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Alaska Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1928

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 Canadian Pacific
 Canadian Pacific Hotels
ON THE PACIFIC COAST
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C.
The largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, overlooking the Strait of Georgia, and serving equally the
business man and the tourist. Situated in the heart of
the shopping district of Vancouver. Golf, motoring,
fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer excursions. Open
all year. European plan. One-half mile from station.
Empress Hotel, Victoria, B.C.
A luxurious hotel in this Garden City of the Pacific
Coast. An equable climate has made Victoria a
favorite summer and winter resort. Motoring, yachting, sea and stream fishing, shooting and all-year golf.
Crystal Garden for swimming and music. Open all
year. European plan. Facing wharf.
IN THE ROCKIES
Jlotel Sicamous, Sicamous, B.C.
X Junction for the orchard districts of the Okanagan Valley, and stop-over
point for those who wish to see the Thompson and Fraser Canyons by daylight.
Lake Shuswap district offers good boating and excellent trout fishing and hunting in season.    Open all year.     American plan.    At station.    Altitude 1,416 feet.
Emerald Lake Chalet, near Field, B.C.
A charming Chalet hotel situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, amidst the
picturesque Alpine scenery of the Yoho National Park. Roads and trails to the
Burgess Pass, Yoho Valley, etc. Boating and fishing. Open June 15th to September 15th.     American plan.     Seven miles from station.    Altitude 4,262 feet.
Chateau Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta
A wonderful hotel facing £n exquisite Alpine Lake in Rocky Mountains
National Park. Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips or walks to Lakes
in the Clouds, Saddleback, etc.. drives or motoring to Moraine Lake, boating,
fishing. Open June 1st to September 30th. European plan. 3'/2 miles from
station by motor railway.     Altitude 5,670 feet.
Banff Springs Hotels, Banff, Alberta
A magnificent hotel in the heart of the Rocky Mountains National Park,
backed by three splendid mountain ranges. Alpine climbing, motoring and
drives on good roads, bathing, hot sulphur springs, golf, tennis, fishing, boating
and riding. Open May 15th to September 30th. European plan. V/i miles
from station.    Altitude 4,625 feet.
THE PRAIRIES
Hotel Palliser, Calgary, Alberta
A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard, in this prosperous city of Southern Alberta. Suited equally to the business man and the tourist en route to or
from the Canadian Pacific Rockies. Good golfing and motoring. Open all year.
European plan.    At station.
Hotel Saskatchewan, Regina, Sask.
A new hotel in the old capital of the Northwest Territory, headquarters of the
Mounted Police.    Golf, tennis.    Most central hotel for the prairies.
Royal Alexandra Hotel, Winnipeg, Manitoba
A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada, appealing to those
who wish to break their transcontinental journey. The centre of Winnipeg s
social life. Good golfing and motoring. Open all year. European plan. At
station.
EASTERN   CANADA
The Royal York, Opens May 1st, 1929.    European plan.
Toronto, Ont.
Place Viger Hotel, A charming hotel in Canada's largest city.    Open
Montreal, Quebec. all year.
Chateau Frontenac, A   metropolitan   hotel—in   the   most   historic   city
Quebec, Quebec. of North America.    Open all year.
McAdam Hotel, A   commercial   and   sportsman's   hotel.    Open   ail
McAdam, N.B. year. , .       , .
The Algonquin, The   social   centre   of   Canada's   most   fashionable
St. Andrews, N.B. seashore    summer    resort.    Open    June    23rd    to
September 10th.
HOTELS  AND  BUNGALOW   CAMPS  REACHED
BY CANADIAN PACIFIC
Moraine Lake, Alta Moraine Lake Camp
Banff-Windermere ^ j Castle Mountain Bungalow Camp
Automobile Highway / \Vermilion River Camp
Radium Hot Springs Camp
Hector, B.C Wapta Camp
Hector, B.C Lake O'Hara Camp
Field, B.C Yoho Valley Camp
Lake Windermere, B.C Lake Windermere Camp
Penticton, B.C Hotel Incola
Cameron Lake, B.C Cameron Lake Chalet
Strathcona Lodge, B.C .... . ..Strathcona Lodge
Kenora, Ont  . Devil's Gap Camp
Nipigon, Ont Nipigon River Camp
French River, Ont French River Camp
Digby, N.S The Pines
Kentville, N.S. Cornwallis Inn
I
I
J
PRINTED IN U. S. A. — 1928
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
CO  AS   T
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
t came as a whip to men's greed
and a challenge to men's courage,
that first ringing call of the Northland. Until then—about thirty years
ago—Alaska was almost unknown,
a white space on the map scrawled
shakily over "Come-and-find-me."
That is, to most of the world; for the
Northland had even then its pioneers,
its prospectors, who had fished its
teeming coasts, trapped its furs,
started small towns, and panned the
first coarse colorings of gold along
its creeks. But outside of these
sturdy old-timers, Alaska, with its
side-partner, the Yukon, was hardly more than a geographical
curiosity—a huge, unpopulated, unexplored, inhospitable block of
land over three-quarters of a million square miles in size, forming
the northern tip of the American continent. It had, as far as one
could estimate then, no very remarkable resources or trading possibilities; on the contrary, it was apparently a land of perpetual
winter, frozen permanently under solid snow and ice—in this and
many other ways exactly resembling Russia, to which it had once
belonged and from which, at the Bering Strait, it was so narrowly
separated.
A pity, perhaps, that the first real revelation of a real Alaska—
an Alaska different from all one's conceptions, and richer than
Monte Cristo—should have come through that basest of motives,
avarice. The discovery"of gold in the Klondike in 1896, in such
vast quantities as to astound humanity, let loose so much sensation
that overnight the new bonanza became almost the most famous
place on earth. That feverish stampede to the north (one does
not have to be very middle-aged to remember it) was like nothing
that had ever happened before, or that has ever happened since.
The Lure of Gold
back in '98 someone took a photograph, which is still occasionally published, of an everyday scene in the Chilkoot Pass.
Perhaps you've seen it; it shows, struggling over the steep, dangerous snow-clad wastes, a thin black streak nearly two miles long—
a streak composed entirely of men, mushing "inside" to the Klondike, with nearly 600 miles travel ahead of them, and treading
so close to one another in the narrow trail that they very nearly
kicked the previous man's ankles. And this was an everyday scene
—happening all the time.
They had their hardships, those early days, before the railway
was built over the White Pass, and when cheechako and sourdough alike had to travel that arduous path over the Chilkoot and
down the Yukon River. Greed pulled them forward; the crowd
behind pressed them onwards; if they could not endure the strain
they fell out and perished.   There was no turning back.   It was
Page Two
truly no place for weaklings, for one was beset not only by a hostile
Nature, but also by the wickedness and depravity of mankind.
The opportunities drew to the Northland some of the most lawless
characters of the earth, and had it not been for the swift justice
meted out by the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, it might have
been true that
"There's never a law of God or man
Runs north of Fifty-three."
The Spell of the North
the Northland put a spell on those who made its acquaintance then. It will put the same spell on us to-day. It is a land of
mystery—a magnet that will always draw men and women, even
though the lure of the gold is fainter now. It is still a land of
romance, its atmosphere impregnated with memories of those sad,
glad days when the century was just turning over. Gold has
ceased to be its principal advantage—has, indeed, proved a false
hope in those many ghost-like "cities" that parade their empty
shells from Dyea to Nome; but there is equally the romance of
to-morrow, the discovery of other and richer resources, the development of a vigorous, prosperous northern empire.
Alaska is a land of contrasts. Never was so mistaken an idea
as that it is all winter. If it were, whence come the gorgeous,
vivid flower gardens that one sees everywhere, such masses of
color that they dazzle the eye? The answer is simple: the warm
Japan current, striking Vancouver Island, is deflected northward,
and carries to the Land of the Midnight Sun the same delightful
humidity that the Pacific Coast knows. But in winter, inland over
the White Pass, how cold it can be!
Alaska is a land of gold, of flowers, or black fox farms, of
salmon, of Indians, of curious Indian totem poles. It is a land
of magnificent scenery. The journey there, by steamer, is one of
nearly a thousand miles, through scenery of a character unknown
elsewhere on this continent. For four days the steamer threads
a long, almost land-locked channel, known as the "Inside Passage," winding through mountain-hemmed fiord-like waterways
as through a fairyland, with wooded islands, tremendous glacier-
clad peaks, fascinating Alaskan towns and queer old settlements
as continuous episodes. No water journey in America, either in
beauty or in romantic appeal, can quite compare with this trip
to Alaska.
The final contrast one meets is in transportation. For the Chilkoot Pass has been superseded by the comfortable railway journey
over the White Pass, and the extraordinary, haphazard and overcrowded steamer experiences of the early days have been superseded by the magnificent service provided by the Canadian Pacific
"Princess" steamers.
Northward Ho!
Vancouver, largest port on the Pacific Coast of Canada, is a
beautiful city situated upon an almost land-locked harbor. With
important lumbering, mining, manufacturing and trading interests,
Rail Connections
The  quickest and most picturesque route  to Vancouver
from the East is by Canadian Pacific, through the Canadian
Pacific Rockies, six hundred miles of the most magnificent
mountain scenery in the world.
In summer, four through trains a day:—
The Trans-Canada Limited, from both Montreal and Toronto—an exclusive all-sleeping-compartment-observation
car train.
The Imperial—from Montreal.
The Vancouver Express—from Toronto.
The Mountaineer—from Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis.
Victoria and Seattle are reached from Vancouver by the
fast "Princess" steamships.
Clothing, Meals, Etc.
Passengers should provide themselves with a good, warm
top-coat. The general weather is very fine and warm, but
a good covering for the evening or a damp day is very desirable. The Canadian Pacific does not supply steamer rugs,
but has arranged to carry on the steamships a limited supply
of rugs, which will be rented to passengers for the round trip
at a nominal charge. The company does not supply the regulation ocean liner deck-chair, but supplies comfortable camp
chairs with backs, free of charge. Barbers, ladies' hairdressers and manicurists are carried on all steamers.
The meals provided on the "Princess" steamships are
breakfast, lunch and dinner, with light refreshments served
in addition in the dining saloon at night. While the steamship is in port at Skagway, meals and berth are not included
in the passage money, but can be secured if the passenger
prefers staying aboard.
Victrolas are carried, with a suitable supply of records, as
well as a piano.
Baggage Free allowance on "Princess" steamers of
150 pounds on whole tickets, and 75 pounds
on half tickets, will be granted, with the customary charge
for excess weight.
Steamer trunks intended for use in staterooms must not
exceed 14 inches in height.
Through passengers from eastern or southern points making the Alaska trip will be granted free storage at Canadian
Pacific wharves at Vancouver, Victoria, or Seattle for thirty
days, after which regular storage charges will accrue.
Customs Baggage checked through from any United
States point to any point in Alaska, or from any
Canadian point to any point in the Yukon territory, or vice-
versa, and not required en route, is not subject to Customs
examination.
Hand baggage, or checked baggage required en route, is
subject to examination northbound by the United States
Customs at Ketchikan, and southbound by the Canadian
Customs at Prince Rupert. Checked baggage, if desired,
may be forwarded to destination in bond.
The baggage of passengers making the White Horse,
Atlin or Dawson trips will also be examined by Canadian
Customs on entering Yukon territory, and by the United
States Customs on returning.
Times     Of   arrival  and  departure   at   the   various  ports
are posted on the bulletin board of the ships.
 PRINCESS ♦ * ^TEAM&IHIPfel «  » TO * ♦ ALASKA
~~ XX; x^ 7
The Princess Louise.
Page Three
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
and with a huge overseas business with the Orient, it is also a
delightful summer city, with all kinds of outdoor recreation.
Victoria, at the south end of Vancouver Island, across the
Juan de Fuca Strait, is the capital of British Columbia; and the
imposing Parliament Buildings that front the inner harbor are
some of the finest in America. Victoria is a charming city of
beautiful homes and lovely gardens, and is a favorite summer
and winter resort.
Seattle, on Puget Sound, is one of the most progressive cities
of the Pacific North-West.
Northbound Sailings
Canadian   Pacific  Alaska
service is performed by the
luxurious steamships
PRINCESS LOUISE
PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
PRINCESS ALICE
Sailings during the summer season: Leave Vancouver every Wednesday and
Saturday (from early June
until late August). During
the balance of the year—at
regular intervals. See current time-tables.
Steamships also sail from
Victoria at 12:00 midnight
previous to advertised sailing
date. Passengers from Seattle
can connect at Vancouver by
leaving Seattle at 9:00 a.m. on
day of sailing of Alaska steamship from Vancouver, or the
11:30 steamer the previous day.
Alaska steamships arrive at
Skagway on the morning of the
fourth day after leaving Vancouver.
Totem Poles
Leaving Vancouver
Page Four
Leaving Vancouver
the voyage to Alaska can be divided into two parts. From
Vancouver to Ketchikan the journey is mostly through narrow
channels, with steep shores heavily timbered to the water's
edge. The second part, from Ketchikan to Skagway, is through
wider stretches of water, with glaciers, waterfalls, and rugged
mountains on either side, and richly colored with the purple
twilights of Alaska.
The Princess steamship slips away from Vancouver on its
four-day northbound trip at 9:00 o'clock at night, when the
long summer dusks have begun to darken. After trunks have
been stowed and opened, dining room reservations made, and
casual first impressions formed of one's fellow-travellers, there
is still time for a stroll up and down deck before turning in.
By this time the ship has left Burrard Inlet, passed Brockton
Point, and has entered the Gulf of Georgia. On the right is
still to be seen the dark bulk of the mainland; on the left, but invisible yet, is Vancouver
Island, in whose lee the route is sheltered for over two hundred miles.
The First  the course is south of long, narrow Texada Island and through Discovery
Day Passage, between that island and Vancouver Island.   The early risers—and
they only!—will see Seymour Narrows, for this, the narrowest part of the
channel, is passed about 6:00 a.m. Some day, perhaps, the Narrows will be bridged, but
at certain times they are rather exciting to navigate, for the ebb and flow of the tides
around the north end of Vancouver Island make the current rush through it like a mill-
race. An hour or so later the ship passes through Johnstone Straits and Broughton
Straits, along whose shores a number of logging camps can be seen. And then after
breakfast—even after the last of all sittings, when those who got up late are just reaching for their first smoke of the day, and those who got up early are just beginning to
sigh for lunch—we reach our first stop, Alert Bay.
Alert Bay alert bay is a small village on a small island—Cormorant Island—situated
so close to Vancouver Island that the maps are almost unable to make any
distinction; but it is nevertheless one of the principal salmon canneries on the Coast.
Here, in fact, will be our first glimpse of this important industry, and during the time in
port the canneries invite visitors to inspect the highly interesting processes of turning a
large, handsome salmon into shiny little round cans. Alert Bay is an old settlement, with
a considerable Indian population; and here, too, we make our first contact with another
object typical of the Northland—the totem pole. (See r(Totem Poles.") The Indian
cemetery, with some modern poles, is well worth the short stroll to see it; but it is to be
regretted, somewhat, that the gigantic poles that until recently stood close to the wharf,
THE totem poles of the Indians of British Columbia
constitute one of the most striking features of the
whole north-west coast. These long shafts, irregularly
planted on the seashore among smoke and feast houses,
convey impressions from a strange world. The rugged
peaks and wooded gorges beyond, with their ever-changing
shades of dark greens and soft blues, provide a unique setting for them. And the squat Mongolian features of the
Indians themselves carry one's imagination beyond the
American frontiers into the mysterious realms of Asia.
These remarkable carvings should not be mistaken for
idols or deities. They were never worshipped. But they
are pictorial records of history and mythology, as the Indians understand them. Some of them represent the Raven,
the Eagle, the Killer-whale and the Wolf, which are the
emblems of the largest social groups in the nation. The
Bear, the Frog, the Sea-Lion, the Beaver, the Thunder-
bird, and many others, are known as the crests of various
clans. Here we have to do only with coats-of-arms or a
system of native heraldry.
Other characters are occasionally introduced among these
figures, which are understood through the medium of myths
and tales of the past. These are the ancestors of the
owners, and often the "uncle" in whose honor the pole was
erected after his death, by his nephew or legitimate successor. Battles and other noted events are also commemorated on poles. A man who wishes to ridicule a rival or
discredit an insolvent debtor may represent him head downwards on whatever pole he may erect in a feast.
There were once many native artists of great repute, who
were hired at large for carving poles, according to definite
instructions furnished them. Large logs were hauled over
long distances for the purpose. When the carving was
finished, numerous guests assembled for the potlatch or feast of
commemoration. Lavish presents were made to the guests, whose
function it was to remember the meaning of the figures on the poles
and acknowledge the rights of the legitimate owners.
Salmon and Other Fisheries
The fisheries of the British Columbia coasts now constitute one
of the powerful industries of that region. They include salmon,
halibut, cod, herring and to some extent whale. Salmon production
is about half the product of all other fish, but the halibut catch is
of much importance, also herring.
About five varieties of salmon are found on this coast; but the
sock-eye (or red salmon), the best-known commercial species, is in
greatest favor for canning purposes. The silver, or "coho," which
comes next in market value and popularity, and the quinnat (or
spring salmon), the largest and choicest variety of Pacific salmon,
are marketed fresh to a great extent; while the latter is also mild
cured in salt.
Canneries are established at numerous points on the coast. These
are conducted on thoroughly modern and hygienic lines, and the
work is done almost entirely by highly ingenious machinery which
performs the work with a rapidity and a precision unobtainable in
the days when work was done by hand. Halibut is shipped fresh,
large cold storage facilities being available at several places, particularly at Prince Rupert.
Indian Basketry has become an important industry among
Baskets        the Indians of the Pacific Coast.    This primitive and
lowly art was neglected for many years, but now the
market afforded by the fast increasing tourist travel has brought it
to life again.
 PRINCESS * * STEAMSHIPS ■♦   * TO ♦ » ALASKA
Page Five
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
S/-SJTJ
{/     Campbell River
mm
f   Courtenay w
and which were some of the most notable of their kind on the
whole Pacific Coast, have now been sold by the Indians, principally to Stanley Park, Vancouver.
Alert Bay to Swanson Bay
Queen Charlotte Sound
after lunch we leave the shelter of Vancouver Island,
reaching Queen Charlotte Sound—with its short experience of
open Pacific Ocean. From Cape Scott, on Vancouver Island, to
Cape St. James, at the southern end of the Queen Charlotte
Islands, is about 150 miles; but we bear away from that wild
and rather primitive group, and keep instead close inland, reaching Calvert Island in three hours—the longest of the three times
we shall see the wide horizon of the open Pacific Ocean during
the entire trip.
Passing through Lama Passage, Bella Bella is on the left—
a very old and practically deserted Indian village. At 10:00 at
night, or so, we enter Old Ocean again, this time at Milbank
Sound, but only for ten miles, "and so" (as Samuel Pepys says)
"to bed."
The Second    entering   the   Tolmie   Channel,   between   Princess   Royal
Day Island and the mainland, we pass Swanson Bay in the night,
and then enter Grenville Channel, in the shelter of 60-mile-
long Pitt Island. At about breakfast time we pass the mouth of the Skeena
River, and shortly, with Digby Island on the west, on which may be seen
the Canadian Government wireless station, arrive at about 9:00 a.m. at
Prince Rupert.
Prince prince rupert is the most northerly city of any size in Canada,
Rupert with a population of about 7,000. Built on a circle of hills formed
of very hard rock, the city is considerably above the level of the
wharf and is reached by a long staircase. It is a very important fishing
centre. Large quantities of fish, particularly halibut, are now being shipped
from here to Eastern Canada and the United States. A big cold storage
plant is located in the Upper Harbor, where the fish are unloaded and put
into cold storage or iced, as the case may be, for shipment to the East.
Prince Rupert is the Pacific terminal of the Canadian National Railways,
and has a very large floating dry dock, 600 feet long and capable of lifting
vessels of 20,000 tons weight. The visitor will probably be interested, during his stay on shore, in the fur-stores of the city—the first sight he will
obtain of the great fur industry of the Northland.
Entering shortly after leaving Prince Rupert, the old Indian village of
Alaska Metlakatla is passed. Here is a very successful mission for the
natives, founded by Father Duncan. About 30 minutes later,
Port Simpson is passed—one of the oldest settlements in Northern British
Columbia, with an old Hudson's Bay Company's post that has been a trading-centre with the Indians for about sixty years.
About three hours after leaving Prince Rupert, Green Island Lighthouse
indicates our nearness to the international boundary line between Canada
and Alaska (United States). Dixon's Entrance, last entrance of the open
Pacific Ocean, is crossed, and we wind our way through Revilla Gigedo
Channel—here called Tongass Narrows—to Ketchikan.
Southbound Sailings
Canadian Pacific Alaska
Steamships leave Skagway
every Monday and Thursday during the summer
tourist season (June 25th to
August 23 rd). Regular
sailings at other times of
year.
Sailing hour from Skagway—7:00 p.m.
(Alaska time is one hour
slower than Pacific Standard
Time.)
Arrive Vancouver—4 days
later, a.m.
Arrive Victoria—4 days later,
afternoon.
Arrive Seattle—4 days later,
evening.
Indians
The natives of the West Coast are strikingly different
from other North American Indians; to many they are not
Indians at all, but a race apart, whose characteristics are
reminiscent of Asia. Their ancestors are indeed likely to
have come to these shores across the sea or over the Strait
of Bering, long ago, after earlier migrations had already
peopled most of the two American continents.
The name of "Siwash," ignorantly given them, is derived
from the French sauvage. They really belong to more than
five races, whose languages are totally different; the Salish,
whose habitat once covered much territory around Victoria,
Vancouver, and the main coast north and south—the Nootka,
who dwell on the west coast of Vancouver Island, and their
distant relatives the Kwakiutl, whose territories stretch
northwards from Vancouver Island to a point near the
Skeena River—the Tsimshian of the Skeena and Nass
Rivers and the adjacent coast, near the present town of
Prince Rupert—the Haidas of Queen Charlotte and Prince
of Wales Islands—and the Tlingit of the Alaskan coast.
Another race, whose name is Dene or Athapascan, inhabit
much of the interior, beyond the boundaries of the above-
named nations.
The west coast natives are essentially fisher folk; they
formerly secured their food almost wholly from the sea. It consisted of seals,
whales, salmon, halibut, fish roe and oolachen, or candle fish. Their dug-out
canoes stood to them as did the horse to the buffalo-hunting Indians of the
prairies a century ago. Before the advent of Europeans they could hardly
ever venture beyond their frontiers. War and daring raids were most common
among them, for they were bold, venturesome and cruel. Even to this day they
are fond of relating tales of adventures of the none-too-distant past.
They were not nomadic, as were their eastern neighbors, but each family claimed
hunting grounds and territories within the national boundaries. They migrated
to their hunting and fishing camps in the spring and returned to their villages
on the coast in the autumn.
Community life was active only in the winter—that is, during the potlatch
season. The leaders then proceeded sternly to their business—the exchange of
goods, the promotion of their children and nephews, and the various ceremonies
that appertained to their social welfare and dutiful commemoration of the deeds
of their ancestors. They were keen and thrifty, and their will unbending. Their
numbers were formerly considerable, but they are now passing away like the other
natives; and their culture has forever given way to that of invaders from the
West and the East who are gradually driving them off the land.
On page 8 will be found pictures of West Coast Indian masks.
Immigration Inspection
Passengers entering Alaska from Canada are required to pass United States
Immigration Inspection at Ketchikan, the port of entry. So far as bona fide
tourists are concerned, this inspection is not strict. Passengers will be asked by
purser for certain information regarding age, place of residence, business, etc.,
and will be given a card by him. This card is presented by the holder to the
immigration inspector, who boards steamer at Ketchikan, and as soon as particulars shown by purser on manifest are checked by the inspector, the passenger
can go ashore. There is a similar inspection by the Canadian Immigration Department on arrival of steamer southbound at Prince Rupert.
Passports are not necessary.
Fossil Buried for more centuries than one can estimate in the sands or frozen
Ivory tundra of the Arctic, and so saturated with mineral or vegetable substances as to have become delicately colored, mammoth or mastodon
ivory is often exposed by the constantly changing shore line, and found by the
wandering Eskimos, who carve it into many objects of use. Besides these, there
is a walrus ivory.
Page Six
 princess! * ♦ ^TkwlSHIPy
4     *
TO * * ALASKA
Hunting in Alaska affords many such
trophies as the Mountain Sheep.
Page Seven
The Princess Alice*
 PRINCESS * * STEAMSHIPS  ♦   * TO * * ALASKA
Photographs by courtesy of the Victoria Memorial Museum, Ottawa
Page Eight
Wooden Ceremonial Masks made by the Indians of the West Coast
 PRINCESS * * STEAMSHIPS  •'  * TO * * ALASKA
Page Nine
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
Princess)Royal ^
/) Swanson~L.
Arlstazable jS( (^   ^
Ketchikan Ketchikan (an Indian word meaning "the town
under the eagle") is the southernmost town in
Alaska, situated on Revilla Gigedo Island. It might also be
said to be now the most prosperous town in Alaska, for salmon
and halibut have made it rich and given it large canneries and
cold storage plants. It is also a mining centre for copper,
gold, platinum, silver and lead, the well-known Salt Chuck
platinum mines being within 30 miles. Ketchikan has a bustling
air, with hotels, stores and banks. Originally an Indian fishing
camp, it has several large canneries, and a great mosquito fleet
of fishing vessels is continually bringing in fish from the sea.
The visitor will find interesting curio stores. There is also
a pleasant walk to the waterfall in Ketchikan Creek (about 15
minutes), where in the late summer months thousands of
salmon may be seen leaping and struggling through the rushing, foaming water on their way to the spawning banks. There
are two splendid totem poles—the Chief Johnson totem, surmounted by Kajuk, a fabled bird of the mountain which amuses
itself by throwing rocks at ground hogs, with below the Raven
and the Frog Woman with her children, the Salmon; and the
Kyan totem, surmounted by the Crane, followed by the Kyak,
another legendary bird, and the Bear.
Swanson Bay to Ketchikan
(See page 6)
The Third Day
A distinct change of scenery occurs from now on. The
stretches of water become wide, and mountains rise on either
side, with waterfalls tumbling down and glaciers crowning their
crests. The steamer winds along Clarence Strait, with Prince of Wales Island on the west, and turning round between Etolin and Zarembo Islands
reaches Wrangell about 4:00 a.m., and leaves before breakfast time. We
shall, however, have ample time to visit it on the southbound voyage.
Wrangell wrangell, situated on the island of the same name, is one of
the oldest cities of Alaska, and is named after Baron Wrangell,
who was governor about 1830. It was originally a trading post, populated
mainly by Indians under the protection of the Russians, but came under
white dominance during the gold rush of '98. Part of the Russian fort
still remains, and there are also some very old totem poles near the wharf.
Wrangell is at the mouth of the Stikine River, which, navigable for about
170 miles, is the entry point to the celebrated Cassiar big-game country.
(See "Sporting" next column.)
Wrangell two hours after leaving Wrangell the ship enters Wrangell
Narrows Narrows, and for twenty miles proceeds at half speed through
this narrow, winding channel of a remarkable beauty. Well
marked with buoys and beacons, this passage between the wooded islands
saves a long detour around Cape Decision.
Princess Steamships
PRINCESS  LOUISE
PRINCESS  CHARLOTTE
PRINCESS  ALICE
To Alaska by the Inside
Passage, and back, is a two-
thousand - mile nine - day
journey from Vancouver,
with six ports of call. To
handle the tourist business,
the Canadian Pacific operates during the summer
months three of the finest
of its well-known "Princess"
steamships, which are large,
modern vessels of the most
comfortable sea-going type.
The Princess Louise is 330
feet long, with a passenger capacity of 260.
The Princess Charlotte is 330
feet long, with a passenger capacity of 255.
The Princess Alice is 289 feet
long, with a passenger capacity
of 222.
These three ships are oil-
burners, and are fitted with
wireless telegraph.
Sporting
The "roof of the world" has been so richly endowed by
nature with mighty snow-capped mountains, expansive
inland seas, vast areas of trackless wilderness and lonely
tundra that it offers the sportsman a wonderful variety of
hunting. In the interior country of Northern British
Columbia, the Yukon Territory and Alaska, the giant moose,
the stately caribou, the wary deer, savage silvertip grizzlies,
mountain sheep, mountain goat and many other varieties of
game roam at large.
Several species of bear are to be found in this mountainous domain, ranging from the huge polar bear and
terrible Kodiak, down through the different varieties to the
common black bear once found all over America.
The northern moose, the largest member of the deer
family, is plentifully distributed throughout the greater part
of this country. Magnificent trophies are brought out each
season. Caribou, too, are abundant, and inhabit the treeless
and tundra sections of the interior. Mountain sheep and goat
are among the most prized game animals.
The fishing affords an interesting side line to a big game
hunt, and the swift, tumbling rivers, well stocked with gamy
fighting trout, and the mountain-rimmed lakes of unequalled
beauty, all combine to make this a paradise for the sportsman.
The principal big game districts and the more widely
known localities are:
The Cassiar country of British Columbia, one of the finest
and most celebrated sporting regions of this continent. Lying
back of the coast range, it is reached from Wrangell, whence
a regular launch service with sleeping accommodation is operated up the Stikine River to Telegraph Creek, B. C. (see
opposite). From the head of navigation (165 miles) hunting
grounds are reached by pack train. An alternative approach
is via Atlin (see page 18) and thence by pack train.
The Kluahne and White River country, reached by automobile from White
Horse, Yukon Territory.
The McMillan and Pelly River districts, reached by Yukon River steamer to
Yukon Crossing or Selkirk, Yukon Territory.
The Kenai Peninsula, via Anchorage or Seward, Alaska.
The Chickaloon-Nelchina region from Anchorage, Alaska, by train to Chick-
aloon.
Alaska Peninsula, Bering Sea and Kodiak Island—via Anchorage, Alaska.
Reliable outfitters and guides are available through whom complete arrangements for hunting trips in the territory indicated can be made.
The General Tourist Agent, Canadian Pacific Railway, Montreal, has gathered considerable information about these peerless hunting fields, which will
gladly be imparted on request.
Distances
The distances between the different ports of the Alaska trip, and the approximate time between each, are as follows:
From
r-         tt       Nautical
To       Hours    MiIes
Vancouver. .
Alert Bay.   14
183
Alert Bay. . .
Prince
Prince
Rupert .  22
287
Rupert. . .
. Ketchikan.    8
81
Ketchikan. .
Wrangell .    7
88
Wrangell. . .
Juneau   . .   11
131
Juneau	
.Skagway .    8
88
858
A nautica
mile is equivalent
to 1.15
statute miles
From
To       Hours
.Nautical
Miles
Seattle	
. Vancouver
(direct)
854
126
Victoria. . .
.Vancouver.
4
72
Inland distances from
Skagway are
as follows:
Statute
Miles
Skagway. . .
. Atlin    ...
150
Skagway. . .
. White
White
Horse   .
110
Horse. . .
. Dawson
460
Page Ten
 PRINCESS ♦ ■* STEAMSHIPS >   * TO:* - ALASKA
The Harbor at Skagway*
Page Eleven
 BRITISH     .COLUMBIA
C   O  A   S  T
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
have dance floors
A Carved House Post
of the West Coast
NOTE. During the season of 1928 it may be
necessary for the ship to proceed from Wrangell to Juneau via Cape Decision, Chatham
Straits and Sumner Straits, owing to the dredging of the Narrows, which was commenced in
1927 and may not be finished until the middle
of 1928.
At the north end of the Narrows lies the old
town of Petersburg, whose name indicates its
origin in the days of the Russian regime. It is
now a flourishing fishing centre. Kupreanof
Island is on the west, and after crossing Frederick Sound and Cape Fanshaw, we enter Stephen's Passage.
Taku we are now surrounded by the typi-
Glacier cal grandeur of Alaska and, turning
up Taku Inlet, the Taku Glacier sends
out hundreds of odd-shaped ice floes to meet us
—as blue as indigo, floating by to melt gradually in warmer waters, as slowly the steamer
approaches this famous sight. This glacier, a
mile wide and 100 feet thick, extends for over 90 miles back
over the mountains to join Llewellyn Glacier at the head of
Atlin Lake (see page 18). It really is two glaciers, one—a
mixture of brown, white, and blue colors—"dead" and receding, the other very much alive and continually moving
forward. Showing all the colors of the rainbow, according
to the time of day or position of the sun, huge masses of ice
frequently break off into the sea, with deafening thunder,
and float majestically away. Even the vibration caused by
the ship's whistle will bring down great hundreds-of-tons
pieces of ice.
Juneau three hours' steaming up Gastineau Channel
brings us to Juneau, clinging to the base and sides
of Mount Juneau, which towers 3,500 feet almost perpendicularly above, near the mouth of the Taku River. Juneau,
named after its French-Canadian founder, is the capital of
Alaska, the residence of the Governor, and the seat of all
government departments. With a population of nearly
4,000, it is a bright and interesting city, built (like so many
of these coast settlements) partly on piles over the water,
partly on bare rock, with modern hotels and stores, and many
attractive residences and public buildings.
The Territorial Museum in the Arctic Brotherhood Hall
has a wonderful collection of Alaska curiosities; on the floor
below is the experimental salmon hatchery. Fine raw fur
stocks can be seen at local dealers. Juneau has good roads
and automobiles a-plenty; one particularly interesting ride
is to the face of the Mendenhall Glacier (2Y2 hours return)
or to Auk Lake (an hour longer).    A short hike away is
Princess Steamships
The  Princess  Steamships
on the Alaska run are fitted
with every comfort and convenience for passengers.
Staterooms on the Princess Steamships are light,
cosy and well-ventilated.
They are not overcrowded,
but designed to accommodate only two passengers per
stateroom. On each ship
there are a few "de luxe"
rooms with private bathrooms, and also some with
sofa berths.
The community rooms—dining room, observation room,
lounges, smoking room, etc.—
are bright, cheerful and charmingly furnished.    All three ships
Geographical
Alaska can be divided, roughly, into three parts. First,
there is the "Panhandle"—a long, narrow ledge of land between the British Columbia boundary and the sea, running
from latitude 55° to 60°, and bold, steep and craggy. Secondly, there is the huge blunt peninsula of "continental"
Alaska, running from latitude 60° to 300 miles north of the
Arctic Circle, and measuring some 600 miles from the Yukon
boundary west to Bering Strait; and lastly, there is the
long, broken fringe of the Aleutian Islands.
The Yukon Territory can be easily confused with continental Alaska, for its topography, atmosphere and general
environment are the same; but it is separate politically, and
is a part of Canada, not the United States. It lies between Alaska and the North-West Territories, and extends
from the northern boundary of British Columbia to the
Arctic Ocean.
Alaska has an area of 591,000 square miles, and a population of about 60,000. Its territorial capital is Juneau.
The Yukon has an area of 207,000 square miles, with a
population of 5,000 and territorial capital at Dawson.
Historical Notes
The region now known as Alaska was first visited by white
men in 1741, when two Russian officers, Captains Bering and
Chirikov, explored the coast as far south as Dixon Entrance.
Many traders and trappers followed them, and Kodiak
Island was settled in 1784. Owing to excesses committed by private traders, who
robbed and massacred the Indians, Russia created in 1799 a semi-official corporation called the Russian-American Company. Alexander Baranov, a famous administrator, founded Sitka in 1804. The monopoly of this company ended in 1861,
when Prince Matsukov, an imperial governor, was appointed. The United States
had already made overtures for the purchase of "Russian America," and in 1867
the purchase was consummated for the price of $7,200,000.
But thus far the Northland had been considered only in terms of fisheries and
the fur trade. The discovery of mineral wealth was made much more slowly,
and it was not until the sensational finds of rich "placers" in the Klondike in 1896,
which culminated in one of the most hectic gold rushes of modern times, that the
attention of the world was riveted upon this feature. The Yukon Territory was
constituted in 1898. The Yukon River was explored by Russians as long ago
as 1842, and in 1883 Lieutenant Frederick Schwatka crossed the Chilkoot Pass,
descended the Lewes River to Fort Selkirk, and so down the river to the sea.
Gold Mining
As early as 1861 gold discoveries were made in the Stikine River, and from
1866 to 1887 scattered colorings were found at many places along or tributary to
the Yukon River. The location of the first Klondike claim in August, 1896, was
followed by a feverish and picturesque rush, the like of which the world has never
seen before or since, and the mines in American territory were temporarily deserted.
The Yukon is a "placer" mining district: that is, the gold is found in alluvial
deposits of mixed sand, gravel and clay, and is obtained by a system of "panning"
or "sluicing." Frequently these deposits are along the hollows of river beds, but
they are also found at higher altitudes, in terraces that formerly were the beds
of streams that have changed their courses. In the latter case, instead of being
worked in the creek or sluice, the gold deposits are first washed down by powerful
jets of water projected by hose lines, and so into the sluices.
The Bonanza was the greatest of the Klondike creeks, and its tributary, the
Eldorado Creek, the richest, probably surpassing any known placer deposit. The
Klondike output reached its climax in 1900, with a production of $22,000,000,
but has since then declined. Besides gold, silver mining has been developed in
the Yukon, an outstanding example being the silver-lead mine near Mayo.
Placer gold was discovered at Juneau in about 1880, but the present mines there
are quartz mines—that is, the gold is found in rocks, which must be crushed.
Page Twelve
 PRINCESS ♦ ♦ STEAMSHIPS ■♦   ♦TO ♦ * ALASKA
Page Thirteen
 BRITISH
C   O   L   U. M   B   I   A
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
the Gold Creek Basin, the site of the first placer gold
strike in Alaska, made by Joe Juneau and Richard Haines
in the early 80's.
Alaska Gold within a short distance from Juneau,
but reached by launch, are Thane and
Douglas, where, until some time after the Great War,
three of the largest low-grade gold-crushing plants in the
world were situated. Now only one remains, the Alaska
Juneau, with a mining and milling capacity of about
9,000 tons of ore daily. On Douglas Island are the old
buildings of the celebrated Treadwell Mine, flooded by
a cave-in in 1917, and not operated since.
Ketchikan to Skagway
(Seepages 10-12)
The Lynn Canal
the steamer leaves Juneau at midnight, and reaches
Skagway about 9:00 a.m.; but on the southbound journey there is ample opportunity to see the beautiful Lynn
Canal, which, with the possible exception of the Taku
Glacier, provides the most wonderful scenery of all. For
over 80 miles we steam up this arm of the sea, which
varies in width from one to five miles. Mountains of
rock capped with snow, towering glaciers and gushing
waterfalls, canyons of all sizes and wild shapes, and
colors in restless variety surround us. Davidson Glacier
is a huge ice wall seen on the west. Passing the town
of Haines and Fort Seward, a U. S. military post, we suddenly turn
a point and see Skagway ahead of us.
Skagway skagway, the end of the northbound run, is a town that
has loomed large in the history of the North. When the
gold rush started to the Yukon in 1896, the landing was made at
Dyea, which lies on the western branch of the Lynn Canal, and the
trail inland led over the dangerous Chilkoot Pass; but word came of
the discovery of the White Pass, and in a day fifteen thousand people
left Dyea, and in a day Skagway arose where before was chiefly
swamp.
At the height of the gold rush, Skagway was one of the wildest,
wickedest places on earth, chock full of the gambling halls, dance
halls, saloons and other lurid temptations that nowadays can be seen
nowhere else but in the "movies." Gangs of "bad men" terrorized
the town, preying not only on the returning successful prospector but
on the incoming "cheechako" as well. Skagway is not such an ancient
town but that old-timers can regale you with stories of its celebrated
characters, such as Soapy Smith or Frank Reid, whose graves nearby
will initiate many reminiscences. But those days are over. Skagway
is a model of propriety, with hotels, stores, and the peaceful air of
ordinary business.
Amongst the marvels of Skagway—to those at least who have
never considered Alaska as aught but perpetual winter—are its beautiful flower gardens.   The background of mountains that enclose it
Books About the Northland
A great many interesting
books can be obtained about
Alaska and the Yukon. By
all means, read some before
you start. There are the
well-known stories by Rex
Beach — "The Spoilers,"
"The Barrier," and "The
Silver Horde;" Jack London's famous "Call of the
Wild," and many others;
Elizabeth Robins' "Magnetic
North" and "Come and Find
Me;" James Oliver Cur-
wood's "Alaskan;" Edison
Marshall's "Seward's Folly;"
and Service's "Trail of Ninety-Eight."
Robert W. Service's
poems, "Songs of a Sourdough" and "Ballads of a
Cheechako" are, we imagine,
so well known as hardly to
need mention.
The Mounted Police
The famous Royal Canadian Mounted Police—formerly named
the Royal North-West Mounted Police—still number the guardianship of the Yukon Territory amongst their multifarious duties, and
greet you, as customs officers, when you cross the border. Due credit
has perhaps never been given to the scarlet-coated "Mounties" for
the way they enforced the law during the great gold rush. Some
writers seeking material for highly-colored adventure stories have
done the force certain injustice by representing the Yukon of that
period as a violent country. The real truth is that notwithstanding
that the gold rush brought to the Yukon—merely by being a gold
rush-—some of the most lawless characters on earth, the administration of justice in Canadian territory was so strict as to strike terror
to the hearts of the wrong-doers.
The force first went north in 1894, with the first gold discoveries.
During the stampede, only three killings—none of which were preventable—occurred in Canadian territory. The Mounted Police assisted 30,000 persons, collected #150,000 in duties and fees, checked
over 30 million pounds of solid food, carried the mails and escorted
gold shipments out of the country. At the height of the rush they
had some 200 officers and men, but now, of course, much fewer.
The A word in general relative to two Alaskan words.
Sourdough Visitors encounter the terms "sourdough" and
"cheechako," distinguishing the resident from the
new arrival. The first is a compliment, meaning an old-timer or
one who has seen the ice form and go out of the Yukon River in
fall and spring. The second is an Indian word meaning tenderfoot,
or newcomer. Uppermost in the minds of everyone is the genuine
friendliness and ready hospitality offered by the "sourdoughs." One
of the surprises is in the gardens of these old residents. Nowhere
can be found finer sweet-peas, dahlias, asters, stocks or pansies, or
such raspberries, currants, strawberries, blueberries and vegetables.
The day of the trapper in the Northland is passing, chiefly by reason of
the decrease in the supply of fur of good quality; but fox farming is rapidly developing instead. With the exportation of live foxes practically forbidden by legislation, a number of farms have been started, and this industry is becoming
an important one.
Foxes are popularly classified as red, black, blue and white. The black fox presents many
color phases, ranging from clear black to extra pale silver. The Alaskan fox is one of the
distinct branches of the black fox, but does not breed true to color with the native Canadian. The "patch" fox is obtained by crossing the red with the black, and the "cross"
fox produced by mating together two distinct types of the black fox, such as the Alaskan
and native Canadian. The blue fox will not cross with either the red or the black, and
only occasionally with the white (or Arctic) fox.
Mink and seal furs are also produced in Alaska and the Yukon.
A Fine Circle Trip
From Dawson the journey can be continued into central-western and south-western
Alaska on a very magnificent circle tour. During the summer season, the White Pass
and Yukon Route operate steamers down the Yukon River, actually—at Fort Yukon—
crossing the Arctic Circle. Turning round up the Tanana River, which flows in from the
south, the steamer brings one, in about five days from Dawson, to Nenana.
Here the Alaska Railroad is met—running north to Fairbanks and Chatanika, the
centre of a great placer gold mining district, and south to Seward, on the Gulf of Alaska.
The latter takes one fairly close to Mount McKinley National Park, and the majestic
mountain itself—highest peak of the North American continent—is in sight practically
all day. Farther south is Anchorage, where the U. S. Government commenced construction of the Alaska Railroad into the interior in 1915.
Another route from Fairbanks is by the Richardson Automobile Highway to Chitina—
a splendid 2/4-day motor trip through a very primitive country, connecting with the
Copper River and Northwestern Railway back to the seaport of Cordova.
From either Seward or Cordova steamer can be taken to Juneau, and the southbound
journey resumed there by Canadian Pacific.
Fox
Farming
Page Fourteen
 PRINCESS ♦ * STEAMSHIPS  ♦   ♦ TO ♦ * ALASKA
A Skagway Flower Garden,
A Hike to a Glacier. dgtf&^lfS^'
Page Fifteen
 DOWN
THE
DAWSON
RIVER
T   O
THE
KLONDIKE
like a cup offer many attractive outings, such as "hikes" along the Skagway
River, to Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove, or the great Denver Glacier.
There are fine launch trips available, and good fishing. The steamer lays
over about 36 hours before starting on its southbound journey.
Inland from Skagway
interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit would be incomplete
without a journey to the equally interesting and fascinating "inside." Such
a journey, difficult as it was in the early days of the. gold rush, can now be
easily undertaken, for Skagway is the southern terminus of the rail line of
the White Pass and Yukon Route. A comfortable train, with large-
windowed observation cars, will carry one through the magnificent scenery
of the White Pass into the Yukon Territory, connecting at Carcross and at
White Horse with the commodious steamers of the same company.
For those who are returning south by the same "Princess" steamship,
there are available the excursions to West Taku Arm or to White Horse.
For those waiting over until the next steamship there is the trip to Atlin
Lake—where, indeed, many visitors linger much longer than such a brief
visit. A description of these beautiful trips will be found on page 18. But
for those with more time, we will continue on to White Horse, whence
there is the wonderful trip down the Yukon River to Dawson.
.few-!* Hi:#n
Llewellyn Glacia
To White Horse and Atlin
The the rail journey is a most
White Pass spectacular one. The salt tang
of the sea is left behind, and
the sweetness of lake and mountain air fills
the nostrils. The scenery grows rugged and
awe-inspiring. We climb steadily around
gorges, along the brink of deep canyons,
past roaring cataracts, and near dead cities
to which cling memories of the trail of '98.
Such names as "Dead Horse Gulch" and
"Log Cabin" help vividly to recall those
grim days.
At White Pass Summit—nearly 3,000
feet higher than Skagway in twenty miles!
—we leave American territory, and the
scarlet-coated Mounted Policeman greets us
as we enter Canada. A bronze monument,
where the flags of the two countries float
side by side, marks the boundary line. For
a very short distance we travel through
British Columbia, and then at Pennington cross into the
Yukon Territory.
Lake Bennett on our left, Lake Bennett begins—a long,
narrow body of water which the railway will
follow for twenty-six miles. It is rather amazing to learn
that Bennett, where a stop is made for lunch, and which
consists merely of a station and its outbuildings, once had
a population of several thousand, and teemed with life and
excitement. For it was to this beautiful lake, bounded by
old-rose color, that the "trail of '98" led. Those who had
survived the epic hazards of the Pass camped on this lake,
and whipsawed lumber to make the rafts, scows and other
manner of water craft in which to reach the golden land of
their hopes. Little did they know, of course, the perils of
the White Horse Rapids or if they had heard of them,
little did they appreciate them.
Along the ever-winding shores of this blue Lake Bennett,
looking out on a long mountain ridge, the railway runs,
until the little town of Carcross is reached. There is an
Indian school nearby, and interesting fox ranches, and in
the cemetery are buried many of the discoverers of the
Klondike.
White Horse lewis and other little lakes are passed and
then Miles Canyon and White Horse Rapids.
On still days, the roar of these rapids can be heard even in
the town, about an hour's walk distant. As we stand on the
brink of this famous gorge, no very highly colored imagination is necessary to conjure up pictures of the old days. We
can imagine the bold adventurers in their frail craft nearing
these death-dealing rapids, whose waters are thrown from
The Midnight Sun
On the 21st of June, Dawson has 22 hours of sunshine
and two hours of twilight.
Approximately 114 days in
the mid-summer months have
no real night. On the contrary, the sun is out of sight
from December 5th until
January 6th, and December
21st has 18 hours of darkness and six of twilight.
The season of navigation
on the Yukon River opens
between May 25th and June
1st, and closes between October 5th and 10th.
side to side in a long serpentine
series of twists, and which are so
troubled that the water rides higher
in the middle than at the sides.
Down they came in their mad rush
to the Klondike—not at intervals,
but in a continuous procession that
was (in the words of an eye-witness) like traffic on a city street.
Some, becoming scared, jumped
ashore as they saw their dangers,
and watched from the high cliffs
the agonies of their boats; but the
majority stayed with their craft.
And so few came through unpunished! Those who did wasted no
time in going back to warn their
competitors, but hurried on.
White Horse is a busy little town
on the west bank of Fifty-Mile
River (also known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the Upper Yukon). There is fairly good
hotel accommodation to be obtained. Trips to
the rapids and other points may be made by automobile over good roads. It is the terminus of the
railway, and the point of departure for the steamer
trip to Dawson.
To the Klondike
the journey from White Horse to Dawson
and back, one that can be made in about a week,
is the fitting climax to the trip "inside." White
Horse is the present head of navigation on the
Yukon waterway (the river in its upper reaches
is really a system of tributaries), which empties
into the sea at St. Michael, Alaska, over 2,000
miles distant. It is a constantly changing succession of pictures—rolling hills, sometimes bare,
again heavily wooded, towering mountain ranges,
awe-inspiring rapids, with now and then a quiet
stretch of water between forested banks. Here
and there is an occasional trading-post, or a mining
camp—perhaps the ghost of a dead "bonanza"—
or a hermit settlement where the steamer stops
awhile to "wood-up."
Sam McGee lake lebarge, a beautiful widening
of the stream (on whose shores, incidentally, occurred the episode that inspired
Robert Service's celebrated poem about the cremation of Sam McGee), Hootalinqua, Little Salmon,
and Carmacks, with its coal mine, are some of the
Page Sixteen
 OVER » THE * WHITE * PASS ♦ AND »YUKON * ROUTE
Page Seventeen
 T O
ATLIN
LAKE
THE
PEARL
O F
THE
NORTHLAND
^^^M^^^m
Down the Yukon River
interesting places passed. The shooting of Five-Finger Rapids, and their
postscript Rink Rapids, gives plenty of thrill to even the most jaded. At
Yukon Crossing, the overland winter trail to Dawson, used when the river
is frozen up, is passed, and then Fort Selkirk—an important trading-centre
founded in 1898 as a militia post to guard gold shipments.
The Caribou one of the most extraordinary sights of the river trip, if
you are so fortunate as to see it, is a herd of caribou swimming the Yukon River. The answer to the riddle, "Why should a caribou
swim the river?" is precisely the same as to the other historic one about the
chicken crossing the road; but often the caribou number hundreds, and even
thousands. For the past three years, practically every Dawson steamer in
the months of July and August has passed within reach of this most unique
spectacle, and on one of our pages we show a photograph taken in 1926.
The mouths of mighty tributaries are passed, amongst them White River
—the only large river that enters the Yukon from the west or south—and
Stewart River, entrance to the new Mayo silver-lead camp 175 miles east.
Smaller steamers ply the Stewart as far as Mayo, whence it is a case of
"packing in." Swede Creek has a Government Experimental Agricultural
Station, and then we are at Dawson. The trip from White Horse takes
about two days—the return trip, owing to the current, about four days.
Dawson dawson, once the focus of the world's greatest gold rush, the
headquarters of the whole Klondike region, is now hardly more
than a shadow of its former glory. Mining operations are still in progress,
but they are carried on under hydraulic and dredging conditions; the picturesque days of which one reads in Service and Jack London have departed.
Gone with them are the highly colored, sensational chapters of Dawson's
history, when the city was the rendezvous of outlaws as well as greed-
crazed miners, when dance halls, saloons and gambling places ran wide
open for the full twenty-four hours. But to be able to recall that "them
was the days" makes one a real old-timer, a sourdough—but not necessarily
a more than middle-aged man.
Dawson is the administrative centre of the Yukon Territory, and the
headquarters of a large detachment of that fine body of men, the Mounted
Police. It is beautifully situated on a bend of the Yukon River, up-to-date,
well-built, with comfortable hotels, fine homes and pretty flower gardens.
Over good roads one can visit mining plants and old, played-out but
famous, bonanza claims. The Indian village of Moosehide, and the fox
farms, are worth a visit; while the old cabin of Robert W. Service, the poet-
laureate of the Northland, is the objective of many pilgrimages.
To Atlin
to atlin is another delightful excursion from Skagway, either as a side
trip on the Dawson trip or as one in itself. The route is the same as before
to Carcross, but here the commodious steamer Tutshi is taken, through a
chain of sapphire lakes, mountain-girt and forest-guarded.
The steamer first crosses Lake Nares, and then through the narrows enters
Tagish Lake, horseshoe shaped and guarded by high peaks. Old mining
towns and fox farms are seen along the way. Presently we turn into the
Taku Arm of the lake, a beautiful sheet of water encompassed by the most
inspiring scenery, and then into Taku Inlet as far as Taku Landing.   Here,
where a wonderful view may be obtained of Jubilee Mountain, to the north,
a transfer is made across a three-mile neck of land by a very unique little
train.
At the end of the portage we reach Lake Atlin, and board the twin-screw
motorship Tarahne for a six-mile run to the little town of Atlin.
The Atlin Inn near the boat landing, and facing the lake, is the Atlin
Inn, built and maintained especially for tourists by the
White Pass and Yukon Route. From its windows a magnificent view may
be obtained of the Atlin Mountains across Lake Atlin. The tourist will
find the Atlin Inn very inviting, the cuisine and service excellent. A stay
here for a day or so, or indeed for several weeks, will add greatly to the
pleasure of the Atlin trip.
There is an indescribable tonic effect in the Atlin climate. Numerous
side trips can be taken by automobile, steamer, launch or on foot to many
points of interest. Amongst these are the placer gold mines, the fox farm,
the Warm Springs, and the Indian Village and wherever one goes, one will
find a profusion of beautiful wild flowers in almost endless variety. Then,
too, there are delightful walks along the shores. Atlin is the base of supplies for one of the richest hydraulic mining camps in British Columbia.
Those who like fishing can try their luck at lake trout, whitefish, or the
smaller but gamy grayling.
Llewellyn the principal event of the trip to Atlin is the afternoon ex-
Glacier cursion on the steamer Tarahne. For about forty miles the
boat winds its way through the narrow mountain-ribbed passage
of the West Channel. The boat then passes out through Copper Island
Narrows, and the return is made down the other side of these islands on
Lake Atlin, where a magnificent view is obtained of the huge Llewellyn
Glacier and the Coast Range.
When the water is smooth, as it frequently is, and on its surface are
mirrored the vari-colored verdure-clad hills and snow-crowned mountains
with their cathedral-like spires, the scene is of sublime beauty and grandeur.
And these reflections are not seen merely for a mile or so, but mile after
mile.
West Taku another beautiful scenic trip is that to the West Taku
Arm Arm, which has been especially designed for passengers who
are making the round trip from Vancouver to Skagway and
back on the same steamship, and who cannot spare sufficient time to avail
themselves of one of the other tours "inside." It gives these passengers an
opportunity of seeing a maximum number of points of interest in the short
time at their disposal. It is a journey which takes the visitor into the very
heart of primeval surroundings, where giant mountains raise their lofty
peaks from the glittering glacial waters of the Arm, which ends at what
might be termed the "back door" of the Taku Glacier that the traveller
saw before reaching Juneau.
The route followed is the same as to Atlin, except that at Golden Gate,
instead of turning into the Taku Inlet, the steamer continues a southerly
course and then west, reaching West Taku Arm Landing and Ben-My-
Chree homestead. Passengers sleep on board and reach Carcross in the
morning, in time to catch the southbound train and their steamer.
Page  Eighteen
 * THE ♦ WHITE XPASS * AND.* VI IKON * ROUTE
Here lived the celebrated Sam McGee.
Page Nineteen
 OVER * THE * WHITE * PA^g * AND -VUKON ♦ ROUTE
r--C^?>* _.rl»-
Page Twenty
Seracs in Llewellyn Glacier.
C.7.:7 . /?y;3
J
 ft
:anadian pacific agencies
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA  AND  UNITED STATES
Ulanta Ga.—E. G. Chesbrough, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1017 Healey Bldg*
Janfif Alta.—J. A. McDonald, District Passenger Agent C.P.R. Station"
Joston Mass.—L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 405 Boylston St"
Buffalo N.Y.—H. R. Mathewson, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 160 Pearl Sf
:algary Alta.—G. D. Brophy. District Pass. Agt C.P.R. Station"
:hicago 111.—T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic 71 East Jackson Blvd"
Cincinnati Ohio—M. E. Malone, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg"
Cleveland Ohio—G. H. Griffin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1010 Chester Ave-
Detroit Mich.—G. G. McKay, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1231 Washington Blvd-
Cdmonton Alta.—C. S. Fyfe, City Passenger Agent. C.P.R. Building-
rort William Ont.—A. J. Boreham, City Passenger Agt 404 Victoria Ave-
Juelph Ont.—W. C. Tully, City Passenger Agent 30 Wyndham St.
lalifax N.S.—A. C. McDonald, City Passenger Agt 117 Hollis St.
lamilton Ont.—A. Craig, City Passenger Agent Cor. King and James Sts.
lonolulu T.H.—Theo H. Davies & Co.
uneau Alaska—W. L. Coates, Agent.
Cansas City Mo.—R. G.  Norris,  City  Pass. Agent 723 Walnut St.
Cetchikan Alaska—F. E. Ryus, Agent.
Kingston Ont.—J. H. Welch, City Passenger Agent 180 Wellington St.
xmdon Ont.—H. J. McCallum, City Passenger Agent 417 Richmond St.
.os Angeles Cal.—W. Mcllroy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 621 So. Grand Ave.
Milwaukee Wis.—F. T. Sansom, City Passenger Agent East 68 Wisconsin St.
Minneapolis. . . .Minn.—H. M. Tait, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 611 2nd Ave. South.
i/TnntrMl r».,o /R- G. Amiot, District Pass. Agent Windsor Station.
 yue.     ^F  c  Lydonf City Pass  Agent 141 St. James St.
tfoosejaw Sask.—T. J. Colton, Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Station.
kelson B.C.—J. S. Carter, District Pass. Agent Baker and Ward Sts.
Jew York N.Y.—F. R. Perry, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic.. Madison Ave. at 44th St.
sTorth Bay Ont.—C .H. White, District Pass. Agt 87 Main Street West
)ttawa Ont.—J. A. McGill, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept '.. . 83 Sparks St.
'eterboro Ont.—J. Skinner, Citv Passenger Agent George St.
'hiladelphia Pa.—R. C. Clayton, City Pass. Agt 1500 Locust St.
'ittsburgh Pa.—C. L. Williams, Gen. Agent Pass. Dept 338 Sixth Ave.
•ortland  Ore.—W. H. Deacon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 55 Third St.
•rince Rupert... .B.C.—W. C. Orchard, General Agent.
)uebec Que.—C. A. Langevin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Palais Station.
legina Sask.—J. W. Dawson, District Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station.
aint John N.B.—G. B. Burpee, District Pass. Agent 40 King St.
t. Louis Mo.—Geo. P. Carbrey, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept  .420 Locust St.
>t. Paul Minn.—W. H. Lennon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. Soo Line. . Robert and Fourth St.
an Francisco Cal.—F. L. Nason, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 675 Market St.
askatoon Sask.— G. B. Hill, City Pass. Agent 115 Second Ave.
ault Ste. Marie. .Ont.—J. O. Johnston, City Pass. Agent 529 Queen Street.
eattle Wash.—E. L. Sheehan, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1320 Fourth Ave.
herbrooke Que.—J. A. Metivier, City Pass. Agt 91 Wellington St. No.
kagway Alaska—L. H. Johnston, Agent.
pokane Wash.—E. L. Cardie, Traffic Mgr. Spokane International Ry.
'acoma  . Wash.—D. C. O'Keefe, City Passenger Agent  1113 Pacific Ave.
oronto Ont.—Wm. Fulton, District Passenger Agt. Canadian Pacific Bldg.
ancouver B.C.—-F. H. Daly, District Passenger Agent 434 Hastings St. W.
'ictoria B.C.—L. D. Chetham, District Passenger Agent 1102 Government St.
Washington D.C.—C. E. Phelps, City Passenger Agent 905 Fifteenth St. N.W.
Windsor Ont.—W. C. Elmer, City Passenger Agent... 34 Sandwich St. West.
Winnipeg    Man.—C. B. Andrews, Dist. Passenger Agent.. Main and Portage.
EUROPE
mtwerp Belgium—A. L. Rawlinson 25 Quai Jordaens.
Belfast Ireland—Wm. McCalla 41-43 Victoria St.
lirmingham Eng.—W. T. Treadaway 4 Victoria Square.
Bristol Eng.—A. S. Ray  18 St. Augustine's Parade.
Irussels Belgium—L. H. R. Plummer 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max.
Glasgow Scotland—W. Stewart 25 Bothwell St.
lamburg... .Germany—T. H. Gardner Gansemarkt 3.
jverpool....:.,.Eng.—R. E. Swain Pier Head.
ondnn Emr — JC- E- Jenkins 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W. 1.
/0naon 1Ulg-     \G. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall St. E.C. 3.
lanchester Eng.—J. W. Maine: 31 Mosley Street.
'aris France—A. V. Clark 7 Rue Scribe.
Rotterdam Holland—J. S. Springett Coolsingel No. 91.
outhampton.... Eng.—H. Taylor 7 Canute Road.
ASIA
long Kong China—G. E. Costello, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Opposite Blake Pier.
lobe Japan—B. G. Ryan, Passenger Agent 7 Harima Machi.
lanila P.I.—J. R. Shaw, Agent 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bidg.
hanghai China—A. M. Parker, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept No. 4 The Bund.
'okohama Japan—E. Hospes, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept No. 1 The Bund.
AUSTRALIA,   NEW ZEALAND,   ETC.
. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand, Union House, Sydney,
N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Rly., for New Zealand, Auckland, N.Z.
Ldelaide. S.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane Qd.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
:hristchurch N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
)unedin N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
'remantle. W.A.— Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
lobart Tas.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
.aunceston Tas.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
lelbourne Vic—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.), Thos. Cook 8c Son.
'erth W.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co
uva Fiji—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
ydney N.S.W.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Wellington N.Z.— Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand, (Ltd.)
-ALWAYS   CARRY-
CANADIAN   PACIFIC  EXPRESS  TRAVELLERS'   CHEQUES
GOOD  THE  WORLD  OVER
his cover printed in Canada 1928.
 Alaska
Canadian Pacific
 >::-■- 7J   -'77    77:^ i7>   '77,.
* COAST SE.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
RAILWAY
£
 Princess Sophia at Taku Glacier
FROM Vancouver, B. C, to Skagway, Alaska, is a
thousand miles through the entrancing Inland Channel,
winding between islands and the mainland as through
a fairyland. The journey is made in the palatial, yacht-like
"Princess" steamers of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Ten days completes the double journey into this land of
romance and back, and leaves the traveller at Vancouver
to start the journey to the East through the magnificent
passes of the Canadian Pacific Rockies.
Mystery, that is the keynote of the North —mystery and
silence. And because of its mystery there will always be an
attraction, something to draw men and to hold them. For it
is no mere legend that the North calls back those who have
once lived in the snows and the mountains and the summers,
each perfect beyond description.
Many a man who has made his fortune has crept slowly
and painfully back across the White Pass and sailed South to
enjoy life in former haunts, only to find that the North is
calling again, that old friends have changed and gone, that
the sweets of other days turn bitter in the mouth; they have
sought happiness in ease and been baffled, until the call has
grown irresistible, and they have returned to the North,
which is ever changing yet ever the same, and found Home.
They have cursed the land where they made their wealth,
as men will, and yet it is back to the North that they return
to find peace and happiness in the end. Go where one will
throughout the world and talk to a man who has once lived
in the Yukon, and one finds his mind turning back to the
land of silence, just as the Mohammedan turns mind and
face to Mecca.
Scarcely has one left Victoria or Vancouver than there
dawns the feeling that here is a new life opening out. To
the right is the mainland of British Columbia, to the left,
the West, the island which takes its name from the intrepid
Indicates Double Track
BRITISH COLUMBIA COAST SERVICE
 explorer who sailed into the unknown waters of the Pacific
and found the mainland through an uncharted maze. To
appreciate the work of Captain Vancouver it is necessary to
travel over at least some of the ground that he covered.
Today scarcely a sunken rock exists but it is charted, and
big steamers journey with the utmost safety to waters which
to the landsman would seem to bristle with dangers at every
turn. To realize to the full the miracle of this thousand
miles of navigation from Vancouver to Skagway, one should
stand for an hour or so looking forward, picking out what
seems the channel the ship will take and finding out how
invariably one's guess is wrong. For it is not always the
mainland which lies to the East. Often the mountains which
tower up to the sky, almost from the very deck of the
ship itself, are but islands; and other channels lie
behind with countless bays and straits and narrow
gorges running miles up into the mainland, twisting,
turning, creeping forward and doubling back, till
they put to shame the most intricate maze which
Oriental mind ever devised. And of such is the whole
route which finally creeps, as through the neck of a
funnel, to the sands of Skagway.
No one who is talking to a friend who has visited
San Francisco but will ask about the beauties of the
Golden Gate. But here is the Golden Gate stretched
out day after day, glorious not only at sunset but at
sunrise too, and noonday glare. Each in its turn
seems best, from the tender violet of early dawn to
the scarlet streaks which light up the crimson and
purple of the evening west. To see and appreciate it all
one needs to be an early riser. Especially in the earlier
months, when the snow is still upon the mountain tops,
should one be up betimes to see the sunrise; at least once
see the chaste whiteness of the snow change, become shadow
flecked as the light creeps into valley after valley; see the
rays of topaz light shoot up high into the heavens, and then
suddenly, for a few moments before the sun creeps above the
horizon, see the white turn to pure gold, gold turn into
burnished copper, and then a soft golden rose blot out every
other colour, reflecting the glory of the blazing crimson of
the newborn day. That is a sight to make the veriest
sluggard and lie-abed count the day well begun. High on
the mountain tops the day is come, but in the valleys there
is still darkness, and one fain would hush oneself with silence
watching the subtle alchemy of light turning leaden night
into life once more. High up the day is there; little by little
the sun creeps higher, little by little the sun creeps down
between the hills.
There is the day to spend wondering which is the more
beautiful: the fleckless turquoise of a sky, cloudless from
rim to rim, or the tender fleeces which gather round the
mountains only to cast a light shadow, throw into greater
relief the innumerable greens of the mountain side forests,
and fade away again beneath the warmth of the sun.
To visit the Pacific Coast without making the journey
through the inside channel to Alaska is like visiting India
without seeing the Taj Mahal, or Egypt without seeing the
Pyramids. Not a mile of the journey but has its point of
interest. Here, indeed, is history, yet only history
in the making. The rush to the Klondike seems
as a thing of the far past, yet here all along the route
are men who took part in that frenzied stampede for
wealth. They are rather silent, these old-timers of
the North. To hear the old reminiscences one needs
to sit quietly until something starts the story unconsciously, and then there are stories to be heard,
true stories too, which have never found their way
into print because a public which will accept the
prettily turned episodes of fiction has yet to learn to
believe the amazing improbabilities of truth in these
Northern lands where the arctic blizzard gives way,
almost in a day, to full summer, and flowers bloom
where the snow has scarcely had time to melt.
Nowhere is the scene the same, barely even similar,
though everywhere it is composed of mountains rising
abruptly from the sea. Islands innumerable guard the
waters of the inside channel from the storms of the Pacific.
In three places alone is the passage exposed to the ocean, at
Queen Charlotte Sound, Millbank Sound, and at Dixon's
Entrance, all three but short stretches quickly left behind.
For the rest, it is as a ship sailing on an endless lake, sometimes a few miles wide and then narrowing down until one
can almost throw a stone from the deck to either shore.
But amid all the splendour of the scenery one must still find
time to remember the history which is written along this
coast. Vancouver Island and the mainland behind Vancouver city teem with it. Here the Honourable Company of
Merchant Adventurers trading into Hudson's Bay had their
scattered posts into which the factors collected the skins
from the Indians whom they had brought under their sway.
British-.Columbia    Coast    Service — Canadian    Pacific    Railway
 2^
Z
Klemtoo Pass
Sunset Off Comox, B. C.
The Straits, Vancouver, with the Princess Charlotte
Totem Poles, Alert Bay, B. C.
Sunset Near Alert Bay
 ALAS K A
X
i
KAUKISH
All along the Fraser Valley, in
Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo,
and a score of other towns may
be found old men, born in the
Province of British Columbia,
who have helped build up the
territory from its oldest stages,
from an outpost of empire to what
it is today. Walk along the
streets of Vancouver and Victoria,
and one may read in their names
the names of the men who laid the
foundations or helped build on
them to evolve order out of chaos.
At the first port of call after
leaving Vancouver, the imagination will paint a picture of how
Vancouver and Victoria the Magnificent were once as Alert Bay is
today; and how short a time that
was ago may be judged from the
fact that only last year there died
in the Isle of Wight one of the two
men who jointly owned as homesteads, side by side, the site on
which Vancouver stands today,
with its skyscrapers and large
population.
The observant has already had
a view of totem poles as the ship
has come North. Here
at Alert Bay he has
opportunity of examining them at close
range, in all their
weirdness of design.
Side by side with them
are modern industries.
Salmon canneries are
in full swing in the
summer, packing the
fish which goes across
the whole world in ever
increasing     quantities
from  the host  of  such  canneries  which" lie
alone the whole of the coast to the North.
The early riser will have seen the ship make
the passage of the famous Seymour Narrows
before reaching the upper waters between the
island and the mainland. At this point the
two come close together, making a narrow
gorge split in two by the wicked looking Whale
Back Rock. Here passage is only possible at
certain stages of the tide, for the waters which
mount up with the high tides pass through to
fill the wider stretches of Discovery Passage
and beyond, boiling in the rush or flowing out
again as the water lowers till no ship can fight
against its mill-race. When the tide is half
run the water rushes through at an incredible
speed and its roar can be heard miles away.
Apart from their own beauty there is a
second reason why the voyager should see the
Seymour Narrows. Later on he will come to
the other Narrows at Wrangel Island and will
be able to mark the contrast between the two.
The first is soon passed, rugged, startling.
The other is long, softer in outline, an epitome
of the whole long journey to the North.
From Alert Bay the passage soon leads past
Bella Bella and on to the open waters of Queen
Charlotte Sound. To the North the ship
again enters the channel between the mainland and the outer fringe of islands and so
leads on to the deep, land-locked
harbour of Prince Rupert, the
Western terminus of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway.
The entrance to Prince Rupert
harbour is from the South, the exit
to the North; and here, in Dixon's
Entrance, is the channel by which
ocean steamers may approach the
mainland at this point of the coast.
Once Dixon's Entrance is left
behind there is no more open sea,
only an arm which stretches up
SBatJy UX       into the very heart of Southeastern
British    Columbia    Coast    Service — Canadian    Pacific    Railw
ay
  Alaska. Almost immediately after Prince Rupert Port
Simpson is left to the East, and then the ship enters into
United States waters.
Here history changes in its character. Here is Alaska,
which only comparatively recently came under the sway of
America. But a few years ago Alaska was a possession of
Russia, which it so nearly joins at the Behring Straits.
Traces of the Russian rule still remain. There is Sitka, the
former capital; there is Petersburg, which keeps its name
under Uncle Sam's Government, although its more famous
namesake has now become Petrograd in honor of the Slavic
tongue. A glance at the map will show the predominance of
the Russian names in the towns and villages which scatter
over the country with surprising frequency. Here is no
longer tender beauty in the landscape, only rugged grandeur.
Here are gathered a strange people, bred in every part of
the world, yet all having one characteristic, hardihood and
ability to work long and hard, almost unceasingly, for the
fight with Nature here is no child's game.
Scandinavian, British, Icelander, all are
here; and, hence, in some future age, will
cornea new race, sturdy as the Norsemen,
to write a new page in the history of the
world.
From Prince Rupert the journey goes on
to Ketchikan, the headquarters of a thriving
fishing industry, and one of the chief customs centres in Alaska. The city is typical
of all these settlements along this coast.
Standing on an island, it has many an advantage which a mainland point misses. On the
one side it has deep water, on the other
mountain and river and lake, so that its
water supply comes gushing to waste through
its pipes and a huge surplus is left above all
that will ever be needed for domestic use to supply the city
with electric light. Here are more fish canneries, and usually
there is time for the visitor to go out to see the salmon
crowding up the creeks and rivers, struggling in a fierce rush
in which thousands are killed, so that they may reach the
safety of the upper waters in which to deposit their spawn.
From Ketchikan the way leads on through the Wrangell
Narrows, mile after mile of a winding way through Paradise.
The narrow channel is marked with buoys and beacons,
shining white in the sun, with varying beams at night when
the lamps shine out. Here a long vista is marked only at
the end with a single light; in other places the twists of the
channel, even more tortuous than the surface would indicate,
are marked with half a dozen points within half a mile. In
the narrow waters the vessel slows down perceptibly, and
more than ever it is like a voyage on some pleasure yacht
journeying only to places where the eye may be delighted.
Beyond the Narrows lies Juneau, on the Gastineau Chan
Worth Hunting
gold mines in the world. The Treadwell mine actually lies
across the channel, and is a mighty mountain of ore which is
being continuously dug away. Recently another great mine
has come into existence, and as one goes North the stamp
house can be seen built into the side of the precipitous face
of the mountain, with rail tracks to carry down the ore from
the tunnels which cut into the heart of the mound.
Standing on the deck of the ship and looking up at the
mountain, it is cause for amazement that a city could ever
be built here. Yet nothing is missing. Standing out boldly
against the side of the hill is the capitol, and around it gather
the business and residential houses of the city, the two districts overlapping in parts yet still fairly well and distinctly
divided.
Every minute can be well occupied in Juneau. During
the voyage from Wrangell, it has seemed as if all real civilization must now have been left behind. But here is electric
light, steam and gasoline launches puffing busily about the
harbour, the ubiquitous "movie" house is
close to the wharf, there is a livery stable and
even an engineering works where major
repairs to automobiles come in side by side
with more pretentious demands.
And, then, eight hours north is Skagway.
Leaving the Gastineau Channel, one enters
into a wide bay leading on to the last passage
through the mountains which grow ever
steeper and more narrowing till the sands
of Skagway are reached beneath a sheer
precipice. Here is another modern town,
and one which has loomed large in the, history of the North. When the gold rush
started to the Yukon in 1896 the landing was
made at Dyea, which lies at the North of the
other bay or canal which completes the Lynn
Canal. From Dyea the trail led over the dangerous Caribou Pass, but word came of the discovery of the White Pass,
and in a day fifteen thousand people left Dyea for Skagway,
and in a day a big city had grown where before was chiefly
swamp.
Today Skagway boasts scarcely a thousand souls, but in
the eight years of its life it has crowded in enough incident
to provide volumes for the historian. All have read of the
famous gambling hells with which the town was once infested, and none should fail to make the four-mile journey
out to the old cemetery where lies the body of "Soapy"
Smith, the famous Boss of the town, half outlaw, half
political heeler. The Sylvester Wharf still stands, half a
ruin now, to mark the place where "Soapy" Smith was shot,
and the day when the sober citizens of Skagway decided to
reform the town, which was suffering from its evil reputation.
Skagway, once the wildest, wickedest town in the world,
is now a model of propriety.    Beyond still lies much of
nel, capital of Alaska, and site of one of the most famous    romance, reached over the romantic rails of the White Pass
British    Columbia    Coast    Service — Canadian    Pacific    Railway
 Skagway, Alaska
Railway. A short climb up the steep hill of the Pass, and the
train has reached the summit, and indeed one seems to be
at the very roof of the world.
And then the journey back through a thousand miles of
loveliness yielding fresh beauties, things unseen, unsuspected
in the Northern journey, creeping up around every twist
and turn of the channel. Verily, with such scenery it is
the shortest thousand miles in the world, and the call of the
North is there, and most who have made the journey once
come back again, if only once.
White Pass and Yukon Route
Those who have time may prefer to continue their journey
over the White Pass and Yukon Route, returning by a lake
route. Leaving the summit, the salt tang of the sea is left
behind and our nostrils are filled with the sweetness of lake
and mountain air. Lake Bennett is a long narrow sheet of
blue, bounded by mountains of old rose color. As the train
approaches Canton, the traveller crosses the most northerly
swing bridge on the American Continent, over the outlet of
Lake Bennett into Nares Lake. Lewes and other little
lakes are found and then Miles Canyon and the White Horse
Rapids — the romance of '97.
As we stand on the brink of this world-famed gorge, pictures of the old days rise before our eyes. Bold adventurers
on rafts and in ill-built boats are whirled into the swift,
dangerous waters, in their mad rush to the Klondike.
In White Horse — about an hour's walk distant -— the
faint, continuous roar of the rapids reaches the ear quite
plainly on still days. White Horse is a busy little city located on the west bank of Fifty-Mile River (which is also
known as the Lewes River and sometimes termed the Upper
Yukon). Near by there are very interesting copper mines.
As at Skagway, there are excellent hotel accommodations.
It is the terminus of the Railway Division of the White Pass
& Yukon Route — the point of departure for the magnificent
trip down the Yukon to Dawson.
Giant towers and bastion-like projections of red rock
stand sentinel along the western shore of Lake Labarge —
while on the east, great, gray, rounded hills of limestone,
veined and shaded with the green of spruce, alternate with
deep wooded valleys and the picturesque mouths of rivers.
On through the splendid scenery of Thirty-Mile River and
the Lewes, we come to one of the most thrilling experiences
of the entire trip — the shooting of Five-Finger Rapids.
Here the river narrows to 150 yards. Five great hulks of
stone rise to a height of forty or fifty feet. The waters rush
foaming between. Our steamer, guided by its skillful pilot,
glides swiftly through, almost touching the stone walls in its
passage.
Rink Rapids, six miles below, gives a second experience of
this exciting form of navigation. At Fort Selkirk begins the
Yukon River proper — which is formed by the union of the
Lewes and the Pelly.
The surging waters have cut through the lower spurs of a
great mountain range. For a hundred and fifty miles the
steamer plies this route of ever-changing scenic grandeur.
British    Columbia    Coast    Service — Canadian    Pacific    Railway
 Eldred Rock, Lynn Canal
Five Fingers Rapids on Yukon Halfway Between
White Horse and Dawson
Wrangell Narrows
Winding around and between countless islands, at times
running close under the lee of huge granite cliffs — now passing the swift foaming White River, where it mingles with the
Yukon — then Stewart River and Indian River — there is
not a single mile of the way but holds vivid interest.
Dawson is an up-to-date, well built and well regulated city
with many fine homes. There are several good hotels.
Mining is still the chief industry.
To St. Michael and Nome
Those who can afford the time will find the trip down the
Yukon to St. Michael, an island off the mouth of the Yukon,
and thence on to Nome, an interesting trip which can be
made in perfect comfort by the steamers of the American
Yukon Navigation Company. En route the Arctic Circle
is crossed and recrossed. Fairbanks, one mile from Dawson,
is the chief town in the interior of Alaska and owes its
prosperity to gold. Beautiful gardens and wonderful
vegetables show also that Fairbanks can grow things. Between Tanana and St. Michael the steamer passes many
interesting Indian villages. From St. Michael to Nome the
voyage is by ocean steamer.
To Atlin
From Skagway to Caribou, and from thence through a
chain of sapphire lakes, mountain and forest-girt, eighty
miles to Atlin — there is a rare jewel of a trip! The cost is
moderate and it takes but little time — but there is more of
sheer beauty packed into that short distance than can be
found in any other place in the world.
Winding through Nares or Tagish Lake the steamer
traverses Windy Arm to enter Taku Arm, a beautiful sheet
of water, almost completely shut in by the most inspiring
mountain scenery. A splendid view is afforded of Jubilee
Mountain, which reaches its snow-crowned head thousands
of feet into the clouds. After steaming through beautiful
Golden Gate and up Taku Inlet, the boat makes a landing
at Taku, where a short portage by rail along the bank of
roaring Atlintoo River brings the tourist to Atlin Lake. It
is six miles by steamer across this wonderful lake to the
little city of Atlin, the base of supplies for the richest hydraulic mining camp in British Columbia.
There is an indescribable tonic effect in the Atlin climate
that will eventually make it one of the world's greatest summer health resorts. There are numerous interesting side
trips. A stage ride of a few miles over a smooth gravel road,
up Pine Creek to Pine City or Discovery, affords an opportunity for inspecting hydraulic mining operations at close
range. Within a short distance are beautiful Pine Creek
Falls and Surprise Lake — a surprise indeed in its mystic
Northland beauty.
British    Columbia    Coast    Service — Canadian    Pacific    Railway
 ^%-F
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Skagway Harbor
Lovett's Gulch, on Bonanza Creek, Klondyke,
Yukon.   Hydraulic Mining
Street in Juneau, Alaska
Flowers and Ice, Stikine River, Alaska
On the Yukon
Treadwell Mines, Juneau, Alaska
 S. S. Princess Charlotte
Notes on Steamers, Customs and Baggage
t* Princess
Alice
Gross tonnage     3099.22
Net tonnage     1903.80
Length       289
Width         46
Depth  17
* Wireless telegraph.    jBurn oil fuel.
%* Princess
Sophia
2319.88
1465.94
245
44
18
%* Princess
Charlotte
3844
1999
33°
46.7
23-7
Hours
Nautical
Miles
183
287
101
99
From To
Vancouver Alert Bay	
Alert Bay Prince Rupert.......
Prince Rupert Ketchikan	
Ketchikan Wrangel	
Wrangell Juneau         n 148
Juneau Skagway  8 100
A nautical mile is equivalent to 1.15 statute miles.
Sailings are from Victoria, B. C, at 11 p. m. every Friday
and from Vancouver, B. C, at g p. m. every Saturday during
June, July and August, with an additional sailing every Tuesday from Victoria and Wednesday from Vancouver at same
hours in July.
Passengers should provide themselves with a good, warm
top coat. The general weather is very fine and warm, but a
good covering for the evening or a damp day is very desirable. The Company does not supply steamer rugs. A
travelling rug is very desirable although not absolutely necessary. However, lady passengers generally derive much
comfort from a good steamer rug. The Company does not
supply the regulation ocean liner deck chair, but supplies
comfortable camp chairs with backs free of charge.
The meals provided on Alaska steamers are breakfast,
lunch, and dinner, and in addition a cold supper is served in
the dining saloon at night without extra charge.
Victrolas with a suitable supply of records are placed on
Canadian Pacific Steamers to Alaska.
Passengers entering Alaska from Canada are required to
pass the customary United States Immigration inspection
at Ketchikan, the port of entry. This inspection is not
strict so far as bona fide tourists are concerned. Passengers
will be asked by purser for certain information regarding
age, place of residence, business, etc., for use in making up
the manifest required by the Immigration Department, and
will be given a card by him.    This card is presented by holder
to immigration inspector, who boards steamer on arrival at
Ketchikan, and as soon as particulars shown by purser on
manifest are checked by the inspector, the passenger is permitted to go ashore. There is a similar inspection by the
Canadian Immigration Department on arrival of steamer
southbound at Prince Rupert. These inspections are largely
formal so far as tourists are concerned.
The usual free allowance of one hundred and fifty (150)
pounds of baggage will be granted on whole tickets, and
seventy-five (75) pounds on half tickets, with customary
additional charge on any excess weight. Steamer trunks, if
intended for use in staterooms, must not be more than
fourteen inches in height. Any steamer trunk of ordinary
width and length can be placed under lower berth if the height
given is not exceeded.
Baggage may be checked through from Seattle to Skagway,
and if not required en route may be forwarded under bond
to avoid necessity of customs inspection. If baggage is
required en route it should be checked to Victoria or Vancouver only and presented for Canadian Customs inspection
before boarding steamer for Alaska. U. S. Customs inspection will also be necessary at Ketchikan, the first port
of entry into Alaska.
Canadian Customs baggage inspection will be made at
Prince Rupert and U. S. Customs inspection at Vancouver
(if passenger is travelling east via Canadian Pacific Railway)
or at Seattle. Baggage checked from Vancouver or Victoria
to Skagway will be inspected by U. S. Customs officers at
Ketchikan, or may be bonded if desired.
Baggage can be checked through from Puget Sound and
British Columbia ports to Atlin or Dawson, via the White
Pass & Yukon Route, without undergoing inspection by
Customs officers at Skagway, provided passengers hold
through tickets, and after it is once checked at starting point
passengers are not annoyed by Customs inspection or re-
checking until arrival at destination, where all baggage from
United States points is subject to inspection. Baggage originating at British Columbia points can be corded and sealed
and sent through Alaska in bond without inspection. Baggage originating at United States ports destined to points in
Alaska on the lower Yukon River below Dawson can go
through to destination in bond without inspection.
British    Columbia    Coast    Service — Canadian    Pacific    Railway
 ■ii-x^.-.
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A Miner's Cabin
$1,000,000,00 in Alaska Gold
Hydraulic Lift
Gold Panning
Alaska Nuggets from Anvil Creek, Nome
 3£T°^
|
Taku Glacier and Porpoises
"Flirting in Alaska," Taku Glacier
Taku Glacier
Taku Glacier
Resurrection Bay, Alaska
Davidson Glacier, Alaska
 CAN
AD
>FFICE
S. M. B
i.	
[AN PACIFIC RAILWAY
c
c
C. E. E. Usshei
W. R. MacInnf
RS OF  THE TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT
OSWORTH, Vice-President, Montreal
. Passenger Traffic Manager Montreal
. Freight Traffic Manager  Montreal
European Manager London, Eng.
.Assistant Passenger Traffic Manager.. .Montreal
.Assistant Passenger Traffic Manager.. .Winnipeg
. General Passenger Agent Montreal
. General Passenger Agent Winnipeg
. General Passenger Aeent Vancouver
Geo. McL. Bro
C. B. Foster. . .
C E. McPhers
W   H. Snell. .
&. A.. Walton.
H. W. Brodie.
WN	
ON	
ELL ....
i   F   MACDONN
W. B. Lanigan
H. E. Dring . .
Of*   c Wells
A. O. Seymour.
J. 0'. Apps	
J. M. Gibbon. .
Auckland	
Belfast. I
Bellingham. . .
Birmingham.
Boston	
Brandon	
.Assistant Freight Traffic Manager.. .
. Assistant Freight Traffic Manager
. General Passenger Agent	
.Assistant to Pass. Traffic Manager...
. General Tourist Agent	
. General Baggage Agent	
. General Publicity Agent	
AGENCIES
.Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
. Wm. McCalla, Agent	
. W. H. Gordon, Freight and Pass. Agt
. W. T. Treadaway, Agent	
.E. F. L. Sturdee, Gen. Agt., Pass. Dep
.J. A. McDonald, District Passenger A
.Macdonald Hamilton & Coy	
Montreal
. .N. Z..
RELAND.
. Wash
. . Eng .
. Mass .
. .Man.
 Qd.
.. Eng .
. . Ont .
. .N.Y..
.India.
. .Alta.
. China .
...Ill.
.. Ohio .
. . Ohio
. Mich .
.Minn.
.. Alta .
. Wash .
. .Ont.
OTLAND.
. .N.S..
. . Ont .
. Vh.'i.!
. .   Mo.
.. Ont .
Japan.
. .Eng.
. .Eng.
. .  Ont.
.. .Cal.
. .AUS.
. . .WIS
.Minn.
. . Que .
Japan.
..B.C..
. .N.Y.
.  Ont.
France.
 Pa.
.... Pa .
. . .Me.
. . Ore .
..Sask
e. Ont.
e Mich
.   N.B..
...MO.
.Minn.
.   Cal.
Wash.
China.
. . Que .
. Wash .
. . Aus.
Wash
. .Ont.
.  B C
.   B.C..
..D.C.
. .Man.
Japan.
. London, Eng.
. Montreal
. Montreal
. Montreal
.Montreal
.'41 Victoria St.
.113 West Holly St.
. 4 Victoria Square
t 332 Washington St.
gent.
Bristol	
Brockville....
Buffalo	
Calcutta	
.A. S.   Ray, Agent	
;Geo. E. McGlade, City Ticket Agent.
.L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept	
. Thos. Cook & Son	
. 18St.AugustinesParade
\ Cor. -King   St.   and
• ( Court House Ave.
. 302 Main St.
. 9 Old Court House St.
Gillanders, Arbuthnot & Co.	
Calgary	
.Robert Dawson, District Pass. Agent .
. 113 Can.Pac.stn. Bldg.
Chicago	
Cincinnati
Cleveland	
i Detroit	
Duluth	
.T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt., Pass. Dept	
.M, E. Malone, Gen. Agt., Pass. Dept.
.Geo. A.Clifford, Gen. Agt..Pass.Dept.
.A. E. Edmonds, Gen.Agt., Pass. Dept.
. Jas. Maney, G.P.A., D.S.S. & A. Ry...
. Chas. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent
. 224 South Clark St.
. 436 Walnut St.
213 Euclid Ave.
. 7 Fort St. West
. Fidelity Building
. 145 Jasper Ave. East
A    T*   Winter   TlnlrPt  Acsnt
. tKt H TTPwitt   Avp
Fort William.
Glasgow... .Sc
Halifax	
Hamilton	
Fiong Kong...
.A. J. Boreham, City Pass. Agent 404 Victoria Ave.
.Thos. Russell, Agent 120 St. Vincent St.
. J. D. Chipman, City Pass, and Frt. Agt. 37 George St.
.A. Craig, City Pass. Agent Cor. King and James Sts.
.P. D. Sutherland, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept., C.P.O.S., Ltd.
Then. H. Da vies <fc- Co    	
Kansas City..
Kingston	
Kobe	
Liverpool	
London	
.K. A. Cook, Traveling Pass. Agent . . .
.F. Conway, City Frt. and Pass. Agent
.J. D. Abell, Agent C.P.O.S., Ltd..	
. Thomas McNeil, Agent	
< H. G. Dring, Gen. Pass. Agt .,
)T_ J. Smith. Gen   Freight, Aeent...';.
. 442 Sheidley Bldg.
. 1 Bund
.Royal    Liver.    Bldg.,
Pier Head
(62-65 Charing Cross
• < S.W.,and 67-68 King
'London	
JLos Angeles.. .
[Melbourne. . .
(Milwaukee . . .
Minneapolis..
'Montreal	
.H. J. McCallum, City Pass. Agent 161 Dundas St.
.A. A. Polhamus, Gen. Agt.Pass. Dept.. 708 South Spring St.
. Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)... Thos. Cook & Son
.F.T. Sansom,(SooLine)Passenger AgentlOO Wisconsin St.
. R. S. Elworthy, Gen. Agt..Pass.Dept.. .402 Nicollet Ave.
.A. E. Lalande, City Pass. Agent 141-145 St. James St.
Nelson	
New York	
Ottawa	
Paris ]
Philadelphia..
Pittsburgh . . .
Portland	
[Portland	
Quebec	
iRegina	
Sault Ste. Mari
Sault Ste. Mari
St. John	
St. Louis	
It. Paul	
San Francisco
Seattle	
Shanghai	
Sherbrooke.. .
Spokane	
[Sydney	
FTacoma	
[Toronto	
.J. S. Carter, District Pass. Agent	
( F. R. Perry, General Agt., Pass. Dept..
] G. O. Walton, City Pass. Agent	
.1231 Broadway   cor.
. 1231 Broadway 30thSt.
. 281 Fifth Ave.
.42 Snarks St.
.Aug. Catoni, Agent 1 Rue Scribe
.R. C. Clayton, City Pass. Agent 629 & 631 Chestnut St.
.C. L. Williams, Gen. Agt.. Pass. Dept. .340 Sixth Ave.
. Leon W. Merrit, T.A., Maine Cent. Rd.. Union Depot
. J.V. Murphy, Gen. Agt., Pass. Dept... .55 Third St.
. G. J. P. Moore, City Pass. Agt 30 St. John Street, cor.
Palace Hill
.J. E. Proctor, District Pass. Agent 1812 Scarth Street
.H. J. Moorehouse, City Pass. Agent... .
. W. J. Atchison, Citv Pass. Agent 224 Ashmun Street
.M. E. Murphy, District Pass. Agent.. . .40 and 42 King St.
.E. L. Sheehan, Gen. Agt., Pass. Dept. .725 Olive St.
.B. E. Smeed, City Pass. Agt., Soo Line.379 Robert St.
. F. L. Nason, G.A.P.D 645 Market St.
.E. E. Penn. Gen. Agt., Pass. Dept 713 Second Avenue
.A. J. Blaisdell, Gen. Agt. Pass., Dept.. C.P.O.S. Ltd.
.E. H. Sewell, City Pass. Ag't. 74 Wellington St.
. W. H. Deacon, City Pass. Ag't 603 Sprague Ave.
.Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd).. .
tH. M. Beyers, City Passenger Agent.. .1113 Pacific Ave.
t W. B. Howard, District Pass. Agent. : .   1
j Wm. Fulton, Asst. Dist. Pass. Agt      1 King East
(1. E. Suckling, Asst. Dist. Pass. Agent..   (
.J. Moe, City Passenger Agent 434 Hastings St. West
Pretoria	
Washington. . .
Winnipeg	
Yokohama.. . .
1
. L. D. Chetham, City Pass. Agent 1102 Government St.
.C. E. Phelps,, City Pass. Agt.. 1419 N. Y. Ave.
.A. G. Richardson, Dist. Pass. Agt Main and Portage Ave.
.G. M. Jackson, G.A.P.D. C.P.O.S. Ltd. 14 Bund..
C: E. E. Ussher, Passenger Traffic Manager,
Canadian Pacific Railway,
Montreal
 ..Hra
 *****
t
.uiiiwum
 Canadian Pacific Hotels
ON THE PACIFIC COAST
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B. C.
The largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, overlooking the Strait of Georgia, and serving equally the
business man and the tourist. Situated in the heart of
the shopping district of Vancouver. Golf, motoring,
fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer excursions. Open
all year. European plan. One-half mile from station.
Empress Hotel, Victoria, B. C.
A luxurious hotel in this Garden City of the Pacific
Coast. An equable climate has made Victoria a
favorite summer and winter resort. Motoring, yachting, sea and stream fishing, shooting and all-year golf.
Crystal Garden for swimming and music. Open all
year.    European plan.    Facing wharf.
IN THE ROCKIES
Hotel Sicamous, Sicamous, B. G.
Junction for the orchard districts of the Okanagan Valley, and stop-over
point for those who wish to see the Thompson and Fraser Canyons by daylight.
Lake Shuswap district offers good boating, and excellent trout fishing and hunting in season.    Open all year.    American plan.    At station.    Altitude 1,146 feet.
Glacier House, Glacier, B. C.
In the heart of the Selkirks. Splendid Alpine climbing and glacier exploring, driving, riding and hiking. Open June 15th to September 15th. American
plan.    1 V2 miles from station.    Altitude 4,086 feet.
Emerald Lake Chalet, near Field, B. C.
A charming Chalet hotel situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, amidst the
picturesque Alpine scenery of the Yoho National Park. Roads and trails to the
Burgess Pass, Yoho Valley, etc. Boating and fishing. Open June 15th to September 15th.    American plan.    Seven miles from station.    Altitude 4,262 feet.
Chateau Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta
A wonderful hotel facing an exquisite Alpine Lake in Rocky Mountains
National Park. Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips or walks to Lakes
in the Clouds, Saddleback, etc., drives or motoring to Moraine Lake, boating,
fishing. Open June 1st to September 30th. European plan. 3l/2 miles from
station by motor railway.    Altitude 5,670 feet.
Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta
A magnificent hotel in the heart of the Rocky Mountains National Park,
backed by three splendid mountain ranges. Alpine climbing, motoring and
drives on good roads, bathing, hot sulphur springs, golf, tennis, fishing, boating
and riding. Open May 15th to September 30th. European plan. \y2 miles
from station.    Altitude 4,625 feet.
THE PRAIRIES
Hotel Palliser, Calgary, Alberta
A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard, in this prosperous city of Southern Alberta. Suited equally to the business man and the tourist en route to or
from the Canadian Pacific Rockies. Good golfing and motoring. Open all year.
European plan.    At station.
Royal Alexandra Hotel, Winnipeg, Manitoba
A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada, appealing to those
who wish to break their transcontinental journey. The centre of Winnipeg's
social life. Good golfing and motoring. Open all year. European plan. At
station.
EASTERN CANADA
Place Viger Hotel, A charming hotel in Canada's largest city     Open
Montreal, Quebec all year.
Chateau Frontenac, A  metropolitan  hotel  in  the  most  historic   city
Quebec, Quebec of North America.    Open all year.
McAdam Hotel, A  commercial  and  sportsman's hotel.    Open   all
McAdam, N.B. year.
The Algonquin, The  social  centre  of Canada's  most  fashionable
St. Andrews, N.B. seashore   summer   resort.    Open   June   26th    to
September 7th.
HOTELS AND BUNGALOW CAMPS REACHED
BY CANADIAN PACIFIC
Moraine Lake, Alta Moraine Lake Camp
Banff-Windermere \ (Storm Mountain Bungalow Camp
Automobile Highway/ 1 Vermilion River Camp
Radium Hot Springs Camp
Hector, B. C .. Wapta Camp
Hector, B. C Lake O'Hara Camp
Field, B. C Yoho Valley Camp
Lake Windermere, B. C Lake Windermere Camp
Penticton, B. C Hotel Incola
Cameron Lake, B. C Cameron Lake Chalet
Strathcona Lodge, B. C Strathcona Lodge
Kenora, Ont Devil's Gap Camp
Nipigon, Ont • Nipigon River Camp
French River, Ont. .    French River Camp
Digby, N* S The Pines
Kentville, N. S Cornwall is Inn
Photograph by G. M. Taylor.
LAKE   ATLIN
ALA
PRINTED IN CANADA-1926
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
t camb as a whip to men's greed
Hi   ia  w1 - mm     i *$        and a challenge to men's courage,
^(fc^y       ^vvfcS i *^a*  ^rs^   rin8inP>  ca^l  °f the
iJi^MrW Northland.   Until then—about
f§LTJ/j|   I thirty years ago—Alaska was al-
ySt^^lh most unknown, a white space on
nfti»—**vA *^e maP» scrawled shakily over
[Ct-^Qi "Come-and-find-me."  That is, to
uF      ^Y most of the world; for the North-
I mL ^5MJM land had even then its pioneers,
VSy, JL AM I its prospectors, who had fished its
Av 388* 1m teeming coasts, trapped its furs,
fjpfc (cCDS)/*: j started small towns, and panned
iB \      X *^e **rst coarse colorings of gold
iUhbL along its creeks.   But outside of
JI WBOKm I ' these sturdy old-timers, Alaska,
^^ X~_     "jf Jt^ with its side-partner, the Yukon,
was hardly more than a geographical curiosity—a huge, unpopulated, unexplored, inhospitable block of land over three-
quarters of a million square miles in size, forming the northern
tip of the American continent. It had, as far as one could
estimate then, no very remarkable resources or trading possibilities; on the contrary, it was apparently a land of perpetual
winter, frozen permanently under solid snow and ice—in this and
many other ways exactly resembling Russia, to which it had
once belonged and from which, at the Bering Strait, it was so
narrowly separated.
A pity, perhaps, that the first real revelation of a real
Alaska—an Alaska different from all one's conceptions, and
richer than Monte Cristo—should have come through that
basest of motives, avarice. The discovery of gold in the
Klondike in 1896, in such vast quantities as to astound humanity,
let loose so much sensation that overnight the new bonanza
became almost the most famous place on earth. That feverish
stampede to the north (one does not have to be very middle-
aged to remember it) was like nothing that had ever happened
before, or that has ever happened since.
The Lure of Gold
back in '98 someone took a photograph, which is still
occasionally published, of an everyday scene in the Chilkoot
Pass. Perhaps you've seen it; it shows, struggling over the
steep, dangerous snow-clad wastes, a thin black streak nearly
two miles long—a streak composed entirely of men, mushing
"inside" to the Klondike, with nearly 600 miles travel ahead
of them, and treading so close to one another in the narrow
trail that they very nearly kicked the previous man's ankles.
And this was an everyday scene—happening all the time.
They had their hardships, those early days, before the
railway was built over the White Pass, and when cheechako
and sourdough alike had to travel that arduous path over the
Chilkoot and down the Yukon River. Greed pulled them forward; the crowd behind pressed them onwards; if they could not
endure the strain they fell out and perished. There was no
turning back. It was truly no place for weaklings, for one was
beset not only by a hostile Nature, but also by the wickedness
and depravity of mankr .a. The opportunities drew to the
Northland some of the most lawless characters of the earth,
and had it not been for the swift justice meted out by the Royal
Northwest Mounted Police, it might have been true that
"There's never a law of God or men
Runs north of Fifty-three."
The Spell of the North
the Northland put a spell on those who made its
acquaintance then. It will put the same spell on us to-day. It
is a land of mystery—a magnet that will always draw men and
women, even though the lure of the gold is fainter now. It is
still a land of romance, its atmosphere impregnated with
memories of those sad, glad days when the century was just
turning over. Gold has ceased to be its principal advantage—
has, indeed, proved a false hope in those many ghost-like
"cities" that parade their empty shells from Dyea to Nome;
but there is equally the romance of to-morrow, the discovery
of other and richer resources, the development of a vigorous,
prosperous northern empire.
Alaska is a land of contrasts. Never was so mistaken an
idea as that it is all winter. If it were, whence come the gorgeous, vivid flower gardens that one sees everywhere, such
masses of color that they dazzle the eye? The answer is simple:
the warm Japan current, striking Vancouver Island, is deflected
northward, and carries to the Land of the Midnight Sun the
same delightful humidity that the Pacific Coast knows. But
in winter, inland over the White Pass, how cold it can be!
Alaska is a land of gold, of flowers, of black fox farms, of
salmon, of Indians, of curious Indian totem poles. It is a land
of magnificent scenery. The journey there, by steamer, is
one of nearly a thousand miles, through scenery of a character
unknown elsewhere on this continent. For four days the steamer
threads a long, almost land-locked channel, known as the
"Inside Passage," winding through mountain-hemmed fiordlike waterways as through a fairyland, with wooded islands,
tremendous glacier-clad peaks, fascinating Alaskan towns and
queer old settlements as continuous episodes. No water-
journey in America, either in beauty or in romantic appeal, can
quite compare with this trip to Alaska.
The final contrast one meets is in transportation. For the
Chilkoot Pass has been superseded by the comfortable railway
journey over the White Pass, and the extraordinary, haphazard
and overcrowded steamer experiences of the" early days have
been superseded by the magnificent service provided by the
Canadian Pacific "Princess" steamers.
Northward Ho!
Vancouver, largest port on the Pacific Coast of
Canada, is a beautiful city situated upon an almost land-locked
harbor. With important lumbering, mining, manufacturing
and trading interests, and with a huge overseas business with
the Orient, it is also a delightful summer city, with all kinds of
outdoor recreation.
Victoria, at the south end of Vancouver Island, across the
Juan de Fuca strait, is the capital of British Columbia; and the
imposing Parliament Buildings that front the inner harbor are
of the finest in America. Victoria is a charming city of beautiful homes and lovely gardens, and is a favorite summer and
winter resort.
Seattle, on Puget Sound, is one of the most progressive cities
of the Pacific North-West.
Leaving the voyage to Alaska can be divided into two
Vancouver parts. From Vancouver to Ketchikan the journey
is mostly through narrow channels, with steep shores
heavily timbered to the water's edge. The second part, from
Ketchikan to Skagway, is through wider stretches of water,
with glaciers, waterfalls and rugged mountains on either side,
and richly colored with the purple twilights of Alaska.
The Princess steamship slips away from Vancouver on its
four-day northbound trip at 9.00 o'clock at night, when the long
(Continued on Page Four)
RAIL   CONNECTIONS
The quickest and most picturesque route to Vancouver
from the East is by Canadian Pacific, through the Canadian
Pacific Rockies, bix hundred miles of the most magnificent
mountain scenery in the world.
In summer, four through trains a day:—
The Trans-Canada Limited, from  both Montreal and
Toronto—an exclusive all-sleeping-compartment-observation car train.
The Imperial—from Montreal.
The Vancouver Express—from Toronto.
The Mountaineer—from Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis.
Victoria and Seattle are reached from Vancouver by the
fast "Princess" steamships.
Clothing, Meals, Etc.
Passengers should provide themselves with a good, warm
top-coat. The general weather is very fine and warm, but
a good covering for the evening or a damp day is very desirable. The Canadian Pacific does not supply steamer rugs,
but has arranged to carry on the steamships a limited supply
of rugs, which will be rented to passengers for the round
trip at a nominal charge. The company does not supply
the regulation ocean liner deck-chair, but supplies comfortable camp chairs with backs, free of charge. Barbers,
ladies' hairdressers and manicurists are carried on all
steamers.
The meals provided on the "Princess" steamships are
breakfast, lunch and dinner, with light refreshments served
in addition in the dining saloon at night. While the steamship is in port at Skagway, meals and berth are not included
in the passage money, but can be secured if the passenger
prefers staying aboard.
Victrolas are carried, with a suitable supply of records,
as well as a piano.
Baggage
Free allowance on Princess Steamers of 150 pounds on
whole tickets, and 75 pounds on half tickets, will be granted,
with the customary charge for excess weight.
Steamer trunks intended for use in staterooms must not
exceed 14 inches in height.
Through passengers from eastern or southern points
making the Alaska trip will be granted free storage at
Canadian Pacific wharves at Vancouver, Victoria, or Seattle
for thirty days, after which regular storage charges will
accrue.
Customs
Baggage checked through from any United States point
to any point in Alaska, or from any Canadian point to any
point in the Yukon territory, or vice-versa, and not required
en route, is not subject to Customs examination.
Hand baggage, or checked baggage required en route, is
subject to examination northbound by the United States Customs at Ketchikan, and southbound by the Canadian Customs at Prince Rupert. Checked baggage, if desired, may
be forwarded to destination in bond.
The baggage of passengers making the White Horse,
Atlin or Dawson trips will also be examined by Canadian
Customs on entering Yukon territory, and by the United
States Customs on returning.
Times
Of arrival and departure at the various ports are posted
on the bulletin board of the ships.
Page Two
 ■■MMMMMi
m*mew>wwt>m*wt%.ja3m0mKmmmM
PRINCESS * * STEAMSHIPS
X    „ (        ill
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HHHIHH
Burrard Inlet, Vancouver.
4-   <»
ALASKA.
The Princess Louise,
Page Three
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
S   T  E  A  M  S  H  I
SERVICES
:V
Seymour Narrows ^S^/^-I   T/
— \f \"^?      X~""""?      ^     ^
''^ Union Bay A
Nanaimo./ a ^^U       ^J£
Tacoma
Leaving Vancouver
summer dusks have begun to darken. After trunks have been
stowed and opened, dining room reservations made, and casual first
impressions formed of one's fellow-travellers, there is still time for
a stroll up and down deck before turning in. By this time the ship
has left Burrard Inlet, passed Brockton Point, and has entered the
Gulf of Georgia. On the right is still to be seen the dark bulk of
the mainland; on the left, but invisible yet, is Vancouver Island, in
whose lee the route is sheltered for over two hundred miles.
The First the course is south of long, narrow Texada
Day Island and through Discovery Passage, between that
island and Vancouver Island. The early risers—and
they only!—will see Seymour Narrows, for this, the narrowest part
of the channel, is passed about 6 a.m. Some day, perhaps, the
Narrows will be bridged, but at certain times they are rather exciting to navigate, for the ebb and flow of the tides around the north
end of Vancouver Island make the current rush through it like a
mill-race. An hour or so later the ship passes through Johnstone
Straits and Broughton Straits, along whose shores a number of logging camps can be seen. And then after breakfast—even after the
last of all sittings, when those who got up late are just reaching
for their first smoke of the day, and those who got up early are
just beginning to sigh for lunch—we reach our first stop, Alert Bay.
Alert Bay alert bay is a small village on a small island—
Cormorant Island—situated so close to Vancouver
Island that the maps are almost unable to make any distinction;
but it is nevertheless one of the principal salmon canneries on the
Coast. Here, in fact, will be our first glimpse of this important
industry, and during the time in port the canneries invite visitors
to inspect the highly interesting processes of turning a large, handsome salmon into shiny little roimd cans. Alert Bay is an old
settlement, with a considerable Indian population; and here, too,
we make our first contact with another object typical of the Northland—the totem pole. (See "Totem Poles.") The Indian cemetery,
with some modern poles, is well worth the short stroll to see it; but
it is to be regretted, somewhat, that the gigantic poles that until
recently stood close to the wharf, and which were some of the most
notable of their kind on the whole Pacific Coast, have now been
sold by the Indians, principally to Stanley Park, Vancouver.
Queen Charlotte after lunch we leave the shelter of Vancouver
Sound Island, reaching Queen Charlotte Sound—with its short
experience of open Pacific Ocean. From Cape Scott, on
Vancouver Island, to Cape St. James, at the southern end of the Queen
Charlotte Islands, is about 150 miles; but we bear away from that wild and
rather primitive group, and keep instead close inland, reaching Calvert
Island in three hours—the longest of the three times we shall see the wide
horizon of the open Pacific Ocean during the entire trip.
Passing through Lama Passage, Bella Bella is on the left—a very old and
practically deserted Indian village. At 10 at night, or so, we enter Old
Ocean again, this time at Milbank Sound, but only for ten miles; "and so"
(as Samuel Pepys says) "to bed."
The Second entering the Tolmie Channel, between Princess Royal
Day Island and the mainland, we pass Swanson Bay in the night,
and then enter Grenville Channel, in the shelter of 60-mile-long
Pitt Island. At about breakfast time we pass the mouth of the Skeena River,
and shortly, with Digby Island on the west, on which may be seen the Canadian Government wireless station, arrive at about 9.00 a.m. at Prince Rupert.
Prince prince rupert is the most northerly city of any size in
Rupert    Canada, with a population of about 7,000.   Built on a circle of
hills formed of very hard rock, the city is considerably above the
level of the wharf and is reached by a long staircase. It is a very important
fishing centre.   Large quantities of fish, particularly halibut, are now being
(The description of Prince Rupert is continued on Page Six)
Northbound Sailings
Intended sailings from
Vancouver   during   the
summer season of 1926
TOTEM   POLES
are:
June  5 A
July
21 C
«   12 B
U
24 B
"   16 A
«
28 A
«   23 B
it
31 C
"   26 A
Aug.
4 B
"   30 C
<
7 A
July   3 B
u
14 B
"     7 A
a
18 A
«   10 C
u
25 B
"   14 B
a
28 A
"   17 A
Sept
.  4 B
The totem poles of the Indians of British Columbia constitute one of the most striking features of
the whole north-west coast. These long shafts,
irregularly planted on the sea shore among smoke
and feast houses, convey impressions from a strange
world. The rugged peaks and wooden gorges
beyond, with their ever-changing shades of dark
greens and soft blues, provide a unique setting for
them. And the squat mongolian features of the
Indians themselves carry one's imagination beyond
the American frontiers into the mysterious realms
of Asia.
These remarkable carvings should not be
mistaken for idols or deities. They were never
worshipped. But they are pictorial records of
history and mythology, as the Indians understood
them. Some of them represent the Raven, the
Eagle, the Killer-whale and the Wolf, which are
the emblems of the largest families in the nation.
The Bear, the Frog, the Sea-Lion, the Beaver, the
Thunder-bird, and many others, are known as the
crests of phratries. So far we have to do only with
coats-of-arms or a system of native heraldry.
Other characters more easily within the knowledge of all are occasionally introduced among
these figures, which are understood through the
medium of myths and tales of the past. These are,
the ancestors of the owners, and often the "uncle"
in whose honor the pole was erected after his
death, by his nephew or legitimate successor.
Battles and other noted events are also commemorated on poles. A man who wishes to ridicule a
rival or discredit an insolvent debtor may represent
him head downwards on whatever pole he may
erect in a feast.
There were once many native artists of great
repute, who were hired at large for carving poles,
according to definite instructions furnished them. Large logs were hauled
over long distances for the purpose. When the carving was finished,
numerous guests assembled for the potlatch or feasts of commemoration.
Lavish presents were made to the guests, whose function it was to
remember the meaning of the figures on the poles and acknowledge the
rights of the legitimate owners.
Salmon and Other Fisheries
The fisheries of the British Columbia and Alaska coasts now constitute
one of the powerful industries of that region. They include salmon,
halibut, cod, herring and to some extent whale. Salmon production is
about ten times the product of all other fish, but the halibut catch is
increasing rapidly.
About five varieties of salmon are found on this coast; but the sock-eye
(or red salmon), the best-known commercial species, is practically the
only variety in favor for canning purposes. The silver, or "coho," which
comes next in market value and popularity, and the quinnat (or spring
salmon), the largest and choicest variety of Pacific salmon, are marketed
largely in fresh condition.
Canneries are established at numerous points on the coast. These
are conducted on thoroughly modern and hygienic lines, and the work is
done almost entirely by highly ingenious machinery which performs the
work with a rapidity and a precision unobtainable in the days when work
was done by hand. Halibut is shipped fresh, large cold storage facilities
being available at several places, particularly at Prince Rupert.
A Princess Louise
B Princess Charlotte
C Princess Alice
Sailing hour, Vancouver—9 p.m.
Southbound Sailings
on page 6.
Steamship also sails from
Victoria at 11 p.m. on night
previous to date mentioned.
Seattle connection—leave
Seattle 9.00 a.m. of sailing
day, or 11.30 p.m. previous
night. Arrive Skagway—
4 days later, a.m.
Page Four
 PRINCESS
♦     <»
SHIPS   • ' ♦ TO * * /VLA.SKA
The Lounge,
Princess Louise.
A Corner of the Observation Room,
Princess Alice.
Page Five
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
'2Am i   ' 1"/^
j\. -n ''*\§Win(wr/Marrows
\\)      Campbell River <
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r
Courtenay 4 ';
Comox ^
shipped from here to Eastern Canada and the United States.
A big cold storage plant is located in the Upper Harbor, where
the fish are unloaded and put into cold storage or iced, as the
case may be, for shipment to the East.
Prince Rupert is the Pacific terminal of the Canadian National
Railways, and has a very large floating dry dock, 600 feet long and
capable of lifting vessels of 20,000 tons weight. The visitor will
probably be interested, during his stay on shore, in the fur-stores of
the city— the first sight he will obtain of the great fur industry of
the Northland.
Entering shortly after leaving Prince Rupert, the old
Alaska Indian village of Metlakatla is passed. Here is a very
successful mission for the natives, founded by Father
Duncan. About 30 minutes later, Port Simpson is passed—one of
the oldest settlements in Northern British Columbia, with an old
Hudson's Bay Company's post that has been a trading-centre with
the Indians for about sixty years.
About three hours after leaving Prince Rupert, Green Island
Lighthouse indicates our nearness to the international boundary
line between Canada and Alaska (United States). Dixon's Entrance, last entrance of the open Pacific Ocean, is crossed, and
we wind our [way through Revilla Gigedo Channel—here called
Tongass Narrows—to Ketchikan.
Southbound Sailings
Intended Sailings from
Skagway during the summer season of 1926 are:
INDIANS
June 10 A
July
26 C
"   17 B
«
29 B
" 21 A
Aug.
2 A
"   28 B
u
5 C
July 1 A
a
9 B
"  5 C
u
12 A
"  8 B
u
19 B
"   12 A
a
23 A
* 15 C
u
30 B
" 19 B
Sept
2 A
*   22 A
a
9 B
Alert Bay to Swanson Bay
(See page 4)
Ketchikan ketchikan, southernmost town in Alaska, is
situated on Revilla Gigedo Island. It might also be
said to be now the most prosperous town in Alaska, for salmon and
halibut have made it rich and given it large canneries and cold
storage plants. It is also a mining centre for copper, gold, platinum,
silver and lead, the well-known Salt Chuck platinum mines being
within 30 miles. Ketchikan has a bustling air, with hotels, stores
and banks.
The visitor will find interesting curio stores. There is also a
pleasant walk to the waterfall (about 15 minutes), where in the late
summer months thousands of salmon may be seen ascending the
falls in the river on their way to the spawning banks. There are
two splendid totem poles—the Chief Johnson totem, surmounted by Kajuk,
a fabled bird of the mountain which amuses itself by throwing rocks at
ground hogs, with below the Raven and the Frog Woman with her children,
the Salmon; and the Kyan totem, surmounted by the Crane, followed by
the Kyak, another legendary bird, and the Bear.
Third Day a distinct change of scenery occurs from now on.
The stretches of water become wide, and mountains rise on
either side, with waterfalls tumbling down and glaciers crowning their
crests. The steamer winds along Clarence Strait, with Prince of Wales
Island on the west, and turning round between Etolin and Zarembo Islands,
reaches Wrangell about 4 a.m., and leaves before breakfast time. We shall,
however, have ample time to visit it on the southbound voyage.
Wrangell wrangell, situated on the island of the same name, is an
old Russian settlement named after a former Russian governor
of Alaska. Part of the Russian fort still remains, and there are also some
very old totem poles near the wharf. Wrangell is at the mouth of the Stikine River, which, navigable for about 170 miles, is the entry point to the
celebrated Cassiar big-game country.  (See "Sporting Attractions," page 10.)
Wrangell two hours after leaving . Wrangell the ship enters
Narrows Wrangell Narrows, and for twenty miles proceeds at half speed
through this narrow winding channel, of a remarkable beauty.
Well marked with buoys and beacons, this passage between the wooded
islands saves a long detour around Cape Decision, across a rough and open
part of the Pacific Ocean.
(The description of Wrangell Narrows is continued on Page Eight)
A Princess Louise
B Princess Charlotte
C Princess Alice
Sailing Hour, Skagway
—7.00 p.m.
(Alaska time, one hour
slower than Pacific standard
time.)
The natives of the West Coast are strikingly
different from other North American Indians; to
many they are not Indians at all, but a race apart,
whose characteristics are reminiscent of Asia.
Their ancestors are indeed likely to have come to
these shores over the Strait of Bering long ago,
after earlier migration had already peopled most
of the two American continents.
The name of "Siwash," ignorantly given them,
is derived from the French sauvage. They really
belong to more than five races, whose languages
are totally different: the Salish, whose habitat
once covered much territory around Victoria,
Vancouver, and the main coast north and south—
the Nootka, who dwell on the west coast of Vancouver Island, and their distant relatives the Kwa-
kiutl, whose territories stretch northwards from
Vancouver Island to a point near the Skeena River
—the Tsimshian of the Skeena and Nass Rivers
and the adjacent coast, near the present town of
Prince Rupert—the Haidas of Queen Charlotte
and Prince of Wales Islands—and the Tlingit of
the Alaskan coast. Another race, whose name is
Dene or Athapascan, inhabit much of the interior,
beyond the boundaries of the above-named
nations.
The west coast natives are essentially fisher-
folk; they formerly secured their food wholly from
the sea. It consisted of seals, whales, salmon,
halibut, fish roe and oolachen, or candle fish.
Their dug-out canoes stood to them as did the horse
to the buffalo-hunting Indians of the prairies.
Before the advent of Europeans they could hardly
ever venture beyond their frontiers. War and
daring raids were most common among them,
for they were bold, venturesome and cruel. Even to this day they are
fond of relating tales of adventures of the none-too-distant past.
They were not nomadic, as were their eastern neighbors, but each
family claimed hunting grounds and territories within the national
boundaries. They migrated to their hunting and fishing camps in the
spring, and returned to their villages on the coast in the autumn.
Community life was active only in the winter—that is, during the
potlatch season. The leaders then proceeded sternly to their business—
the exchange of goods, the promotion of their children and nephews, and
the various ceremonies that appertained to their social welfare and
dutiful commemoration of the deeds of their ancestors. They were
keen and thrifty, and their will unbending. Their numbers were formerly
considerable, but they are now passing away like the other natives; and
their culture has forever given way to that of invaders from the west
and the east who are gradually driving them off the land.
Immigration Inspection
Passengers entering Alaska from Canada are required to pass United
States Immigration Inspection at Ketchikan, the port of entry. So far
as bona fide tourists are concerned, this inspection is not strict. Passengers will be asked by purser for certain information regarding age,
place of residence, business, etc., and will be given a card by him. This
card is presented by the holder to the immigration inspector, who boards
steamer at Ketchikan, and as soon as particulars shown by purser on
manifest are checked by the inspector, the passenger can go ashore.
There is a similar inspection by the Canadian Immigration Department
on arrival of steamer southbound at Prince Rupert.
Passports are not necessary.
Arrive   Vancouver—4
later, a.m.
Arrive   Victoria—4
later, p.m.
Arrive   Seattle—4
later, evening.
days
days
days
Page Six
 PRINCESS »
.
STEAMSHIP!
4 *-
TO  ♦ ♦AJLASKA
Totem Poles at
Alert Bay.
Very old Totems
at Wrangell.
Ketchikan—first port of call in Alaska going north.
The Princess Charlotte.
Page Seven
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
GO     A    Q    T
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
'wM'W^A
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impson
i ^AsPort Simp?*
<\K "
MetlatafcJ^        jZd>
. inceTrupert
DigD^cKSVort Essington O
Porc^her,ld./j£^ /^T^N-—(J-~
Wn (  'S/tr  t) 3^^eT
Banks id?
Princess]
/) Swanson-BaylP^: 0$J
Aristazable Jd.j (-
Swanson Bay to Ketchikan
(See pages 4-6)
At the north end of the Narrows lies the old town of Petersburg,
whose name indicates its origin in the days of the Russian regime.
It is now a flourishing fishing centre. Kupreanof Island is on
the west, and after crossing Frederick Sound and Cape Fanshaw,
we enter Stephen's Passage.
Taku we are now surrounded by the typical grandeur
Glacier of Alaska. The Taku Glacier sends out hundreds of
odd-shaped ice floes to meet us, as blue as indigo,
floating by to melt gradually in warmer waters? as slowly the
steamer approaches this famous sight. This glacier, a mile wide
and 100 feet thick, extends for over 90 miles back over the mountains to join Llewellyn Glacier at the head of Atlin Lake (see page
14). It really is two glaciers, one—a mixture of brown, white,
and blue colors—"dead" and receding, the other very much alive
and continually moving forward. Showing all the colors of the
rainbow, according to the time of day or position of the sun,
huge masses of ice frequently break off into the sea, with deafening thunder, and float majestically away. Even the vibration
caused by the ship's whistle will bring down great hundreds-of-
tons pieces of ice.
Juneau three hours' steaming up Gastineau Channel
brings us to Juneau, clinging to the base and sides of
Mount Juneau, which towers 3,500 feet almost perpendicularly
above, near the mouth of the Taku River. Juneau, named after
its French-Canadian founder, is the capital of Alaska, the residence of the Governor, and the seat of all government departments. With a population of nearly 4,000, it is a bright and
interesting city, built (like so many of these coast settlements)
partly on piles over the water, partly on bare rock, with modern
hotels and stores, and many attractive residences and public
buildings.
The Territorial Museum in the Arctic Brotherhood Hall has a
wonderful collection of Alaska curiosities; on the floor below is
the experimental salmon hatchery. Fine raw fur stocks can be
seen at local dealers. Juneau has good roads and automobiles
a-plenty; one particularly interesting ride is to the face of the
Mendenhall Glacier (2| hours return) or the Auk Lake (an hour
longer). A short hike away is the Gold Creek Basin, the site
of the first placer gold strike in Alaska, made by Joe Juneau
and Richard Haines in the early 80's.
Alaska Gold within a short distance from Juneau, but reached by
launch, are Thane and Douglas, where, until some time after
the Great War, three of the largest low-grade gold-crushing plants in the
world were situated. Now only one remains, the Alaska Juneau, with a
mining and milling capacity of about 9,000 tons of ore daily. On Douglas
Island are the old buildings of the celebrated Treadwell Mine, flooded by
a cave-in in 1917, and not operated since.
The Lynn Canal the steamer leaves Juneau at midnight, and reaches
Skagway about 9 a.m.; but on the southbound journey there
is ample opportunity to see the beautiful Lynn Canal, which, with the possible
exception of the Taku Glacier, provides the most wonderful scenery of all.
For over 80 miles we steam up this arm of the sea, which varies in width
from one to five miles. Mountains of rock capped with snow, towering
glaciers and gushing waterfalls, canyons of all sizes and wild shapes, and
colors in restless variety surround us. Davidson Glacier is a huge ice wall
seen on the west. Passing the town of Haines and Fort Seward, a U.S.
military post, we suddenly turn a point and see Skagway ahead of us.
Skagway      skagway, the end of the northbound run, is a town that
has loomed large in the history of the North.   When the gold
rush started to the Yukon in 1896, the landing was made at Dyea, which
(The description of Skagway is continued on Page Ten)
Princess Steamships
Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte
Princess Alice
To Alaska by the Inside Passage, and back,
is a two-thousand-mile
nine-day journey from
Vancouver, with six ports
of call. To handle the
tourist business, the Canadian Pacific operates
during the summer
months three of the
finest of its well-known
"Princess" steamships,
which are large, modern
vessels of the most comfortable sea-going type.
The Princess Louise is
330 feet long, with a passenger capacity of 260.
The Princess Charlotte is 330 ft. long, with a
passenger capacity of 262.
The Princess Alice is
289 feet long, with a passenger capacity of 222.
These three ships are
oil-burners, and are fitted
with wireless telegraph.
MOUNTAINS
The mountains that fringe the Inside Passage
to Alaska form practically one range throughout
—the Coast Range. Leaving Vancouver, the
mountains are, as a rule, higher on the mainland
side than on Vancouver Island, averaging 3,000
to 4,000 feet in height; but towards Queen Charlotte
Sound they tail off somewhat. From the other side
of the Skeena River, and entering the long Alaskan
"panhandle," the altitude increases again. From
Juneau north to the White Pass the range is sometimes known as the Chilkoot Range.
The White Pass and Yukon Railway from Skagway (which is, of course, at sea level) to White
House reaches its highest altitude at Log Cabin
(2,916 feet). On the other side of the summit, the
surface is, generally speaking, a huge plateau,
broken by long spurs of mountains. Lake Bennett
is 2,161 feet above sea level and Atlin Lake 2,200.
Jubilee Mountain, at the north end of Lake Atlin,
the highest in that district, is about 4,200 feet
above the lake (6,380 feet above sea level).
In the extreme south-west corner of the Yukon
Territory, where it tucks into Alaska, and lying
on both sides of the international boundary, is an
isolated, exceedingly lofty group of mountains
known as the St. Elias Range. Mount Logan
(19,539 feet) and Mount St. Elias (18,024 feet) are
the highest, the former having been climbed in
1925 for the first time. They are, however, very
inaccessible owing to lack of transportation thither.
Mount McKinley, highest mountain on the American Continent (20,464 feet), lies in the National
Park of that name about 400 miles west of this
group.
Glaciers
Along or near the Inside Passage to Alaska, or
round Atlin Lake, many magnificent glaciers are
to be seen.   The principal ones are:—
Taku Glacier (See next column) ^
Wright Glacier (beyond Taku, higher up the Taku River).
Norris Glacier, near Juneau.
Davidson Glacier, on the west side of Lynn Canal, just before
reaching Haines.
Denver Glacier, about six miles north of Skagway and about 3
miles walk from the W.P. & Y.R.
Llewellyn Glacier, at the south end of Atlin Lake.
Muir and Brady Glaciers are on Glacier Bay, west from Lynn
Canal over the height-of-land.
A glacier is, broadly speaking, an accumulation of ice, of sufficient size
and weight to flow down from a snow-coveicd elevation.   It is a river
flowing from a lake, only the lake is of snow and the river of ice.    The
thickness of the ice will vary greatly—it may be, under favorable conditions, as much as 1,000 feet.
Glaciers frequently extend far below the snow line of the region.
Exactly how a glacier moves has never been satisfactorily explained, but
that it does move has been proved by observation and calculations; more
than that, the stream at the centre of a glacier moves much faster than
at the sides or bottom.
One of the most interesting characteristics of glaciers is the power to
transport rocks and other heavy material over great distances.   These
Page Eight
 PRINCESS ,♦ * STEAMSHIPS  *   ♦ TO * * ALASKA
Juneau is the Capital of Alaska.
X-7
Taku Glacier—a mile wide and 90 miles long.
The Princess AUc#9
Page Nine
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
Ketchikan to Skagway
( See page 8)
lies on the western branch of the Lynn Canal, and the trail inland
led over the dangerous Chilkoot Pass; but word came of the discovery of the White Pass, and in a day fifteen thousand people left
Dyea, and in a day Skagway arose where before was chiefly swamp.
At the height of the gold rush, Skagway was one of the wildest,
wickedest places on earth, chock full of the gambling-halls, dance-
halls, saloons and other lurid temptations that nowadays can be
seen nowhere else but in the "movies." Gangs of "bad men" terrorized the town, preying not only on the returning successful
prospector but on the incoming "cheechako" as well. Skagway is
not such an ancient town but that old-timers can regale you with
stories of its celebrated characters, such as Soapy Smith or Frank
Reid, whose graves nearby will initiate many reminiscences. But
those days are over. Skagway is a model of propriety, with hotels,
stores, and the peaceful air of ordinary business.
One of the marvels of Skagway—to those at least who have
never considered Alaska as aught but perpetual winter—is its
beautiful flower gardens. The background of mountains that
enclose it like a cup offer many attractive outings, such as "hikes"
along the Skagway River, to Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove, or the
great Denver Glacier. There are fine launch trips available, and
good fishing. The steamer lays over about 36 hours before starting
on its southbound journey.
Inland from Skagway
int e r estingthough Skagway is, the shortest visit
would be incomplete without a journey to the equally interesting
and fascinating "inside." Such a journey, difficult as it was in the
early days of the gold rush, can now be easily undertaken, for Skagway is the southern terminus of the rail line of the White Pass and
Yukon Route. A comfortable train, with large-windowed observation cars, will carry one through the magnificent scenery of the
White Pass into the Yukon Territory, connecting at Carcross and at
White Horse with the commodious steamers of the same company.
For those who are returning south by the same "Princess"
steamship, there are available the excursions to West Taku Arm or
to White Horse. For those waiting over until the next steamship,
there is the trip to Atlin Lake—where, indeed, many visitors linger
much longer than such a brief visit. For those with more time,
there is the wonderful trip from White Horse down the Yukon River to
Dawson.
Over the the rail journey is a most spectacular one. The
White Pass salt tang of the sea is left behind, and the sweetness of lake and
mountain air fills the nostrils. The scenery grows rugged and
awe-inspiring. We climb steadily around gorges, along the brink of deep
canyons, past roaring cataracts, and near dead cities to which cling memories of the trail of '98. Such names as "Dead Horse Gulch" and "Log
Cabin" help vividly to recall those grim days.
At White Pass Summit—nearly 3,000 feet higher than Skagway in twenty
miles!—we leave American territory, and the scarlet-coated Mounted
Policeman greets us as we enter Canada. A bronze monument, where the
flags of the two countries float side by side? marks the boundary line. For a
very short distance we travel through British Columbia, and then at Pennington cross into the Yukon Territory.
Lake Bennett On our left, Lake Bennett begins—a long, narrow body of
water which the railway will follow for twenty-six miles. It is
rather amazing to learn that Bennett, where a stop is made for lunch, and
which consists merely of a station and its outbuildings, once had a population
of several thousand, and teemed with life and excitement. For it was to this
beautiful lake, bounded by old-rose color, that the "trail of '98" led. Those
who had survived the epic hazards of the Pass camped on this lake, and
(The description of Lake Bennett is continued on Page Twelve)
Princess Steamships
The Princess Steamships on the Alaska run
are fitted with every comfort and convenience for
passengers.
Staterooms on the
Princess Steamships are
light, cosy and well-ventilated. They are not
overcrowded, but designed to accommodate only
two passengers per stateroom. On each ship there
are a few "de luxe"
rooms with private bathrooms, and also some
with sofa berths.
The community rooms
—dining room, observation room, lounges,
smoking room, etc.—
are bright, cheerful and
charmingly furnished.
The Princess Louise and
Princess Charlotte have
dance floors.
All ships have ample
deck space for promenading, sports and lounging.
SPORTING
The "roof of the world" has been so richly
endowed by nature with mighty snow-capped
mountains, expansive inland seas, vast areas of
trackless wilderness and lonely tundra, that it
offers the sportsman a wonderful variety of hunting. In the interior country of Northern British
Columbia and the Yukon Territory the giant
moose, the stately caribou, the wary deer, savage
silvertip grizzlies, mountain sheep, mountain goat
and many other varieties roam at large.
More than a dozen varieties of bear are to be
found in this mountainous domain, ranging from
the huge polar bear and terrible kodiak down
through the different species to the common black
bear once found all over America. The different
varieties are numerous, according to location, on
the islands, along the coast, in the trackless forests,
the mountain peaks and the ice floes.
The northern moose, the largest members of
the deer family, are plentifully distributed throughout the greater part of this country. Magnificent
trophies are brought out each season. Caribou,
too, are abundant, and inhabit the treeless and
tundra sections of the interior. Mountain sheep
and goat are among the most prized game animals.
The fishing affords an interesting side line to a
big game hunt, and the swift, rocky, tumbling
rivers, well stocked with gamy fighting trout, and
the mountain-rimmed lakes of unequalled beauty,
all combine to make this a paradise for the sportsman.
While some of the more accessible localities are
hunted each year, the main big game districts can
at present be limited to five:
The Cassiar country, one of the finest and most
celebrated sporting regions of this continent. Lying
back of the coast range, it is reached from Wrangell, whence a regular launch service with sleeping
accommodation is operated up the Stikine River to Telegraph Creek,
B.C. (see page 6). From the head of navigation (165 miles) hunting grounds are reached by pack train. An alternative approach is
via Atlin (see page 14) and thence by pack train.
The Kluahne country, reached by automobile from White Horse.
The McMillan and Pelly River districts, reached by Yukon River
steamship to Yukon Crossing or Selkirk.
The Atlin Lake country.
The Teslin Lake country, about 40 miles east of Atlin Lake.
This company has prepared sportsmen's bulletins about the hunting possibilities of the above districts, with names of outfitters, etc.
Write to the General Tourist Agent, Canadian Pacific Railway, Montreal, for a copy.
Books About the Northland
A great many interesting books can be obtained about Alaska and
the Yukon. By all means, read some before you start. There are the
well-known stories by Rex Beach—"The Spoilers," "The Barrier," and
"The Silver Horde"; Jack London's famous "Call of the Wild," and
many others; Elizabeth Robins" "Magnetic North" and "Come and
Find Me"; James Oliver Curwood's "Alaskan"; Edison Marshall's
"Seward's Folly"; and Service's "Trail of Ninety Eight."
Robert W. Service's poems, "Songs of a Sourdough" and "Ballads of
a Cheechako," are, we imagine, so well-known as hardly to need mention.
A good concise handbook is Rand McNally's "Guide to Alaska and
the Yukon."
Page Ten
 S * * STEAMSHIPS  *   ♦ TO * * ALASKA
The Lynn Canal.
7'&7;]-7-^
Looking down the Lynn Canal from Skagway.
:-"V'::¥';f::%<T
kagway s Mam Street.
Skagway Flower Gardens are a Surprise.
A Hike to a Glacier.
Page Eleven
J
 DOWN
THE
DAWSON
RIVER
T   O
THE
KLONDIKE
whipsawed lumber to make the rafts, scows and other manner of water
craft in which to reach the golden land of their hopes. Little did they know,
of course, the perils of the White Horse Rapids; or if they had heard of them,
little did they appreciate them.
Along the ever-winding shores of this blue Lake Bennett, looking out on
a long mountain ridge, the railway runs, until the little town of Carcross is
reached. There is an Indian school nearby, and interesting fox ranches;
and in the cemetery are buried many of the discoverers of the Klondike.
White Horse lewis and other little lakes are passed, and then Miles
Canyon and White Horse Rapids. On still days, the roar of
these rapids can be heard even in the town, about an hour's walk distant.
As we stand on the brink of this famous gorge, no very highly colored
imagination is necessary to conjure up pictures of the old days. We can
imagine the bold adventurers in their frail craft nearing these death-
dealing rapids, whose waters are thrown from side to side in a long serpentine series of twists, and which are so troubled that the water rides
higher in the middle than at the sides. Down they came in their mad rush
to the Klondike—not at intervals, but in a continuous procession that was
(in the words of an eye-witness) like traffic on a city street. Some,
becoming scared, jumped ashore as they saw their dangers, and watched from
the high cliffs the agonies of their boats; but the majority stayed with
their craft. And so few came through unpunished ! Those who did wasted
no time in going back to warn their competitors, but hurried on.
.WHITE HORSE
' 'V^  Miles Canyon^^^^^    "//'
*< <0\\N
.^agi^^^T,? Pennington 771T "»        "^"\ l^, <        ,\\
-g|fBI^T5>   Vi    /7<^\^\|.,3        ~\ Vi-.      SuZPrise Lake
C-  „ - tClitton y   > V   _     .aW   '   ~\ f/f /
^^ Llewellyn Glacier x       • '^Vp7
3 and Atlin Lake
To White Horse and Atlin Lake
White Horse is a busy little town on the west bank of
Fifty-Mile River (also known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the Upper Yukon). There is fairly good hotel
accommodation to be obtained. Trips to the rapids and
other points may be made by automobile over good roads.
It is the terminus of the railway, and the point of departure
for the steamer trip to Dawson.
To the the journey from White Horse to Daw-
Klondike son and back, one that can be made in about a
week, is the fitting climax to the trip "inside."
White Horse is the present head of navigation on the Yukon
waterway (the river in its upper reaches is really a system
of tributaries), which empties into the sea at St. Michael,
Alaska, over 2,000 miles distant. It is a constantly changing succession of pictures—rolling hills, sometimes bare,
again heavily wooded, towering mountain ranges, awe-
inspiring rapids, with now and then a quiet stretch of water
between forested banks. Here and there is an occasional
trading-post, or a mining camp—perhaps the ghost of a
dead "bonanza"—or a hermit settlement where the steamer
stops awhile to "wood-up."
The Cremation lake lebarge, a beautiful widen-
of Sam McGee ing of the stream (on whose shores, incidentally, occurred the episode that
inspired Robert Service's celebrated poem about Sam
McGee), Hootalinqua, Little Salmon, and Carmacks, with
its coal mine, are some of the interesting places passed.
The shooting of Five-Finger Rapids, and their postscript
Rink Rapids, gives plenty of thrill to even the most jaded.
At Yukon Crossing, the overland winter trail to Dawson,
used when the river is frozen up, is passed, and then Fort
Selkirk—an important trading-centre founded in 1898 as a
militia post to guard gold shipments.
The mouths of mighty tributaries are passed, amongst
them White River—the only large river that enters the
Yukon from the west or south—and Stewart River, entrance
to the new Mayo silver-lead camp 175 miles east. Smaller
steamers ply the Stewart as far as Mayo, whence it is a case
of "packing in." Swede Creek has a Government Experimental Agricultural Station, and then we are at Dawson.
The trip from White Horse takes about two days—the return
trip, owing to the current, about four days.
Dawson d a w s o n , once the focus of the world's greatest gold rush, the headquarters of the whole
Klondike region, is now hardly more than a shadow of its
former glory. Mining operations are still in progress, but
they are carried on under hydraulic and dredging conditions:
the picturesque days of which one reads in Service and Jack
London have departed. Gone with them are the highly
colored, sensational chapters of Dawson's history, when the
city was the rendezvous of outlaws as well as greed-crazed
miners, when dance-halls, saloons and gambling places ran
wide open for the full twenty-four hours. But to be able to
recall that "them was the days" makes one a real old-
timer, a sourdough—but not necessarily a more than middle-
aged man.
Dawson is the administrative centre of the Yukon Territory, and the headquarters of a large detachment of that
fine body of men the Mounted Police. It is beautifully
situated on a bend of the Yukon River, up-to-date, well-built,
with comfortable hotels, fine homes and pretty flower
gardens.
(Dawson is concluded on Page Fourteen)
FOX   FARMING
The day of the trapper in the Northland is
passing, chiefly by reason of the decrease in the
supply of fur of good quality; but fox farming is
rapidly developing instead. With the exportation
of live foxes practically forbidden by legislation,
a number of farms have been started, and this
industry is becoming an important one.
Foxes are popularly classified as red, black,
blue and white. The black fox presents many
color phases, ranging from clear black to extra
pale silver. The Alaskan fox is one of the distinct
branches of the black fox, but does not breed true
to color with the native Canadian. The "patch"
fox is obtained by crossing the red with the black,
and the "cross" fox produced by mating together
two distinct types of the black fox, such as the
Alaskan and native Canadian. The blue fox will
not cross with either the red or the black, and
only occasionally with the white (or Arctic) fox.
Mink and seal furs are also produced in Alaska
and the Yukon.
Historical Notes
The region now known as Alaska was first
visited by white men in 1741, when two Russian
officers, Captains Bering and Chirikov, explored
the coast as far south as Dixon Entrance. Many
traders and trappers followed them, and Kodiak
Island was settled in 1784. Spanish expeditions
in 1774-75 visited the south-eastern coast, and
Captain Cook in 1778; but the first real charts
were made by that intrepid navigator, Captain
Vancouver, in 1793-94.
Owing to excesses committed by private traders,
who robbed and massacred the Indians, Russia
created in 1799 a semi-official corporation called
the Russian-American Company. Alexander Bar-
anov, a famous administrator, founded Sitka in
1804. The monopoly of this company ended in
1861, when Prince Matsukov, an imperial governor,
was appointed. The United States had already
made overtures for the purchase of "Russian
America," and in 1867 the purchase was consummated for the price of $7,200,000.
But thus far the Northland had been considered
only in terms of fisheries and the fur trade. The
discovery of mineral wealth was made much more
slowly, and it was not until the sensational finds
of rich "placers" in the Klondike in 1896, which
culminated in one of the most hectic gold rushes of
modern times, that the attention of the world was
riveted upon this feature. The Yukon Territory
was constituted in 1898, and, with the subsequent
discovery of gold at Nome in 1900, the mining
industry has been stabilized. The Yukon River
was explored by Russians as long ago as 1842, and
in 1883 Lieutenant Frederick Schwatka crossed the
Chilkoot Pass, descended the Lewes River to Fort
Selkirk, and so down the river to the sea. The
dangerous Chilkoot Pass was, however, abandoned
by the "musher" for the newly discovered White
Pass, soon after the Klondike strike.
Pape Twelve
 OVER ♦ THE * WHITE * PASS * AND ♦"YUKON * ROUTE
Steamer "Tutshi"
on Lake Tagish.
A Ghost of Gold Rush Days
—White Pass City,
Page Thirteen
 T O
l\        1        L*s      A
LAKE
THE
Jr    13   x\   .TA.   JLj
O F
THE
N O
T H L A N D
—s Canyon-   . c
Down the Yukon River
Over good roads one can visit mining plants and old, played-out but famous
bonanza claims. The Indian village of Moosehide, and the fox farms, are
worth a visit; while the old cabin of Robert W. Service, the poet-laureate of
the Northland, is the objective of many pilgrimages.
To Atlin to atlin is another delightful excursion from Skagway,
either as a side trip on the Dawson trip or as one in itself. The
route is the same as before to Carcross, but here the commodious steamer
"Tutshi" is taken, through a chain of sapphire lakes, mountain-girt and
forest-guarded.
The steamer first crosses Lake Nares, and then through the narrows
enters Tagish Lake, horse-shoe shaped and guarded by high peaks. Old
mining towns and fox farms are seen along the way. Presently we turn into
the Taku Arm of the lake, a beautiful sheet of water encompassed by the
most inspiring scenery, and then into Taku Inlet as far as Taku Landing.
Here, where a wonderful view may be obtained of Jubilee Mountain, to the
north, a transfer is made across a three-mile neck of land by a very unique
little train.
At the end of the portage we reach Lake Atlin, and board the twin-screw
motorship "Tarahne" for a six-mile run to the little town of Atlin.
The Atlin Inn near the boat landing, and facing the lake, is the
Atlin Inn, built and maintained especially for tourists by
the White Pass and Yukon Route. From its windows a magnificent view
may be obtained of the Atlin Mountains across Lake Atlin. The tourist
will find the Atlin Inn very inviting, the cuisine and service excellent. A
stay here for a day or so, or indeed for several weeks, will add greatly to the
pleasure of the Atlin trip.
There is an indescribable tonic effect in the Atlin climate. Numerous
side trips can be taken by automobile, steamer, launch or on foot to many
points of interest. Amongst these are the placer gold mines, the fox farm,
the Warm Springs, and the Indian Village; and wherever one goes, one will
find a profusion of beautiful wild flowers in almost endless variety. Then,
too, there are delightful walks along the shores. Atlin is the base of
supplies for one of the richest hydraulic mining camps in British Columbia,
Those who like fishing can try their luck at lake trout, whitefish, or the
smaller but gamy grayling.
The Llewellyn the principal event of the trip to Atlin is the after-
Glacier noon excursion on the steamer "Tarahne." For about forty
miles the boat winds its way through the narrow mountain-
ribbed passages of the West Channel. The boat then passes out through
Copper Island Narrows, and the return is made down the other side of these
islands on Lake Atlin, where a magnificent view is obtained of the huge
Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast Range.
When the water is smooth, as it frequently is, and on its surface are
mirrored the vari-colored verdure-clad hills and snow-crowned mountains
with their cathedral-like spires, the scene is of sublime beauty and grandeur.
And these reflections are not seen merely for a mile or so, but mile after
mile.
To West Taku  another beautiful scenic trip is that to the
Arm West Taku Arm, which has been especially designed for
passengers who are making the round trip from Vancouver
to Skagway and back on the same steamship, and who cannot spare sufficient
time to avail themselves of one of the other tours "inside." It gives these
passengers an opportunity of seeing a maximum number of points of interest
in the short time at their disposal. It is a journey which takes the visitor
into the very heart of primeval surroundings, where giant mountains raise
their lofty peaks from the glittering glacial waters of the Arm, which ends
at what might be termed the "back door" of the Taku Glacier that the
traveller saw before reaching Juneau
The route followed is the same as to Atlin, except that at Golden Gate,
instead of turning into the Taku Inlet, the steamer continues a southerly
course and then west, reaching West Taku Arm Landing and Ben-My-Chree
homestead, Passengers sleep on board and reach Carcross in the morning,
in time to catch the southbound train and their steamer.
GOLD   MINING
As early as 1861 gold discoveries were made in the Stikine River, and
from 1866 to 1887 scattered colorings were found at many places along or
tributary to the Yukon River. The location of the first Klondike claim
in August, 1896, was followed by a feverish and picturesque rush, the like
of which the world has never seen before or since, and the mines in
American territory were temporarily deserted. Nome, over 800 miles
due west of Dawson, and situated not far from Bering Straits, was the
scene of another great stampede in 1900.
The Yukon is a "placer" mining district: that is, the gold is found in
alluvial deposits of mixed sand, gravel and clay, and is obtained by a
system of "panning" or "sluicing." Frequently these deposits are along
the hollows of river beds, but they are also found at higher altitudes, in
terraces that formerly were the beds of streams that have changed their
courses. In the latter case, instead of being worked in the creek or
sluice, the gold deposits are first washed down by powerful jets of water
projected by hose lines, and so into the sluices.
The Bonanza was the greatest of the Klondike creeks, and its tributary,
the Eldorado Creek, the richest, probably surpassing any known placer
deposit. The Klondike output reached its climax in 1900, with a production of $22,000,000, but has since then declined. The richest gravels
were all worked out before 1910, and the production of the entire Yukon,
including new deposits discovered, is now less than a million dollars a
year.
Placer gold was discovered at Juneau in about 1880, but the present
mines there are quartz mines—that is, the gold is found in rocks, which
must be crushed,. The quartz mines near Juneau are amongst the greatest
stamp mills of the world. The new Engineer mine on Tagish Lake, near
Atlin, is a quartz mine. Besides gold, silver mining is being developed
in the Yukon, an outstanding example being the silver-lead mine at Keno,
near Mayo, which to the end of 1923 had produced nearly $2,500,000 of
silver and lead.
From
Distances
To
Vancouver Alert Bay.......
Alert Bay.  .Prince Rupert...
Prince Rupert.  .Ketchikan.	
Ketchikan. .Wrangell........
Wrangell.................Juneau..........
Juneau   Skagway........
Hours
14
22
8
.   7
11
8
Seattle.  Vancouver (direct)...... 8§
Victoria Vancouver  4
A nautical mile is equivalent to 1.15 statute miles.
Skagway.................Atlin.
Skagway. .White Horse.
White Horse  Dawson
Nautical
Miles
183
287
81
88
131
88
858
126
72
Statute
Miles
150
110
460
The Midnight Sun
On the 21st of June, Dawson has 22 hours of sunshine and two hours
of twilight. Approximately 114 days in the mid-summer months have
no real night. On the contrary, the sun is out of sight from December
5th until January 6th, and December 21st has 18 hours of darkness and
six of twilight. The Yukon River opens for navigation at Dawson about
May 5th, and closes about October 30th,
Page Fourteen
 OVER * THE » WHITE ♦■ PA!
Dawson, Capital of the Yukon
This was once a
famous Dawson
" dance hall."
The Five Finger Rapids (Photograph by Hamacher.,
A Northern Husky Dog
Down the Yukon River to Dawson.
Here lived the celebrated Sam McGee.
Page Fifteen
 OVER * THE * WHITE * PASS * AND ♦ YUKON * ROUTE
Atlin Inn—headquarters of this beautiful region.
Page Sixteen
Seracs in Llewellyn Glacier.
 CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA  AND   UNITED  STATES
Atlanta. . . Ga.—E. G. Chesbrough, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 49 N. Forsyth St.
Banff Alta.—J. A. McDonald, District Passenger Agent C. P. R. Station
Bellingham Wash.—Eric W. Spence, City Passenger Agent 1252 Elk St.
Boston  .Mass.—L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo N.Y.—H. R. Mathewson, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 160 Pearl St.
Calgary  Alta.—J. E. Proctor, District Pass. Agt C.P.R. Station
Chicago 111.—T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati Ohio—M. E. Malone, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland Ohio—G. H. Griffin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1010 Chester Ave.
Detroit Mich.—G. G. McKay, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton Alta.—C. S. Fyfe, City Passenger Agent. . C.P.R. Building
Fort William Ont.—A. J. Boreham, City Passenger Agt. 404 Victoria Ave.
Guelph  Ont.—W. C. Tully, City Passenger Agent. . 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax N.S.—A. C. McDonald, City Passenger Agt 117 Hollis St.
Hamilton. Ont.—A. Craig, City Passenger Agent Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu T.H.—Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau  .Alaska—W. L. Coates, Agent.
Kansas City Mo.—R. G. Norris, City Pass. Agent 601 Railway Exchange Bldg.
Ketchikan Alaska—F. E. Ryus, Agent.
Kingston Ont.—F. Conway, City Passenger Agent 180 Wellington St.
London  .Ont.—H. J. McCallum, City Passenger Agent 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles. Cal.—W. Mcllroy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 621 So. Grand Ave.
Milwaukee Wis.—F. T. Sansom,  City Passenger Agent , 68 Wisconsin St.
Minneapolis Minn.—H. M. Tait, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 611 2nd Ave. South
,, +„   . a   ■      J R. G. Amiot, District Pass. Agent' Windsor Station
Montreal Que—^ F  c  Lydon> City pasSi Agent    141 St. James St.
Moosejaw ,.Sask.—A.  C.  Harris,  Ticket Agent. .. ] Canadian  Pacific  Station
Nelson B.C.—J. S. Carter, District Pass. Agent  .Baker and Ward Sts.
New York N.Y.—F. R. Perry, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay Ont.—L. O. Tremblay, District Pass. Agt 87 Main Street West
Ottawa Ont.—J. A. McGill, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro Ont.—J, Skinner, City Passenger Agent George St.
Philadelphia Pa.—R. C. Clayton, City Pass. Agt Locust St. at 15th
Pittsburgh Pa.—C. L. Williams, Gen. Agent Pass. Dept 338 Sixth Ave.
Portland  .Ore.—W. H. Deacon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept  55 Third St.
Prince Rupert. . . .B.C.—W. C. Orchard, General Agent.
Quebec Que.—C. A. Langevin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Palais Station
Regina. .Sask.—G. D. Brophy, District Pass. Agt. Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John N.B.—G. B. Burpee, 'District Pass. Agent -40 King St.
St. Louis. Mo.—Geo. P. Carbrey, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 420 Locust St.
St. Paul Minn.—W. H. Lennon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. Soo Line. .Robert and Fourth St.
San Francisco Cal.—F. L. Nason, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 675 Market St.
Saskatoon Sask.—G. B. Hill, City Pass. Agent 415 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie.. .Ont.—J. O. Johnston, City Pass. Agent 529 Queen Street
Seattle Wash.—E. L. Sheehan, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept . . 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke Que.—J. A. Metivier, City Pass. Agt 74 Wellington St.
Skagway Alaska—L. H. Johnston, Agent.
Spokane Wash.—E.,L. Cardie, Traffic Mgr. Spokane International Ry.
Tacoma  . Wash.—D. C. O'Keefe, City Passenger Agent 1113 Pacific Ave.
Toronto.  .Ont.—Wm. Fulton, District Passenger Agt Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Vancouver B.C.—F. H. Daly, City Passenger Agent. 434 Hastings St. West
Victoria. B.C.—L. D. Chetham, District Passenger Agent 1102 Government St.
Washington D.C.—C. E. Phelps, City Passenger Agent 905 Fifteenth St. N.W.
Windsor Ont.—W. C. Elmer, City Passenger Agent 34 Sandwich St. West
Winnipeg Man.—J. W. Dawson, Dist. Passenger Agent  .Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp Belgium—A.  L.   Rawlinson 25  Quai Jordaens
Belfast Ireland—Wm.   McCalla 41-43   Victoria  St.
Birmingham Eng.—W. T. Treadaway.  .4 Victoria Square
Bristol Eng.—A.  S.  Ray  18  St.' Augustine's Parade
Brussels Belgium—L.   H.   R.   Plummer 92   Blvd.   Adolphe-Max
Glasgow Scotland—W. Stewart 25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg.... Germany—J. H. Gardner Gansemarkt 3
Liverpool Eng.—R. E. Swain Pier Head
t «t>h™ T7nD- _ J c- E- Jenkins   62-65 Charing Cross, S.W. 1
i.onaon u,ng.     <j G Saxon j0nes   103 Leadenhall St. E.C. 3
Manchester Eng.—J. W. Maine  31 Mosley Street
Paris France—A.  V.  Clark 7  Rue   Scribe
Rotterdam.... Holland—J. S. Springett. Coolsingel No. 91
Southampton Eng.—H. Taylor 7 Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong China—T. R. Percy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept  .Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe Japan-^E.  Hospes,  Passenger Agent 1  Bund
Manila P.I.—J. R. Shaw, Agent 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai China—A. M. Parker, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept No. 4 The Bund
Yokohama Japan—G. E. Costello, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept No. 1 The Bund
AUSTRALIA,   NEW  ZEALAND,   ETC.
J. Sclater, Australian and New Zealand Representative, Union House, Sydnoy, N.S.W.
Adelaide S.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane Qd.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch..... .N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Dunedin  .N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Fremantle W.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart Tas.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Launcestbn  .Tas.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Melbourne Vic.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.), Thos. Cook & Son.
Perth W.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva Fiji—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Sydney. N.S.W.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Wellington N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
This cover printed in Canada.
  *******. i i^itTr-v:^
■'■■■•   '77m&7.
£77;77:.77:.
:
 Canadian Pacific Hotels
ON THE PACIFIC COAST
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C.
The largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, overlooking the Strait of Georgia, and serving equally the
business man and the tourist. Situated in the heart of
the shopping district of Vancouver. Golf, motoring,
fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer excursions. Open
all year. European plan. One-half mile from station.
Empress Hotel, Victoria, B.C.
A luxurious hotel in this Garden City of the Pacific
Coast. An equable climate has made Victoria a
favorite summer and winter resort. Motoring, yachting, sea and stream fishing, shooting and all-year golf.
Crystal Garden for swimming and music. Open all
year.   European pilan.   Facing wharf.
IN THE ROCKIES
Hotel Sicamous, Sicamous, B.C.
Junction for the orchard districts of the Okanagan Valley, and stop-over
point for those who wish to see the Thompson and Fraser Canyons by daylight.
Lake Shuswap district offers good boating, and excellent trout fishing and hunting in season.   Open all year.    American plan.    At station.    Altitude 1,146 feet.
Emerald Lake Chalet, near Field, B.C.
A charming Chalet hotel situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, amidst the
picturesque Alpine scenery of the Yoho National Park. Roads and trails to the
Burgess Pass, Yoho Valley, etc. Boating and fishing. Open June 15th to September 15th.   American plan.    Seven miles from station.    Altitude 4,262 feet.
Chateau Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta
A wonderful hotel facing an exquisite Alpine Lake in Rocky Mountains
National Park. Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips or walks to Lakes
in the Clouds, Saddleback, etc., drives or motoring to Moraine Lake, boating,
fishing. Open June 1st to September 30th. European plan. 3% miles from
station by motor railway.   Altitude 5,670 feet.
Banff Springs Hotels, Banff, Alberta
A magnificent hotel in the heart of the Rocky Mountains National Park,
backed by three splendid mountain ranges. Alpine climbing, motoring and
drives on good roads, bathing, hot sulphur springs, golf, tennis, fishing, boating
and riding. Open May 15th to September 30th. European plan. lj/£ miles
from station.   Altitude 4,625 feet.
THE PRAIRIES
Hotel Palliser, Calgary, Alberta
A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard, in this prosperous city of Southern Alberta. Suited equally to the business man and the tourist en route to or
from the Canadian Pacific Rockies. Good golfing and motoring. Open all year.
European plan.   At station.
Regina, Sask.
New Canadian Pacific Hotel (Open 1927)
Royal Alexandra Hotel, Winnipeg, Manitoba
A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada, appealing to those
who wish to break their transcontinental journey. The centre of Winnipeg's
social life. Good golfing and motoring. Open all year. European plan. At
station.
EASTERN CANADA
Place Viger Hotel, A charming hotel in Canada's largest city.    Open
Montreal, Quebec all year.
Chateau Frontenac, A   metropolitan   hotel   in   the   most   historic   city
Quebec, Quebec of North America.    Open all year.
McAdam Hotel, A   commercial   and   sportsman's   hotel.    Open   all
McAdam, N.B. year.
The Algonquin, The   social   centre   of   Canada's   most   fashionable
St. Andrews, N.B. seashore    summer    resort.    Open    June    25th    to
September 7th.
HOTELS  AND  BUNGALOW  CAMPS  REACHED
BY CANADIAN PACIFIC
Moraine Lake, Alta Moraine Lake Camp
Banff-Windermere \ j Storm Mountain Bungalow Camp
Automobile Highway] \ Vermilion River Camp
Radium Hot Springs Camp
Hector, B.C Wapta Camp
Hector, B.C Lake O'Hara Camp
Field, B.C Yoho Valley Camp
Lake Windermere, B.C Lake Windermere Camp
Penticton, B.C Hotel Incola
Cameron Lake, B.C Cameron Lake Chalet
Strathcona Lodge, B.C Strathcona Lodge
Kenora, Ont Devil's Gap Camp
Nipigon, Ont Nipigon River Camp
French River, Ont French River Camp
Digby, N.S The Pines
Kentville, N.S Cornwallis Inn
PRINTED IN U. S. A.-1927
L
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
f came as a whip to men's greed
I and a challenge to men's courage,
$ that first ringing call of the North-
| land. Until then—about thirty
I years ago—Alaska was almost un-
I known, a white space on the map.
I scrawled shakily over "Come-and-
R find-me." That is, to most of the
I world; for the Northland had even
| then its pioneers, its prospectors,
| who had fished its teeming coasts,
trapped its furs, started small
towns, and panned the first coarse
colorings of gold along its creeks.
But outside of these sturdy old-
timers, Alaska, with its side-partner,
the Yukon, was hardly more than
■ a geographical curiosity—a huge,
unpopulated, unexplored, inhospitable block of land over three-quarters of a million square miles
in size, forming the northern tip of the American continent. It
had, as far as one could estimate then, no very remarkable resources or trading possibilities; on the contrary, it was apparently
a land of perpetual winter, frozen permanently under solid snow
and ice—in this and many other ways exactly resembling Russia,
to which it had once belonged and from which, at the Bering
Strait, it was so narrowly separated.
A pity, perhaps, that the first real revelation of a reaf Alaska—
an Alaska different from all one's conceptions, and richer than
Monte Cristo—should have come through that basest of motives,
avarice. The discovery of gold in the Klondike in 1896, in such
vast quantities as to astound humanity, let loose so much sensation that overnight the new bonanza became almost the most
famous place on earth. That feverish stampede to :he north
(one does not have to be very middle-aged to rem >mber it)
was like nothing that had ever happened before, or that has
ever happened since.
The Lure of Gold
back in '98 someone took a photograph, which is still
occasionally published, of an everyday scene in the Chilkoot
Pass. Perhaps you've seen it; it shows, struggling over the steep,
dangerous snow-clad wastes, a thin black streak nearly two miles
long—a streak composed entirely of men, mushing "inside" to
the Klondike, with nearly 600 miles travel ahead of them, and
treading so close to one another in the narrow trail :hat they
very nearly kicked the previous mans ankles. And this was an
everyday scene—happening all the time.
They had their hardships, those early days, before the railway was built over the White Pass, and when cheechako and
sourdough alike had to travel that arduous path over the Chilkoot
and down the Yukon River. Greed pulled them forward; the
crowd behind pressed them onwards; if they could not endure
the strain they fell out and perished. There was no turning back.
It was truly no place for weaklings, for one was beset not only
by a hostile Nature, but also by the wickedness and depravity
of mankind. The opportunities drew to the Northland some of
the most lawless characters of the earth, and had it not been
for the swift justice meted out by the Royal Northwest Mounted
Police, it might have been true that
"There's never a law of God or men
Runs north of Fifty-three."
The Spell of the North
the Northland put a spell on those who made its
acquaintance then. It will put the same spell on us to-day. It
is a land of mystery—a magnet that will always draw men and
women, even though the lure of the gold is fainter now. It is
still a land of romance, its atmosphere impregnated with memories of those sad, glad days when the century was just turning
over. Gold has ceased to be its principal advantage—has, indeed,
proved a false hope in those many ghost-like "cities" that parade
their empty shells from Dyea to Nome; but there is equally
the romance of to-morrow, the discovery of other and richer
resources, the development of a vigorous, prosperous northern
empire.
Alaska is a land of contrasts. Never was so mistaken an idea
as that it is all winter. If it were, whence come the gorgeous,
vivid flower gardens that one sees everywhere, such masses of
color that they dazzle the eye? The answer is simple: the warm
Japan current, striking Vancouver Island, is deflected northward,
and carries to the Land of the Midnight Sun the same delightful
humidity that the Pacific Coast knows. But in winter, inland
over the White Pass, how cold it can be!
Alaska is a land of gold, of flowers, of black fox farms, of
salmon, of Indians, of curious Indian totem poles. It is a land
of magnificent scenery. The journey there, by steamer, is one
of nearly a thousand miles, through scenery of a character
unknown elsewhere on this continent. For four days the steamer
threads a long, almost land-locked channel, known as the "Inside
Passage," winding through mountain-hemmed fiord-like waterways as through a fairyland, with wooded islands, tremendous
glacier-clad peaks, fascinating Alaskan towns and queer old
settlements as continuous episodes. No water-journey in America,
either in beauty or in romantic appeal, can quite compare with
this trip to Alaska.
The final contrast one meets is in transportation. For the
Chilkoot Pass has sheen superseded by the comfortable railway
journey over the White Pass, and the extraordinary, haphazard
and overcrowded steamer experiences of the early days have
been superseded by the magnificent service provided by the
Canadian Pacific "Princess" steamers.
Northward Ho!
Vancouver, largest port on the Pacific Coast of
Canada, is a beautiful city situated upon an almost land-locked
harbor. With important lumbering, mining, manufacturing and
trading interests, and with a huge overseas business with the
Orient, it is also a delightful summer city, with all kinds of
outdoor recreation.
Victoria, at the south end of Vancouver Island, across the
Juan de Fuca strait, is the capital of British Columbia; and the
imposing Parliament Buildings that front the inner harbor are
of the finest in America. Victoria is a charming city of beautiful
homes and lovely gardens, and is a favorite summer and winter
resort.
Seattle, on Puget Sound, is one of the most progressive cities
of the Pacific North-West.
Leaving the voyage to Alaska can be divided into two
Vancouver parts. From Vancouver to Ketchikan the journey
is mostly through narrow channels, with steep shores
^heavily timbered to the water's edge. The second part, from
Ketchikan to Skagway, is through wider stretches of water, with
glaciers, waterfalls and rugged mountains on either side, and
richly colored with the purple twilights of Alaska.
(Continued on Page Four)
Rail Connections
The quickest and most picturesque route to Vancouver
from the East is by Canadian Pacific, through the Canadian
Pacific Rockies, six hundred miles of the most magnificent
mountain scenery in the world.
In summer, four through trains a day:—
The  Trans-Canada  Limited,   from  both  Montreal  and
Toronto—an   exclusive   all-sleeping-compartment-observation car train.
The Imperial—from Montreal.
The Vancouver Express—from Toronto.
The Mountaineer—from Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis.
Victoria and Seattle are reached from Vancouver by the
fast "Princess" steamships.
Clothing, Meals, Etc.
Passengers should provide themselves with a good, warm
top-coat. The general weather is very fine and warm, but
a good covering, for the evening or a damp day is very desirable. The Canadian Pacific does not supply steamer rugs,
but has arranged to carry on the steamships a limited supply
of rugs, which will be rented to passengers for the round
trip at a nominal charge. The company does not supply the
regulation ocean liner deck-chair, but supplies comfortable
camp chairs with backs, free of charge. Barbers, ladies' hairdressers and manicurists are carried on all steamers.
The meals provided on the "Princess" steamships are
breakfast, lunch and dinner, with light refreshments served
in addition in the dining saloon at night. While the steamship is in port at Skagway, meals and berth are not included
in the passage money, but can be secured if the passenger
prefers staying aboard.
Victrolas are carried, with a suitable supply of records, as
well asa piano.
Baggage
Free allowance on "Princess" steamers of 150 pounds on
whole tickets, and 75 pounds on half tickets, will be granted,
with the customary charge for excess weight.
Steamer trunks intended for use in staterooms must not
exceed 14 inches in height.
Through passengers from eastern or southern points making the Alaska trip will be granted free storage at Canadian
Pacific wharves at Vancouver, Victoria, or Seattle for thirty
days, after which regular storage charges will accrue.
Customs
Baggage checked through from any United States point
to any point in'Alaska, or from any Canadian point to any
point in the Yukon territory, or vice-versa, and not required
en route, is not subject to Customs examination.
Hand baggage, or checked baggage required en route, 'is
subject to examination northbound by the United States Customs at Ketchikan, and southbound by the Canadian Customs at Prince Rupert. Checked baggage, if desired, may
be forwarded to destination in bond.
The baggage of passengers making the White Horse, Atlin
or Dawson trips will also be examined by Canadian Customs
on entering Yukon territory, and by the United States Customs on returning.
Times
Of arrival and departure at the various ports are posted on
the bulletin board of the ships.
?age Two
 The Princess Louise.
Page Three
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
C >0   A   S   T
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
|Seymour Narrows ^^/|v
Mr
Nanaimo
3)  .Valdes .u..
The Princess steamship slips away from Vancouver on its
four-day northbound trip at 9.00 o'clock at night, when the
long summer dusks have begun to darken. After trunks have
been stowed and opened, dining room reservations made, and
casual first impressions formed of one's fellow-travellers, there
is still time for a stroll up and down deck before turning in.
By this time the ship has left Burrard Inlet, passed Brockton
Point, and has entered the Gulf of Georgia. On the right is
stiil to be seen the dark bulk of the mainland; on the left,
but invisible yet, is Vancouver Island, in whose lee the
route is sheltered for over two hundred miles.
The First    the course is south of long, narrow Texada
Day Island and through Discovery Passage, between
that island and Vancouver Island. The early
risers—anc they only!—will see Seymour Narrows, for this,
the narrowest part of the channel, is passed about 6.00 a.m.
Some day, perhaps, the Narrows will be bridged, but at certain times they are rather exciting to navigate, for the ebb
and flow of the tides around the north end of Vancouver
Island male the current rush through it like a mill-race. An
hour or so iater the ship passes through Johnstone Straits and
Broughton Straits, along whose shores a number of logging
camps can be seen. And then after breakfast—even after the
last of all sittings, when those who got up late are just reaching for their first smoke of the day, and those who got up
early are just beginning to sigh for lunch—we reach our first
stop, Alert Bay.
Northbound Sailings
Intended sailings from
Vancouver during the
of 1927
Totem Poles
summer season
are:
4
11
June
July
A
B
15 A
22 B
25 A
29 C
2 B
6 A
9 C
13 B
16 A
July
20 C
23 B
Aug
27
30
3
6
13
17
Leaving Vancouver
Alert Bay alert bay is a small village on a small
island—Cormorant Island—situated so close to
Vancouver Island that the maps are almost unable to make
any distinction; but it is nevertheless one of the principal
salmon canneries on the Coast. Here, in fact, will be our first
glimpse of this important industry, and during the time in
port the Ccnneries invite visitors to inspect the highly interesting processes of turning a large, handsome salmon into
shiny little round cans. Alert Bay is an old settlement, with a
considerable Indian population; and here, too, we make our first contact
with another object typical of the Northland—the totem pole. (See
"Totem Poles.") The Indian cemetery, with some modern poles, is well
worth the short stroll to see it; but it is to be regretted, somewhat, that the
gigantic pcles that until recently stood close to the wharf, and which were
some of the most notable of their kind on the whole Pacific Coast, have
now been sold by the Indians, principally to Stanley Park, Vancouver.
Queen Chsrlotte   after lunch we leave the shelter of Vancouver
Sound Island, reaching Queen Charlotte Sound—with its short
experience of open Pacific Ocean. From Cape Scott, on
Vancouver Island, to Cape St. James, at the southern end of the Queen
Charlotte Islands, is about 150 miles; but we bear away from that wild and
rather primitive group, and keep instead close inland, reaching Calvert
Island in three hours—the longest of the three times we shall see the wide
horizon of :he open Pacific Ocean during the entire trip.
Passing through Lama Passage, Bella Bella is on the left—a very old
and practically deserted Indian village. At 10.00 at night, or so, we enter
Old Ocean again, this time at Milbank Sound, but only for ten miles;
"and so" (as Samuel Pepys says) "to bed."
The Second    entering   the  Tolmie  Channel, between  Princess
Day Royal Island and the mainland, we pass Swanson Bay in the
night, and then enter Grenville Channel, in the shelter of
60-mile-long Pitt Island.  At about breakfast time we pass the mouth of
the Skeena River, and shortly, with Digby Island on the west, on which
(Continued on Page Six)
The totem poles of the Indians of British Columbia constitute one of the most striking features of the whole northwest coast. These long shafts, irregularly planted on the
seashore among smoke and feast houses, convey impressions from a strange world. The rugged peaks and wooded
gorges beyond, with their ever-changing shades of dark
greens and soft blues, provide a unique setting for them.
And the squat mongolian features of the Indians themselves carry one's imagination beyond the American frontiers into the mysterious realms of Asia.
These remarkable carvings should not be mistaken for
idols or deities. They were never worshipped. But they
are pictorial records of history and mythology, as the Indians understood them. Some of them represent the Raven,
the Eagle, the Killer-whale and the Wolf, which are the
emblems of the largest social groups in the nation. The
Bear, the Frog, the Sea-Lion, the Beaver, the Thunder-
bird, and many others, are known as the crests of various
clans. Here we have to do only with coats-of-arms or a
system of native heraldry.
Other characters are occasionally introduced among
these figures, which are understood through the medium of
myths and tales of the past. These are the ancestors of the
owners, and often the "uncle" in whose honor the pole was
erected after his death, by his nephew or legitimate successor. Battles and other noted events are also commemorated on poles. A man who wishes to ridicule a rival or
discredit an insolvent debtor may represent him head
downwards on whatever pole he may erect in a feast.
There were once many native artists of great repute,
who were hired at large for carving poles, according to
definite instructions furnished them. Large logs were
hauled over long distances for the purpose. When the carving was finished, numerous guests assembled for the pot-
latch or feast of commemoration. Lavish presents were
made to the guests, whose function it was to remember the
meaning of the figures on the poles and acknowledge the rights of the legitimate owners.
Salmon and Other Fisheries
The fisheries of the British Columbia coasts now constitute one of the
powerful industries of that region. They include salmon, halibut, cod, herring
and to some extent whale. Salmon production is about half the product of all
other fish, but the halibut catch is of much importance, also herring.
About five varieties of salmon are found on this coast; but the sock-eye
(or red salmon), the best-known commercial species, is in greatest favor for
canning purposes. The silver, or "coho," which comes next in market value
and popularity, and the quinnat (or spring salmon), the largest and choicest
variety of Pacific salmon, are marketed fresh to a great extent; while the latter
is also mild cured in salt.
Canneries are established at numerous points on the coast. These are
conducted on thoroughly modern and hygienic lines, and the work is done
almost entirely by highly ingenious machinery which performs the work with
a rapidity and a precision unobtainable in the days when work was done by
hand. Halibut is shipped fresh, large cold storage facilities being available at
several places, particularly at Prince Rupert.
Indian Baskets
Basketry has become an important industry among the Indians of the
Pacific Coast. This primitive and lowly art went neglected for many years,
but now the market afforded by the fast increasing tourist travel has brought
it to life again.
"    24 B
"    27 A
Sept.   3 B
A Princess Louise
B Princess Charlotte
C Princess Alice
Sailing hour, Vancouver—9.00 p.m.
Southbound Sailings
on page 6.
Steamship also sails from
Victoria at 11.45 p.m. on night
previous to date mentioned.
Seattle connection—leave
Seattle 9.00 a.m. of sailing
day, or 11.30 p.m. previous
night. Arrive Skagway—
4 days later, a.m.
Page Four
 PRINCESS *  * STEAMSHIPS
<»      *
TO F * /VLXVSKA.
Page Five
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
Estevan Id
/ Courtenay
may be seen the Canadian Government wireless station, arrive
at about 9.00 a.m. at Prince Rupert.
Prince prince rupert is the most northerly city
Rupert of any size in Canada, with a population of about
7,000. Built on a circle of hills formed of very hard
rock, the city is considerably above the level of the wharf and
is reached by a long staircase. It is a very important fishing
centre. Large quantities of fish, particularly halibut, are now
being shipped from here to Eastern Canada and the United
States. A big cold storage plant is located in the Upper
Harbor, where the fish are unloaded and put into cold storage
or iced, as the case may be, for shipment to the East.
Prince Rupert is the Pacific terminal of the Canadian
National Railways, and has a very large floating dry dock,
600 feet long and capable of lifting vessels of 20,000 tons
weight. The visitor will probably be interested, during bis
stay on shore, in the fur-stores of the city—the first sight he
will obtain of the great fur industry of the Northland.
Entering shortly after leaving Prince Rupert,
Alaska the old Indian village of Metlakatla is passed.
Here is a very successful mission for the natives,
founded by Father Duncan. About 30 minutes later, Port
Simpson is passed—one of the oldest settlements in Northern
British Columbia, with an old Hudson's Bay Company's post
that has been a trading-centre with the Indians for about
sixty years.
About three hours after leaving Prince Rupert, Green
Island Ligftthouse indicates our nearness to the international
boundary line between Canada and Alaska (United States).
Dixon's E it ranee, last entrance of the open Pacific Ocean, is
crossed, and we wind our way through Revilla Gigedo Channel
—here called Tongass Narrows—to Ketchikan.
Southbound Sailings
Intended Sailings from
Skagway during the summer season of 1927 are:
Indians
June
July
9 A
July
25 C
16 B
ii
28 B
20 A
Aug.
1 A
27 B
a
4 C
30 A
a
8 B
4 C
a
11 A
7 B
a
18 B
11 A
a
22 A
14 C
a
29 B
18 B
Sept
1 A
21 A
a
8 B
Alert Bay to Swanson Bay
(See page 4)
Ketchikan, ketchikan (an Indian word meaning "the town under
the eagle") is the southernmost town in Alaska, situated on
Revilla Gigedo Island. It might also be said to be now the most prosperous
town in Alaska, for salmon and halibut have made it rich and given it
large canneries and cold storage plants. It is also a mining centre for copper,
gold, platinum, silver and lead, the well-known Salt Chuck platinum mines
being within 30 miles. Ketchikan has a bustling air, with hotels, stores
and banks Originally an Indian fishing camp, it has several large canneries,
and a greet mosquito fleet of fishing vessels is continually bringing in fish
from the S2a.
The visitor will find interesting curio stores. There is also a pleasant
walk to tie waterfall in Ketchikan Creek (about 15 minutes), where in
the late summer months thousands of salmon may be seen leaping and
struggling through the rushing, foaming water on their way to the spawning
banks. There are two splendid totem poles—the Chief Johnson totem,
surmounted by Kajuk, a fabled bird of the mountain which amuses itself
by throwing rocks at ground hogs, with below the Raven and the Frog
Woman with her children, the Salmon; and the Kyan totem, surmounted
by the Crsne, followed by the Kyak, another legendary bird, and the Bear.
Third Day adistinct change of scenery occurs from now on.
The stretches of water become wide, and mountains rise on
either side, with waterfalls tumbling down and glaciers crowning their
crests. The steamer winds along Clarence Strait, with Prince of Wales
Island on the west, and turning round between Etolin and Zarembo Islands,
(Continued on Page Ten)
The natives of the West Coast are strikingly different
from other North American Indians; to many they are
not Indians at all, but a race apart, whose characteristics
are reminiscent of Asia. Their ancestors are indeed
likely to have come to these shores across the sea or
over the Strait of Bering long ago, after earlier migrations had already peopled most of the two American
continents.
The name of "Siwash," ignorantly given them, is derived from the French sauvage. They really belong to more
than five races, whose languages are totally different: the
Salish, whose habitat once covered much territory around
Victoria, Vancouver, and the main coast north and south—
the Nootka, who dwell on the west coast of Vancouver
Island, and their distant relatives the Kwakiutl, whose
territories stretch northwards from Vancouver Island to a
point near the Skeena River—the Tsimshian of the Skeena
and Nass Rivers and the adjacent coast, near the present
town of Prince Rupert—the Haidas of Queen Charlotte
and Prince of Wales Islands—and the Tlingit of the Alaskan coast. Another race, whose name is Dene or Athapascan, inhabit much of the interior, beyond the boundaries
of the above-named nations.
The west coast natives are essentially fisher folk; they
formerly secured their food almost wholly from the sea. It
consisted of seals, whales, salmon, halibut, fish roe and
oolachen, or candle fish. Their dug-out canoes stood to
them as did the horse to the buffalo-hunting Indians of the
prairies a century ago. Before the advent of Europeans
they could hardly ever venture beyond their frontiers.
War and daring raids were most common among them, for
they were bold, venturesome and cruel. Even to this day
they are fond of relating tales of adventures of the none-
too-distant past.
They were not nomadic, as were their eastern neighbors, but each family claimed hunting grounds and territories within the national boundaries.   They migrated to their hunting and
fishing camps in the spring and returned to their villages on the coast in the
autumn.
Community life was active only in the winter—that is, during the potlatch
season. The leaders then proceeded sternly to their business—the exchange of
goods, the promotion of their children and nephews, and the various ceremonies
that appertained to their social welfare and dutiful commemoration of the
deeds of their ancestors. They were keen and thrifty, and their will unbending.
Their numbers were formerly considerable, but they are now passing away
like the other natives; and their culture has forever given way to that of invaders from the West and the East who are gradually driving them off the
land.
On page 8 will be found pictures of West Coast Indian masks.
Immigration Inspection
Passengers entering Alaska from Canada are required to pass United
States Immigration Inspection at Ketchikan, the port of entry. So far as
bona fide tourists are concerned, this inspection is not strict. Passengers
will be asked by purser for certain information regarding age, place of residence, business, etc., and will be given a card by him. This card is presented
by the holder to the immigration inspector, who boards steamer at Ketchikan,
and as soon as particulars shown by purser on manifest are checked by the
inspector, the passenger can go ashore. There is a similar inspection by the
Canadian Immigration Department on arrival of steamer southbound at
Prince Rupert.
Passports are not necessary.
A Princess Louise
B Princess Charlotte
C Princess Alice
Sailing Hour Skagway
—7.00 p.m.
(Alaska time, one hour
slower than Pacific Standard
time.)
Arrive Vancouver—4 days
later, a.m.
Arrive Victoria—4 days
later, p.m.
Arrive Seattle—4 days
later, evening.
Page Six
->-	
 PRINCESS *...;♦ STEAMSHIPS   •..♦.TO * * ALASKA
Page Seven
 * * STEAMSHIPS  ♦   * TO * * ALASKA
Page Eight
Wooden Ceremonial Masks made by the Indians of the West Coast
Photographs by courtesy of the Victoria Memorial Mmeum, Ottawa
 PRINCESS...'...♦..'.♦ .STEAMSHIPS . .♦ > TO ♦.. ♦ ALASKA
Amongst the Glaciers of the Alaska Coast
Alaskan Berries rather Contradict
that Frozen North idea
«•&«  •■Mfrvm ii
Page Nine
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
I. iS*i
^11 <Fv\  =
"■'i    B Wort Simpson    V
•***.
Metlakgj^ajf %|
RINCERUPERT
Diqo^S^Vort Essington O
^5;ei* i?iVer   _
Artstazable Jd( j^   ^
reaches Wrangell about 4.00 a.m., and leaves before breakfast
time. We shall, however, have ample time to visit it on the
southbound voyage.
Wrangell wrangell, situated on the island of the
same name, is one of the oldest cities of Alaska,
and is named after Baron Wrangell, who was governor about
1830. It was originally a trading post, populated mainly by
Indians under the protection of the Russians, but came under
white dominance during the gold rush of '98. Part of the
Russian fort still remains, and there are also some very old
totem poles near the wharf. Wrangell is at the mouth of the
Stikine River, which, navigable for about 170 miles, is the
entry point to the celebrated Cassiar big-game country.
(See "Sporting," next column.)
Wrangell two hours after leaving Wrangell the
Narrows ship enters Wrangell Narrows, and for twenty
miles proceeds at half speed through this narrow
winding channel, of a remarkable beauty. Well marked with
buoys and beacons, this passage between the wooded islands
saves a long detour around Cape Decision, across a rough
and open part of the Pacific Ocean.
At the north end of the Narrows lies the old town of Petersburg whose name indicates its origin in the days of the Russian
regime. It is now a flourishing fishing centre. Kupreanof
Island is on the west, and after crossing Frederick Sound and
Cape Fanshaw, we enter Stephen's Passage.
Swanson Bay to Ketchikan
(See pages 4-6)
Taku we are now surrounded by the typical grandeur
Glacier of Alaska and, turning up Taku Inlet, the Taku
Glacier sends out hundreds of odd-shaped ice floes
to meet us—as blue as indigo, floating by to melt gradually
in warmer waters, as slowly the steamer approaches this
famous sight. This glacier, a mile wide and 100 feet thick,
extends for over 90 miles back over the mountains to join
Llewellyn Glacier at the head of Atlin Lake (see page 18).
It really is two glaciers, one—a mixture of brown, white, and
blue colors—"dead" and receding, the other very much alive
and continually moving forward. Showing all the colors of the rainbow,
according to the time of day or position of the sun, huge masses of
ice frequently break off into the sea, with deafening thunder, and float
majestically away. Even the vibration caused by the ship's whistle will
bring down great hundreds-of-tons pieces of ice.
Juneau three hours' steaming up Gastineau Channel brings us
to Juneau, clinging to the base and sides of Mount Juneau,
which towers 3,500 feet almost perpendicularly above, near the mouth of
the Taku River. Juneau, named after its French-Canadian founder, is
the capital of Alaska, the residence of the Governor, and the seat of all
government departments. With a population of nearly 4,000, it is a bright
and interesting city, built (like so many of these coast settlements) partly
on piles over the water, partly on bare rock, with modern hotels and
stores, and many attractive residences and public buildings.
The Territorial Museum in the Arctic Brotherhood Hall has a wonderful
collection of Alaska curiosities; on the floor below is the experimental
salmon hatchery. Fine raw fur stocks can be seen at local dealers. Juneau
has good roads and automobiles a-plenty; one particularly interesting ride
is to the face of the Mendenhall Glacier (2% hours return) or to Auk
Lake (an hour longer). A short hike away is the Gold Creek Basin, the
site of the first placer gold strike in Alaska, made by Joe Juneau and
Richard Llaines in the early 80's.
(Continued on Page Twelve)
Princess Steamships
Princess Louise
Princess Charlotte
Princess Alice
To Alaska by the Inside Passage, and back,
is a two-thousand-mile
nine-day journey from
Vancouver, with six ports
of call. To handle the
tourist business, the Canadian Pacific operates
during the summer
months three of the finest of its well-known
"Princess" steamships,
which are large, modern
vessels of the most comfortable sea-going type.
The Princess Louise is
330 feet long, with a passenger capacity of 260.
The Princess Charlotte is 330 ft. long, with a
passenger capacity of 25 5.
The Princess Alice is
289 feet long, with a passenger capacity of 222.
These three ships are
oil-burners, and are fitted
with  wireless  telegraph.
Sporting
The "roof of the world" has been so richly endowed
by nature with mighty snow-capped mountains, expansive
inland seas, vast areas of trackless wilderness and lonely
tundra that it offers the sportsman a wonderful variety
of hunting. In the interior country of Northern British
Columbia, the Yukon Territory and Alaska, the giant
moose, the stately caribou, the wary deer, savage silvertip
grizzlies, mountain sheep, mountain goat and many other
varieties of game roam at large.
Several species of bear are to be found in this mountainous domain, ranging from the huge polar bear and
terrible Kodiak down through the different varieties to
the common black bear once found all over America.
The northern moose, the largest member of the deer
family, is plentifully distributed throughout the greater
part of this country. Magnificent trophies are brought
out each season. Caribou, too, are abundant, and
inhabit the treeless and tundra sections of the interior.
Mountain sheep and goat are among the most prized game
animals.
The fishing affords an interesting side line to a big game
hunt, and the swift, tumbling rivers, well stocked with
gamy fighting trout, and the mountain-rimmed lakes of
unequalled beauty, all combine to make this a paradise
for the sportsman.
The principal big game districts and the more widely
known localities are:
The Cassiar country of British Columbia, one of the
finest and most celebrated sporting regions of this continent.
Lying back of the coast range, it is reached from Wrangell,
whence a regular launch service with sleeping accommodation is operated up the Stikine River to Telegraph Creek,
B.C. (see opposite). From the head of navigation (165 miles)
hunting grounds are reached by pack train. An alternative approach is via Atlin (see page 18) and thence by pack
train.
The Kluahne and White River country, reached by
automobile from White Horse, Yukon Territory.
The McMillan and Pelly River districts, reached by Yukon River steamer
to Yukon Crossing or Selkirk, Yukon Territory.
The Kenai Peninsula, via Anchorage or Seward, Alaska.
The Chickaloon-Nelchina  region from Anchorage,  Alaska,  by train to
Chickaloon.
Alaska Peninsula, Bering Sea and Kodiak Island—via Anchorage, Alaska.
Reliable  outfitters  and  guides  are  available  through  whom  complete
arrangements for hunting trips in the territory indicated can be made.
The Alaska Glacier Tours Association, with headquarters at Anchorage,
Alaska, are prepared to look after sporting parties going into South-western
Alaska. They have Andy Simons (one of Alaska's outstanding guides) as
manager of field operations. This organization has at its disposal two modern
1927 model Travel-Air-Bi-planes, which will save the hunter considerable time
in reaching hunting grounds hitherto inaccessible by other means of travel.
The General Tourist Agent, Canadian Pacific Railway, Montreal, has
gathered considerable information about these peerless hunting fields, which
will gladly be imparted on request.
Fossil Ivory
Buried for more centuries than one can estimate in the sands or frozen
tundra of the Arctic, and so saturated with mineral or vegetable substances
as to have become delicately colored, mammoth or mastodon ivory is often
exposed by the constantly changing shore line, and found by the wandering
Eskimos, who carve it into many objects of use. Besides these, there is a walrus
ivory.
Page Ten
 PRINCESS'♦".♦ STEAMSHIPS  ♦.. ♦ TO  ♦...♦ ALASKA
The Harbor at Skagway,
Page Eleven
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
Alaska Gold within a short distance from
Juneau, but reached by launch,
are Thane and Douglas, where, until some
time after the Great War, three of the largest
low-grade gold-crushing plants in the world
were situated. Now only one remains, the
Alaska Juneau, with a mining and milling
capacity of about 9,000 tons of ore daily. On
Douglas Island are the old buildings of the
celebrated Treadwell Mine, flooded by a cave-
in in 1917, and not operated since.
The Lynn Canal the steamer leaves Juneau at midnight, and reaches
Skagway about 9.00 a.m.; but on the southbound journey there is ample opportunity to
see the beautiful Lynn Canal, which, with the
possible exception of the Taku Glacier, provides the most wonderful scenery of all. For
over 80 miles we steam up this arm of the sea,
which varies in width from one to five miles.
Mountains of rock capped with snow, towering glaciers and gushing waterfalls, canyons
of all sizes and wild shapes, and colors in
restless variety surround us. Davidson Glacier
is a huge ice wall seen on the west. Passing
the town of Haines and Fort Seward, a U. S.
military post, we suddenly turn a point and
see Skagway ahead of us.
Skagway
skagway, the end of the northbound run, is a town that has
loomed large in the history of the North.
When the gold rush started to the Yukon in
1896, the landing was made at Dyea, which
lies on the western branch of the Lynn Canal,
and the trail inland led over the dangerous
Chilkoot Pass; but word came of the discovery of the White Pass, and in a day fifteen
thousand people left Dyea, and in a day
Skagway arose where before was chiefly swamp.
A Carved House Post
of the West Coast
At the height of the gold rush, Skagway was one of the
wildest, wickedest places on earth, chock full of the gambling-halls, dance-halls, saloons and other lurid temptations that nowadays can be seen nowhere else but in the
"movies." Gangs of "bad men" terrorized the town, preying not only on the returning successful prospector but on
the incoming "cheechako" as well. Skagway is not such an
ancient town but that old-timers can regale you with stories
of its celebrated characters, such as Soapy Smith or Frank
Reid, whose graves nearby will initiate many reminiscences.
But those days are over. Skagway is a model of propriety,
with hotels, stores, and the peaceful air of ordinary business.
Amongst the marvels of Skagway—to those at least who
have never considered Alaska as aught but perpetual
winter—are its beautiful flower gardens. The background of
mountains that enclose it like a cup offer many attractive
outings, such as "hikes" along the Skagway River, to
Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove, or the great Denver
Glacier. There are fine launch trips available, and good
fishing. The steamer lays over about 36 hours before starting on its southbound journey.
(Continued on Page Fourteen)
Geographical
Alaska can be divided, roughly, into three parts. First,
there is the "Panhandle"—a long, narrow ledge of land
between the British Columbia boundary and the sea, running from latitude 55° to 60°, and bold, steep and craggy.
Secondly, there is the huge blunt peninsula of "continental" Alaska, running from latitude 60° to 300 miles north
of the Arctic Circle, and measuring some 600 miles from
the Yukon boundary west to Bering Strait; and lastly,
there is the long, broken fringe of the Aleutian Islands.
The Yukon Territory can be easily confused with continental Alaska, for its topography, atmosphere and general
environment are the same; but it is separate politically,
and is a part of Canada, not the United States. It lies
between Alaska and the North-West Territories, and extends from the northern boundary of British Columbia to
the Arctic Ocean.
Alaska has an area of 591,000 square miles, and a population of about 60,000. Its territorial capital is Juneau.
The Yukon has an area of 207,000 square miles, with a
population of 5,000 and territorial capital at Dawson.
Mountains
The mountains that fringe the Inside Passage to Alaska
form practically one range throughout—the Coast Range.
Leaving Vancouver, the mountains are, as a rule, higher
on the mainland side than on Vancouver Island, averaging
3,000 to 4,000 feet in height; but towards Queen Charlotte
Sound they tail off somewhat.. From the other side of the
Skeena River, and entering the long Alaskan "panhandle,"
the altitude increases again. From Juneau north to the
White Pass the range is sometimes known as the Chilkoot
Range.
The White Pass &z Yukon Railway from Skagway
(which is, of course, at sea level) to White Horse reaches
its highest altitude at Log Cabin (2,916 feet). On the other
side of the summit, the surface is, generally speaking, a
huge plateau, broken by long spurs of mountains. Lake
Bennett is 2,161 feet above sea level and Atlin Lake 2,200.
Jubilee Mountain, at the north end of Lake Atlin, the highest in that district,
is about 4,200 feet above the lake (6,380 feet above sea level).
In the extreme south-west corner of the Yukon Territory, where it tucks
into Alaska, and lying on both sides of the international boundary, is an
isolated, exceedingly lofty group of mountains known as the St. Elias Range.
Mount Logan (19,539 feet) and Mount St. Elias (18,024 feet) are the highest,
the former having been climbed in 1925 for the first time. They are, however,
very inaccessible owing to lack of transportation thither. Mount McKinley,
highest mountain on the American Continent (20,464 feet), lies in the National
Park of that name about 400 miles west of this group
Fox Farming
The day of the trapper in the Northland is passing, chiefly by reason of
the decrease in the supply of fur of good quality; but fox farming is rapidly
developing instead. With the exportation of live foxes practically forbidden
by legislation, a number of farms have been started, and this industry is becoming en important one.
Foxes are popularly classified as red, black, blue and white. The black fox
presents many color phases, ranging from clear black to extra pale silver.
The Alaskan fox is one of the distinct branches of the black fox, but does not
breed true to color with the native Canadian. The "patch" fox is obtained by
crossing the red with the black, and the "cross" fox produced by mating
together two distinct types of the black fox, such as the Alaskan and native
Canadian. The blue fox will not cross with either the red or the black, and
only occasionally with the white (or Arctic) fox.
Mink and seal furs are also produced in Alaska and the Yukon.
Princess Steamships
The Princess Steamships on the Alaska run
are fitted with every comfort and convenience for
passengers.
Staterooms on the
Princess Steamships are
light, cosy and well-ventilated. They are not
overcrowded, but designed to accommodate only
two passengers per stateroom. On each ship there
are a few "de luxe''
rooms with private bathrooms, and also some
with sofa berths.
The community rooms
—dining room, observa-
tion room, lounges,
smoking room, etc.—
are bright, cheerful and
charmingly furnished.
The Princess Louise and
Princess Charlotte have
dance floors.
All ships have ample
deck space for promenading, sports and lounging.
Page Twelve
 PRINCESS ♦. * STEAMSHIPS  ♦   * TO * * ALASKA
hmmhhhi
Page Thirteen
 BRITISH
COLUMBIA
COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICES
Ketchikan to Skagway
(Seepages 10-12)
Inland from Skagway
interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit would
be incomplete without a journey to the equally interesting and fascinating "inside." Such a journey, difficult as it was in the early days
of the gold rush, can now be easily undertaken, for Skagway is the
southern terminus of the rail line of the White Pass and Yukon
Route. A comfortable train, with large-windowed observation cars,
will carry one through the magnificent scenery of the White Pass into
the Yukon Territory, connecting at Carcross and at White Horse
with the commodious steamers of the same company.
For those who are returning south by the same "Princess"
steamship, there are available the excursions to West Taku Arm or
to White Horse. For those waiting over until the next steamship,
there is the trip to Atlin Lake—where, indeed, many visitors linger
much longer than such a brief visit. A description of these beautiful
trips will be found on page 18. But for those with more time, we
will continue on to White Horse, whence there is the wonderful trip
down the Yukon River to Dawson.
Over the the rail journey is a most spectacular one. The
White Pass salt tang of the sea is left behind, and the sweetness
of lake and mountain air fills the nostrils. The scenery
grows rugged and awe-inspiring. We climb steadily around gorges,
along the brink of deep canyons, past roaring cataracts, and near
dead cities to which cling memories of the trail of '98. Such names as
"Dead Horse Gulch" and "Log Cabin" help vividly to recall those
grim days.
At White Pass, Summit—nearly 3,000 feet higher than Skagway
in twenty miles!—we leave American territory, and the scarlet-
coated Mounted Policeman greets us as we enter Canada. A bronze
monument, where the flags of the two countries float side by side,
marks the boundary line. For a very short distance we travel through
British Columbia, and then at Pennington cross into the Yukon
Territory.
Lake Bennett On our left, Lake Bennett begins—a long, narrow
body of water which the railway will follow for
twenty-six miles. It is rather amazing to learn that Bennett, where
a stop is made for lunch, and which consists merely of a station and
its outbuildings, once had a population of several thousand, and
teemed with life and excitement. For it was to this beautiful lake,
bounded by old-rose color, that the "trail of '98" led. Those who
had survived the epic hazards of the Pass camped on this lake, and
whipsawed lumber to make the rafts, scows and other manner of
water craft in which to reach the golden land of their hopes. Little
did they know, of course, the perils of the White Horse Rapids; or
if they had heard of them, little did they appreciate them.
Along the ever-winding shores of this blue Lake Bennett, looking
out on a long mountain ridge, the railway runs, until the little town
of Carcross is reached. There is an Indian school nearby, and interesting fox ranches; and in the cemetery are buried many of the discoverers of the Klondike.
White Horse lewis and other little lakes are passed; and then
Miles Canyon and White Horse Rapids. On still days,
the roar of these rapids can be heard even in the town, about an hour's
walk distant. As we stand on the brink of this famous gorge, no very
highly colored imagination is necessary to conjure up pictures of
(Continued on Page Sixteen)
The Mounted Police
The famous Royal Canadian Mounted Police—formerly named the Royal North-
West Mounted Police—are still the guardians of the Yukon Territory, and greet you,
as customs officers, when you cross the border. Due credit has perhaps never been
given to the scarlet-coated "Mounties" for the way they enforced the law during the
great gold rush. Some writers seeking material for highly-colored adventure stories
have done the force certain injustice by representing the Yukon of that period as a
violent country. The real truth is that notwithstanding that the gold rush brought to
the Yukon—merely by being a gold rush—some of the most lawless characters on
earth, the administration of justice in Canadian territory was so strict as to strike
terror to the hearts of the wrong-doers.
The force first went north in 1894, with the first gold discoveries. During the
stampede, only three killings—none of which were preventable—occurred in Canadian
territory. The Mounted Police assisted 30,000 persons, collected $150,000 in duties
and fees, checked over 30 million pounds of solid food, carried the mails and escorted
gold shipments out of the country. At the height of the rush they had some 200
officers and men, but now, of course, much fewer.
The Sourdough
A word in general relative to two Alaska words. Visitors encounter the terms
"sourdough" and "cheechako," distinguishing the resident from the new arrival.
The first is a compliment, meaning an old timer or one who has seen the ice form
and go out of the Yukon River in fall and spring. The second is an Indian word meaning tenderfoot, or newcomer. Uppermost in the minds of everyone is the genuine
friendliness and ready hospitality offered by the "sourdoughs." One of the surprises
is in the gardens of these old residents. Nowhere can be found finer sweet-peas,
dahlias, asters, stocks or pansies, or such raspberries, currants, strawberries, blueberries and vegetables.
Books About the Northland
A great many interesting books can be obtained about Alaska and the Yukon.
By all means, read some before you start. There are the well-known stories by Rex
Beach—-"The Spoilers," "The Barrier," and "The Silver Horde;" Jack London's
famous "Call of the Wild," and many others; Elizabeth Robins' "Magnetic North"
and "Come and Find Me;" James Oliver Curwood's "Alaskan," Edison Marshall's
"Seward's Folly;" and Service's "Trail of Ninety-Eight."
Robert W. Service's poems, "Songs of a Sourdough" and "Ballads of a Cheechako," are, we imagine, so well-known as hardly to need mention.
A good concise handbook is Rand McNally's "Guide to Alaska and the Yukon."
Glaciers
Along or near the Inside Passage to Alaska, or round Atlin Lake, many magnificent glaciers are to be seen.   The principal ones are:—
Taku Glacier (see page 10).
Wright Glacier (beyond Taku, higher up the Taku River).
Norris Glacier, near Juneau.
Davidson Glacier, on the west side of Lynn Canal, just before reaching Haines.
Denver Glacier, about six miles north of Skagway and about three miles walk
from the W. P. & Y. R.
Llewellyn Glacier, at the south end of Atlin Lake.
Muir and Brady Glaciers are on Glacier Bay, west from Lynn Canal over the
height-of-land.
A glacier is, broadly speaking, an accumulation of ice, of sufficient size and weight
to flow down from a snow-covered elevation.   It is a river flowing from a lake, only
the lake is of snow and the river of ice.   The thickness of the ice will vary greatly	
it may be, under favorable conditions, as much as 1,000 feet.
Glaciers frequently extend far below the snow line of the region. Exactly how a
glacier moves has never been satisfactorily explained, but that it does move has been
proved by observation and calculations; more than that, the stream at the centre of
a glacier moves much faster than at the sides or bottom.
Page Fourteen
 * ALASKA
A Skagway Flower Garden
A Hike to a Glacier.
Page Fifteen
 DOWN
THE
D   A   W   S   O   N
RIVER
T   O
THE
KLONDIKE
the old days. We can imagine the bold adventurers in their frail craft nearing
these death-dealing rapids, whose waters are thrown from side to side in a long
serpentine series of twists, and which are so troubled that the water rides
higher in the middle than at the sides. Down they came in their mad rush
to the Klondike—not at intervals, but in a continuous procession that was
(in the words of an eye-witness) like traffic on a city street. Some, becoming
scared, jumped ashore as they saw their dangers, and watched from the high
cliffs the agonies of their boats; but the majority stayed with their craft.
And so few came through unpunished! Those who did wasted no time in going
back to warn their competitors, but hurried on.
White Horse is a busy little town on the west bank of Fifty-Mile River
(also known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the Upper Yukon). There
is fairly good hotel accommodation to be obtained. Trips to the rapids
and other points may be made by automobile over good roads. It is the
terminus of the railway, and the point of departure for the steamer trip
to Dawson.
To the the journey from White Horse to Dawson and back, one
Klondike that can be made in about a week, is thegfitting climax to the trip
' 'inside.'' White Horse is the present head of navigation on the Yukon
waterway (the river in its upper reaches is really a system of tributaries),
which empties into the sea at St. Michael, Alaska, over 2,000 miles distant. It is
a constantly changing succession of pictures—rolling hills, sometimes bare, again
y        ,-9fl   1   Denver^
Ueweityn Glacier
To White Horse and Atlin
heavily wooded, towering mountain ranges, awe-inspiring
rapids, with now and then a quiet stretch of water between
forested banks. Here and there is an occasional trading-
post, or a mining camp — perhaps the ghost of a dead
"bonanza"—or a hermit settlement where the steamer
stops awhile to "wood-up."
The Cremation lake lebarge, a beautiful widen-
of Sam McGee ing of the stream (on whose shores, incidentally, occurred the episode that
inspired Robert Service's celebrated poem about Sam
McGee), Hootalinqua, Little Salmon, and Carmacks, with
its coal mine, are some of the interesting places passed.
The shooting of Five-Finger Rapids, and their postscript
Rink Rapids, gives plenty of thrill, to even the most jaded.
At Yukon Crossing, the overland winter trail to Dawson,
used when the river is frozen up, is passed, and then Fort
Selkirk—an important trading-centre founded in 1898 as
a militia post to guard gold shipments.
The Caribou one of the most extraordinary sights
of the river trip, if you are so fortunate as
to see it, is a herd of caribou swimming the Yukon River.
The answer to the riddle, "Why should a caribou swim
the river?" is precisely the same as to the other historic
one about the chicken crossing the road; but often the
caribou number hundreds, and even thousands. For the
past three years, practically every Dawson steamer in the
months of July and August has passed within reach of this
most unique spectacle, and on one of our pages we show
a photograph taken in 1926.
The mouths of mighty tributaries are passed, amongst
them White River—the only large river that enters the
Yukon from the west or south—and Stewart River,
entrance to the new Mayo silver-lead camp 175 miles east.
Smaller steamers ply the Stewart as far as Mayo, whence it
is a case of "packing in." Swede Creek has a Government
Experimental Agricultural Station, and then we are at
Dawson. The trip from White Horse takes about two days
—the return trip, owing to the current, about four days.
Dawson d a w s o n , once the focus of the world's greatest gold rush, the headquarters of the whole
Klondike region, is now hardly more than a shadow of its
former glory. Mining operations are still in progress, but
they are carried on under hydraulic and dredging conditions: the picturesque days of which one reads in Service
and Jack London have departed. Gone with them are the
highly colored, sensational chapters of Dawson's history,
when the city was the rendezvous of outlaws as well as
greed-crazed miners, when dance-halls, saloons and gambling places ran wide open for the full twenty-four hours.
But to be able to recall that "them was the days" makes
one a real old-timer, a sourdough—but not necessarily a
more than middle-aged man.
Dawson is the' administrative centre of the Yukon
Territory, and the headquarters of a large detachment of
that fine body of men, the Mounted Police. It is beautifully
situated on a bend of the Yukon River, up-to-date, well-
built, with comfortable hotels, fine homes and pretty
flower gardens.
Over good roads one can visit mining plants and old,
played-out but famous bonanza claims. The Indian village
of Moosehide, and the fox farms, are worth a visit; while
(Dawson is concluded on Page Fighteen)
Gold Mining
As early as 1861 gold discoveries were made in the
Stikine River, and from 1866 to 1887 scattered colorings
were found at many places along or tributary to the
Yukon River. The location of the first Klondike claim
in August, 1896, was followed by a feverish and picturesque rush, the like of which the world has never
seen before or since, and the mines in American territory were temporarily deserted. Nome, over 800 miles
due west of Dawson, and situated not far from Bering
Straits, was the scene of another great stampede in 1900.
The Yukon is a "placer" mining district: that is,
the gold is found in alluvial deposits of mixed sand,
gravel and clay, and is obtained by a system of "panning" or "sluicing." Frequently these deposits are along
the hollows of river beds, but they are also found at
higher altitudes, in terraces that formerly were the beds
of streams that have changed their courses. In the
latter case, instead of being worked in the creek or
sluice, the gold deposits are first washed down by
powerful jets of water projected by hose lines, and so
into the sluices.
The Bonanza was the greatest of the Klondike
creeks, and its tributary, the Eldorado Creek, the richest, probably surpassing any known placer deposit. The
Klondike output reached its climax in 1900, with a
production of $22,000,000, but has s;nce then declined.
The richest gravels were all worked out before 1910,
and the production of the entire Yukon, including new
deposits discovered, is now less than a million dollars
a year.
Placer gold was discovered at Juneau in about 1880,
but the present mines there are quartz mines—that is,
the gold is found in rocks, which must be crushed.
The quartz mines near Juneau are amongst the greatest
stamp mills of the world. Besides gold, silver mining
has been developed in the Yukon, an outstanding example being the silver-lead mine near Mayo, including
the Keno, Hill, Treble Yukon and other smaller mines
which, to the end of 1925, have produced over $3,300,000
of silver and lead. The production of this area increased
from $150,147 in 1924 to $734,832 in 1925.
Hotels
The following hotels are situated at points en route
to Alaska, and at inland points beyond Skagway:
Ketchikan. Stedman
Atlin. . .
. Atlin Inn
Revilla
Royal
Wrangell. . Wrangell
Kootenay
Juneau.. . .Gastineau
White
Zynda
Horse.
. White Pass
Skagway. .PullenHouse
Commercial
Golden North
Regina
Portland
Dawson.
. Rochester
Royal Alexandra
Carcross.. .Caribou
Yukonia
Principal
Most of the above are run on the European plan,
rates from $1.50 up. Those on American plan, $5.00 up.
Meals a la carte.
Page Sixteen
 OVER • THE ♦WHITE * PASS * AND »ATJKON * ROUTE
:  **    C
I A Ghost of Gold Rush Days
—White Pass City.
Page Seventeen
 T O
ATLIN
LAKE
THE
PEARL
O F
THE
NORTHLAND
Down the Yukon River
the old cabin of Robert W. Service, the poet-laureate of the Northland, is
the objective of many pilgrimages.
To Atlin to atlin is another delightful excursion from Skagway,
either as a side trip on the Dawson trip or as one in itself. The
route is the same as before to Carcross, but here the commodious steamer
"Tutshi" is taken, through a chain of sapphire lakes, mountain-girt and
forest-guarded.
The steamer first crosses Lake Nares, and then through the narrows
enters Tagish Lake, horse-shoe shaped and guarded by high peaks. Old
mining towns and fox farms are seen along the way. Presently we turn into
the Taku Arm of the lake, a beautiful sheet of water encompassed by the
most inspiring scenery, and then into Taku Inlet as far as Taku Landing.
Here, where a wonderful view may be obtained of Jubilee Mountain, to
the north, a transfer is made across a three-mile neck of land by a very
unique little train.
At the end of the portage we reach Lake Atlin, and board the twin-screw
motorship "Tarahne" for a six-mile run to the little town of Atlin.
The Atlin Inn near t h e boat landing, and facing the lake, is the
Atlin Inn, built and maintained especially for tourists by
the White Pass and Yukon Route. From its windows a magnificent view
may be obtained of the Atlin Mountains across Lake Atlin. The tourist
will find the Atlin Inn very inviting, the cuisine and service excellent. A
stay here for a day or so, or indeed for several weeks, will add greatly to
the pleasure of the Atlin trip.
There is an indescribable tonic effect in the Atlin climate. Numerous
side trips can be taken by automobile, steamer, launch or on foot to many
points of interest. Amongst these are the placer gold mines, the fox farm,
the Warm Springs, and the Indian Village; and wherever one goes, one will
find a profusion of beautiful wild flowers in almost endless variety. Then,
too, there are delightful walks along the shores. Atlin is the base of supplies for one of the richest hydraulic mining camps in British Columbia.
Those who like fishing can try their luck at lake trout, whitefish, or the
smaller but gamy grayling.
The Llewellyn    the   principal   event of the trip to Atlin is the
Glacier afternoon excursion on the steamer "Tarahne."   For about
forty miles the boat winds its way through the narrow
mountain ribbed passages of the West Channel. The boat then passes out
through Copper Island Narrows, and the return is made down the other
side of these islands on Lake Atlin, where a magnificent view is obtained
of the huge Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast Range.
When the water is smooth, as it frequently is, and on its surface are
mirrored the vari-colored verdure-clad hills and snow-crowned mountains
with their cathedral-like spires, the scene is of sublime beauty and grandeur.
And these reflections are not seen merely for a mile or so, but mile after
mile.
To West Taku    another   beautiful  scenic  trip  is  that   to
Arm the West Taku Arm, which has been especially designed
for passengers who are making the round trip from Vancouver to Skagway and back on the same steamship, and who cannot spare
sufficient time to avail themselves of one of the other tours "inside." It
gives these passengers an opportunity of seeing a maximum number of
points of interest in the short time at their disposal. It is a journey which
takes the visitor into the very heart of primeval surroundings, where giant
mountains raise their lofty peaks from the glittering glacial waters of the
Arm, which ends at what might be termed the "back door" of the Taku
Glacier that the traveller saw before reaching Juneau.
The route followed is the same as to Atlin, except that at Golden Gate,
instead of turning into the Taku Inlet, the steamer continues a southerly
course and then west, reaching West Taku Arm Landing and Ben-My-
Chree homestead. Passengers sleep on board and reach Carcross in the
morning, in time to catch the southbound train and their steamer.
Historical Notes
The region now known as Alaska was first visited by white men in 1741,
when two Russian officers, Captains Bering and Chirikov, explored the coast
as far south as L ixon Entrance. Many traders and trappers followed them,
and Kodiak Island was settled in 1784. Spanish expeditions in 1774-75 visited
the south-eastern coast, and Captain Cook in 1778; but the first real charts
were made by that intrepid navigator, Captain Vancouver, in 1793-94.
Owing to excesses committed by private traders, who robbed and massacred
the Indians, Russia created in 1799 a semi-official corporation called the Russian-American Company. Alexander Baranov, a famous administrator,
founded Sitka in 1804. The monopoly of this company ended in 1861, when
Prince Matsukov, an imperial governor, was appointed. The United States
had already made overtures for the purchase of "Russian America," and in
1867 the purchase was consummated for the price of $7,200,000.
But thus far the Northland had been considered only in terms of fisheries and
the fur trade. The discovery of mineral wealth was made much more slowly,
and it was not until the sensational finds of rich "placers" in the Klondike in
1896, which culminated in one of the most hectic gold rushes of modern times,
that the attention of the world was riveted upon this feature. The Yukon
Territory was constituted in 1898, and, with the subsequent discovery of
gold at Nome in 1900, the mining industry has been stabilized. The Yukon
River was explored by Russians as long ago as 1842, and in 1883 Lieutenant
Frederick Schwatka crossed the Chilkoot Pass, descended the Lewes River to
Port Selkirk, and so down the river to the sea. The dangerous Chilkoot Pass
was, however, abandoned by the "musher" for the newly discovered White
Pass, soon after the Klondike strike.
The Midnight Sun
On the 21st of June, Dawson has 22 hours of sunshine and two hours of
twilight. Approximately 114 days in the mid-summer months have no real
night. On the contrary, the sun is out of sight from December 5th until January
6th, and December 21st has 18 hours of darkness and six of twilight. The
Yukon River opens for navigation at Dawson about May 5th, and closes about
October 30th.
Distances
The distances between the different ports of the Alaska trip, and the
approximate time between each, are as follows:
From
To
Vancouver Alert Bay	
Alert Bay Prince Rupert 	
Prince Rupert Ketchikan	
Ketchikan Wrangell  .        7
Wrangell Juneau        11
Juneau Skagway         8
Seattle Vancouver (direct).
Victoria Vancouver	
Hours
Nautical
Miles
14
183
22
287
8
81
131
858
&y2
126
4
71
A nautical mile is equivalent to 1.15 statute miles.
Inland distances from Skagway are as follows:
Statute
Miles
150
Skagway Atlin	
Skagway White Horse        110
White Horse Dawson       460
Page Eighteen
 OVER • THE * WHITE * PASS * AND ♦ YUKON * ROUTE
Dawson, Capital of the Yukon.
Down the Yukon River to Dawson.
Here lived the celebrated Sam McGee.
Page Nineteen
 ♦ THE * WHITE * PASS * AND * "YUKON ♦ ROUTE
Atlin Inn—headquarters of this beautiful region.
Ben-My-Chree
A Cruise on Lake Atlin.
^  ,^40«an"
5pr^^^4'*'*
Page Twenty
Seracs in Llewellyn Glacier.
7 *
CM
5>u
 CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA AND  UNITED  STATES
Atlanta Ga.—E. G. Chesbrough, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 49 N. Forsyth St.
Banff Alta.—J. A. McDonald, District Passenger Agent C.P.R. Station.
Boston Mass.—L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo N.Y.—H. R. Mathewson, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 160 Pearl St.
Calgary Alta.—G. D. Brophy, District Pass. Agt C.P.R. Station
Chicago 111.— T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati Ohio—M. E. Malone, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland Ohio—G. H. Griffin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1010 Chester Ave.
Detroit Mich.—G. G. McKay, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton Alta.—C S. Fyfe, City Passenger Agent C.P.R. Building.
Fort William. . . . .Ont.—A. J. Boreham, City Passenger Agt 404 Victoria Ave.
Guelph Ont.—W. C. Tully, City Passenger Agent 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax N.S.—A. C. McDonald, City Passenger Agt. 117 Hollis St
Hamilton. ....... Ont.—A. Craig, City Passenger Agent Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu T.H.—Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau Alaska—W. L. Coates, Agent
Kansas City Mo.—R. G. Norris, City Pass. Agent  6 1 Railway Exchange Bldg
Ketchikan Alaska—F. E. Ryus, Agent.
Kingston Ont.—J. H. Welch, City Passenger Agent. 180 Wellington St.
London Ont.—H. J. McCallum, City Passenger Agent 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles Cal.—W. Mcllroy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 621 So. Grand Ave.
Milwaukee Wis.—F. T. Sansom, City Passenger Agent. 68 Wisconsin St.
Minneapolis. . . . Minn.—H. M. Tait, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 611 2nd Ave. South
M„ntrp„i rv„„ /R. G. Amiot, District Pass. Agent Windsor Station
Montreal Uue-     IF. C. Lydon, City Pass. Agent 141 St. James St.
Moosejaw Sask.—T. J. Colton, Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson      B C.—J. S. Carter, District Pass. Agent Baker and Ward Sts.
New York. N Y —F. R. Perry, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay Ont.—L. O. Tremblay, District Pass. Agt 87 Main Street West
'Ottawa Ont.—J. A. McGill, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro Ont.—J. Skinner, City Passenger Agent George St.
Philadelphia Pa.—R. C. Clayton, City Pass. Agt Locust St. at 15th
Pittsburgh.    .   . .     Pa.—C. L. Williams, Gen. Agent Pass. Dept 338 Sixth Ave.
Portland Ore.—W. H. Deacon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 55 Third St.
Prince Rupert.. . . B.C.—W. C. Orchard, General Agent.
Quebec Que.—C. A. Langevin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Palais Station
Regina Sask.—J. W. Dawson, District Pass. Agt Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John N.B.—G. B. Burpee, District Pass. Agent 40 King St.
St. Louis Mo.—Geo. P. Carbrey, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 420 Locust St.
St. Paui Minn.—W. H. Lennon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. Soo Line.. Robert and Fourth St.
San Francisco.. .. . Cal.—F. L. Nason, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. 675 Market St.
Saskatoon Sask.—G. B. Hill, City Pass. Agent 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie. .Ont.—J. O. Johnston, City Pass. Agent 529 Queen Street
Seattle Wash.—E. L. Sheehan, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke Que.—J. A. Metivier, City Pass. Agt  . .91 Wellington St. No.
Skagway Alaska—L. H. Johnston, Agent.
Spokane Wash.—E. L. Cardie, Traffic Mgr. Spokane International Ry.
Tacoma Wash.—D. C. O'Keefe, City Passenger Agent 1113 Pacific Ave.
Toronto Ont.—Wm. Fulton, District Passenger Agt Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Vancouver. B.C.—F. H. Daly, District Passenger Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Victoria B.C.—L. D. Chetham, District Passenger Agent 1102 Government St.
Washington D.C—C. E. Phelps, City Passenger Agent 905 Fifteenth St. N.W.
Windsor Ont.—W. C. Elmer, City Passenger Agent 34 Sandwich St. West
Winnipeg Man.—C. B. Andrews, Dist. Passenger Agent Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp . Belgium—A. L. Rawlinson 25 Quai Jordaens
Belfast Ireland—Wm. McCalla 41-43 Victoria St.
Birmingham Eng.—W. T. Treadaway 4 Victoria Square
Bristol Eng.—A. S. Ray 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Brussels Belgium—L. H.. R. Plummer 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
Glasgow Scotland—W. Stewart 25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg.. . . Germany—T. H. Gardner Gansemarkt 3
Liverpool Eng.—R. E. Swain Pier Head
T       , „ /C.E.Jenkins 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W. 1
London Eng~\G. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall St. E.C. 3
Manchester. .... . Eng.—J. W. Maine 31 Mosley Street
Paris France—A. V. Clark 7 Rue Scribe
Rotterdam Holland—J. S. Springett Coolsingel No. 91
Southampton. . . . Eng.—H. Taylor 7 Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong China—G. E. Costello, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe . . . .Japan—E. Hospes, Passenger Agent 7 Harima Machi.
Manila... P.I.—J. R. Shaw, Agent 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai China—T. R. Percy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept No. 4 The Bund
Yokohama Japan—A. M. Parker, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept No. 1 The Bund
AUSTRALIA,   NEW ZEALAND,   ETC.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand, Union House, Sydney,
N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Rly., for New Zealand, Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide S.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane Qd.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Dunedin N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Fremantle W.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart Tas.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Launceston Tas.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Melbourne. ..... .Vic.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.), Thos. Cook & Son.
Perth W.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
1 Suva , .Fiji—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Sydney N.S.W.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Wellington N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand, (Ltd.)
This cover printed in Canada 1927.
 ■ ■-..■ ■    ■•■ ■... - :.  ' v.--'.-:.: ■-■■   '-       ' ".".'■.   .    ..   ■'■ ■. . C ^
^^77:'''%,7-77:--7^:;.?-     -

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