland
along with 1027 out of 1477 souls on board in May 29, 1914,
must rank as our worst peacetime disaster.
The beautiful Empress of Ireland built in 1906 was 14,190
gross tons, 550 ft. in length and 65 ftin beam and was outbound
from Montreal to England when she was struck amidships on the
starboard side by the 6000 ton Norwegian collier Storstad
carrying a full load of coal from Sydney, Nova Scotia to
Montreal, Quebec.
The collision took place in a thick fog which had very suddenly
covered the St. Lawrence River at the Quebec hamlet of Father
Point. That spot today is marked by a red floating buoy.
The wound inflicted by the coal collier was so severe that the
Empress sank within 20 minutes of impact. In fact so fast did
she sink that only 4 of her lifeboats were able to get away.
In comparing the sinking of the Empress of IrelandXa the loss
on the Titanic two years earlier in 1912, the Empress of Ireland
lost 840 passengers as compared to 807 in the sinking of the
Titanic. The remainder of the dead were crew members - 187
from the Empress and 696 for the Titanic.
One other great Canadian maritime tragedy was the loss, on
September 17, 1949, of the S.S. Noronic by fire in Toronto
Harbour, Ontario. Of the 524 passengers and 171 crew, 104
were lost and 14 were classed as missing. The Noronic was
tied alongside the dock at the time of the fire and all the dead
and missing were passengers.
Among the lost on the Empress of Ireland vs tit some 150
members of the Salvation Army including the entire Canadian
leadership corps and headquarters staff band. They were heading
for a massive international congress in London, England.
In lune 1914, a board of inquiry headed by Lord Mersy heard
61 witnesses and placed the major blame for the sinking of the
Empress of Ireland on the Storstad crew.
Golf is Flog spelled backward!
Conversely, the Norwegians held their own probe at the
Norwegian Consulate in Montreal. Perhaps predictably, they
completely cleared Captain Andersen and his Storstad crew and
placed the blame on Captain Kendall, who survived the sinking.
Both Captains blamed the other for altering course in the fog.
Captain Kendall did not command a CP. vessel at sea again. He
did serve for about 20 years as the CP. Marine representative in
London, retiring in 1939.
Outside the French Canadian village of Father Point, four miles
east of Rimouski, is a small fenced cemetery with a memorial
where unknown victims of the sinking he buried. At the
southeast comer of Toronto's Mount Pleasant Cemetery, a 230
acre cemetery which seems more like a park than a burial
ground, stands a 10 foot tall monument topped by a crown.
Around the base are carved waves, and on its' front is a Bible
verse: "God is our refuge and strength; a present help in
trouble"
At this site every year in late May the Salvation Army, with
their band playing 'Abide with me' and the audience singing
quietly commemorates the sinking of the Canadian Pacific liner
Empress of Ireland, and they remember the worst maritime
tragedy in Canada's history.
\0H
XL
J   W>
A
IN FOR REFIT
(members in the hospital
or on the mend at home)
ALLAN MILLS in Royal Arch Masonic Home,
Burnaby, B.C.
JOHN COWAN
at home in Nanaimo.
JIMMY GRANT
in Victoria General Hospital.
 IS**1
page 11
speed 22* knots:
we8ank,scotland,
—mha.vahcowe*.
io, smnMmr Tm7cmmM wane, mimr ewpwY. .. .
IN 1941, iMv tm   SS. WCESS MA8SUERITE.
'    WH fOEO S*  W IRWOirFS: AtlO  SHfT-
TO THE M«TORRAf»EAN W»ERE THIY «8K*MED VAUJASt-E SERVICE
IN THE TRANSPORTATION OF TROO«. ;«EFUSEES AND WAR MATERIAL.
OK AUS.JM042, THE .$5."f>M*CE$$ MA8SUMTE" WAS TOSPEDOtD AK> SUM,
Aitt AT TK -$,)HAVII«  CSWMKAVISATHr'tHf- WORlfii ■;,•;■■'■
JS5 KATHUsEK* STEAMED   6^   ALONE   TO VICTORIA,
,   /■w.idjatA,   ARROWS   AUG. 2* 1946.
K46   *»j|Sg 31? 1947, THE:   MS5EN6ER
ENTIRE AMD     SEWRNiSHED,
AND-THE -CONDITIONED   6Y
',»;   •.-.. .    , . ■ ■!■■
KOOO HORSi
■ .BUI1T A** t
f0» THE  fed-
AM), SEATTUS
IN 1941, H
AItt AT Tl
THE   SS.>
ia****8**
PLAQUE    ON    SS.    PRINCESS    KATHLEEN        ?.tt*>
A plaque on the Princess Kathleen
(in the centre)
Twin Screw Turbine Steamer
PRINCESS KATHLEEN
12,000 horsepower, Gross tonnage 5995, Speed 22 1/2 knots
Built and engined in 1924 by John Brown & Co., Ltd.,
Clydebank, Scotland, for the express, mail and passenger service
between Victoria, Vancouver, and Seattle, of the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company.
In 1941, the vessel and her sister ship the S.S. "Princess
Marguerite," were requisitioned by the British Government, and
sent to the Mediterranean where tiiey performed valuable service
in the transport of troops, refugees and war material. On Aug.
17 1942, the S.S. "Princess Marguerite" was torpedoed and
sunk, and at die end of hostilities, having circumnavigated the
world, the S.S."Princess Kathleen" steamed back alone to
Victoria, British Columbia, arriving Aug. 2nd 1946. Between
September 18th 1946 and May 31st. 1947, the passenger
accommodation was entirely rebuilt and refurnished, and the
ship completely reconditioned by the Victoria Machinery Depot
Company Ltd. Victoria, B.C.
(around the outside of the plaque arc the ports she visited)
(starting top centre and going clock wise around) VICTORIA
SINGAPORE NAPLES ALEXANDRIA TARANTO PORT
SUDAN COLOMBO CEYLON TRIPOLI SUVA RHODES
GIBRALTAR TOBRUK HONOLULU CYPRUS BRINDASI
PORT SAID BENGHAZIE CRISTOBAL VICTORIA HAIFA
MANZAN1LLA PIRAEUS JIDDA TOULON ADEN PORT
DARWIN AUSTRALIA SALONIKA TRINIDAD TRIESTE
ALGIERS PORT MORESBY NEW GUINEA CRETE MALTA
CORFU SUEZ SAN PEDRO
A picture similar to the above was featured in the October
1949 issue of Harbour and Shipping under the caption 'PROUD
RECORD OF A LADY' and states, 'This plaque in the forward
saloon of the Canadian Pacific B.C. Coast Steamship, luxury
cruise ship, PRINCESS KATHLEEN, tells the story of her
25-year record in peace and war.'
Our thanks to Marg Dixon who allowed us to
copy this postcard picture she sent to her sister
in Montreal in 1947 (for 3<t).
 page  13
PRINCESSES IN ALASKA
by Jack Meredith
The southern extremities of Lynn Canal in Alaska could
possibly be claimed by C. P. Coaster's as their own domain in
light of the number of Canadian Pacific vessels that have
ignominiously come to grief in this tricky stretch of water over
the years.
On August 15th., 1901 at 2 ajn. the 'Islander', enroute from
Skagway to Juneau with 110 passengers and a crew of 62, in
good visibility and a calm sea, rammed an iceberg off Douglas
Island and sank with the loss of 23 passengers and 16 crewmen.
A few years later, on August 10th, 1910, the 'Princess May'
stranded on Sentinel Island and on the receding tide became
high and dry, thus providing what is considered to be a most
spectacular and
renowned picture
of a steamship in
extreme difficulty.
At 5:50 p.m. on
Friday October
25th., 1918, in a
blinding snow
storm, the stricken
'Princess Sophia'
after striking Van-
derbilt Reef, slid
off into deep water
taking all the passengers and crew
(some 350 persons)
to their deaths. And
much more recently, at 3 ajn. on September 7th., 1952, during
the watch of Chief Officer W. (Bill) Savage, the 'Princess
Kathleen', enroute from Juneau to Skagway, stranded on Lena
Point north of Juneau and south of Sentinel Island and became a
total loss — there was no loss of life.
Now, an interloping Princess of another era and belonging to
another maritime Company, the palatial Monrovian registered
'Star Princess' has left its mark in these hallowed waters. At
1:50 ajn. June 23rd 1995, on an overcast but clear morning,
S.S. ISLANDER
enroute from Skagway to Juneau, the vessel grounded on
Poundstone Rock just minutes after safely passing Vanderbilt
Reef and Sentinel Island. The 'Star Princess' sustained a gash in
its hull of some 100 feet and the starboard stabilizer and
propeller were damaged, but the vessel remained afloat. At the
time of the stranding the navigation of the 'Star Princess' was in
the hands of Second Officer Landi and Alaskan Marine Pilot
Robert Nerup. The 1,550 passengers were later taken ashore by
the vessel's tenders and transported into Juneau by buses in a
manner akin to the handling of the passengers of the "Princess
Kathleen".
The A ugust 1995 edidon of 'The Pacific Maritime Magazine'
provides some rather interesting comments on tbe past performance of Captain Nerup, the marine pilot on the bridge at tbt
time of tbe mishap. We quote the item in its entirety with tht
kind permission of R. H. Philips Company of Seattle,  tht
publishers of 'The
Pacific Maritime
Magazine'.
BUNGLING
PILOT
Captain Robert
Nerup, the southeast Alaska Pilots
Association pilot
aboard the 'Star
Princess' when she
struck Poundstone
Rock, on June 23,
has a colorful history as an Alaska
pilot.
Prior to the 'Star Princess' incident, Capt. Nerup had been
involved in several casualties, and his license had been
suspended twice.
In March 1987, a ship under Capt. Nerup's pilotage collided
with a stationary log boom in Hobart Bay, Alaska, and in April
of that year, a ship he was piloting went aground in Hobart Bay.
As a result of these transgressions, Capt. Nerup's license was
suspended from October 1, 1987 through May 29, 1988 and
from October 15,  1988 through May  15,  1989, and he was
 page   14
required  to  observe  four dockings and  four  undockings  at
Hobart Bay, performed by other licensed marine pilots.
On May 27, 1991, Capt. Nerup was piloting the M/V 'Island
Princess' when it collided with the M/V 'Regent Sea', near
Skagway, damaging both vessels and injuring several passengers. Again his license was suspended, this time for six
months, and he was required to complete a one-day, U.S. Coast
Guard approved radar operator school, a two-week ship handling
and navigation course, and a 50-question rules of the road
examination.
Capt. Nerup's license was suspended the third time on July 6,
by the Alaska Board of Marine Pilots, who voted unanimously.
Captain Dan Twohig, Marine Pilot Coordinator for the State of
Alaska, declared in a notarized affidavit that Capt. Nerup
"displayed a lack of requisite knowledge and skill in pilotage
duties," that he exercised those duties "in a manner which
endangered life, property, and the marine environment," and
that his "continued licensure as a marine pilot poses a clear and
immediate danger to the public health and safety."
POSTSCRIPT: The mv REGAL PRINCESS (73,700 grt)
because of a sudden wind change, damaged four fishing vessels
and destroyed the old Sockeye Sam Building
on the waterfront of Ketchikan, Alaska.
(Thanks to "Ship's Log" of the World Ship
Society of B.C. - May 1996.)
A KEEN SPORTSMAN
(by N.N. Grimmer)
Captain Sears was skipper of the C. P. N.'s "Yosemite" during
the 'nineties. Often while coming into Port Washington wharf
(Pender Island) he would be standing on the bridge, banging
away at ducks with a I2-bore pump gun giving orders through
an open window to his quarter-master between blasts of
gun-fire.
What company would tolerate such conduct these days ?
(from "A GULF ISLANDS PATCHWORK")
Special Half Price Offer!
Members of the CP Coasters
may receive The Pacific
Maritime Magazine for 1/2
off the regular Canadian
subscription price! Call
Chris Philips at
(206) 284-8285, and
mention this ad. .
DEXTER NEAL, JOHNNY PETRUCCI, RAY HUDSON
 L. i
rcjGtfrir"
page   15
Pictures
from the
past.
Thanks to,
AlJensen
for this picture.
MARG DIXON and HARRY PLATER
If opportunity knocked, he'd complain about the noise!
In Australia, a kangaroo was hit by a car and rushed
to a hospital. The next morning the ward doctor
made his rounds and asked, "Was he brought here
to die?"   The nurse answered, "No, he was
brought here yestcrdic!"
DANMcKILLOP RETIREING
Capt. Ted Gerrard, Dan McKillop, Phil Nichols
photo by Capt. Ray Hudson
Happcncss is having a large, loving,
caring, close-knit family in another
city.
George Burns
 page 16
I am not there
Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there. I do not sleep
I am a thousand winds that blow
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.
Anon.
An English newspaper claims ;
"These beautiful words come from the burial prayers of the
Makah, a tribe of North American Indians whose tiny
reservation is situated on the Pacific Coast of America."
Thanks to our sister publication TIMELINK in London.
C. P. COASTER'S
Capt.
• Subscription form
□ Mr.      [
Mrs.        ~\ Ms.
Name:	
Street:  Apt.#	
City :   Prov/State:	
Postcode:    Phone:	
SERVICE YEARS:
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~~] Start _ J Renew my subscription
J Payment enclosed ($5.00 per year)
Please make cheques payable to CP. Coaster's
SEND TO:-   MR. LEN NOAKES,
1905 SAN PEDRO AVE.,
VICTORIA, B.C.    V8N2G7
Conscience is what hurts when everything else feels good.
A little girl came home from Sunday school and told her
mother that she learned God's name today.
Her mother asked her what it was and she said "Harold"
"We learned it in a prayer --'Our Father, Who art in
Heaven, Harold be Thy name "
After a Victoria Church service, an elderly
lady was asked by a friend why she
thought God had blessed her with such
a long life.    She replied sweetly,
'To test the patience of my relatives".
LEN SAYS
If you haven't paid your 1996 dues you
may be in for a surprise !
Printed by COPYPRINT (Sidney) CENTRE LTD.
 The  g^ Coasters        NEWSLETTER
VOLUME 1,  No. 1
March 1987
"MUG-UPTIME"
by  Merv ( 'Curly' ) Hughes
Thanks to Tommy Soames and a
group of friends, we finally had
that reunion we've been talking
about all these years.
It was held, with just a few days
notice, at the CHERRY BANK
HOTEL in Victoria on Feb. 5th at
10:00. ( a note of thanks here to
DAVE BOWMAN and his staff for
a great time. DAVE is a former ship
mate and owns the hotel! )
To everyones' surprise we were
able to visit, if ever so briefly, with
over 80 (eighty ! ) past friends who
heard about the reunion and were
able to show up, even had a strong
showing from both NANAIMO and
VANCOUVER. The gist of all this
is to see if you would like to do this
again, maybe once a year, next time
in Vancouver or Nanaimo ? So to
find out what you want we have to
be able to get in touch by phone,
letter or in person and to do that
we require some information. We
have included with this short letter
a form, and we ask you to fill it
out and send to the area address
noted. ..   „
If you wonder about the $Wfc66
fee, it's for a newsletter along this
style, only both sides next time, I
hope, with notes about meetings,
who's just retired and where 'old
so and so' is now, etc., etc.
Tommy and Tina Soames are in
the process of moving their home
to Langley ( a real loss for us ) and
will be phoning all they can to get
a Club, Association or whatever,
started over there, and Jack Foster
is doing the same in Nanaimo, so
that should cover it.
Tommy volunteered me to look
after this end ( thanks Tommy ),
but he also volunteered Tommy
Banks and Len Noakes along with
Jack Lenfesty to help, so how
could I refuse ? ( for a while —
anyhow ). The name "CP. Coasters" is just one we thought up and
if you feel you would like us to
carry on we will be having a contest
for the name most wanted.
CP. Coasters
CPR _ BCCSS
PLEASE FILL IN THE FOLLOWING AND REPLY TO AN AREA LISTED
□ CAPT.   DMR.   *D MRS.   OMISS
NAME:
* WORKING NAME:	
STREET: '	
CITY: PROV.:	
POSTAL CODE: PHONE:	
BIRTHDAY: ( Skip if you wish )
SERVICE YEARS:
FROM: TO:    DEPT:	
WOULD YOU BE WILLING TO HELP DEFRAY COSTS ?
D YES    □ NO
( $£).00 PER YEAR )   .
Also, if you know someone who
would like to join, and worked at
one time for BCCSS, please send us
their name and address, we'll do the
rest.
In the event you were not aware
Tommy Banks is now Chief Steward
on the Princess Marguerite, Len
Noaks is retired, Jack Lenfesty is
retired from the Game Warden Business and I'm still working on the
B.C. Ferries, so Len & Jack are going to be called on a lot !!
That's it for this MUG-UP !
 'Curly'
Cut label from page and tape to envelope.
IN VICTORIA AREA
MR. MERV HUGHES
2254 AMELIA AVENUE
SIDNEY, B.C.
V8L2H7
ON THE MAINLAND
MR. TOMMY SOAMES
4628   198-C STREET
LANGLEY, B.C.
V3A 5S4
IN NANAIMO AREA
MR. JACK FOSTER
3881 HAMMOND BAY ROAD
NANAIMO, B.C.
Y9T 1G4
 The  C. P. Coasters       NEWSLETTER
VOLUME 1, No. 2
September 1987
"MUG-UPTIME"
by  Merv ( 'Curly' ) Hughes
First, let me thank all those who
returned the form from the last Newsletter. It was to be a poll to see if
there was sufficient interest in having future reunions and also if you
wanted a Newsletter. To date, approx. 40% in the Victoria area have
been returned, and of that number
all indicated they would support a
Newsletter, some even added notes
of encouragement and suggestions,
again, "Thankyou !!"
When we reach that number of
returns that would make it viable to
'go' with a Newsletter you will be
reading this, and we will be phoning
all those in the areas for their support
commitment, and their opinion on
some other issues; i.e. the number of
issues per year, the best time for another reunion meeting (Victoria) and
their thoughts on where we should
hold the meeting. Since the first reunion the Maritime Museum people
have suggested we could hold itthere.
on the top floor. We would of course
be required to pay the entrance fee
of $ 3.00 each to get in. While we're
talking about the Museum. Ron Armstrong, a former shipmate now involved at the Museum, asked me to mention in this column that they are on
the lookoutfor old CPR uniforms and
memorabalia. If you have something
you would like to donate, give Ron
a call at home [479-3928], he would
like to talk to you. Those in the Vancouver area, please call your local
Maritime Museum, they to are most
interested in receiving memorabalia.
WHERE ARE ALL THE GIRLS ??
If you know the married names
and addresses of any of our former
'gals', PLEASE send those names to
us so we may send them a Newsletter.
************************
What a surprise it is to find a person you have known for 24 years was
employed for a while on the CPR
ships, and you never knew it. Well
that was the position I found myself
in one day sailing the Gulf Islands. A
long-time resident of Saturna Is. and
I were standing at the rail talking and
I mentioned we had just had a reunion
of former employees in February and
how great it was to see old friends,
when he offered if he had known he
would have liked to have attended. I
told him I was not aware he had
worked for the Company, but he assured me he had and went on that he
had worked on the "Otter", "Island
Princess", "Nootka", "Mary" and
"Charmer"!!
EDDIE REID as I said, lives on
Saturna Island, a young 83 year old
bachelor, who then set about listing
and NAMING the crew of the