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Alaska cruise, daily bulletin Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1968

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 DAILY BULLETIN
QounouUtm (Pacifa
B.C. COAST   STEAMSHIP   SERVICE
 Canadian   Pacific  Railway   Company
B.    C.      COAST      STEAMSHIP      SERVICE
f
Daily Bulletin
This Bulletin is for your information and to assist
you in locating the various points of interest which can
be seen from the steamship. The times shown are necessarily approximate, exact time
of arrival at and departure from way ports will be posted on ship's bulletin board.
A large chart of the route is displayed in the Social Hall on which the ship's position
will be posted daily. Do not miss the notices on the Bulletin Board; they will be of
interest to you.
Sailing Day
The sailing hour has been arranged at 9:00 p.m. while it is still light in these
latitudes, at least during most of the summer season, in order that you may enjoy
a glimpse of the harbor and surroundings while passing through the harbor entrance,
or First Narrows.
A few miles beyond, on the right or "starboard" side, is Point Atkinson Lighthouse. The point on the left or "port" side is Point Grey with the buildings of the
University of British Columbia near the point.
After passing Point Atkinson the steamship turns northwest along the Strait of
Georgia following the Vancouver Island shore during the night.
a 6:00 a.m. — Having passed Cape Mudge light, Quadra Island,
on the right, we proceed along Discovery Passage through Seymour Narrows, the narrowest part of the channel between Vancouver Island and the Islands off the mainland. A strong tide
runs through the narrows due to the ebb and flow of the tide
around the north end of Vancouver Island, and the passage is usually made only at
the time of slack water.
7:00 a.m. — Proceeding along Johnstone Straits, with Vancouver Island on our
left, and the Mainland and adjacent Islands on the right, a number of logging camps
can be seen on Vancouver Island shore, from which logs are rafted and towed to the
sawmills on the Lower Island and Mainland.
10:30 a.m. — ALERT BAY — The first port of call is a small village on Cormorant
Island, on the right side of the channel. We land at Alert Bay Wharf. Time will be
allowed for a walk ashore. To the right is the Indian Cemetery with a number of
interesting Totem Poles; also the Church of England Missionary Hospital and School.
To the left is the large Government Residential Indian School,  and Indian village.
2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m Having passed the north
end of Vancouver Island on our left, we cross Queen
Charlotte Sound, the longest stretch of open water on
the entire voyage. At the entrance to the Sound is Pine
Island Lighthouse on the right, and two-thirds of the
way across is Egg Island Light on the right. A little
over half way across can be seen to the right the
entrance to Smith's Sound and further north Rivers
Inlet, where are located numerous salmon canneries.
5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m After traversing Fitzhugh
Sound for several hours the vessel makes a sharp turn
to the left through a narrow channel called Llama passage, where can be seen the old Indian village of Bella Bella on the left, also New
Bella Bella, thence we proceed northwestward through Seaforth Channel, passing
Ivory Island Lighthouse on the right.
10:00 p.m. —For about one hour we are crossing Millbank Sound and we feel the
swell of the Pacific Ocean, after which the ship enters Finlayson Channel and for
the rest of the night passes through the sheltered waters of Graham Reach, Fraser
Reach and Grenville Channel.
2———-^       7:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. — After passing Lawyer's Island light
TI^J on the left, we cross the mouth of the Skeena River and several
j^ \ salmon canneries can be seen in the distance. The Skeena, a very
uuy \ turbulent stream has its source in central British Columbia. We
are now approaching Prince Rupert with Digby Island on which
can be seen the Canadian Government Wireless station and lighthouse depot on
the left.
9:00 a.m.—Prince Rupert is the most northerly city in British Columbia, population about 8,000. It is located on Kaien Island, close to the Mainland, is an important centre for the fishing industry of the Naas and Skeena Rivers, and for mining
in the Portland Canal district, located about  100 miles north.
The Government floating drydock, 600 feet long, with a lifting capacity for
vessels of 20,000 tons deadweight, and a large cold storage plant, where can be seen
immense quantities of frozen halibut, are only a short distance from the wharf
by auto.
A considerable portion of the halibut caught on the banks of Southeastern
Alaska is shipped by rail line from Prince Rupert to Eastern Canada and United
States.
12:00 Noon — Leaving Prince Rupert our vessel roimds Digby Island and turns
northward passing the old Indian village of Metlakatla on the right, and about thirty
minutes later Port Simpson, one of the oldest settlements in Northern British
Columbia, founded by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1834.
3:00 p.m.—On the right is Green Island lighthouse, six miles south of the International Boundary. Our vessel now crosses Dixon Entrance with the Pacific Ocean
on the left and Tree Point Light on the right at the entrance to Revilla Gigedo
Channel. We are now in United States waters and after passing Mary Island Light
on the left, will shortly enter Tongass Narrows on the
right side of which is located our first port of call in
Alaska-—Ketchikan.
7:00 p.m. — United States Customs and Immigration
officials will board our vessel immediately on arrival at
Ketchikan and all passengers will be required to present
their immigration cards and pass inspection before going
ashore. Ketchikan, population of 6,500 is one of the
largest and most prosperous cities in Alaska, being the
centre of the fishing industry, with about fourteen
canneries located in the immediate vicinity, and a large
cold storage plant. A fifteen-minute walk up the stream
to the waterfall, will, in the late summer, give the visitor an opportunity to see
salmon ascending the swift waters of the rapids in large numbers.
A visit should be made to the new Indian school established by the United States
Government, where the children are taught  the lost  art of  making totem poles;
special native teachers having been brought in from the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Visitors will also find a number of interesting curio stores.
The ship's sailing hour will be posted on the blackboard  at the foot of  the
gangway as you go ashore.
3———*—        4:30   a.m.—During   the  night   we  have   traversed   Clarence
rd Strait and Stikine Strait and now make a short stop at Wrangell,
~        1       an old settlement established by the Russians and named after
^ay \     Baron von Wrangell, one of the ablest of the Russian Governors
 r      of Alaska. A few miles to the north of Wrangell lies the mouth
of the Stikine River, which is navigable for about 185 miles to Telegraph Creek, in
Northern British Columbia, an outfitting point for big game hunters entering the
Cassiar District. The Barrington Transportation Company operate a regular weekly
gas boat service from Wrangell to Telegraph Creek during the open season of
Navigation. Wrangell has a number of interesting curio stores and some splendid
totem poles. Our vessel only makes a short stop northbound but an opportunity
will be afforded to inspect this interesting port on our southbound voyage.
6:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m.—About two hours after leaving Wrangell we enter
Wrangell Narrows, with Point Alexander Lighthouse on the right, a narrow tortuous
channel, about 20 miles long between Kupreanof Island, on the left, and Mitkof
Island on the right. The channel is well marked with buoys and beacons, and the
ship passes at half speed through some very beautiful scenery. At the north end of
the Narrows, on the right, lies the old town of Petersburg, settled originally in the
days of the Russian occupation, and now a flourishing fishing centre. After leaving
the north end of Wrangell Narrows many small icebergs may be seen ahead of and
to the right of the vessel. The bergs have broken away from the Baird or Patterson
Glaciers, both of which can be seen clearly in fair weather.
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.—After passing Petersburg a beautiful panorama of
mountain scenery opens before us. Passing Prolewy Point light on the left we enter
Frederick Sound, to the northwest can be seen the Devil's Thumb, a sharp needle
 of rock 9,077 feet high, located on the International
boundary line. Further south the Needles, 10,002 feet
high, and Castle Mountain 7,326 feet high, all of the
peaks are on the International boundary line.
During the afternoon we follow Stephen's Passage
and about 4:00 p.m. enter Taku Inlet diverging from
the main channel enroute to the Glacier.
5:00 p.m. — We are now within a short distance of
the face of the magnificent TAKU GLACIER (pronounced Ta-koo). This immense river of ice, about a
mile wide on its face and 100 to 200 feet high, has its
origin in the perpetual ice-fields to the east of the Coast
Range in British Columbia, running for 90 miles before entering the sea. Small bergs
are constantly breaking off from the main body of the Glacier, and these may be
encountered for a considerable distance south of Taku Inlet. On the left is the dead
or receding Norris glacier.
7:00 p.m. —A short run from the Glacier brings us to Gastineau Channel and on
our right, as we enter, is the town of Thane. On the left, on Douglas Island, is the
famous Treadwell Mine, flooded by a cave-in during 1917 and not since operated.
Adjoining the site is the town of Douglas, and near the end of the channel lies
Juneau, the Capital of Alaska, population about 8,000. Here are splendid stores and
curio shops, modern hotels and many beautiful residences and public buildings.
On the side of Mount Roberts, overlooking the city, can be seen the buildings
of the Alaska Juneau Gold Mining Company, the largest gold quartz mill in the
United States or Alaska, with a capacity of 12,000 tons of ore per day.
The territorial Museum, with its splendid collection of Eskimo curios is said
to be the finest and only complete one of its kind. A motor trip of fourteen miles
will take you to the Grand Mendenhall Glacier and beautiful Auk Lake. Juneau was
founded in the 80's and was first called Harrisburg, then Rockwell and finally
Juneau, having been made the capital of Alaska in 1900, but the executive offices
were not removed from Sitka until 1906. Our vessel will sail for Skagway at midnight.
4 9:00 a.m.— (Ship's time)—During the early morning hours
*** a magnificent panorama of mountains and glaciers opens before
Day \      us as our vessel passes along the Lynn Canal. On the west side,
A     about one hour before reaching Skagway, are the towns of Haines
and Fort Seward, the latter a United States military post. Our
sea trip ends at Skagway where connection is made with trains of the White Pass and
Yukon Route for Lake Bennett,  Carcross  and Whitehorse,  connecting  with their
Lake and River steamships to West Taku Arm, Atlin and Dawson.
Skagway with its population of about 500 is almost surrounded by mountains,
among the principal points of interest are Reid's Falls, Dewey Falls, Dewey Lake,
Alpine Ridge and Skagway Park. There are also good hiking trails to A.B. and Dewey
Mountains, and numerous relics of the Trail of '98  to the Klondyke Gold Fields.
2611
Additional copies for mailing will be gladly supplied at Pursers' Office.
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CANADIAN
PACIFIC
 DAILY BULLETIN of your
GaMtJfafjhcifac
 B.C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
DAILY BULLETIN
Ship time is Pacific Standard
8:00 p.m.—We glide slowly out of
Vancouver harbour on our first lap of this
unique cruise to Alaskan ports, once scenes of violent adventure in the
mysterious land of the silent seas.
For the next few days all the facilities of our luxury liner are at your
convenience to make this voyage a memorable one.
This bulletin will help you identify places of interest as we cruise through
deep Inside Passage waters. We follow the wake of intrepid Russian,
Spanish and British explorers and adventurers who sought in vain for a
northwest waterway from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Glance back at the
beautiful setting as we leave Vancouver harbour in the closing dusk. Less
than 75 years ago it was desolate bushland.
The Lions' Gate suspension bridge divides Vancouver harbour from the
Gulf of Georgia. In 1792, Captain George Vancouver, a British naval officer
and explorer extraordinary, sailed north on this same course aboard an
80-foot sloop, H.M.S. "Discovery". He named the gulf after King George III,
who backed his hardy venture.
Soon we pass Point Atkinson lighthouse on our right (starboard). Around
us are chunky boats of salmon fishermen; plodding tugs with tows of spruce,
fir and cedar rafts; deep-sea ships arriving with exotic cargoes from
distant world ports. This lighthouse is their guiding beacon to a safe harbour.
Also to starboard is the placid, deep water cutoff to Howe Sound. The
explorer named this for Admiral Richard Howe, who was then Commander
in Chief of America and a close friend of Benjamin Franklin.
On the starboard hand also, we pass close to the shore of Bowen
Island, a popular summer resort.
Tonight about 3 a.m., we will run the Seymour Narrows "slot". Here in
surges, swift tide water boils through the passage at
_^am^_lmmmmmm^ 13   knots.  Our ship  is  equipped  with  every  safety
I — "J        aid  to  navigation.  It is  piloted   by officers  expen
ds* I        enced   in  these  coastal  waters, which  are  different
I   Day   \      from   any   other   waters   in   the   world,   who   have
I \     timed our arrival for slack water.
7:00 a.m.—We are now in Johnstone Straits.
The mountain-girt, heavily wooded shoreline on our left (port), is vast
Vancouver Island, 282 miles long and 60 miles wide. It was first discovered
by the famed Spanish explorer, Senor Bodega y Quadra in 1775. He
came up from Lima, Peru, in a 36-foot boat, built of green timbers. This is
just about the same length as our life boats. He named this Quadra Island.
When Captain Vancouver arrived later, the island was ceded to Great
Britain, and the name changed to Vancouver
Island. To its shores came Dutch, Portuguese,
Chinese and Russian traders. They sought
fabulous fortunes from sea otter pelts, which
Indian tribes were using for teepees. They left on
record behind them a saga of pillage and
brutality which has never been equalled to this
day. They also sought gold, and massacred
entire Indian villages in their madness for this
precious metal. These were the pioneers of
civilization through this vast territory, although
this was incidental to their real motives. Now the
coast of Vancouver Island is dotted with fishing
villages and logging camps.
10:30 a.m.—Look to starboard for Alert Bay, an old Indian Village
bristling with totem poles. It is on Cormorant Island and the centre of these
waters for salmon canning. Here the Government maintains a large residential school. There is also a Church of England missionary hospital.
2:00-5:00 p.m.—In Queen Charlotte Sound, our first stretch of open
water, our ship has struck her real travel beat. With each turn of the
propeller, civilization falls behind and we move into the unchanged world
of the primitive. Voyagers who keep a sharp lookout may see whales
blowing as they frolic through the Pacific. In the distance to port, like a
stationary cloud, is the northern tip of Vancouver Island. It was in this Sound,
named after Queen Charlotte Sophia, wife of King George III, that Captain
Vancouver ran his "Discovery" aground and fought off fierce Haida
Indians who came in huge red cedar canoes to plunder his ship.
5:00-7:00 p.m.—Now we are in Fitzhugh Sound, named by James
Hanna, an enterprising English trader who operated on the China coast in
1785. He sailed across the Pacific in a 60-ton brig. From these waters he
got 580 sea otter skins from the natives, which he sold in China for $20,500.
7:30 p.m.—Pass Bella Bella and enter Milbanke Sound at 8:30 p.m.
7:00-9:00 a.m.—Now we are at the mouth of the famous Skeena River,
at whose source far in the interior of British Columbia, salmon spawn.
This river has on its banks more canneries than any
other river in the world. Strange as it may seem, Captain Vancouver missed the mouth of the Skeena when
he came along the same route we now sail. We
will cruise past Hammer Island, Glenn Island,
Lawyer's Lighthouse and Holland rock, and enter Prince Rupert harbour
with Digby Island to port, passing Watson Island, site of a 40-million-dollar
celanese plant. The island actually lies in a slough of the Skeena River.
During the war Watson was an ammunition dump for United States forces
in Alaska.
9:00-12:00 noon—Prince Rupert, originally a Hudson Bay post, 40
miles from the Alaska Boundary, with a population of 8,500, boasts the
world's largest cold storage plant. From it thousands of pounds of halibut
and salmon, caught in the channels and sound through which we travel, are
shipped by air, rail and steamer to all parts of the world. Ten miles from
the city is the 300-ton-a-day Columbia Cellulose mill. As the most northern
city in British Columbia it is a rail head to eastern Canada.
12:00-3:00  p.m.—We  retrace our passage  round  Digby Island  to
(Hi
Chatham Sound, named by Captain Vancouver
after the small ship H.M.S. "Chatham" which
accompanied him on his voyage of exploration.
About 1 p.m. we should pass Lucy Island.
It is claimed that the British explorer named
this islet after his sweetheart in England. However, he died a bachelor. He was only 33 years
old when he sailed from Falmouth, England, on
this voyage. In these waters which we cruise in a
few days, Vancouver spent five years "feeling"
his way and suffering grim hardships and
privation.
The British Government had a standing
reward of Twenty Thousand Pounds (about
$50,000) for the first person who returned with proof of the long-dreamed
waterway through the North American continent from Pacific to Atlantic.
Oddly enough, a passage was finally discovered in 1946. The Royal
Canadian Mounted Police arctic patrol ship St. Roche finally conquered
the northern route, but had to go thousands of miles north through the
Arctic circle.
We pass Green Island lighthouse on the starboard hand and enter
Holiday Passage, where the crew of the "Discovery" were given a few
days holiday before pushing farther northward, and enter Dixon Entrance,
another stretch of Pacific sea.
This entrance was named by the enterprising trader George Dixon,
another English trader who came across from China many years before
Captain Vancouver arrived. Dixon saw the priceless sea otter pelts in
China where he was trading. They made an excellent luxury companion
for those priceless Mandarin silks. He was told the pelts had come across
from Siberia. That the Russians had traded them for tea.
Dixon had a successful voyage to this coast. From the Tlingit Indians he
collected 2,552 sea otter pelts which he sold for $54,875. These enterprising traders considered the six hundred percent profit they made on
these trips a fair return for their courage and investments which were
usually a few cheap trinkets for the natives.
About 3:30 we cross the boundary waters which separate Alaska from
British Columbia. The first light in Alaskan waters is Lord Island.
3:30-6:00 p.m.—We are cruising Revilligedo Channel, named after
the Viceroy of New Spain (Mexico).
Here Captain Vancouver and his companion Puget (after whom Puget
Sound is named) were almost stoned to death by a tribe of hostile Indians.
From the tall cliffs that tower above us, the natives pelted the explorers
with rocks as they rowed back to the "Discovery" anchored in this channel.
They had come ashore in a row boat to examine rock formations which
might contain gold.
While lounging on deck, it will take little imagination to picture Indians
and Aleutians, paddling through these waters chanting weird songs, long
before the white man knew of this continent.
We are now moving into areas which still retain the mark of Baranof,
fabulous "Russian King of Alaska", who came down from the eternal ice
fields of Siberia in 1740, to establish a chain of fur trading forts through the
Alaskan panhandle.
 During this period of expansion, there were
60-odd trading companies all at each other's
throats, establishing forts and having them
blown up by rival companies in this frantic
rush for pelts.
6:00 p.m.—Angle Point. United States Customs
and Immigration officers will board our ship
from a motor launch. Before disembarking at
Ketchikan, our next port of call, all passengers
will present their immigration cards and pass
inspection.
7:00 p.m.—Ketchikan. This Alaskan city of
6,500 population cans more fish than any other
city in the world. There are fourteen canneries and a large cold storage
plant in the immediate vicinity. In late summer a run up the stream will
reward the visitor with a view of schools of salmon ascending swift waters to
the spawning grounds. In the city park are some fine examples of totem
poles. Alaska Native Department maintains a school to teach young
Indians the rapidly declining art of carving totem poles.
The teachers are the famed Haida Indians from Queen Charlotte
Islands. There is a good variety of curio stores. Wood Cove is the site of
a large new pulp mill.
The ship's sailing time from Ketchikan will be posted on the blackboard at
the foot of the gangway.
We sail through Tongass Narrows to starboard and Guard Island to
port; during the night we will traverse Clarence Strait and pass Wrangell.
A stop will be made southbound. Then you will have an opportunity
to inspect this historic city which was originally a Russian trading fort.
It was established by Baranof who tried to colonize it with Cossacks.
They refused even to try to farm the land. At the height of Russian colonization in Alaska Wrangell came under the influence of Baron Von Wrangell
and was founded under his able leadership. Many influences of Russian
life can still be seen in the churches. It has excellent curio shops.
35555!5555fcea>j        6:00-7:00 a.m.—We are in the Wrangell Narrows.
yd On our left is Kupreanof Island and Mitkof Island on
1^        \        the right.
y \ It was through the straits which we shall  travel
today  that the  biggest mass otter hunts  in  Alaska
were staged.
One hunt staged by the Russians consisted of 550 Aleutian biders (skin
boats) and 1,200 Aleutian natives. This hunt took an entire month. The pelts
yielded $2,000,000. Here, too, the trading ships of Jacob Astor came to
help found that famous fortune.
Bloody battles were fought and refought here between traders,
explorers, Aleutians and savage Indian tribes. This continual warfare
sadly depleted the Aleutian race. Demanded and enslaved by the warring
traders because they were good otter hunters, these primitive people found
themselves caught in the middle. If they hunted seals they were robbed of
them or their flimsy craft were lost in raging gales. If they did not hunt they
were massacred. Baranof was the first white trader to give the Aleutians
a fair break. It paid off well for him.
Now we cruise northward to Frederick Sound. To the northwest lies the
Devil's Thumb which rises 9,077 feet high. Farther south the Needles 10,002
feet high and Castle Mountain 7,326 feet high. Around our ship will be
ice calves which have broken away from the Baird and Patterson Glaciers.
These are remnants of a primeval ice age.
It is with awe that we realize that these drifting floes are part of a
world of prehistoric mammals. In the ice age, these glacial beds united
this continent with Asia. Across these glaciers from Siberia came the aboriginal Aleutians and Eskimos, whose descendants live still in the scattered
towns and villages we pass.
3:00 p.m.—The town of Thane is on the right as we enter Gastineau
Channel. On the left is Douglas Island. Here is the famous Treadwell Mine,
flooded in 1917 and since abandoned. Adjoining the site is the town of
Douglas. Near the end of this channel is Juneau, capital of Alaska, with a
population of about 7,500. The city has modern hotels, many fine residences,
an outstanding museum and public buildings. The biggest low grade
quartz mine in the United States or Alaska is located here. It is seen on the
side of the 4,000-foot Mount Juneau, overlooking the city. Gold recovery
from this mine was only around 83 cents per ton of ore.
Juneau does not reckon her history from the sealing days, but from 1898
when Joe Juneau, a prospector, came north with the frenzied horde of men
seeking the gleaming gold nuggets in the Klondike. It has been the capital
of Alaska since 1900. The territorial museum is a must for every visitor. It
has the world's finest collection of Russian, Eskimo and Aleutian art. In it is
a copy of the document of the purchase of Alaska from Czar Alexander II
of Russia by United States of America in 1867. Grand Mendenhall Glacier
and beautiful Auk Lake are about a 14-mile drive.
1 1:30 p.m.—Leave Juneau. We retrace our course through Gastineau
Channel as far as Marmion Island and into Stephens Passage.
During the night we will cruise Lynn Canal, which Captain Vancouver
named after King's Lynn, his home in England.
6:00-8:00 a.m.—We are now sailing through
Chilkoot Inlet and passing the town of Haines and
the old Chilkoot barracks. A road connects this town
with the famed Alcan Highway. Skagway is our next
port of call.
9:00  a.m.—Skagway, that  magic  name  indelibly
engraved on the world's memory. This is the gateway
to the real glamour north.
To this town in '98 came gold seekers from all over the world —
bearded, full-bodied men, slim downy-cheeked youngsters, soft-bosomed,
hard-eyed women, the crook, the gambler, the adventurer and the miner.
They came not to remain in Skagway. Here they outfitted for the hard
trek across the White Pass to bonanza creeks of the Yukon.
Ghosts of the days when gold dust and nuggets were standard currency
for ham and eggs still haunt this town. Here, fortunes were risked on the
turn of a card and human life became the cheapest commodity on the trail.
Now tourists can take the train from Skagway over the same route as the
gold seekers toiled toward the gold fields beyond.
But Skagway has other surprises besides the grave of Soapy Smith and
the poems of Robert Service and the tales of Jack London. During the short
summer, nature works wonders in this arctic soil. Endless days result in rapid
plant life growth. They reach sizes three times bigger than the normal
"outside".
  CRUISE  MEMORIES
ARE   GOOD  MEMORIES
The Purser will be glad to supply extra copies.
1954
 W?
DAILY BULLETIN
Special Qtiuide
B. C. COAST   STEAMSHIP   SERVICE
 Canadian Pacific Railway Company
B. C. COAST STEAMSHIP  SERVICE
Daily Bulletin
This bulletin is for your information and to assist
you in locating the various points of interest which can
be seen from the steamship. The times shown are necessarily approximate and exact time of arrival at and departure from way-ports will
be posted on ship's bulletin board. A large chart of the route is displayed in the
Social Hall*, on which the ship's position will be posted daily. Do not miss the notices
on the Bulletin Board as they will be of interest to you.
I-q        11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.   Our good ship sails from Pier "C"
jist I       and   passes   out   of   Vancouver   Harbor   through   First   Narrows.
I Pi \ A  few  miles   beyond  on   the  right,   or   "Starboard"   side,   is
I    Day   \      Point Atkinson Lighthouse. ■ The point on the left, or "Port" side,
' A     is Point Grey, with the ^University of British Columbia buildings
near the point. After passing Point Atkinson, the steamship turns
northwest along the Strait of Georgia following the Vancouver Island shore. Between
1:00 and 2:00 p.m. we pass Texada Island, a long narrow island on the starboard side,
on the north end of which is located Blubber Bay.
Shortly before dinner, Cape Mudge Light, on Quadra Island, is on our right,
and we then proceed along Discovery Passage through Seymour Narrows, the
narrowest point between Vancouver Island and the islands off the mainland. A strong
tide runs through the Narrows, due to the ebb and flow around the north end of
Vancouver Island. The passage is usually made only at slack water.
During the late evening the vessel proceeds along Johnstone Straits, with Van •
couver Island on the left and the mainland and adjacent islands on the right. A
number of logging camps are located on the shore, from which logs are rafted and
towed to the sawmills  of the lower island and mainland.
About 11:00 p.m. the site of Alert Bay may be seen on the right, a small village
on Cormorant Island. No landing will be made on northbound trip, but on our return
from Skagway sufficient time will be allowed to visit the Indian Cemetery, with its
many Totem poles reminding us of by-gone days, and the Church of England Indian
Residential School and Hospital.
During the night we have crossed Queen Charlotte Sound, the longest stretch
of open water on the entire voyage. At the entrance to the Sound is Pine Island
Lighthouse, and on the same side two-thirds of the way across is Egg Island light,
also on the right.
I—^^—* ' " „i       10:00  a.m.  to  12:00  Noon.  A  stop  of two  hours  will  be
f\t\d made  at  Ocean   Falls,  the  site  of  a  large  pulp  and  paper  mill,
I  %M \       owned and operated by Pacific Mills Ltd. Ocean Falls is situated
j£-   Day \      at the head of Cousins Inlet, 311 miles north of Vancouver and
1 ,\     180 miles south of Prince Rupert. The port is open to navigation
the year around and accommodation provided for the largest
ocean freight steamships. The Company was incorporated in the year 1915, the mill
having a daily production of about 325 tons of ground wood, sulphite pulp, and about
300 tons of newsprint, kraft wrapping and other papers which are shipped to all parts
of the world.
12:00  Noon to   11:00  p.m.   Leaving  Ocean  Falls  we  proceed  South  along
Dean  Channel  and  through  Johnson   Channel  to   Seaforth   Channel  thence  through
Graham Reach and Fraser Reach during the afternoon,
a long narrow stretch of sheltered water with Princess
Royal Island on the left and the mainland on the right,
thence into Grenville Channel during the late afternoon,
with Pitt Island on the left and the mainland on the
right. During the night we pass Prince Rupert on the
right and several hours later cross the International
Boundary and enter Alaska waters.
0
rd
Day
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Ketchikan, our first call in Alaska. A
stop of about two hours will be
sufficient to visit the most interesting places, including the Falls, a
short distance from the Wharf,
where, from the bridge, can be seen in the la^e Summer, large numbers of salmon
ascending the River. Many salmon canneries arc located in the vicinity of Ketchikan
which is one of the most important fishing centres in the North and the outfitting
point for the Halibut Fleet operating in the Gulf of Alaska. Ketchikan is an enterprising and modern city with a population of about 6500.
11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Leaving Ketchikan we proceed south through Tongass Narrows for about twenty miles and enter the Behm Canal, thence northward
along this beautiful stretch of water with Revilla Gigedo Island on the left and the
Mainland of Alaska on the right, passing on the left a sharp pinnacle of rock known
as the Eddystone Rock, rising 250 feet above the water. Now we cruise into the
beautiful land-locked Rudyerd Bay, frequently called the Punchbowl, enhanced by a
magnificent panorama of mountains on all sides. Farther along the Canal is Walker
Cove, a narrow and winding stretch of water about seven miles long, with more
impressive mountain scenery. During the late afternoon we pass through Behm
Narrows and about 7:00 p.m. turn northerly into Clarence Strait, the main channel
to the North.
1*^^—■  "i    , Daylight to 12:00 Noon. During the early morning hours we
A fU pass through Wrangell Narrows with Point Alexander Lighthouse
^l 1       on the right, a narrow tortuous channel about twenty miles long,
^f Day \ dividing Kupreanof Island on the left and Mitkof Island on the
_\ right. The channel is well marked with buoys and beacons and
the ship cruises at half speed through some very beautiful scenery. At the North end of the Narrows on the right lies the old town of Petersburg,
settled originally in the days of the Russian Occupancy and now a flourishing fishing
centre. After leaving the north end of Wrangell Narrows many small icebergs may be
seen ahead and to the right of the vessel. The icebergs have broken away from the
Baird and Patterson Glaciers, both of which may be seen clearly in fair weather.
After passing Petersburg a panorama of mountain scenery opens before us.
Passing Proleway Point light on the left we enter Frederick Sound. To the northwest
can be seen the Devil's Thumb, a sharp needle of rock 9077 feet high, and farther
south the Needles, 10,002 feet high, and Castle Mountain, height 7,326 feet. All of
these peaks are located on the International Boundary line. In the late afternoon we
enter Taku Inlet, diverging from the main channel enroute to the  Glacier.
12:00 Noon to 2:30 p.m. Steaming to within a short distance of magnificent
Taku Glacier (pronounced Ta-koo), this immense river of ice, about a mile wide on
its face and 200 to 300 feet high, had its origin in the perpetual ice fields to the east
of the Coast Range in British Columbia, running for 90 miles before entering the sea.
Small bergs are continually breaking off from the main body and may be encountered
for a considerable distance south of Taku Inlet. On the left is the dead or receding
Norris Glacier.
2:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. A 25-mile run from the Glacier brings us to Juneau,
capital of Alaska,  on  Gastineau  Channel.  On  the  right as  we  enter  is  the  town  of
Thane. On the left, is Douglas Island, where the
famous Treadwell Mine was flooded by a cave-in in
1917, and not since operated. Adjoining the site is the
town of Douglas and near the end of the Channel
lies Juneau, capital of Alaska, with a population of
about 8000. There are splendid stores, curio shops,
modern hotels, many beautiful residences and public
buildings. On the side of Mount Roberts, overlooking
the City, can be seen the Alaska Juneau Gold Mining
Co., the largest gold quartz mill in the United States
or Alaska, with a capacity of 10,000 tons of ore per
day. A motor trip of 14 miles will take you to the
Great Mendenhall Glacier and beautiful Auk Lake.
The territorial Museum with its splendid collection of
Eskimo curios is well worth a visit. Juneau was founded
in the 80's and became capital of Alaska in 1900, but
executive offices were not removed from Sitka until 1906.
5——^s        7:00  a.m.  to  5:00   p.m.   During  the   night  we  have  passed
t"L through Stephen Passage and rounded the North end of Admir-
1        alty Island, into Chatham Strait, and about 7:00 a.m. enter Peril
Day \      Strait, a narrow and rugged water passage separating Chichagof
\     Island and Baranof Island. This passage takes about two hours
and   the   ship   turns   south   into   Salisbury   Sound   in   the   lee   of
Kruzof Island and on to Sitka, arriving about 11:00 a.m.
Sitka—the former Capital, and the oldest settlement in South-Eastern Alaska.
The first post was established in 1799 and in 1802 sacked, burned, and completely
destroyed by the Indians. Among the principal points of interest are the Russian
Orthodox Cathedral of St. Michael, the park with its picturesque Totem Poles, the
reconstructed block house, and many other relics of the early days.
Im^mmmmmm"os       Daylight  to   8:00   a.m.   Returning  through   Peril   Strait   the
M ft* previous  evening,  and  proceeding  up   Chatham   Strait,  we  enter
,   M\^ \       Lynn   Canal  about  2:00  a.m.,  where  a  magnificent  panorama  of
^^B   Day \      mountains and Glaciers is unfolded and may be viewed from the
^^ jV     deck as our vessel passes along. At the extreme end of the Canai
is located Skagway, the end of our sea voyage, and the gateway
to the Yukon. Connection is made with trains of the White Pass & Yukon Route for
Lake Bennett, Carcross, and Whitehorse and at Carcross connection is made with
their Lake steamship to West Taku Arm.
Skagway has a population of about 500 and is almost surrounded by mountains.
Principal points of interest are Reid's Falls, Dewey Falls, Dewey Lake, Alpine Ridge
and Skagway Park, with numerous relics of the Trail of '98 to the Klondyke Gold Fields.
8:00 p.m. to 12 Midnight. Leaving Skagway at 8:00 p.m.
(Pacific Standard Time) we proceed south down the Lynn Canal
and Stephen Passage, enroute to Wrangell.
—mK^m^^mb^^_^ Daylight to 10:00 p.m. Having completed our journey through
1^1        Stephen Passage, early morning brings us into Frederick Sound
^\th l        about 6:00 a.m. and we continue in this passage until about 10:00
f4i    T\n*j \       a.m., when the ship enters the famous Wrangell narrows, forming
\Jf   Uay \       Kupreanof Island on our right and Mitkof Island on our left, the
.' passage   taking  about   three   hours  and   being  one   of   the  most
interesting events of the voyage. About 2:00 p.m. we arrive at Wrangell, an old settlement established by the Russians and named after Baron Von Wrangell, one of the
ablest Russian Governors of Alaska. A few miles north of Wrangell is the mouth of
the Stikine River, navigable for 185 miles to Telegraph Creek, the outfitting point for
big game hunters entering the famous Cassiar District of British Columbia. A regular
 weekly gas boat service is operated between Wrangell
and Telegraph Creek during the summer season. Curio
stores and some splendid totem poles make our short
stay interesting. We leave Wrangell at 3:30 p.m. and
cruise south through Clarence Strait, arriving Ketchikan
10:00 p.m. and remaining there until 1:00 a.m. the
following morning.
Daylight to 12 Midnight. After
leaving Ketchikan early this morning, the ship has crossed Dixon
Entrance and arrives at Prince
Rupert at 9:00 a.m. Prince Rupert,
with its population of about 8000,
is the largest city in Northern British Columbia. Having
direct rail connection with Eastern Canada, Prince
Rupert is the receiving point for large quantities of fish. Cold storage plant and
Government drydock are well worth a visit.
The ship will leave Prince Rupert at 12:30 p.m. and about 2 hours later will enter
Grenville Channel, and for the remainder of the afternoon will proceed south through
this waterway, which is quite narrow and straight. The large island on our right is
Pitt Island and on our left the mainland of British Columbia. Between six and seven
in the evening we enter Fraser Reach, with Princess Royal Island on our right, thence
into Graham Reach and Tolmie Channel, and around midnight the ship will cross
Millbank Sound.
—^        8:30 a.m. to Dusk.  Having completed the crossing of Queen
J&i^^kth      I Charlotte Sound during the early hours of the morning, we sight
II   Ij^       1        the north end of Vancouver Island about 7:00 a.m., and proceed
| \JLJay \       south   in   Queen   Charlotte   Sound   to   Alert   Bay  on   Cormorant
i A      Island, with its totem poles and Indian Schools, one of the oldest
missionary settlements on the British Columbia Coast, arriving
at 8:30 a.m. Leaving Alert Bay about 10:00 a.m. the ship passes through a succession
of notable waterways including, Broughton and Johnstone Straits, Discovery Passage
and the famed Seymour Narrows. Traversing through Seymour Narrows in the
middle of the afternoon we pass Campbell River an hour later, the home of the famous
Tyee Salmon, thence Cape Mudge and into the Gulf of Georgia. About 6:00 p.m. we
have Denman Island on our right and about thirty minutes later Hornby Island on
our left. A circuit is made of Denman Island and passing Northward through the
channel between Vancouver Island and Denman Island we pass one of the coal
centers of Vancouver Island, Union Bay. Comox is right ahead and will be reached
at 8:00 p.m.
Comox, the Gateway to the fertile Comox Valley, scenically and agriculturally
the finest on Vancouver Island. Lovely Comox Bay is noted for its fine Salmon
fishing. A dance has been arranged here, as an added attraction. Sightseeing trips
have  also  been  arranged  for  those  who  may  wish  to  see  the  surrounding  country.
—I        10:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. At 10:30 a.m. we leave Comox and
^k<jkt\\       I        run south through Baynes  Sound and into the  Gulf of  Georgia.
I n        I        Our course is for Point Atkinson the entrance to Burrard Inlet.
I   § Day \       On either side of the Gulf are located numerous colonies of Sum-
i i        mer homes.  Passing  Point  Atkinson  shortly  after  3:00  p.m.  we
pass through the First Narrows a few minutes later, which opens
up into one of the finest natural harbors in the world.
At 4:00 p.m. we arrive at Vancouver, which allows 1^2 hours for the completion
of any shopping desired (stores close at 5:30 p.m.). Vancouver is the largest city in
British Columbia, and the third largest in Canada, where connections are made with
Canadian Pacific trains for the Canadian Rockies, Eastern Canada, and the United
States, and with Canadian Pacific Steamships for Victoria and  Seattle.
We hope that your sojourn with us has been a pleasant and happy one and that
at some not too distant date we may have the pleasure of again having you with us.
  ALASKA
y!h^
AND THE
* JL=>
YUKON
A Magnificent View of Taku Glacier
I
West Taku Arm, Amidst a Panorama of Snow-Gapped Mountains
 #
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
t'RIU .Ell   IN   CANADA
 DAILY BULLETIN
Qounadlajn (PadJ^c
B.C. COAST   STEAMSHIP   SERVICE
 Canadian   Pacific  Railway  Company
B.    C.      COAST      STEAMSHIP      SERVICE
Daily Bulletin
This Bulletin is for your information and to assist
you in locating the various points of interest which can
be seen from the steamship. The times shown are necessarily approximate, exact time
of arrival at and departure from way ports will be posted on ship's bulletin board.
A large chart of the route is displayed in the Social Hall on which the ship's position
will be posted daily. Do not miss the notices on the Bulletin Board; they will be of
interest to you.
Sailing Day
The sailing hour has been arranged at 9:00 p.m. while it is still light in these
latitudes, at least during most of the summer season, in order that you may enjoy
a glimpse of the harbor and surroundings while passing through the harbor entrance,
or First Narrows.
A few miles beyond, on the right or "starboard" side, is Point Atkinson Lighthouse. The point on the left or "port" side is Point Grey with the buildings of the
University of British Columbia near the point.
After passing Point Atkinson the steamship turns northwest along the Strait of
Georgia following the Vancouver Island shore during the night.
u
St
Day
6:00 a.m. — Having passed Cape Mudge light, Quadra Island,
on the right, we proceed along Discovery Passage through Seymour Narrows, the narrowest part of the channel between Vancouver Island and the Islands off the mainland. A strong tide
runs through the narrows due to the ebb and flow of the tide
around the north end of Vancouver Island, and the passage is usually made only at
the time of slack water.
7:00 a.m. — Proceeding along Johnstone Straits, with Vancouver Island on our
left, and the Mainland and adjacent Islands on the right, a number of logging camps
can be seen on Vancouver Island shore, from which logs are rafted and towed to the
sawmills on the Lower Island and Mainland.
10:30 a.m. — ALERT BAY — The first port of call is a small village on Cormorant
Island, on the right side of the channel. We land at Alert Bay Wharf. Time will be
allowed for a walk ashore. To the right is the Indian Cemetery with a number of
interesting Totem Poles; also the Church of England Missionary Hospital and School.
To the left is the large Government Residential Indian School, and Indian village.
2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m Having passed the north
end of Vancouver Island on our left, we cross Queen
Charlotte Sound, the longest stretch of open water on
the entire voyage. At the entrance to the Sound is Pine
Island Lighthouse on the right, and two-thirds of the
way across is Egg Island Light on the right. A little
over half way across can be seen to the right the
entrance to Smith's Sound and further north Rivers
Inlet, where are located numerous salmon canneries.
5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m After traversing Fitzhugh
Sound for several hours the vessel makes a sharp turn
to the left through a narrow channel called Llama passage, where can be seen the old Indian village of Bella Bella on the left, also New
Bella Bella, thence we proceed northwestward through Seaforth Channel, passing
Ivory Island Lighthouse on the right.
10:00 p.m. —For about one hour we are crossing Millbank Sound and we feel the
swell of the Pacific Ocean, after which the ship enters Finlayson Channel and for
the rest of the night passes through the sheltered waters of Graham Reach, Fraser
Reach and Grenville Channel.
7:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. —After passing Lawyer's Island light
on the left, we cross the mouth of the Skeena River and several
salmon canneries can be seen in the distance. The Skeena, a very
turbulent stream has its source in central British Columbia. We
are now approaching Prince Rupert with Digby Island on which
can be  seen the  Canadian  Government Wireless  station  and  lighthouse  depot  on
the left.
9:00 a.m.—Prince Rupert is the most northerly city in British Columbia, population about 8,000. It is located on Kaien Island, close to the Mainland, is an important centre for the fishing industry of the Naas and Skeena Rivers, and for mining
in the Portland Canal district, located about  100 miles north.
The Government floating drydock, 600 feet long, with a lifting capacity for
vessels of 20,000 tons deadweight, and a large cold storage plant, where can be seen
immense quantities of frozen halibut, are only a short distance from the wharf
by auto.
A considerable portion of the halibut caught on the banks of Southeastern
Alaska is shipped by rail line from Prince Rupert to Eastern Canada and United
States.
12:00 Noon — Leaving Prince Rupert our vessel rounds Digby Island and turns
northward passing the old Indian village of Metlakatla on the right, and about thirty
minutes later Port Simpson, one of the oldest settlements in Northern British
Columbia, founded by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1834.
3:00 p.m. — On the right is Green Island lighthouse, six miles south of the International Boundary. Our vessel now crosses Dixon Entrance with the Pacific Ocean
on the left and Tree Point Light on the right at the entrance to Revilla Gigedo
Channel. We are now in United States waters and after passing Mary Island Light
on the left, will shortly enter Tongass Narrows on the
right side of which is located our first port of call in
Alaska—Ketchikan.
7:00 p.m. — United States Customs and Immigration
officials will board our vessel immediately on arrival at
Ketchikan and all passengers will be required to present
their immigration cards and pass inspection before going
ashore. Ketchikan, population of 6,500 is one of the
largest and most prosperous cities in Alaska, being the
centre of the fishing industry, with about fourteen
canneries located in the immediate vicinity, and a large
cold storage plant. A fifteen-minute walk up the stream
to the waterfall, will, in the late summer, give the visitor an opportunity to see
salmon ascending the swift waters of the rapids in large numbers.
A visit should be made to the new Indian school established by the United States
Government, where the children are taught  the lost  art of  making totem poles;
special native teachers having been brought in from the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Visitors will also find a number of interesting curio stores.
The ship's sailing hour will be posted on the blackboard at the foot of the
gangway as you go ashore.
3———«_^       4:30   a.m.—During   the  night   we  have   traversed   Clarence
rd     "" Strait and Stikine Strait and now make a short stop at Wrangell,
p.        \       an old settlement established by the Russians and named after
Uay \     Baron von Wrangell, one of the ablest of the Russian Governors
        of Alaska. A few miles to the north of Wrangell lies the mouth
of the Stikine River, which is navigable for about 185 miles to Telegraph Creek, in
Northern British Columbia, an outfitting point for big game hunters entering the
Cassiar District. The Barrington Transportation Company operate a regular weekly
gas boat service from Wrangell to Telegraph Creek during the open season of
Navigation. Wrangell has a number of interesting curio stores and some splendid
totem poles. Our vessel only makes a short stop northbound but an opportunity
will be afforded to inspect this interesting port on our southbound voyage.
6:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. — About two hours after leaving Wrangell we enter
Wrangell Narrows, with Point Alexander Lighthouse on the right, a narrow tortuous
channel, about 20 miles long between Kupreanof Island, on the left, and Mitkof
Island on the right. The channel is well marked with buoys and beacons, and the
ship passes at half speed through some very beautiful scenery. At the north end of
the Narrows, on the right, lies the old town of Petersburg, settled originally in the
days of the Russian occupation, and now a flourishing fishing centre. After leaving
the north end of Wrangell Narrows many small icebergs may be seen ahead of and
to the right of the vessel. The bergs have broken away from the Baird or Patterson
Glaciers, both of which can be seen clearly in fair weather.
9:00  a.m.  to 4:00  p.m After  passing Petersburg  a  beautiful  panorama  of
mountain scenery opens before us. Passing Prolewy Point light on the left we enter
Frederick Sound, to the northwest can be seen the Devil's Thumb, a sharp needle
 of rock 9,077 feet high, located on the International
boundary line. Further south the Needles, 10,002 feet
high, and Castle Mountain 7,326 feet high, all of the
peaks are on the International boundary line.
During the afternoon we follow Stephen's Passage
and about 4:00 p.m. enter Taku Inlet diverging from
the main channel enroute to the Glacier.
5:00 p.m.—We are now within a short distance of
the face of the magnificent TAKU GLACIER (pronounced Ta-koo). This immense river of ice, about a
mile wide on its face and 100 to 200 feet high, has its
origin in the perpetual ice-fields to the east of the Coast
Range in British Columbia, running for 90 miles before entering the sea. Small bergs
are constantly breaking off from the main body of the Glacier, and these may be
encountered for a considerable distance south of Taku Inlet. On the left is the dead
or receding Norris glacier.
7:00 p.m. —A short run from the Glacier brings us to Gastineau Channel and on
our right, as we enter, is the town of Thane. On the left, on Douglas Island, is the
famous Treadwell Mine, flooded by a cave-in during 1917 and not since operated.
Adjoining the site is the town of Douglas, and near the end of the channel lies
Juneau, the Capital of Alaska, population about 8,000. Here are splendid stores and
curio shops, modern hotels and many beautiful residences and public buildings.
On the side of Mount Roberts, overlooking the city, can be seen the buildings
of the Alaska Juneau Gold Mining Company, the largest gold quartz mill in the
United States or Alaska, with a capacity of 12,000 tons of ore per day.
The territorial Museum, with its splendid collection of Eskimo curios is said
to be the finest and only complete one of its kind. A motor trip of fourteen miles
will take you to the Grand Mendenhall Glacier and beautiful Auk Lake. Juneau was
founded in the 80's and was first called Harrisburg, then Rockwell and finally
Juneau, having been made the capital of Alaska in 1900, but the executive offices
were not removed from Sitka until 1906. Our vessel will sail for Skagway at midnight.
^f*j       9:00 a.m.— (Ship's time)—During the early morning hours
^k ^ I       a magnificent panorama of mountains and glaciers opens before
^T   Day  \      us as our vessel passes along the Lynn Canal. On the west side,
*!]]' . A     about one hour before reaching Skagway, are the towns of Haines
and Fort Seward, the latter a United States military post. Our
sea trip ends at Skagway where connection is made with trains of the White Pass and
Yukon Route for Lake Bennett,  Carcross  and Whitehorse,  connecting with their
Lake and River steamships to West Taku Arm, Atlin and Dawson.
Skagway with its population of about 500 is almost surrounded by mountains,
among the principal points of interest are Reid's Falls, Dewey Falls, Dewey Lake,
Alpine Ridge and Skagway Park. There are also good hiking trails to A.B. and Dewey
Mountains, and numerous relics of the Trail of '98 to the Klondyke Gold Fields.
2611
Additional copies for mailing will be gladly supplied at Pursers' Office,
  ALASKA
AND THE
YUKON
A Magnificent Vieiv of Talut Glacier
aku Arm, Amidst a Panorama of Snow-Gapped Mountains
 CANADIAN
PACIFIC
 DAILY BULLETIN
QcmaSkm (Paapc
B.C. COAST   STEAMSHIP   SERVICE
 *>;
Canadian   Pacific  Railway   Company
B.    C.      COAST      STEAMSHIP      SERVICE
Daily Bulletin
This Bulletin is for your information and to assist
you in locating the various points of interest which can
be seen from the steamship. The times shown are necessarily approximate, exact time
of arrival at and departure from way ports will be posted on ship's bulletin board.
A large chart of the route is displayed in the Social Hall on which the ship's position
will be posted daily. Do not miss the notices on the Bulletin Board; they will be of
interest to you.
Sailing Day
i$MA.-*tf^
The sailing hour has been arranged at 9:00 p.m. while it is still light in these
latitudes, at least during most of the summer season, in order that you may enjoy
a glimpse of the harbor and surroundings while passing through the harbor entrance,
or First Narrows.
A few miles beyond, on the right or "starboard" side, is Point Atkinson Lighthouse. The point on the left or "port" side is Point Grey with the buildings of the
University of British Columbia near the point.
After passing Point Atkinson the steamship turns northwest along the Strait of
Georgia following the Vancouver Island shore during the night.
m
:00 a.m. — Having passed Cape Mudge light, Quadra Island,
on the right, we proceed along Discovery Passage through Seymour Narrows, the narrowest part of the channel between Vancouver Island and the Islands off the mainland. A strong tide
runs through the narrows due to the ebb and flow of the tide
around the north end of Vancouver Island, and the passage is usually made only at
the time of slack water.
7:00 a.m. — Proceeding along Johnstone Straits, with Vancouver Island on our
left, and the Mainland and adjacent Islands on the right, a number of logging camps
can be seen on Vancouver IsUndshorg, from which logs are rafted and towed to the
sawmills on the Lower Island and Mainland.
10:30 a.m. — ALER1
0— The first port of call is a small village on Cormorant
Island, on the rigEt side of the channel. ^^2£w™«wk£^^ Time will be
allowed for a walk ashore. To the right is the Indian Cemetery with a number of
interesting Totem Pole^; also the Church of England"Missionary Hospital and School.
To the left is the large Government Residential Indian School, and Indian village.
-2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m Having passed the north
end of Vancouver Island on our left, we cross iQueen
Charlotte SoundAthe longest stretch of open\jvater on
tn^Kftire^voyage. At the entrance to the Sound is Pirte
Island Lighthouse on the right, and two-thirds of the
way across is Egg Island Light on the right. A little
over half way across can be seen to the right the
entrance to Smith's Sound and further north Rivers
Inlet, where are located numerous salmon canneries.
5^00 p.m. to SiO„Op.m.--After traversing Fitzhugh
Sound for several hours the vessel makes a, sharp turn
to the left through a narrow channel called Llama pas-
jagg^Where can be seen the old Indian village of Bella Bella on the left, also New
BeJlaJBeJ^a^ thence we proceed northwestward through Seaforth Channel,, passing
Ivory Island Lighthouse on the right.
10:00 p.m. -—For about one hour we are crossing Millbank Sound and we feel the
swell of the Pacific Ocean, after which the ship enters(Finlayson Channel and for
the rest of the night passes through the sheltered waters oT Graham Reach, Fraser
Reach and Grenville Channel.
J—^™—           w 7:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. — After passing Lawyer's Island light
I  f\nd on the left, we cross the mouth of the Skeena River and several
^m    j~v        1 salmon canneries can be seen in the distance. The Skeena, a very
j ^™   Lsuy  \ turbulent stream has its source in central British Columbia. We
are now approaching Prince Rupert with Digby Island on which
can be seen the Canadian Government Wireless station and lighthouse depot on
the left.
9:00 a.m.—Prince Rupert is the most northerly city in British Columbia, population about 8,000. It is located on Kaien Island, close to the Mainland, is an important centre for the fishing industry of the Naas and Skeena Rivers, and for mining
in the Portland Canal district, located about  100 miles north.
The Government floating drydock, 600 feet long, with a lifting capacity for
vessels of 20,000 tons deadweight, and a large cold storage plant, where can be seen
immense quantities of frozen halibut, are only a short distance from the wharf
by auto.
A considerable portion of the halibut caught on the banks of Southeastern
Alaska is shipped by rail line from Prince Rupert to Eastern Canada and United
States.
12:00 Noon i—Leaving Prince Rupert our vessel rounds Digby Island and turns
northward passing the old Indian village of Metlakatla on the right, and about thirty
minutes later Port Simpson, one of the oldest settlements in Northern British
Columbia, founded by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1834.
3:00 p.m. —On the right is Green Island lighthouse, six miles south of the International Boundary. Our vessel now crosses Dixon Entrance with the Pacific Ocean
on the left and Tree Point Light on the right at the entrance to Revilla Gigedo
Channel. We are now in United States waters and after passing Mary Island Light
on the left, will shortly enter Tongass Narrows on the
right side of which is located our first port of call in
Alaska—Ketchikan.
7:00 p.m. United States Customs and Immigration
officials will board our vessel immediately on arrival at
Ketchikan and all passengers will be required to present
their immigration cards and pass inspection before going
ashore. Ketchikan, population of 6,500 is one of the
largest and most prosperous cities in Alaska, being the
centre of the fishing industry, with about fourteen
canneries located in the immediate vicinity, and a large
cold storage plant. A fifteen-minute walk up the stream
to the waterfall, will, in the late summer,  give the visitor  an opportunity to see
salmon ascending the swift waters of the rapids in large numbers.
A visit should be made to the new Indian school established by the United States
Government,  where  the  children are  taught  the  lost  art  of  making  totem poles;
special native teachers having been brought in from the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Visitors will also find a number of interesting curio stores.
The ship's sailing hour will be posted on the blackboard  at the foot of  the
gangway as you go ashore.
(—— i in    ^       4:30   a.m. — During   the   night   we  have   traversed   Clarence
,   #^ r J Strait and Stikine Strait and now make a short stop at Wrangell,
■m    ^       1       an old settlement established by the Russians and named after
j   +J   Uay \      garon von Wrangell, one of the ablest of the Russian Governors
^============r^    0f Alaska. A few miles to the north of Wrangell lies the mouth
of the Stikine River, which is navigable for about 185 miles to Telegraph Creek, in
Northern British Columbia, an outfitting point for big game hunters entering the
Cassiar District. The Barrington Transportation Company operate a regular weekly
gas boat service from Wrangell to Telegraph Creek during the open season of
Navigation. Wrangell has a number of interesting curio stores and some splendid
totem poles. Our vessel only makes a short stop northbound but an opportunity
will be afforded to inspect this interesting port on our southbound voyage.
6:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. — About two hours after leaving Wrangell we enter
Wrangell Narrows, with Point Alexander Lighthouse on the right, a narrow tortuous
channel, about 20 miles long between Kupreanof Island, on the left, and Mitkof
Island on the right. The channel is well marked with buoys and beacons, and the
ship passes at half speed through some very beautiful scenery. At the north end of
the Narrows, on the right, lies the old town of Petersburg, settled originally in the
days of the Russian occupation, and now a flourishing fishing centre. After leaving
the north end of Wrangell Narrows many small icebergs may be seen ahead of and
to the right of the vessel. The bergs have broken away from the Baird or Patterson
Glaciers, both of which can be seen clearly in fair weather.
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.—After passing Petersburg a beautiful panorama of
mountain scenery opens before us. Passing Prolewy Point light on the left we enter
Frederick Sound, to the northwest can be seen the Devil's Thumb, a sharp needle
 of rock 9,077 feet high, located on the International
boundary line. Further south the Needles, 10,002 feet
high, and Castle Mountain 7,326 feet high, all of the
peaks are on the International boundary line.
During the afternoon we follow Stephen's Passage
and about 4:00 p.m. enter Taku Inlet diverging from
the main channel enroute to the Glacier.
5:00 p.m. — We are now within a short distance of
the face of the magnificent TAKU GLACIER (pronounced Ta-koo). This immense river of ice, about a
mile wide on its face and 100 to 200 feet high, has its
origin in the perpetual ice-fields to the east of the Coast
Range in British Columbia, running for 90 miles before entering the sea. Small bergs
are constantly breaking off from the main body of the Glacier, and these may be
encountered for a considerable distance south of Taku Inlet. On the left is the dead
or receding Norris glacier.
7:00 p.m.—A short run from the Glacier brings us to Gastineau Channel and on
our right, as we enter, is the town of Thane. On the left, on Douglas Island, is the
famous Treadwell Mine, flooded by a cave-in during 1917 and not since operated.
Adjoining the site is the town of Douglas, and near the end of the channel lies
Juneau^the Capital of Alaska, population about 8J300. Here are splendid stores and
curio shops, modem hotels and many beautiful residences and public buildings.
On the side of Mount Roberts, overlooking the city, can be seen the buildings
of the Alaska Juneau Gold Mini^^nrpp^nv. the largest gold quartz mill in the
United States^or Alaska, with a capacity of 12,000 tons of ore per day.
The territorial Museum, with its splendid collection of Eskimo curios is said
to be the finest and only complete one of its kind. A motor trip of fourteen miles
will take you to the Grand Mendenhall Glacier and beautiful Auk Lake. Juneau was
founded in the 80's and was first called Harrisburg, then Rockwell and^ finally
Juneau, having been made the capital of Alaska in 1900, but the executive offices
were not removed from Sitka until 1906. Our vessel will sail for Skagway at midnight.
19:00 a.m.— (Ship's time)—During the early morning hours
^k *"- a magnificent panorama of mountains and glaciers opens before
I ^i    Day \      us as our vessel passes along the Lynn Canal. On the west side,
1 A     about one hour before reaching Skagway* are the towns of Haines
and Fort Seward, the latter a United States military post. Our
sea trip ends at Skagway where connection is made with trains of the White Pass and
Yukon Route for Lake Bennett, Carcross and Whitehorse, connecting with their
Lake and River steamships to West Taku Arm, Atlin and Dawson.
Skagway with its population of about 500 is almost surrounded by mountains,
among the principal points of interest are Reid's Falls, Dewey Falls, Dewey Lake,
Alpine Ridge and Skagway Park. There are also good hiking trails to A.B. and Dewey
Mountains, and numerous relics of the Trail of '98 to the Klondyke Gold Fields.
2611
Additional copies for mailing will be gladly supplied at Pursers' Office.
  '
A Magnificent V
ALASKA
AND THE
YUKON
S.S. Princess Alice
Skagway, Alaska
West Taku Arm, Amidst a Panorama of Snow-Gapped Mountains
 CANADIAN
PACIFIC
1   B. C. COAST
[STEAMSHIPS
^MvwORLDsX
^^^■i greatestI
^^■1   TRAVEL   1^-     /
^B\SYSTEM/Mpr
"
 DAILY BULLETIN of your
GmuJUkQ^c
 B.C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
DAILY  BULLETIN
Ship time is Pacific Standard
8:00 p.m.—We glide slowly out of
Vancouver harbour on our first lap of this
unique cruise to Alaskan ports, once scenes of violent adventure in the
mysterious land of the silent seas.
For the next few days all the facilities of our service are at your
convenience to make this voyage a memorable one.
This bulletin will help you identify places of interest as we cruise through
deep Inside Passage waters. We follow the wake of intrepid Russian,
Spanish and British explorers and adventurers who sought in vain for a
northwest waterway from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Glance back at the
beautiful setting as we leave Vancouver harbour in the closing dusk. Less
than 75 years ago it was desolate bushland.
The Lions' Gate suspension bridge divides Vancouver harbour from the
Gulf of Georgia. In 1792, Captain George Vancouver, a British naval officer
and explorer extraordinary, sailed north on this same course aboard an
80-foot sloop, H.M.S. "Discovery". He named the gulf after King George III,
who backed his hardy venture.
Soon we pass Point Atkinson lighthouse on our right (starboard). Around
us are chunky boats of salmon fishermen; plodding tugs with tows of spruce,
fir and cedar rafts; deep-sea ships arriving with exotic cargoes from
distant world ports. This lighthouse is their guiding beacon to a safe harbour.
Also to starboard is the placid, deep water cutoff to Howe Sound. The
explorer named this for Admiral Richard Howe, who was then Commander
in Chief of America and a close friend of Benjamin Franklin.
On the starboard hand also, we pass close to the shore of Bowen
Island, a popular summer resort.
Tomorrow about 4 a.m., we will run the Seymour Narrows "slot". Here in
surges, swift tide water boils through the passage at
il 3 knots. Our ship is equipped with every safety
aid to navigation. It is piloted by officers experienced in these coastal waters, which are different
from any other waters in the world, who have
timed our arrival for slack water.
7:00 a.m.—We are now in Johnstone Straits.
The mountain-girt, heavily wooded shoreline on our left (port), is vast
Vancouver Island, 282 miles long and 60 miles wide. It was first discovered
by the famed Spanish explorer, Senor Bodega y Quadra in 1775. He
came up from Lima, Peru, in a 36-foot boat, built of green timbers. This is
just about the same length as our life boats. He named this Quadra Island.
When Captain Vancouver arrived later, the island was ceded to Great
Britain, and the name changed to Vancouver
Island. To its shores came Dutch, Portuguese,
Chinese and Russian traders. They sought
fabulous fortunes from sea otter pelts, which
Indian tribes were using for teepees. They left on
record behind them a saga of pillage and
brutality which has never been equalled to this
day. They also sought gold, and massacred
entire Indian villages in their madness for this
precious metal. These were the pioneers of
civilization through this vast territory, although
this was incidental to their real motives. Now the
coast of Vancouver Island is dotted with fishing
villages and logging camps.
10:30 a.m.—Look to starboard for Alert Bay, an old Indian Village
bristling with totem poles. It is on Cormorant Island and the centre of these
waters for salmon canning. Here the Government maintains a large residential school. There is also a Church of England missionary hospital.
2:00-5:00 p.m.—In Queen Charlotte Sound, our first stretch of open
water, our ship has struck her real travel beat. With each turn of the
propeller, civilization falls behind and we move into the unchanged world
of the primitive. Voyagers who keep a sharp lookout may see whales
blowing as they frolic through the Pacific. In the distance to port, like a
stationary cloud, is the northern tip of Vancouver Island. It was in this Sound,
named after Queen Charlotte Sophia, wife of King George III, that Captain
Vancouver ran his "Discovery" aground and fought off fierce Haida
Indians who came in huge red cedar canoes to plunder his ship.
5:00-7:00 p.m.—Now we are in Fitzhugh Sound, named by James
Hanna, an enterprising English trader who operated on the China coast in
1785. He sailed across the Pacific in a 60-ton brig. From these waters he
got 580 sea otter skins from the natives, which he sold in China for $20,500.
7:30 p.m.—Pass Bella Bella and enter Milbanke Sound at 8:30 p.m.
7:00-8:30 a.m.—Now we are at the mouth of the famous Skeena River,
at whose source far in the interior of British Colum-
2;^*^\        bia, salmon spawn.
flJ This river has on its banks more canneries than any
p.        \       other river in the world. Strange as it may seem, Cap-
Uay\       ta|n Vancouver missed the mouth of the Skeena when
= he  came  along  the  same  route  we  now  sail.   We
will cruise past Hammer Island, Glenn Island,
Lawyer's Lighthouse and Holland rock, and enter Prince Rupert harbour
with Digby Island to port, passing Watson Island, site of a 40-million-dollar
celanese plant. The island actually lies in a slough of the Skeena River.
During the war Watson was an ammunition dump for United States forces
in Alaska.
8:30-1 1:30 a.m.—Prince Rupert, 40 miles from the Alaska Boundary,
with a population of 8,500, boasts the world's largest cold storage plant.
From it thousands of pounds of halibut and salmon, caught in the channels
and sound through which we travel, are shipped by air, rail and steamer
to all parts of the world. Ten miles from the city is the 300-ton-a-day
Columbia Cellulose mill. As the most northern city in British Columbia it is a
rail head to eastern Canada.
11:30-3:00  p.m.—We  retrace our passage  round  Digby Island  to
Chatham Sound, named by Captain Vancouver
after the small ship H.M.S. "Chatham" which
accompanied him on his voyage of exploration.
About 1 p.m. we should pass Lucy Island.
It is claimed that the British explorer named
this islet after his sweetheart in England. However, he died a bachelor. He was only 33 years
old when he sailed from Falmouth, England, on
this voyage. In these waters which we cruise in a
few days, Vancouver spent five years "feeling"
his way and suffering grim hardships and
privation.
The British Government had a standing
reward of Twenty Thousand Pounds (about
$50,000) for the first person who returned with proof of the long-dreamed
waterway through the North American continent from Pacific to Atlantic.
Oddly enough, a passage was finally discovered in 1946. The Royal
Canadian Mounted Police arctic patrol ship St. Roche finally conquered
the northern route, but had to go thousands of miles north through the
Arctic circle.
2:00 p.m.—We pass Green Island lighthouse on the starboard hand
and enter Holiday Passage, where the crew of the "Discovery" were
given a few days holiday before pushing farther northward, and enter
Dixon Entrance, another stretch of Pacific sea.
This entrance was named by the enterprising trader George Dixon,
another English trader who came across from China many years before
Captain Vancouver arrived. Dixon saw the priceless sea otter pelts in
China where he was trading. They made an excellent luxury companion
for those priceless Mandarin silks. He was told the pelts had come across
from Siberia. That the Russians had traded them for tea.
Dixon had a successful voyage to this coast. From the Tlingit Indians he
collected 2,552 sea otter pelts which he sold for $54,875. These enterprising traders considered the six hundred percent profit they made on
these trips a fair return for their courage and investments which were
usually a few cheap trinkets for the natives.
About 3:30 we cross the boundary waters which separate Alaska from
British Columbia. The first light in Alaskan waters is Lord Island.
5:30-6:30 p.m.—We are cruising Revilligedo Channel, named after
the Viceroy of New Spain (Mexico).
Here Captain Vancouver and his companion Puget (after whom Puget
Sound is named) were almost stoned to death by a tribe of hostile Indians.
From the tall cliffs that tower above us, the natives pelted the explorers
with rocks as they rowed back to the "Discovery" anchored in this channel.
They had come ashore in a row boat to examine rock formations which
might contain gold.
While lounging on deck, it will take little imagination to picture Indians
and Aleutians, paddling through these waters chanting weird songs, long
before the white man knew of this continent.
We are now moving into areas which still retain the mark of Baranof,
fabulous "Russian King of Alaska", who came down from the eternal ice
fields of Siberia in 1740, to establish a chain of fur trading forts through the
Alaskan panhandle.
 During this period of expansion, there were
60-odd trading companies all at each other's
throats, establishing forts and having them
blown up by rival companies in this frantic
rush for pelts.
6:00 p.m.—Angle Point. United States Immigration officers will board our ship from a motor
launch. Before disembarking at Ketchikan, our
next port of call, all passengers will present
their immigration cards and  pass inspection.
7:00 p.m.—Ketchikan. This Alaskan city of
9,000 population cans more fish than any other
city in the world. There are fourteen canneries and a large cold storage
plant in the immediate vicinity. In late summer a run up the stream will
reward the visitor with a view of schools of salmon ascending swift waters to
the spawning grounds. In the city park are some fine examples of totem
poles.
There is a good variety of curio stores. Ward Cove is the site of
a large new pulp mill.
The ship's sailing time from Ketchikan will be posted on the blackboard at
the foot of the gangway.
We sail through Tongass Narrows to starboard and Guard Island to
port; during the night we will traverse Clarence Strait and pass Wrangell.
A stop will be made southbound. Then you will have an opportunity
to inspect this historic city which was originally a Russian trading fort.
It was established by Baranof who tried to colonize it with Cossacks.
They refused even to try to farm the land. At the height (1831) of Russian
colonization in Alaska, Wrangell came under the influence of Baron Von
Wrangell and was founded under his able leadership. In 1834 the Russians
erected Fort Dionisyus Many influences of Russian life can still be seen in
the churches. It has excellent curio shops.
(TUT"""*"^^j 6:00-7:00 a.m.—We are in the Wrangell Narrows.
^\rd On our left is Kupreanof Island and Mitkof Island on
I J5  Day \ the r'ght'
\ It was through the straits which we shall travel
today that the biggest mass otter hunts in Alaska
were staged.
One hunt staged by the Russians consisted of 550 Aleutian biders (skin
boats) and 1,200 Aleutian natives. This hunt took an entire month. The pelts
yielded $2,000,000. Here, too, the trading ships of Jacob Astor came to
help found that famous fortune.
Bloody battles were fought and refought here between traders,
explorers, Aleutians and savage Indian tribes. This continual warfare
sadly depleted the Aleutian race. Demanded and enslaved by the warring
traders because they were good otter hunters, these primitive people found
themselves caught in the middle. If they hunted seals they were robbed of
them or their flimsy craft were lost in raging gales. If they did not hunt they
were massacred. Baranof was the first white trader to give the Aleutians
a fair break. It paid off well for him.
Now we cruise northward to Frederick Sound. To the northwest lies the
Devil's Thumb which rises 9,077 feet high. Farther south the Needles 10,002
feet high and Castle Mountain 7,326 feet high. Around our ship will be
ice calves which have broken away from the Baird and Patterson Glaciers.
These are remnants of a primeval ice age.
It is with awe that we realize that these drifting floes are part of a
world of prehistoric mammals. In the ice age, these glacial beds united
this continent with Asia. Across these glaciers from Siberia came the aboriginal Aleutians and Eskimos, whose descendants live still in the scattered
towns and villages we pass.
3:00 p.m.—The town of Thane is on the right as we enter Gastineau
Channel. On the left is Douglas Island. Here is the famous Treadwell Mine,
flooded in 1917 and since abandoned. Adjoining the site is the town of
Douglas. Near the end of this channel is Juneau, capital of Alaska, with a
population of about 7,500. The city has modern hotels, many fine residences,
an outstanding museum and public buildings. The biggest low grade
quartz mine in the United States or Alaska is located here. It is seen on the
side of the 4,000-foot Mount Juneau, overlooking the city. Gold recovery
from this mine was only around 83 cents per ton of ore.
Juneau does not reckon her history from the sealing days, but from
1880 when Joe Juneau and Fred Harris, who had been grubstaked by a
Sitka Mining Engineer called Pliz, came north with the frenzied horde of
men seeking the gleaming gold nuggets in the Klondike.lt has been the
capital of Alaska since 1900. The territorial museum is a must for every
visitor. It has the world's finest collection of Russian, Eskimo and Aleutian
art. In it is a copy of the document of the purchase of Alaska from Czar
Alexander II of Russia by United States of America in 1867. Grand Mendenhall Glacier and beautiful Auk Lake are about a 14-mile drive.
1 1:30 p.m.—Leave Juneau. We retrace our course through Gastineau
Channel as far as Marmion Island and into Stephens Passage.
During the night we will cruise Lynn Canal, which Captain Vancouver
named after King's Lynn, his home in England.
______ 6:00-8:00   a.m.—We   are   now  sailing   through
t Chilkoot Inlet and  passing the town of Haines and
Jk ttl the old Chilkoot barracks. A road connects this town
JbA   Dav  \       w'*^ ^e famed Alcan Highway. Skagway is our next
1      * y   \      port of call.
9:00  a.m.—Skagway, that magic name indelibly
engraved on the world's memory. This is the gateway
to the real glamour north.
To this town in '98 came gold seekers from all over the world —
bearded, full-bodied men, slim downy-cheeked youngsters, soft-bosomed,
hard-eyed women, the crook, the gambler, the adventurer and the miner.
They came not to remain in Skagway. Here they outfitted for the hard
trek across the White Pass to bonanza creeks of the Yukon.
Ghosts of the days when gold dust and nuggets were standard currency
for ham and eggs still haunt this town. Here, fortunes were risked on the
turn of a card and human life became the cheapest commodity on the trail.
Now tourists can take the train from Skagway over the same route as the
gold seekers toiled toward the gold fields beyond.
But Skagway has other surprises besides the grave of Soapy Smith and
the poems of Robert Service and the tales of Jack London. During the short
summer, nature works wonders in this arctic soil. Endless days result in rapid
plant life growth. They reach sizes three times bigger than the normal
"outside".
  CRUISE MEMORIES
ARE GOOD MEMORIES
The Purser will be glad to supply extra copies.
1 957
 DAILY BULLETIN of your
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DAILY BULLETIN
Ship time is Pacific Standard
8:00 p.m.—We glide slowly out of
Vancouver harbour on our first lap of this
unique cruise to Alaskan ports, once scenes of violent adventure in the
mysterious land of the silent seas.
For the next few days all the facilities of our service are at your
convenience to make this voyage a memorable one.
This bulletin will help you identify places of interest as we cruise through
deep Inside Passage waters. We follow the wake of intrepid Russian,
Spanish and British explorers and adventurers who sought in vain for a
northwest waterway from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Glance back at the
beautiful setting as we leave Vancouver harbour in the closing dusk. Less
than 80 years ago it was desolate bushland.
The Lions' Gate suspension bridge divides Vancouver harbour from the
Gulf of Georgia. In 1792, Captain George Vancouver, a British naval officer
and explorer extraordinary, sailed north on this same course aboard an
80-foot sloop, H.M.S. "Discovery". He named the gulf after King George III,
who backed his hardy venture.
Soon we pass Point Atkinson lighthouse on our right (starboard). Around
us are chunky boats of salmon fishermen; plodding tugs with tows of spruce,
fir and cedar rafts; deep-sea ships arriving with exotic cargoes from
distant world ports. This lighthouse is their guiding beacon to a safe harbour.
Also to starboard is the placid, deep water cutoff to Howe Sound. The
explorer named this for Admiral Richard Howe, who was then Commander
in Chief of America and a close friend of Benjamin Franklin.
On the starboard hand also, we pass close to the shore of Bowen
Island, a popular summer resort.
Tomorrow about 4 a.m., we will run the Seymour Narrows "slot". Here in
surges, swift tide water boils through the passage at
al 3 knots. Our ship is equipped with every safety
aid to navigation. It is piloted by officers experienced in these coastal waters, which are different
from any other waters in the world, who have timed
our arrival for slack water. Here, in April 1958, the
famous Ripple Rock was blown up by the largest
non-atomic explosion ever set off in North America.
7:00 a.m.—We are now in Johnstone Straits.
The mountain-girt, heavily wooded shoreline on our left (port), is vast
Vancouver Island, 282 miles long and 60 miles wide. It was first discovered
by the famed Spanish explorer, Senor Bodega y Quadra in 1775. He
came up from Lima, Peru, in a 36-foot boat, built of green timbers. This is
just about the same length as our life boats. He named this Quadra Island.
When Captain Vancouver arrived later, the island was ceded to Great
Britain, and the name changed to Vancouver
Island. To its shores came Dutch, Portuguese,
Chinese and Russian traders. They sought
fabulous fortunes from sea otter pelts, which
Indian tribes were using for teepees. They left on
record behind them a saga of pillage and
brutality which has never been equalled to this
day. They also sought gold, and massacred
entire Indian villages in their madness for this
precious metal. These were the pioneers of
civilization through this vast territory, although
this was incidental to their real motives. Now the
coast of Vancouver Island is dotted with fishing
villages and logging camps.
10:30 a.m.—Look to starboard for Alert Bay, population 700, an old
Indian Village bristling with totem poles. It is on Cormorant Island and the
centre of these waters for salmon canning. Here the Government maintains
a large Indian residential school administered by the Anglican Church.
There are also a hospital and a wireless station.
2:00-5:00 p.m.—In Queen Charlotte Sound, our first stretch of open
water, our ship has struck her real travel beat. With each turn of the
propeller, civilization falls behind and we move into the unchanged world
of the primitive. Voyagers who keep a sharp lookout may see whales
blowing as they frolic through the Pacific. In the distance to port, like a
stationary cloud, is the northern tip of Vancouver Island. It was in this Sound,
named after Queen Charlotte Sophia, wife of King George III, that Captain
Vancouver ran his "Discovery" aground and fought off fierce Haida
Indians who came in huge red cedar canoes to plunder his ship.
5:00-7:00 p.m.—Now we are in Fitzhugh Sound, named by James
Hanna, an enterprising English trader who operated on the China coast in
1785. He sailed across the Pacific in a 60-ton brig. From these waters he
got 580 sea otter skins from the natives, which he sold in China for $20,500.
7:30 p.m.—Pass Bella Bella and enter Milbanke Sound at 8:30 p.m.
7:00-8:30 a.m.—Now we are at the mouth of the famous Skeena River,
at whose source far in the interior of British Columbia, salmon spawn.
ft s This river has on its banks more canneries than any
III  f\nd other  river in the world. Strange  as it  may seem,
I ^M _^ \ Captain Vancouver missed the mouth of the Skeena
l'i| Mm L/Qy \ when he came along the same route we now sail.
^- '       We  will  cruise  past  Hammer  Island,  Glenn   Island,
Lawyer's Lighthouse and Holland rock, and enter Prince Rupert harbour
with Digby Island to port, passing Watson Island, site of a 40-million-dollar
celanese plant. The island actually lies in a slough of the Skeena River.
During the war Watson was an ammunition dump for United States forces
in Alaska.
8:30-1 1:00 a.m.—Prince Rupert, 40 miles from the Alaska Boundary,
with a population of 10,500, boasts the world's largest cold storage plant.
From it thousands of pounds of halibut and salmon, caught in the channels
and sound through which we travel, are shipped by air, rail and steamer
to all parts of the world. Ten miles from the city is the 300-ton-a-day
Columbia Cellulose mill. As the most northern city in British Columbia it is
a railhead to eastern Canada. The ship's sailing time from Prince Rupert
will be posted on the blackboard at the foot of the gangway.
11:00-3:00 p.m.—We  retrace our passage  round  Digby Island  to
Chatham Sound, named by Captain Vancouver
after the small ship H.M.S. "Chatham" which
accompanied him on his voyage of exploration.
About 1  p.m. we should pass Lucy Island.
It is claimed that the British explorer named
this islet after his sweetheart in England. However, he died a bachelor. He was only 33 years
old when he sailed from Falmouth, England, on
this voyage. In these waters which we cruise in a
few days, Vancouver spent five years "feeling"
his way and suffering grim hardships and
privation.
The British Government had a standing
reward of Twenty Thousand Pounds (about
$50,000) for the first person who returned with proof of the long-dreamed
waterway through the North American continent from Pacific to Atlantic.
Oddly enough, a passage was finally discovered in 1946. The Royal
Canadian Mounted Police arctic patrol ship St. Roch finally conquered
the northern route, but had to go thousands of miles north through the
Arctic circle.
2:00 p.m.—We pass Green Island lighthouse on the starboard hand
and enter Holiday Passage, where the crew of the "Discovery" were
given a few days holiday before pushing farther northward, and enter
Dixon Entrance, another stretch of Pacific sea.
This entrance was named by the enterprising trader George Dixon,
another English trader who came across from China many years before
Captain Vancouver arrived. Dixon saw the priceless sea otter pelts in
China where he was trading. They made an excellent luxury companion
for those priceless Mandarin silks. He was told the pelts had come across
from Siberia. That the Russians had traded them for tea.
Dixon had a successful voyage to this coast. From the Tlingit Indians he
collected 2,552 sea otter pelts which he sold for $54,875. These enterprising traders considered the six hundred percent profit they made on
these trips a fair return for their courage and investments which were
usually a few cheap trinkets for the natives.
About 3:30 we cross the boundary waters which separate Alaska from
British Columbia. This first light in Alaskan waters is Lord Island.
5:30-6:30 p.m.—We are cruising Revilligedo Channel, named after
the Viceroy of New Spain (Mexico).
Here Captain Vancouver and his companion Puget (after whom Puget
Sound is named) were almost stoned to death by a tribe of hostile Indians.
From the tall cliffs that tower above us, the natives pelted the explorers
with rocks as they rowed back to the "Discovery" anchored in this channel.
They had come ashore in a row boat to examine rock formations which
might contain gold.
While lounging on deck, it will take little imagination to picture Indians
and Aleutians, paddling through these waters chanting weird songs, long
before the white man knew of this continent.
We are now moving into areas which still retain the mark of Baranof,
fabulous "Russian King of Alaska", who came down from the eternal ice
fields of Siberia in 1740, to establish a chain of fur trading forts through
the Alaskan panhandle.
 During this period of expansion, there were
60-odd trading companies all at each other's
throats, establishing forts and having them
blown up by rival companies in this frantic
rush for pelts.
6:00p.m.—Angle Point. United States Immigration officers will board our ship from a motor
launch. Before disembarking at Ketchikan, our
next port of call, all passengers will present
their immigration cards and pass inspection.
7:00 p.m.—Ketchikan. This Alaskan city of
9,000 population cans more fish than any other
city in the world. There are several canneries, a large cold storage plant,
radio and TV stations and a modern school in the immediate vicinity. In
late summer a run up the stream will reward the visitor with a view of
schools of salmon ascending swift waters to the spawning grounds. In the
city park are some fine examples of totem poles.
There is a good variety of curio stores. Ward Cove is the site of a
large new pulp mill.
The ship's sailing time from Ketchikan will be posted on the blackboard
at the foot of the gangway.
We sail through Tongass Narrows to starboard and Guard Island to
port; during the night we will traverse Clarence Strait and pass Wrangell.
A stop will be made at the town of Wrangell southbound. Then you
will have an opportunity to inspect this historic place which was originally
a Russian trading fort.
It was established by Baranof who tried to colonize it with Cossacks.
They refused even to try to farm the land. At the height (1 831) of Russian
colonization in Alaska, Wrangel! came under the influence of Baron Von
Wrangell and was founded under his able leadership. In 1 834 the Russians
erected Fort Dionisyus. About a mile from the wharf is the Chief Shakes
Indian Community House and some interesting totem poles.
v       6:00-7:00 a.m.—We are in the Wrangell Narrows.
yA     "~ I        On our left is Kupreanof Island and Mitkof Island on the
I       right, as is the town of Petersburg at the northern end.
L/ay \ |t was through the straits which we shall travel
'       today that the  biggest  mass otter hunts in Alaska
were staged.
One hunt staged by the Russians consisted of 550 Aleutian biders (skin
boats) and 1,200 Aleutian natives. This hunt took an entire month. The pelts
yielded $2,000,000. Here, too, the trading ships of Jacob Astor came to
help found that famous fortune.
Bloody battles were fought and refought here between traders,
explorers, Aleutians and savage Indian tribes. This continual warfare
sadly depleted the Aleutian race. Demanded and enslaved by the warring
traders because they were good otter hunters, these primitive people found
themselves caught in the middle. If they hunted seals they were robbed of
them or their flimsy craft were lost in raging gales. If they did not hunt they
were massacred. Baranof was the first white trader to give the Aleutians
a fair break. It paid off well for him.
Now we cruise northward to Frederick Sound. To the northwest lies the
Devil's Thumb which rises 9,077 feet high. Farther south the Needles 10,002
feet high and Castle Mountain 7,326 feet high. Around our ship will be
ice calves which have broken away from the Baird and Patterson Glaciers.
These are remnants of a primeval ice age.
It is with awe that we realize that these drifting floes are part of a
world of prehistoric mammals. In the ice age, these glacial beds united
this continent with Asia. Across these glaciers from Siberia came the aboriginal Aleutians and Eskimos, whose descendants live still in the scattered
towns and villages we pass.
3:00 p.m.—The town of Thane is on the right as we enter Gastineau
Channel. On the left is Douglas Island. Here is the famous Treadwell Mine,
flooded in 1917 and since abandoned. Adjoining the site is the town of
Douglas. Near the end of this channel is Juneau, capital of Alaska, with a
population of about 7,500. The city has modern hotels, many fine residences,
an outstanding museum and public buildings. The biggest low grade
quartz mine in all the fifty United States is located here. It is seen on the
side of the 4,000-foot Mount Juneau, overlooking the city. Gold recovery
from this mine was only around 83 cents per ton of ore.
Juneau does not reckon her history from the sealing days, but from
1 880 when Joe Juneau and Fred Harris, who had been grubstaked by a
Sitka Mining Engineer called Pliz, came north with the frenzied horde of
men seeking the gleaming gold nuggets in the Klondike. It has been the
capita! of Alaska since 1 900. The territorial museum is a must for every
visitor. It has the world's finest collection of Russian, Eskimo and Aleutian
art. In it is a copy of the document of the purchase of Alaska from Czar
Alexander II of Russia by United States of America in 1 867. Grand Mendenhall Glacier and beautiful Auk Lake are about a 14-mile drive.
1 1:30 p.m.—Leave Juneau. We retrace our course through Gastineau
Channel as far as Marmion Island and into Stephens Passage.
During the night we will cruise Lynn Canal, which Captain Vancouver
named after King's Lynn, his home in England.
_______ 6:00-8:00 a.m.—We are now sailing through Chil-
i^Tmm^m L.«|       koot Inlet and passing the town of Haines and the old
jfl tn I       Chilkoot barracks. A road connects this town with the
All   V)av \      famed Alcan Highway. Skagway is our next port of call.
I  ^   \     9:00 a.m.—Skagway, a magic name indelibly en
graved on the world's memory, is the gateway to
the real glamour north.
To this town in '98 came gold seekers from all over the world —
bearded, full-bodied men, slim downy-cheeked youngsters, soft-bosomed,
hard-eyed women, the crook, the gambler, the adventurer and the miner.
They came not to remain in Skagway. Here they outfitted for the hard
trek across the White Pass to bonanza creeks of the Yukon, a journey
made today by the White Pass & Yukon Railway.
Ghosts of the days when gold dust and nuggets were standard currency
for ham and eggs still haunt this town. Here, fortunes were risked on the
turn of a card and human life became the cheapest commodity on the trail.
Now tourists can take the train from Skagway over the same route as the
gold seekers toiled toward the gold fields beyond.
But Skagway has other surprises besides the grave of Soapy Smith and
the poems of Robert Service and the tales of Jack London. During the short
summer, nature works wonders in this arctic soil. Endless days result in rapid
plant life growth. They reach sizes three times bigger than the normal
"outside".
  p
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4032 gross register tons
CRUISE MEMORIES
1
Length 330'
Breadth 48'
ARE GOOD MEMORIES
1962
The Purser will be glad to supply extra copies.
 (jZ/tCLCua/l C/aufft^\
ALASKA CRUISE
DAILY BULLETII
Canadian Gwcitic
ALASKA CRUISE
DAILY BULLETIN
 'W
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;  ALICE ARM
D'XOA/
P°*lLAND   INLE'
^TRANCE JS> *
c£>ST     GREEN   ISLAND HGHTHOUSE
^   f
m^ fLUCY  ISLAND  LIGHTHOUSE
DIGBY  ISLAND/* PRINCE   RUPERT
PORCHER  ISLAND
SKEENA
RIVER
LAWYER'S  LIGHTHOUSE
ALASKA ROUTE
PRINCESS PATRICIA
QUEEN
'77     '■   ■'.'"'
CHARLOTTE
PRINCESS
feUTEDALE
SOUND
ROYAL
ISLAND ^j
^T*
BOAT  BLUFF
M/LBANK  SO^D
IVORY   ISLAND   LIGHTHOUSE
BELLA  BELLA*
► OCEAN   FALLS
Jr'      G  \SLAND
Jr^VQWX. CHANNEL
I BELLA COOLA
&7
- Ift
CAPE SCOTT
EGG   ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE
PINE   ISLAND  LIGHTHOUSE
ftPULTNEY   POINT   LIGHTHOUSE
GILFORD   ISLAND
DENMAN   ISLAND    i ^?-N
HORNBY  ISLAND!
^
Southbound: Wmk
Only deviation shown
in blue. BHb.
Only deviation shown In blue.
^      BOWEN   ISLAND
POINT ATKINSON
PVancouver
Georgia/  omm^
ALASKA ROUTE - PRINCESS PATRICIA
>.i/s
WHITEHORSE
mm
"V
ft DAVIDSON  GLACIER
ELDRED  ROCK
SENTINAL  ISLAND!
^MENDENHALL GLACIER
DOUGLA^»Vl
DOUGLAS  ISLAND •
TRACY ARM
I FIVE  FINGERS  LIGHTHOUSE
#
Hi
WRANGELL
#
NARROWS-^ PETERSBURGH
\ + DEVIL'S THUMB
+'KATE'S  NEEDLE
CAPE  DECISION!
LINCOLN  RO«ty§
LIGHTHOUSV
t  GW^RD  ISLAND
!     JtVKETCHIKAlf
ANNETTE 9c
ISLAND Ok
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CANAD4
D*oN
dTREE  POINT LIGHTHOUSE
1ALORD  ROCK  LIGHT
ENTRANCE
r1
 PRINCES
PARTICULARS OF VESSEL
Gross tonnage 6000 tons
Length 373 ft. 9 in.
Breadth 56 feet
Draught 15 ft. 7 in.
Horsepower 15,500
Maximum speed  23.5 knots
FULLY AIR CONDITIONED
DISTANCES IN STATUTE MILES
NORTHBOUND
Vancouver to Prince Rupert  548
Prince Rupert to Ketchikan 106
Ketchikan to Juneau  327
Juneau to Skagway 115
1096
SOUTHBOUND
Skagway to Wrangell 267
Wrangell to Kitimat  329
Kitimat to Vancouver 504
1100
TOTAL STATUTE MILES VANCOUVER TO
SKAGWAY & RETURN 2196
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Regarding Ship's Services
MAIL- Mail received on board will be delivered to
staterooms as soon as received. Outgoing mail
properly stamped may be placed in the box by the
Purser's office. Mail going ashore at Vancouver,
Prince Rupert and Kitimat, B.C., must bear Canadian stamps which can be obtained from the Canadian stamp-vending machine by the newsstand. Mail going ashore at Ketchikan, Juneau,
Skagway and Wrangell in Alaska must bear U.S.
stamps which can be obtained from the U.S.
stamp-vending machine, also by the newsstand.
Rates for postage when mailed from Vancouver, Prince Rupert and Kitimat, B.C. to Canadian
points are: Postcards 4 cents, letters 5 cents. Postcards and the average letters to Canadian destinations are usually handled by airmail wherever
possible without additional charge. Rates to U.S.
points by surface carrier: postcards 4 cents, letters 5 cents. By airmail: postcards or letters
8 cents.
Rates for postage when mailed from Ketchikan, Juneau, Skagway or Wrangell to Canadian or
U.S. points by surface carrier: postcards 5 cents,
letters 6 cents. By airmail: postcards 8 cents,
letters 10 cents. There is daily airmail service
from the points mentioned in Alaska.
BATHS - If your room is not equipped with bath
please check with stewardess (women) or bellboy
(men) who will arrange your bath schedule.
LIBRARY - The library is attended by the Social
Hostess, and is situated aft on "E" deck. Library
hours will be posted on the Bulletin Board.
LAUNDRY & VALET SERVICE-An automatic
self-service laundry is available aboard. There is
also laundry and dry-cleaning service available
at shore establishments at Prince Rupert and
Juneau. Please check with Bellboy.
SEATS IN THE DINING ROOM - When entering the
Dining Room for the first luncheon, please present
your meal coupon to the Steward at Dining Room
entrance and he will assign your table and seat,
which will be yours for the complete cruise.
DEPARTURE TIMES - Please check Departure
Times on the blackboard at the head of the gangway before going ashore at Ports of Call. Don't
Miss the Ship.
WARNING WHISTLE - A half hour before departure
— 2 long blasts; 15 minutes before — one long
blast; at cast off — one short toot.
 !
BINGO CARDS - After the first Luncheon you will
be handed a Bingo Card by the hostess - it is called
"get acquainted Bingo". The Hostess will show you
what to do. Please retain these cards until called
for.
DECK GAMES - Shuffleboard - Ping-Pong. Horse
Racing and regular Bingo games will be held as
announced. A Hat Parade and dance will be held
the night leaving Kitimat southbound.
CAUTION RE-ACCIDENTS ABOARD - Please remember
that because of the peculiar construction of a
ship, it is necessary to have high sills at each outside doorway, leading out on deck, and smaller
ones inside. All stairs are steep so use hand-rails.
Special word for those wearing double focus glasses and high heel shoes: Be careful!
NEWSSTAND - Situated forward on the Promenade
Deck.
BEAUTY PARLOUR - Situated midships on the Promenade Deck. Please consult attendant regarding
appointments.
RADIO SERVICE - Messages should be filed with
Marconi Operator at the Wireless Room.
LOST ARTICLES - Apply at the Purser's Off ice.
VALUABLES - Deposit with Purser for safekeeping.
BULLETIN BOARDS - Notices of daily activities will
be posted each day.
ELEVATOR - Self-service between the Upper, Promenade and Boat Decks only.
BAGGAGE - Announcements regarding baggage will
be made evening before arrival at Vancouver.
FIRE & BOAT DRILL - At 11 A.M. on the first morning
northbound, the Master will announce Fire & Boat
Drill. This is a practice drill only and will acquaint
you with procedures. Listen carefully to the instructions.
DIVINE SERVICES - A nondenominational Protestant service will be held on board each Sunday
when and if there is a clergyman available. Similarly Holy Mass will be celebrated if a Roman
Catholic priest is aboard.
MEAL       Breakfast - 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.
HOURS:   Lunch
■first sitting
second sitting
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
12:00 noon
1:00 p.m.
Dinner     -first sitting
second sitting
Afternoon Tea Available  3:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Night Lunch Available 10:30 -11:30 p.m.
Early morning coffee available
in the After Social Hall        5:00a.m.
All Times shown (Pacific) Daylight Saving Time.
Punctuality at meals is essential for the benefit
of all passengers.
COCKTAIL LOUNGE - "PRINCESS ROOM" - Forward on the Boat Deck-Open 10:30 a.m. to
11:30 p.m., except while the vessel is in port.
The "Princess Room" is an ideal spot for a
pre-dinner cocktail and chat or an after-dinner
liqueur. In order to serve everyone better, wine
service is not available in the dining room.
DAILY  BULLETIN
9:00 p.m. D.S.T. - We glide slowly out of Vancouver harbour on our first lap of this unique cruise
to Alaskan ports, once scenes of violent adventure in the mysterious land of the silent seas.
For the next few days all the facilities of our
services are at your convenience to make this
voyage a memorable one.
This bulletin will help you identify places of
interest as we cruise through deep Inside Passage
waters. We follow the wake of intrepid Russian,
Spanish and British explorers and adventurers
who sought in vain for a northwest waterway from
the Pacific to the Atlantic. Glance back at the
beautiful setting as we leave Vancouver harbour
in the closing dusk. Less than 80 years ago it was
desolate bushland.
The Lions' Gate suspension bridge divides
Vancouver harbour from the Gulf of Georgia. In
1792, Captain George Vancouver, a British naval
officer and explorer extraordinary, sailed north
on this same course aboard an 80-foot sloop,
H.M.S. "Discovery". He named the gulf after King
George III, who backed his hardy venture.
Soon we pass Point Atkinson lighthouse on
our right (starboard). Around us are chunky boats
of salmon fishermen; plodding tugs with tows of
 spruce, fir and cedar rafts; deep-sea ships arriving with exotic cargoes from distant world ports.
This lighthouse is their guiding beacon to a safe
harbour.
Also to starboard is the placid, deep water
cutoff to Howe Sound. The explorer named this
for Admiral Richard Howe, who was then Commander in Chief of America and a close friend of
Benjamin Franklin.
On the starboard hand also, we pass close to
the shore of Bowen Island, a popular summer
resort.
7:00 a.m. D.S.T. - We are now in
Johnstone Straits. The mountain-
girt, heavily wooded shoreline on
our left (port), is vast Vancouver
Island, 282 miles long and 60
mi les wide. It was first discovered
by the famed Spanish explorer,
Senor Bodega y Quadra in 1775.
He came up from Lima, Peru, in a 36-foot boat,
built of green timbers.This is just about the same
length as our life boats. He named this Quadra
Island. When Captain Vancouver arrived later, the
island was ceded to Great Britain, and the name
changed to Vancouver Island. To its shores came
Dutch, Portuguese, Chinese and Russian traders.
They sought fabulous fortunes from sea otter
pelts, which Indian tribes were using for teepees.
They left on record behind them a saga of pillage
and brutality which has never been equalled to
this day. They also sought gold, and massacred
entire Indian villages in their madness for this
precious metal. These were the pioneers of civilization through this vast territory, although this
was incidental to their real motives. Now the coast
of Vancouver Island is dotted with fishing villages
and logging camps.
10:30 a.m. D.S.T. - Look to starboard for Alert Bay,
an old Indian Village bristling with totem poles.
Here the Government maintains a large residential school. It is also the transportation centre for
fishing and logging operations of the surrounding
district.
1:30-4:30 p.m. D.S.T. - In Queen Charlotte
Sound, our first stretch of open water, our ship
has struck her real travel beat. With each turn of
the propeller, civilization falls behind and we
move into the unchanged world of the primitive.
Voyagers who keep a sharp lookout may see whales
blowing as they frolic through the Pacific. In the
distance to port, like a stationary cloud, is the
northern tip of Vancouver Island. It was in this
Sound, named after Queen Charlotte Sophia, wife
of King George III, that Captain Vancouver ran his
"Discovery" aground and fought off fierce Haida
Indians who came in huge red cedar canoes to
plunder his ship.
5:00-7:00 p.m. D.S.T. - Now we are in Fitzhugh
Sound, named by James Hanna, an enterprising
English trader who operated on the China coast
in 1785. He sailed across the Pacific in a 60-ton
brig. From these waters he got 580 sea otter skins
from the natives, which he sold in China for
$20,500.
7:30 p.m. D.S.T. - Pass Bella Bella and enter
Milbanke Sound at 8:30 p.m.
2nd DAY
7:00-8:30 a.m. D.S.T. - Now we
are at the mouth of the famous
Skeena River, at whose source
far in the interior of British
Columbia, salmon spawn.
This river has on its banks
more canneries than any other
river in the world. Strange as it
may seem, Captain Vancouver missed the mouth
of the Skeena when he came along the same route
we now sail. We will cruise past Hammer Island,
Glenn Island, Lawyer's Lighthouse and Holland
rock, and enter Prince Rupert harbour with Digby
Island to port, passing Watson Island, site of a
40-million-dollar celanese plant. The island actually lies in a slough of the Skeena River. During
the War Watson was an ammunition dump for
United States forces in Alaska.
9:00-12:00 Noon D.S.T. - Prince Rupert, 40 miles
from the Alaska Boundary, with a population of
12,000, boasts the world's largest cold storage
plant. From it thousands of pounds of halibut and
salmon, caught in the channels and sound through
which we travel, are shipped by air, rail and
steamer to all parts of the world. Ten miles from
the city is the 300-ton-a-day Columbia Cellulose
mill. As the most northern city in British Columbia
it is a rail head to eastern Canada.
12:00-3:00 p.m. D.S.T. - We retrace our passage
round Digby Island to Chatham Sound, named
by Captain Vancouver after the small ship
H.M.S. "Chatham" which accompanied him on his
voyage of exploration.
About 1 p.m. we should pass Lucy Island.
It is claimed that the British explorer named
this islet after his sweetheart in England. However,
he died a bachelor. He was only 33 years old when
he sailed from Falmouth, England, on this voyage.
In these waters which we cruise in a few days,
Vancouver spent five years "feeling" his way and
suffering grim hardships and privation.
The British Government had a standing reward
of Twenty Thousand Pounds (about $50,000) for
the first person who returned with proof of the
long-dreamed waterway through the North American continent from Pacific to Atlantic. Oddly
enough, a passage was finally discovered in 1946.
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police arctic patrol
ship St. Roche finally conquered the northern
route, but had to go thousands of miles north
through the Arctic circle.
2:30 p.m. D.S.T.-We pass Green Island lighthouse on the starboard hand and enter Holiday
Passage passing Holiday Light, the last Canadian
navigational aid,  where the  crew of the  "Dis-
6
 covery" was given a few days' holiday before
pushing farther northward, and enter Dixon
Entrance, another stretch of Pacific sea.
This entrance was named by the enterprising
trader George Dixon, another English trader who
came across from China many years before Captain
Vancouver arrived. Dixon saw the priceless sea
otter pelts in China where he was trading. They
made an excellent luxury companion for those
priceless Mandarin silks. He was told the pelts
had come across from Siberia. That the Russians
had traded them for tea.
Dixon had a successful voyage to this coast.
From the Tlingit Indians he collected 2,552 sea
otter pelts which he sold for $54,875. These enterprising traders considered the six hundred percent
profit they made on these trips a fair return for
their courage and investments which were usually
a few cheap trinkets for the natives.
About 3:30 p.m. D.S.T. - We cross the boundary
waters which separate Alaska from British Columbia. The first light in Alaskan waters is Lord Island.
5:30-6:30 p.m. D.S.T. - We are cruising Revitlagi-
gedo Channel, named after the Viceroy of New
Spain (Mexico).
Here Captain Vancouver and his companion
Puget (after whom Puget Sound is named) were
almost stoned to death by a tribe of hostile Indians.
From the tall cliffs that tower above us, the natives
pelted the explorers with rocks as they rowed back
to the "Discovery" anchored in this channel. They
had come ashore in a row boat to examine rock
formations which might contain gold.
While lounging on deck, it will take little imagination to picture Indians and Aleutians, paddling through these waters chanting weird songs,
long before the white man knew of this continent.
We are now moving into areas which still
retain the mark of Baranof, fabulous "Russian
King of Alaska", who came down from the eternal
ice fields of Siberia in 1740, to establish a chain
of fur trading forts through the Alaskan panhandle.
During this period of expansion, there were
60-odd trading companies all at each other's
throats, establishing forts and having them blown
up by rival companies in this frantic rush for pelts.
6:30 p.m. D.S.T.-Angle Point. United States Immigration officers will board our ship from a
motor launch. Before disembarking at Ketchikan,
our next port of call, all passengers will present
their immigration cards and pass inspection.
7:30 p.m. D.S.T. - Ketchikan. This Alaskan city of
9,000 population is the centre of the fishing industry of South East Alaska. In late summer a
run up the stream will reward the visitor with a
view of schools of salmon ascending swift waters
to the spawning grounds. In the city park are
some fine examples of totem poles.
There is a good variety of curio stores. Ward
Cove is the site of a large new pulp mill.
The ship's sailing time from Ketchikan will
be posted on the blackboard at the foot of the
gangway.
8
We sail through Tongass Narrows to starboard
and Guard Island to port; during the night we
will traverse Clarence Strait and pass Wrangell
A stop will be made southbound. Then you will'
have an opportunity to inspect this historic city
which was originally a Russian trading fort
3ri DAY
6:00-7:00 a.m. D.S.T. - We are
now in Chatham Strait, with Kuiu
Island on our Starboard side and
Baranof Island on our Port side.
About 4 a.m., we rounded Cape
Decision, the southern extremity
of Kuiu Island, which also
marks the entrance of Chatham
Strait from the Pacific Ocean. Westward on Baro-
nof Island is the town of Sitka. This city, during
the Russian period and up to 1908, was the capital
of Alaska. Juneau became the Capital in 1908
because Sitka was felt to be unsuitable due to its
isolated position. We will soon enter Frederick
Sound and on into Stephens Passage. Watch for
whales which are sighted frequently in this passage - also look for Icebergs that drift out on the
tide from Endicott and Tracy Arms.
Because of the fog in Wrangell Narrows in the
early morning, it is necessary for us to steam 60
miles further around Cape Decision to arrive at
Juneau on time. Southbound we pass through
Wrangell Narrows in the late forenoon.
It was through the straits which we shall travel
today that the biggest mass otter hunts in Alaska
were staged.
,r«r^ne hunt sta§ed by the Russians consisted of
550 Aleutian biders (skin boats) and 1,200 Aleutian
natives. This hunt took an entire month. The pelts
yielded $2,000,000. Here, too, the trading ships
of Jacob Astor came to help found that famous
fortune.
 Bloody battles were fought and refought here
between traders, explorers, Aleutians and savage
Indian tribes. This continual warfare sadly depleted
the Aleutian race. Demanded and enslaved by the
warring traders because they were good otter
hunters, these primitive people found themselves
caught in the middle. If they hunted seals they
were robbed of them or their flimsy craft were
lost in raging gales. If they did not hunt they
were massacred. Baranof was the first white trader
to give the Aleutians a fair break. It paid off well
for him.
2:30 p.m. D.S.T. - The town of Thane is on the
right as we enter Gastineau Channel. On the left
is Douglas Island. Here is the famous Treadwell
Mine, flooded in 1917 and since abandoned. Adjoining the site is the town of Douglas. Near the
end of this channel is Juneau, capital of Alaska,
with a population of about 9,000. The city has
modern hotels, many fine residences, an outstanding museum and public buildings. The biggest low grade quartz mine in the United States
or Alaska is located here. It is seen on the side
of the 4,000-foot Mount Juneau, overlooking the
city. Gold recovery from this mine was only around
83 cents per ton of ore.
Juneau does not reckon her history from the
sealing days, but from 1880 when Joe Juneau and
Fred Harris, who had been grubstaked by a Sitka
Mining Engineer called Pliz, came north with the
frenzied horde of men seeking the gleaming gold
nuggets in the Klondike. It has been the capital of
Alaska since 1908. The territorial museum is a
must for every visitor. It has the world's finest
collection of Russian, Eskimo and Aleutian art.
In it is a copy of the document of the purchase of
Alaska from Czar Alexander II of Russia by United
States of America in 1867. Grand Mendenhall
Glacier and beautiful Auk Lake are about a 14-
mile drive.
12:30 a.m. D.S.T. — Leave Juneau. We retrace our
course through Gastineau Channel as far as Mar-
mion Island and into Stephens Passage.
During the night we will cruise Lynn Canal,
which Captain Vancouver named after King's Lynn,
his home in England.
6:00-8:00 a.m. D.S.T. - We are now
«*.»%/! sailing through Chilkoot Inlet
IJAY I and passing the town of Haines
fTfl VHi I and the old Chilkoot barracks. A
road connects this town with the
famed Alcan Highway. Skagway
is our next port of call.
9:00 a.m. D.S.T.-Arrive Skagway,
that magic name indelibly engraved on the
world's memory. This is the gateway to the real
glamour north.
To this town in '98 came gold seekers from all
over the world - bearded, full-bodied men, slim
downy-cheeked youngsters, soft-bosomed, hard-
eyed women, the crook, the gambler, the adventurer and the miner. They came not to remain in
Skagway. Here they outfitted for the hard trek
across the White Pass to bonanza creeks of the
Yukon.
Ghosts of the days when gold dust and nuggets
were standard currency for ham and eggs still
haunt this town. Here, fortunes were risked on
the turn of a card and human life became the
cheapest commodity on the trail. Now tourists
can take the train from Skagway over the same
route as the gold seekers toiled toward the gold
fields beyond.
But Skagway has other surprises besides the
grave of Soapy Smith and the poems of Robert
Service and the tales of Jack London. During the
short summer, nature works wonders in this arctic
soil. Endless days result in rapid plant life growth.
They reach sizes three times bigger than the
normal "outside".
After the vessel arrives at Skagway, the White
Pass & Yukon Route's narrow-gauge train will leave
for Carcross and return. This train is powered by
a modern diesel unit and is equipped with parlour
car coaches. The route is through mountain gorges
on parts of "The Trail of '98", through tunnels
and over bridges through the White Pass, thence
over the top of mountains (elevation 2900 feet) to
Lake Bennett where stop is made for lunch. From
Bennett the line follows Lake Bennett for 36 miles
to Carcross, Yukon Territory. The train is turned
at this point and returned to Skagway, in time for
dinner on board "Princess Patricia".
This is an optional trip for $23.50 (subject
to change) U.S. funds or equivalent in Canadian
funds which includes round trip transportation
in parlor car accommodation and lunch at Lake
Bennett.
If you have not already purchased tickets for
this optional trip, arrangements may be completed
at the Purser's office.
Camera fans should carry plenty of film as
there is much opportunity for interesting photography.
Passengers who do not take the trip to Carcross
will be served lunch on board "Princess Patricia"
if they so desire.
After dinner the citizens of Skagway provide
special entertainment for the passengers at Eagles
Hall, with the theme of Robert Service's poem,
"Shooting of Dan McGrew". Bring your cameras
with flashes, and get some shots of the "Can Can
Girls". Time of departure will be posted on the
ship's bulletin board.
5thMYl
10:00-12:00 Noon D.S.T.-Sail by
the entrance to Tracy and Endi-
cott Arms. We now turn south
and proceed down Lynn Canal
across Frederick Sound and enter Wrangell Narrows, arriving
about 1:30 p.m. D.S.T. at Wrangell. Near the Entrance of
Wrangell   Narrows  on  the   Port
side is the little town of Petersburg, population
1,500.
10
11
 The industry is fishing and the population is
predominantly Scandinavian. This is a very scenic
passage as we navigate the ensuing 22 miles of
intricate waterways. Parts of these waterways are
so narrow you can throw a stone across them.
Mitkof Island is on the Port side and Kupreanof
Island is to Starboard. Have your camera ready
here for good northern scenery. Looking back
through the Entrance of the Narrows at Petersburg, if the weather is clear, you may see a high
mountain peak, called the Devil's Thumb, rising
oven 9,000 feet. Further South is tbe Needles,
10,000.feet high. These are also boundary markers,
defining the boundary between British Columbia
and Alaska Pan-handle.
1:30 to 3:00 p.m. D.S.T. - Arrive at the town of
Wrangell. Population 1,800. On the wharf we are
met by the Wrangell High School Band. The industry is Fishing and Lumbering. It was founded
by the Russians in 1831, and later in the year 1834
became known as Fort Dionisyus. Nothing remains of the Russian occupation. It has excellent
curio shops. About one mile from the ship, Chief
Shakes Indian Community House, with its totem
poles and Indian lore, may be found. The people
here, like all Alaskans, are very friendly. The
children come down to meet the ship on arrival.
See them on the wharf with their Mother's baking
pans. They contain Garnet stones, from a local
deposit. They sell for 10c or as much as the
market will bear. Have some fun!
This is your last Alaskan Port, so get your
letters mailed. This afternoon, we sail for Kitimat, B.C. During the evening we sail down Clarence Strait and pass Ketchikan about 9 p.m. We
will cross Dixon Entrance about midnight.
6th
8 a.m. - We have been steaming
-^#1 thru Granville Channel, one of
T\ AV I the beauty spots of the "inside
Ir f» ■ I passage". It is a long narrow
passageway, with high mountains on each side, covered by a
lush green forest, intersected by
ribbons of waterfalls, and rushing waterways. We will soon turn hard to Port and
head north again, this is Douglas Channel, another beautiful waterway, at the head of which
is located the community of Kitimat, sixty miles
from the open sea.
This is a new town carved out of the forest
about 1952, and is the site of the giant factory
of the Aluminum Company of Canada.
To-night we will proceed south thru Douglas
Channel and Fraser Reach, passing the fishing
village of Butedale about midnight. To-night is
also gala night aboard ship. The Captain's Dinner
is featured, providing the ladies a chance to
"Dress up". Dinner is followed by a "Hat Parade"
at 9 p.m., and dance.
7a 0M
We will enter Queen Charlotte
Sound approximately 9:00 a.m.,
and will arrive at Alert Bay at
approximately 3 p.m. If local
conditions are favourable a
landing will be made at this interesting little port. Announcements will be made in this
connection just prior to arrival.
Alert Bay is the Transportation centre for the
surrounding   district   and   has   a   large   Indian
population.
These people are very proud of their heritage
and have recently completed a new Indian Lodge
where ceremonial dances are held. Whenever
possible every effort will be made to have this
interesting ceremony performed for the benefit
of the passengers. Announcements in this regard
will be made as soon as confirmation can be
obtained. Across from the dock you will observe
the Indian Cemetery, in the grounds of which
are some very fine specimens of Totem Poles,
in good condition. Bring your camera. The white
buildings on the left is the Hospital. Time of
departure will be announced.
8th
-^ m\i\     Breakfast  for  the  first  sitting
nAY        7:00 a.m.
Ir™" I Have your last-minute packing
completed before breakfast as
the steward will be calling at
your room for your baggage -
Time to say "Au Revoir" and obtain the address of new friends
before arriving Vancouver at 9.30 a.m. DST.
We  sincerely  hope  you   have  enjoyed   our
cruise  aboard   the   "Princess   Patricia"  to  the
"Land of the Midnight Sun" and that we shall
meet again soon.
PRINCE RUPERT B.C.
The City of Prince Rupert, population 12,000,
is situated on Kaien Island. It is particularly noted
for its fishing. Two great northern Salmon rivers
are located to the north and south of it, the Naas
River to the North and the Skeena River to the
South. Prince Rupert has the world's largest Cold
Storage Plant for fish. During the fishing season,
long refrigerated fish trains can be seen moving
eastward to markets in North America. To the
seaward, the continental shelf provides a wonderful
feeding ground for the Halibut and in the fall of
the year shoals of herring invade the coastal inlets.
Not only is this city a distributing centre for
the north country but it is also the terminus of
12
13
 Provincial Highway Number 6 from Prince George,
five hundred miles to the Eastward. This is also
the southern terminus of the Alaska sea-ferry
service connecting with the Alaska highway at
Haines, Alaska, via Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau.
The name Prince Rupert was selected from a
competition by school children and is derived from
English History at the time of James 1st (1670).
Approximately 12 miles out from the city the
Columbia Cellulose Company has established a
large pulp and paper plant at Port Edwards, which
has steadied the economy considerably for this
area.
Prince Rupert also has a large grain elevator
where grain from the Prairie Provinces is stored
before export overseas, mainly to the Orient.
The City has a totem Pole Park, where specimens of early Indian Art are found. These are principally from the Queen Charlotte Islands and are
made by the Haida Indians. The City Museum is
well worth a visit. It boasts an interesting display
of Indian Art and articles of pioneer days.
KETCHIKAN, Alaska
Ketchikan is your first port in Alaska on this
cruise. It is a city of approximately 10,000 people,
situated on Revillagigedo Island. Like Prince
Rupert its economy is also based on the Fishing
and Pulp and Paper Industries.
It was founded in 1880 by Mark Martin, a
sawmill operator. At one time Ketchikan had 12
fish canneries operating in its vicinity, but now,
in light of more modern methods of refrigeration,
fish are kept in cold storage until they are required.
The city has modern apartment blocks, two
of which are nine stories high. It has T.V. and a
Radio Station, large schools, and new shopping
centres.
Saxman Park has some very good examples of
Indian Totem Poles, Curios and photographic
stores are on the main street. Daily Aircraft flights
carrying passengers and mail, land on Annette
Island and keep Ketchikan in direct contact with
the outside world.
WRANGELL, Alaska
Wrangell, situated on Wrangell Island near the
mouth of the Stikine River, is a fishing and lumbering town of 1500 people. It was first founded by
the Russians in 1831 and in 1834 and was known
then as Fort Dionisyus. It was first settled by
Russian Cossacks, who found they were unable
to farm the surrounding country. There is little
or nothing left of the old Russian occupation, at
the present day.
Wrangell is surrounded by hills of virgin forest
overlooking a beautiful wide bay, known as Etolin
Bay which sometimes is the setting for fantasticly
14
colourful sunsets. Gardens abound and beautiful
flowers grow in the damp soil which seems to suit
them so well. Dahlias, pansies, and wild sitka
(purple) roses do very well here. The people are
very friendly and the town has a settled look about
it. Curios stores are on the main street.
JUNEAU, Alaska
Juneau, the Capital of Alaska, is situated on
Gastineau Channel; is a city of 9000 people. It
was first founded in 1881 by the discoverer of
gold - Joseph Juneau, a French Canadian. For
many years the city prospered on the operation
of two large gold mines, the Treadwell Mines at
Douglas, on the opposite shore to Juneau. However,
both mines are now closed and Juneau biggest
industry is being the capital, the seat of the various
government agencies.
A fish cold storage plant operates full time and
a lumber mill processes timber for the area.
Aircraft fly in and out of Juneau to neighbouring cities, such as Sitka, Anchorage and Fairbanks,
making Juneau the transportation centre. The
Baranof Hotel in the centre of the city is a modern
structure, and is the social centre for community
activities. Eighteen miles out of Juneau by way of
a modern highway, lies the Mendenhall Glacier, a
large expanse of frozen ice. The Government recently completed a fine Observation building,
where one can get an excellent view of this vast
expanse of ice. Sightseeing buses take passengers
from the ship to the Mendenhall Glacier and back
for a moderate charge.
The Glacier drains into Auk Lake, where the
beautiful log Presbyterian church nestles on the
shore. This is a wonderful spot for the camera
fans to shoot some typical northern scenery.
15
 In the evening the curio shops are open for
the tourist. One of the musts is to pay a visit to
the State's Museum, located on the third floor
of the Administrative Building. Here displays of
local Indian Art; such as totem poles, Eskimo
Ivory, and samples of minerals, as well as wild
animal life of the north are on view.
SKAGWAY, Alaska
Skagway, with a population of approximately
500, is located at the head of the Lynn Canal,
and known in history as the gateway to the rich
Klondike Rush of 1896-98. It was here that tens
of thousand people disembarked from ships and
made their way over the Chilkoot Train to Lake
Bennett and down the Yukon River to Dawson.
It was also here that the famous character
"Soapy Smith" held the town in his grip and by
means of games of chance and fraud, relieved
the traveller of his hard-earned gold nuggets.
In time he stirred up some opposition and a
vigilante committee was established. One night
the town's people held their meeting on the end
of the wharf to decide"what to do with Soapy and
his men. At the entrance to the wharf, a man
named Reid stood guard at a point where the
dock joined the shore. Here "Soapy" in a angry
mood met Reid. Reid would not let him through
to the meeting at the end of the Dock...both men
fired simultaneously and Soapy died soon after
- Reid a few days later as a result of his wound.
They were buried in a little cemetery not far
from the White Pass Railway Round House, and
for years people have come to see "Soapy's"
grave. Chips of stone have been removed so many
times from his grave stone that new stones had to
be installed. Strange as it may seem, Reid, the
man who saved the town, received little attention,
but the stories of the many sided "Soapy" has
lived on to be one of the memorable characters
of the North.
Commercially, Skagway is to this day, as in
the past, the jumping off place to entrain for
Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. All Canadian cargo
for the Yukon comes up by ship and is discharged
at Skagway for reloading into the little Freight
Cars of the White Pass & Yukon Railway.
Many town buildings constructed at the turn
of the Century show their date of architecture by
the overhead balconies and fancy cornices.
Scenically it is nicely located on the delta of
the Skagway River with towering mountains on
both sides, capped with the eternal snows. Flowers
bloom profusely, and lupins and fireweed are in
season everywhere.
16
KITIMAT, B.C.
Kitimat is a new community, situated at the
head of Douglas Channel, approximately 60
miles from the sea, whose entire economy is
based on the manufacture of aluminum ingots.
It is a romantic story of the uniting of natural
elements with modern science to produce a
product that can be sold at competitive prices
on the world markets.
The basic requirement of this industry is
intense heat. Heat can be made from coal, gas,
even atomic power. Here in this relatively isolated area the Aluminum Company was able to
obtain water rights from the British Columbia
Government giving them access to abundant
hydro-electric power. This was a huge capital
investment for a private Company, but with the
heavy annual rainfall, tremendous river and lake
systems in the interior of the Province, a constant source of power was available without the
use of a pound of coal or any other allied heating
agency.
To reduce the Kitimat story to a few facts,
here is what happened. In 1951, when it was decided to go ahead with the project, it was
divided into four essential parts. First the construction of the Kennedy Dam, (third largest earth
filled dam in the world) which diverted the flow
of the rivers and lakes of this area of the interior
from the upper regions of the Thompson and
Fraser River Systems to Tahtsa Lake. Second a
tunnel ten miles long and twenty-five feet wide
was drilled thru a mountain to drain the waters
of Tahtsa Lake with a fall of water some two
thousand feet. At Kemano Bay a Power House
was built into the mountain for the generation
of the power, amounting to over one-million
horse-power. Thirdly, a transmission line was
built over five thousand foot mountains for a
distance of fifty miles. Fourthly, the building of
the town of Kitimat itself.
This is a modern community equipped with
everything a city of 10,000 people would have,
modern schools, shopping centres, Churches and
Hospitals, all laid out in accordance with modern
town planning. Deep sea docks were built to
accommodate the aluminum ore ships that come
in from the West Indies via the Panama Canal.
Branch roads and rail lines connect with its
neighboring community of Terrace on highway
16 and the Canadian National Railways System.
Between these two centres lies Lakelse, a favourite
natural Hot Spring Spa of great beauty. Special
excursion by bus to Lakelse, also a tour of Kitimat will be available, announcements will be
made from the Purser's Office, in this regard.
17
 ALERT BAY, B.C.
Alert Bay is a community of some 1500 persons, situated on an Island approximately 175
miles north of Vancouver on the main shipping
route of the famous "inside passage" to Alaska.
It is also the home of one of the larger and
more progressive Indian tribes of the coast, as
well as being a transportation centre for the area.
Considerable fishing and logging is done by its
inhabitants. A large Indian residential school is
maintained by the government. The community
is also served by a hospital, Wireless and Radio
Telephone Station.
18
 NOTES
INFORMATION AND CUSTOMS
NORTHBOUND-All passengers must proceed
through U.S. Immigration inspection at Ketchikan and should have available suitable identification and proof of citizenship.
SOUTHBOUND-All passengers must proceed
through Canadian Customs and Immigration inspection immediately upon disembarking at Vancouver and should have available suitable identification and proof of citizenship.
Canadian passengers who have made purchases in Alaska exceeding $5.00, should complete usual declaration form available at Purser's
office for delivery to Customs officer, and have
goods available for inspection.
SAFETY INFORMATION
The "Princess Patricia",
registered in Canada,
meets International Safety Standards
for new ships developed in 1960,
and meets the 1966
fire safety requirements.
20
TRAINS/TRUCKS/SHIPS/PLANES/HOTELS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS
WORLD'S MOST COMPLETE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
)1968
 &K
Daily
2%       Bulletin
CANADIAN PACIFIC
B.C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
 Canadian  Pacific  Railway
B. C. Coast Steamship Service
DAILY BULLETIN
«
"oreworc
»   »
This Bulletin is for your information and
to assist you in locating the various points
of interest which can be seen from the steam
ship.
The times shown are necessarily approximate, exact time of arrival at and departure
from way ports will be posted on ship's
bulletin board. A large chart of the route is
displayed in the Social Hall on which the
ship's position will be posted daily.
Do not miss the notices on the Bulletin
Board, they will be of interest to you.
FIRST DAY
July 31 — 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Our ship sails from Pier "D" and passes out
of Vancouver Harbour through First Narrows.
A few miles beyond on the right or "starboard" side is Point Atkinson Lighthouse.
The point on the left or "port" side is Point
Grey with the buildings of the University of
British Columbia near the point. After passing Point Atkinson, * the steamship turns
northwest along the Strait of Georgia following the Vancouver Island shore. Between
1:00 and 2:00 p.m. we pass Texada Island, a
long narrow Island on the starboard side on
the  north  end of  which  is  located  Blubber
Shortly before dinner, Cape Mudge light on
Quadra Island is on the right and we then
proceed along Discovery Passage through
Seymour Narrows, the narrowest point between Vancouver Island and the Islands off
the mainland. A strong tide runs through
the narrows due to the ebb and flow of the
tide around the north end of Vancouver
Island and the passage is usually made only
at the time of slack water.
During the late evening and night the vessel
proceeds along Johnstone Straits, with Vancouver Island on the left and the mainland
and adjacent islands on the right. A large
number of logging camps are located on the
Vancouver Island shore, from which logs are
rafted and towed to the sawmills on the
Lower Island and Mainland.
About 11:00 p.m. the village of Alert Bay
may be seen on the right, a small village on
Cormorant Island. No landing will be made
on northbound trip but on our return voyage
from Skagway, sufficient time will be allowed
at Alert Bay to visit the Indian Cemetery
with its many Totem poles reminding us of
bygone days, and the Church of England
Indian Residential School and Hospital.
During the night for about three hours we
cross Queen Charlotte Sound, the longest
stretch of open water on the entire voyage.
At the entrance to the Sound is Pine Island
Lighthouse on the right and two thirds of
the way across is Egg Island light also on
the right.
SECOND DAY
August 1—9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
A stop of two hours will be made at Ocean
Falls, the site of a large pulp and paper mill,
owned   and   operated   by   the   Pacific   Mills
Limited. Ocean Falls is situated at the head
of Cousins Inlet about 311 miles north of
Vancouver and 180 miles south of Prince
Rupert. The port is open to navigation the
year around and accomodation is provided
for the largest ocean freight steamships. The
Company was incorporated in the year 1915,
the mill having a daily production of about
325 tons of ground wood, sulphite and sulphate pulp and about 300 tons of newsprint,
kraft wrapping and other papers which are
shipped to all parts of the world.
August 1—11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Leaving Ocean Falls we proceed South along
Dean Channel and through Johnson Channel
to Seaforth Channel thence along Graham
Reach and Fraser Reach during the afternoon, a long narrow stretch of sheltered
water with Princess Royal Island on the left
and the mainland on the right, thence through
Grenville Channel during the late afternoon,
with Pitt Island on the left and the mainland
on the right. During the night we pass Prince
Rupert on the right and several hours later
cross the International Boundary and enter
Alaska waters.
THIRD DAY
August 2—8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Ketchikan, our first call in Alaska. A stop
of about two hours will be sufficient to visit
the most interesting places including the
Falls, a short distance from the wharf where,
from the bridge, can be seen in the late Summer, large numbers of salmon ascending the
River. About 15 salmon canneries are located in the vicinity of Ketchikan which is
one of the most important fishing centres in
the North and the outfitting point for the
Halibut fleet operating in the Gulf of Alaska.
Ketchikan is an enterprising and modern
City with a population of about 4000.
 August 2—10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Leaving Ketchikan we proceed south along
the Tongass Narrows for about twenty miles
and enter the Behm Canal thence northward
along this beautiful stretch of water with
Revilla Gigedo Island on the left and the
mainland of Alaska on the right, passing on
the left a sharp pinnacle of rock known as
the Eddystone Rock, rising 250 feet above
the water and cruise into the beautiful landlocked Rudyard Bay, frequently called the
Punch Bowl with a magnificent panorama of
mountains on all sides. Further along the
Canal is Walker Cove, a narrow and tortuous stretch of water about seven miles long
with the most impressive mountain scenery.
During the late afternoon we pass Behm
Narrows and about 6:00 p.m. turn northerly
along Clarence Strait, the main channel to
tjje North.
FOURTH DAY
August 3—Daylight to 12:00 noon
During the early morning hours we pass
through Wrangell Narrows with Point Alexander Lighthouse on the right, a narrow
tortuous Channel about twenty miles long
between Kupreanof Island on the left and
Mitkof Island on the right. The channel is
well marked with buoys and beacons and
ship passes at half speed through some very
beautiful scenery. At the north end of the
Narrows, on the right lies the old town of
Petersburg, settled originally in the days of
the Russian occupancy and now a flourishing
fishing centre. After leaving the north end
of Wrangell Narrows many small icebergs
may be seen ahead of and to the right of
the vessel. The bergs have broken away
from the Baird and Patterson Glaciers, both
of which can be seen clearly in fair weather.
After passing Petersburg a beautiful panorama
of mountain scenery opens before us. Passing
Proleway Point light on the left we enter
Frederick Sound, to the northwest can be
seen the Devil's Thumb, a sharp needle of
rock 9,077 feet high located on the International Boundary line, further south the
Needles, 10,002 feet high and Castle Mountain 7,325 feet high. All of these peaks are
located on the International Boundary line.
In the late afternoon we enter Taku Inlet
diverging from the main channel enroute to
the Glacier.
August 3—12:00 noon to 2:30 p.m.
We now steam to within a few feet of the
magnificent TAKU GLACIER (pronounced
Ta-koo). This immense river of ice about a
mile wide on its face and 200 to 300 feet high,
has its origin in the perpetual ice-fields to the
East of the Coast Range in British Columbia,
running for 90 miles before entering the sea.
Small bergs are continually breaking off from
the main body and may be encountered for a
considerable distance south of Taku Inlet.
On the left is the dead or receding Norris
Glacier.
August 3—2:30 p.m. to 12 midnight
A 25-mile run from the Glacier brings us to
Juneau, Capital of Alaska, on Gastineau
Channel. On the right as we enter is the
town of Thane. On the left, on Douglas
Island, is the famous Treadwell Mine, flooded
by a cave-in during 1917 and not since operated. Adjoining the site is the town of Douglas and near the end of the Channel lies
Juneau, the Capital of Alaska, population
about 5000. There are splendid stores and
curio shops, modern hotels and many beautiful residences and public buildings.
On the side of Mount Roberts overlooking
the City can be seen the Alaska Juneau Gold
Mining Company, the largest gold quartz
mill in the United States or Alaska with a
capacity of 10,000 tons of ore per day.
A motor trip of 14 miles will take you to the
Great Mendenhall Glacier and beautiful Auk
Lake and the territorial museum with its
splendid collection of Eskimo Curios is well
worth a visit. Juneau was founded in the
80's and became capital of Alaska in 1900
but executive offices were not removed from
Sitka until 1906.
FIFTH DAY
August 4 — Daylight to 9:00 a.m.
During the early morning hours a magnificent panorama of mountains and glaciers can
be viewed from the deck as our vessel passes
along the Lynn Canal, at the extreme end
of which is located Skagway, the end of our
sea voyage and the gateway to the Yukon.
Connection is made with trains of the White
Pass and Yukon Route for Lake Bennett,
Carcross and Whitehorse and at Carcross
connection is made with their Lake steamship
to West Taku Arm.
Skagway has a population of about 500 and
is almost surrounded by mountains. Principal points of interest are Reid's Falls,
Dewey Falls, Dewey Lake, Alpine Ridge and
Skagway Park and numerous relics of the
Trail of '98 to the Klondyke Gold Fields.
SIXTH DAY
August 5 — 7:00 p.m. to midnight
Leaving Skagway at 7:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time we proceed south along the Lynn
Canal and Chatham Straits and during the
early morning hours enter Peril Straits enroute to Sitka.
 SEVENTH DAY
August 6—11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Sitka—The former Capital, and the oldest
settlement in South Eastern Alaska. The
first post was established in 1799 and in 1802
sacked, burned and completely destroyed by
the Indians. Among the principal points of
interest are the Russian Orthodox Cathedral
of St. Michael, the park with its picturesque
Totem poles, the reconstructed block house
and many other relics of the early days.
EIGHTH DAY
August 7—10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
During the night we have passed along Peril
Straits and Chatham Straits and arrived at
Wrangell, an old settlement established by
the Russians and named after Baron von
Wrangell, one of the ablest Russian Governors in Alaska. A few miles North of Wrangell, is the mouth of the Stikine River, navigable for 185 miles to Telegraph Creek, the
outfitting point for big game hunters, entering the famous Cassiar District of British
Columbia. A regular weekly gas boat service
is operated between Wrangell and Telegraph
Creek during the summer season. Interesting curio stores and some splendid Totem
poles make our short stop a pleasant one.
August 7—7:30 p.m. to 12 midnight
The evening is spent in Ketchikan giving an
opportunity to visit the many interesting
points in the vicinity.
NINTH DAY
August 8 — 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Prince Rupert with its population of about
8000 is the largest city in Northern British
Columbia. Having direct rail connection
with Eastern Canada, Prince Rupert is the
shipping  point  for   large   quantities   of   fish.
Cold storage plant and Government drydock
are both well worth a visit.
August 8 — 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
A short stop is made at Butedale on Princess
Royal Island for the purpose of visiting a
salmon cannery in operation.
TENTH DAY
August 9—10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
Alert Bay on Cormorant Island, with its
totem poles and Indian Schools is one of the
oldest missionary settlements on the British
Columbia Coast.
August 9 — 8:00 p.m. to midnight
Powell River the site of a pulp mill, owned
and operated by the Powell River Company,
one of the most modern pulp mills in North
America, has a daily output of almost 600
tons of newsprint. An opportunity will be
furnished to those who wish, to visit the
plant.
ELEVENTH DAY
August 10—
A short stop will be made at Nanaimo,. city
of about 8000 on Vancouver Island, forty
miles from Vancouver, and the gateway to
the many pleasure resorts of Vancouver
Island. A beautiful drive has been arranged
to Cathedral Grove, a splendid stand of timber, returning via Qualicum Beach, one of
British Columbia's beauty spots for those
who wish to avail themselves of this opportunity.
At 1:30 p.m. we arrive at Vancouver, the
largest city in British Columbia, where connections can be made with Canadian Pacific
trains for the Canadian Rockies and Eastern
Canada or the United States also with Canadian Pacific steamships for Victoria and
Seattle.
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PATRICIA
PARTICULARS OF VESSEL
Gross tonnage 6000 tons
Length 373 ft. 9 in.
Breadth 56 feet
Draught 15 ft. 7 in.
Horsepower 15,500
Maximum speed  23.5 knots
FULLY AIR CONDITIONED
DISTANCES IN STATUTE MILES
NORTHBOUND
Vancouver to Prince Rupert  548
Prince Rupert to Ketchikan 106
Ketchikan to Juneau  327
Juneau to Skagway 115
1096
SOUTHBOUND
Skagway to Wrangell  267
Wrangell to Kitimat 329
Kitimat to Vancouver 504
1100
TOTAL STATUTE MILES VANCOUVER TO
SKAGWAY & RETURN  2196
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Regarding Ship's Services
MAIL- Mail received on board will be delivered to
staterooms as soon as received. Outgoing mail
properly stamped may be placed in the box by the
Purser's office. Mail going ashore at Vancouver,
Prince Rupert and Kitimat, B.C., must bear Canadian stamps which can be obtained from the Canadian stamp-vending machine by the newsstand. Mail going ashore at Ketchikan, Juneau,
Skagway and Wrangell in Alaska must bear U.S.
stamps which can be obtained from the U.S.
stamp-vending machine, also by the newsstand.
Rates for postage when mailed from Vancouver, Prince Rupert and Kitimat, B.C. to Canadian
points are: Postcards 4 cents, letters 5 cents. Postcards and the average letters to Canadian destinations are usually handled by airmail wherever
possible without additional charge. Rates to U.S.
points by surface carrier: postcards 4 cents, letters 5 cents. By airmail: postcards or letters
8 cents.
Rates for postage when mailed from Ketchikan, Juneau, Skagway or Wrangell to Canadian or
U.S. points by surface carrier: postcards 4 cents,
letters 5 cents. By airmail: postcards 6 cents,
letters 8 cents. There is daily airmail service from
the points mentioned in Alaska.
BATHS - If your room is not equipped with bath
please check with stewardess (women) or bellboy
(men) who will arrange your bath schedule.
LIBRARY - The library is attended by the Social
Hostess, and is situated in the Forward Observation Room. Library hours will be posted on the
Bulletin Board.
LAUNDRY & VALET SERVICE-An automatic
self-service laundry is available aboard. There is
also laundry and dry-cleaning service available
at shore establishments at Prince Rupert and
Juneau. Please check with Bellboy.
SEATS IN THE DINING ROOM - When entering the
Dining Room for the first luncheon, please present
your meal coupon to the Steward at Dining Room
entrance and he will assign your table and seat,
which will be yours for the complete cruise.
DEPARTURE TIMES - Please check Departure
Times on the blackboard at the head of the gangway before going ashore at Ports of Call. Don't
Miss the Ship.
WARNING WHISTLE - A half hour before departure
— 2 long blasts; 15 minutes before — one long
blast; at cast off — one short toot.
 BINGO CARDS - After the first Luncheon you will
be handed a Bingo Card by the hostess - it is called
"get acquainted Bingo". The Hostess will show you
what to do. Please retain these cards until called
for.
DECK GAMES - Shuffleboard - Ping-Pong. Horse
Racing and regular Bingo games will be held as
announced. A Hat Parade and dance will be held
the night leaving Kitimat southbound.
CAUTION RE-ACCIDENTS ABOARD - Please remember
that because of the peculiar construction of a
ship, it is necessary to have high sills at each outside doorway, leading out on deck, and smaller
ones inside. All stairs are steep so use hand-rails.
Special word for those wearing double focus glasses and high heel shoes: Be careful!
NEWSSTAND - Situated forward on the Promenade
Deck.
BEAUTY PARLOUR - Situated midships on the Promenade Deck. Please consult attendant regarding
appointments.
RADIO SERVICE - Messages should be filed with
Marconi Operator at the Wireless Room.
LOST ARTICLES - Apply at the Purser's Office.
VALUABLES - Deposit with Purser for safekeeping.
BULLETIN BOARDS - Notices of daily activities will
be posted each day.
ELEVATOR - Self-service between the Upper, Promenade and Boat Decks only.
BAGGAGE - Announcements regarding baggage will
be made evening before arrival at Vancouver.
FIRE & BOAT DRILL - At 11 A.M. on the first morning
northbound, the Master will announce Fire & Boat
Drill. This is a practice drill only and will acquaint
you with procedures. Listen carefully to the instructions.
DIVINE SERVICES - A nondenominational Protestant service will be held on board each Sunday
when and if there is a clergyman available. Similarly Holy Mass will be celebrated if a Roman
Catholic priest is aboard.
MEAL       Breakfast - 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.
HOURS:   Lunch      -first sitting 12:00 noon
second sitting        1:00 p.m.
Dinner     -first sitting 6:00 p.m.
second sitting        7:00 p.m.
Afternoon Tea Available  3:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Night Lunch Available 10:30 -11:30 p.m.
Early morning coffee available
in the After Social Hall        5:00a.m.
All Times shown (Pacific) Daylight Saving Time.
Punctuality at meals is essential for the benefit
of all passengers.
COCKTAIL LOUNGE - "PRINCESS ROOM" - Forward
on the Boat Deck - Open 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.,
except Sundays and while the vessel is in port.
DAILY  BULLETIN
9:00 p.m. D.S.T. - We glide slowly out of Vancouver harbour on our first lap of this unique cruise
to Alaskan ports, once scenes of violent adventure in the mysterious land of the silent seas.
For the next few days all the facilities of our
services are at your convenience to make this
voyage a memorable one.
This bulletin will help you identify places of
interest as we cruise through deep Inside Passage
waters. We follow the wake of intrepid Russian,
Spanish ana British explorers and adventurers
who sought in vain for a northwest waterway from
the Pacific to the Atlantic. Glance back at the
beautiful setting as we leave Vancouver harbour
in the closing dusk. Less than 80 years ago it was
desolate bushland.
The Lions' Gate suspension bridge divides
Vancouver harbour from the Gulf of Georgia. In
1792, Captain George Vancouver, a British naval
officer and explorer extraordinary, sailed north
on this same course aboard an 80-foot sloop,
H.M.S. "Discovery". He named the gulf after King
George III, who backed his hardy venture.
Soon we pass Point Atkinson lighthouse on
our right (starboard). Around us are chunky boats
of salmon fishermen; plodding tugs with tows of
 spruce, fir and cedar rafts; deep-sea ships arriving with exotic cargoes from distant world ports.
This lighthouse is their guiding beacon to a safe
harbour.
Also to starboard is the placid, deep water
cutoff to Howe Sound. The explorer named this
for Admiral Richard Howe, who was then Commander in Chief of America and a close friend of
Benjamin Franklin.
On the starboard hand also, we pass close to
the shore of Bowen Island, a popular summer
resort.
7:00 a.m. D.S.T.
io
— We are now in
Johnstone Straits. The mountain-
■^ M\/        girt, heavily wooded shoreline on
If AY our left (port), is vast Vancouver
Vi* Island, 282 miles  long and 60
miles wide. It was first discovered
by the famed Spanish explorer,
Senor Bodega y Quadra in 1775.
He came up from Lima, Peru, in a 36-foot boat,
built of green timbers.This is just about the same
length as our life boats. He named this Quadra
Island. When Captain Vancouver arrived later, the
island was ceded to Great Britain, and the name
changed to Vancouver Island. To its shores came
Dutch, Portuguese, Chinese and Russian traders.
They sought fabulous fortunes from sea otter
pelts, which Indian tribes were using for teepees.
They left on record behind them a saga of pillage
and brutality which has never been equalled to
this day. They also sought gold, and massacred
entire Indian villages in their madness for this
precious metal. These were the pioneers of civilization through this vast territory, although this
was incidental to their real motives. Now the coast
of Vancouver Island is dotted with fishing villages
and logging camps.
10:30 a.m. D.S.T. - Look to starboard for Alert Bay,
an old Indian Village bristling with totem poles.
Here the Government maintains a large residential school. It is also the transportation centre for
fishing and logging operations of the surrounding
district.
1:30-4:30 p.m. D.S.T. - In Queen Charlotte
Sound, our first stretch of open water, our ship
has struck her real travel beat. With each turn of
the propeller, civilization falls behind and we
move into the unchanged world of the primitive.
Voyagers who keep a sharp lookout may see whales
blowing as they frolic through the Pacific. In the
distance to port, like a stationary cloud, is the
northern tip of Vancouver Island. It was in this
Sound, named after Queen Charlotte Sophia, wife
of King George III, that Captain Vancouver ran his
"Discovery" aground and fought off fierce Haida
Indians who came in huge red cedar canoes to
plunder his ship.
brig. From these waters he got 580 sea otter skins
from the natives, which he sold in China for
$20,500.
7:30 p.m. D.S.T. - Pass Bella Bella and enter
Milbanke Sound at 8:30 p.m.
ZdDM
5:00-7:00 p.m. D.S.T. - Now we are in Fitzhugh
Sound, named by James Hanna, an enterprising
English trader who operated on the China coast
in 1785. He sailed across the Pacific in a 60-ton
6
I	
7:00-8:30 a.m. D.S.T. - Now we
are at the mouth of the famous
Skeena River, at whose source
far in the interior of British
Columbia, salmon spawn.
This river has on its banks
more canneries than any other
river in the world. Strange as it
may seem, Captain Vancouver missed the mouth
of the Skeena when he came along the same route
we now sail. We will cruise past Hammer Island,
Glenn Island, Lawyer's Lighthouse and Holland
rock, and enter Prince Rupert harbour with Digby
Island to port, passing Watson Island, site of a
40-million-dollar celanese plant. The island actually lies in a slough of the Skeena River. During
the War Watson was an ammunition dump for
United States forces in Alaska.
9:00-12:00 Noon D.S.T. - Prince Rupert, 40 miles
from the Alaska Boundary, with a population of
12,000, boasts the world's largest cold storage
plant. From it thousands of pounds of halibut and
salmon, caught in the channels and sound through
which we travel, are shipped by air, rail and
steamer to all parts of the world. Ten miles from
the city is the 300-ton-a-day Columbia Cellulose
mill. As the most northern city in British Columbia
it is a rail head to eastern Canada.
12:00-3:00 p.m. D.S.T. - We retrace our passage
round Digby Island to Chatham Sound, named
by Captain Vancouver after the small ship
H.M.S. "Chatham" which accompanied him on his
voyage of exploration.
About 1 p.m. we should pass Lucy Island.
It is claimed that the British explorer named
this islet after his sweetheart in England. However,
he died a bachelor. He was only 33 years old when
he sailed from Falmouth, England, on this voyage.
In these waters which we cruise in a few days,
Vancouver spent five years "feeling" his way and
suffering grim hardships and privation.
The British Government had a standing reward
of Twenty Thousand Pounds (about $50,000) for
the first person who returned with proof of the
long-dreamed waterway through the North American continent from Pacific to Atlantic. Oddly
enough, a passage was finally discovered in 1946.
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police arctic patrol
ship St. Roche finally conquered the northern
route, but had to go thousands of miles north
through the Arctic circle.
2:30 p.m. D.S.T.-We pass Green Island lighthouse on the starboard hand and enter Holiday
Passage passing Holiday Light, the last Canadian
navigational aid,  where the  crew of the  "Dis-
 covery" was given a few days' holiday before
pushing farther northward, and enter Dixon
Entrance, another stretch of Pacific sea.
This entrance was named by the enterprising
trader George Dixon, another English trader who
came across from China many years before Captain
Vancouver arrived. Dixon saw the priceless sea
otter pelts in China where he was trading. They
made an excellent luxury companion for those
priceless Mandarin silks. He was told the pelts
had come across from Siberia. That the Russians
had traded them for tea.
Dixon had a successful voyage to this coast.
From the Tlingit Indians he collected 2,552 sea
otter pelts which he sold for $54,875. These enterprising traders considered the six hundred percent
profit they made on these trips a fair return for
their courage and investments which were usually
a few cheap trinkets for the natives.
About 3:30 p.m. D.S.T. - We cross the boundary
waters which separate Alaska from British Columbia. The first light in Alaskan waters is Lord Island.
5:30-6:30 p.m. D.S.T.-We are cruising Revitlagi-
gedo Channel, named after the Viceroy of New
Spain (Mexico).
Here Captain Vancouver and his companion
Puget (after whom Puget Sound is named) were
almost stoned to death by a tribe of hostile Indians.
From the tall cliffs that tower above us, the natives
pelted the explorers with rocks as they rowed back
to the "Discovery" anchored in this channel. They
had come ashore in a row boat to examine rock
formations which might contain gold.
While lounging on deck, it will take little imagination to picture Indians and Aleutians, paddling through these waters chanting weird songs,
long before the white man knew of this continent.
We are now moving into areas which still
retain the mark of Baranof, fabulous "Russian
King of Alaska", who came down from the eternal
ice fields of Siberia in 1740, to establish a chain
of fur trading forts through the Alaskan panhandle.
During this period of expansion, there were
60-odd trading companies all at each other's
throats, establishing forts and having them blown
up by rival companies in this frantic rush for pelts.
6:30 p.m. D.S.T.-Angle Point. United States Immigration officers will board our ship from a
motor launch. Before disembarking at Ketchikan,
our next port of call, all passengers will present
their immigration cards and pass inspection.
7:30 p.m. D.S.T. — Ketchikan. This Alaskan city of
9,000 population is the centre of the fishing industry of South East Alaska. In late summer a
run up the stream will reward the visitor with a
view of schools of salmon ascending swift waters
to the spawning grounds. In the city park are
some fine examples of totem poles.
There is a good variety of curio stores. Ward
Cove is the site of a large new pulp mill.
The ship's sailing time from Ketchikan will
be posted on the blackboard at the foot of the
gangway.
8
We sail through Tongass Narrows to starboard
and Guard Island to port; during the night we
will traverse Clarence Strait and pass Wrangell.
A stop will be made southbound. Then you will
have an opportunity to inspect this historic city
which was originally a Russian trading fort.
3rd DAY
6:00-7:00 a.m. D.S.T. - We are
now in Chatham Strait, with Kuiu
Island on our Starboard side and
Baranof Island on our Port side.
About 4 a.m., we rounded Cape
Decision, the southern extremity
of Kuiu Island, which also
marks the entrance of Chatham
Strait from the Pacific Ocean. Westward on Baro-
nof Island is the town of Sitka. This city, during
the Russian period and up to 1908, was the capital
of Alaska. Juneau became the Capital in 1908
because Sitka was felt to be unsuitable due to its
isolated position. We will soon enter Frederick
Sound and on into Stephens Passage. Watch for
whales which are sighted frequently in this passage — also look for Icebergs that drift out on the
tide from Endicott and Tracy Arms.
Because of the fog in Wrangell Narrows in the
early morning, it is necessary for us to steam 60
miles further around Cape Decision to arrive at
Juneau on time. Southbound we pass through
Wrangell Narrows in the late forenoon.
It was through the straits which we shall travel
today that the biggest mass otter hunts in Alaska
were staged.
One hunt staged by the Russians consisted of
550 Aleutian biders (skin boats) and 1,200 Aleutian
natives. This hunt took an entire month. The pelts
yielded $2,000,000. Here, too, the trading ships
of Jacob Astor came to help found that famous
fortune.
 Bloody battles were fought and refought here
between traders, explorers, Aleutians and savage
Indian tribes. This continual warfare sadly depleted
the Aleutian race. Demanded and enslaved by the
warring traders because they were good otter
hunters, these primitive people found themselves
caught in the middle. If they hunted seals they
were robbed of them or their flimsy craft were
lost in raging gales. If they did not hunt they
were massacred. Baranof was the first white trader
to give the Aleutians a fair break. It paid off well
for him.
2:30 p.m. D.S.T. — The town of Thane is on the
right as we enter Gastineau Channel. On the left
is Douglas Island. Here is the famous Treadwell
Mine, flooded in 1917 and since abandoned. Adjoining the site is the town of Douglas. Near the
end of this channel is Juneau, capital of Alaska,
with a population of about 9,000. The city has
modern hotels, many fine residences, an outstanding museum and public buildings. The biggest low grade quartz mine in the United States
or Alaska is located here. It is seen on the side
of the 4,000-foot Mount Juneau, overlooking the
city. Gold recovery from this mine was only around
83 cents per ton of ore.
Juneau does not reckon her history from the
sealing days, but from 1880 when Joe Juneau and
Fred Harris, who had been grubstaked by a Sitka
Mining Engineer called Pliz, came north with the
frenzied horde of men seeking the gleaming gold
nuggets in the Klondike. It has been the capital of
Alaska since 1908. The territorial museum is a
must for every visitor. It has the world's finest
collection of Russian, Eskimo and Aleutian art.
In it is a copy of the document of the purchase of
Alaska from Czar Alexander II of Russia by United
States of America in 1867. Grand Mendenhall
Glacier and beautiful Auk Lake are about a 14-
mile drive.
12:30 a.m. D.S.T. - Leave Juneau. We retrace our
course through Gastineau Channel as far as Mar-
mion Island and into Stephens Passage.
During the night we will cruise Lynn Canal,
which Captain Vancouver named after King's Lynn,
his home in England.
6:00-8:00 a.m. D.S.T. - We are now
fv m\i sailing through Chilkoot Inlet
If A V and passing the town of Haines
VI*■ and the old Chilkoot barracks. A
road connects this town with the
famed Alcan Highway. Skagway
is our next port of call.
9:30 a.m. D.S.T. - Arrive Skagway,
that magic name indelibly engraved on the
world's memory. This is the gateway to the real
glamour north.
To this town in '98 came gold seekers from all
over the world - bearded, full-bodied men, slim
downy-cheeked youngsters, soft-bosomed, hard-
eyed women, the crook, the gambler, the adventurer and the miner. They came not to remain in
Skagway. Here they outfitted for the hard trek
4th
across the White Pass to bonanza creeks of the
Yukon.
Ghosts of the days when gold dust and nuggets
were standard currency for ham and eggs still
haunt this town. Here, fortunes were risked on
the turn of a card and human life became the
cheapest commodity on the trail. Now tourists
can take the train from Skagway over the same
route as the gold seekers toiled toward the gold
fields beyond.
But Skagway has other surprises besides the
grave of Soapy Smith and the poems of Robert
Service and the tales of Jack London. During the
short summer, nature works wonders in this arctic
soil. Endless days result in rapid plant life growth.
They reach sizes three times bigger than the
normal "outside".
After the vessel arrives at Skagway, the White
Pass & Yukon Route's narrow-gauge train will leave
for Carcross and return. This train is powered by
a modern diesel unit and is equipped with parlour
car coaches. The route is through mountain gorges
on parts of "The Trail of '98", through tunnels
and over bridges through the White Pass, thence
over the top of mountains (elevation 2900 feet) to
Lake Bennett where stop is made for lunch. From
Bennett the line follows Lake Bennett for 36 miles
to Carcross, Yukon Territory. The train is turned
at this point and returned to Skagway, in time for
dinner on board "Princess Patricia".
This is an optional trip for $23.50 (subject
to change) U.S. funds or equivalent in Canadian
funds which includes round trip transportation
in parlor car accommodation and lunch at Lake
Bennett.
If you have not already purchased tickets for
this optional trip, arrangements may be completed
at the Purser's office.
Camera fans should carry plenty of film as
there is much opportunity for interesting photography.
Passengers who do not take the trip to Carcross
will be served lunch on board "Princess Patricia"
if they so desire.
After dinner the citizens of Skagway provide
special entertainment for the passengers at Eagles
Hall, with the theme of Robert Service's poem,
"Shooting of Dan McGrew". Bring your cameras
with flashes, and get some shots of the "Can Can
Girls". Time of departure will be posted on the
ship's bulletin board.
DM\
10:00-12:00 Noon D.S.T.-Sail by
the entrance to Tracy and Endi-
a mjn*#i    cott Arms. We now turn south
Hh&Mw I and Proceed down Lynn Canal
across Frederick Sound and enter Wrangell Narrows, arriving
about 1:30 p.m. D.S.T. at Wrangell. Near the Entrance of
Wrangell   Narrows  on  the   Port
side is the little town of Petersburg, population
1,500.
10
11
 The industry is fishing and the population is
predominantly Scandinavian. This is a very scenic
passage as we navigate the ensuing 22 miles of
intricate waterways. Parts of these waterways are
so narrow you can throw a stone across them.
Mitkof Island is on the Port side and Kupreanof
Island is to Starboard. Have your camera ready
here for good northern scenery. Looking back
through the Entrance of the Narrows at Petersburg, if the weather is clear, you may see a high
mountain peak, called the Devil's Thumb, rising
oven 9,000 feet. Further South is the Needles,
10,000 feet high. These are also boundary markers,
defining the boundary between British Columbia
and Alaska Pan-handle.
1:30 to 3:00 p.m. D.S.T. - Arrive at the town of
Wrangell. Population 1,800. On the wharf we are
met by the Wrangell High School Band. The industry is Fishing and Lumbering. It was founded
by the Russians in 1831, and later in the year 1834
became known as Fort Dionisyus. Nothing remains of the Russian occupation. It has excellent
curio shops. About one mile from the ship, Chief
Shakes Indian Community House, with its totem
poles and Indian lore, may be found. The people
here, like all Alaskans, are very friendly. The
children come down to meet the ship on arrival.
See them on the wharf with their Mother's baking
pans. They contain Garnet stones, from a local
deposit. They sell for 10c or as much as the
market will bear. Have some fun!
This is your last Alaskan Port, so get your
letters mailed. This afternoon, we sail for Kitimat, B.C. During the evening we sail down Clarence Strait and pass Ketchikan about 9 p.m. We
will cross Dixon Entrance about midnight.
8 a.m.— We have been steaming
m\i t'iru Granville Channel, one of
|\Aw the beauty spots of the "inside
Iff?I passage". It is a long narrow
passageway, with high mountains on each side, covered by a
lush green forest, intersected by
ribbons of waterfalls, and rushing waterways. We will soon turn hard to Port and
head north again, this is Douglas Channel, another beautiful waterway, at the head of which
is located the community of Kitimat, sixty miles
from the open sea.
This is a new town carved out of the forest
about 1952, and is the site of the giant factory
of the Aluminum Company of Canada. It is also
at this Port that the Canadian Customs and
Immigration will be passed. This examination will
enable you to go ashore upon arrival at Vancouver
without further examination till you cross the
U.S. Border.
To-night we will proceed south thru Douglas
Channel and Fraser Reach, passing the fishing
village of Butedale about midnight. To-night is
12
also gala night aboard ship. The Captain's Dinner
is featured, providing the ladies a chance to
"Dress up". Dinner is followed by a "Hat Parade"
at 9 p.m., and dance.
6th
7aS?]
We will enter Queen  Charlotte
Sound   approximately   11   a.m.,
fit   I     il\#l     and wi" arrive at Alert Bay at
in I//I ■ I approximately 3 p.m. If local
conditions are favourable a
landing will be made at this interesting little port. Announcements will be made in this
connection just prior to arrival.
Alert Bay is the Transportation centre for the
surrounding   district   and   has   a   large   Indian
population.
These people are very proud of their heritage
and have recently completed a new Indian Lodge
where ceremonial dances are held. Whenever
possible every effort will be made to have this
interesting ceremony performed for the benefit
of the passengers. Announcements in this regard
will be made as soon as confirmation can be
obtained. Across from the dock you will observe
the Indian Cemetery, in the grounds of which
are some very fine specimens of Totem Poles,
in good condition. Bring your camera. The white
buildings on the left is the Hospital. Time of
departure will be announced.
8th
-^ m\i       Breakfast  for  the  first   sitting
DAY      7:00 a-m-
I/O I Have your last-minute  packing
completed before breakfast as
the steward will be calling at
your room for your baggage -
Time to say "Au Revoir" and obtain the address of new friends
before arriving Vancouver at 9.30 a.m. DST.
We  sincerely  hope  you   have  enjoyed   our
cruise  aboard   the   "Princess   Patricia"  to  the
"Land of the Midnight Sun" and that we shall
meet again soon.
PRINCE RUPERT B.C.
The City of Prince Rupert, population 12,000,
is situated on Kaien Island. It is particularly noted
for its fishing. Two great northern Salmon rivers
are located to the north and south of it, the Naas
River to the North and the Skeena River to the
South. Prince Rupert has the world's largest Cold
Storage Plant for fish. During the fishing season,
long refrigerated fish trains can be seen moving
eastward to markets in North America. To the
seaward, the continental shelf provides a wonderful
feeding ground for the Halibut and in the fall of
the year shoals of herring invade the coastal inlets.
Not only is this city a distributing centre for
the north country but it is also the terminus of
13
 Provincial Highway Number 6 from Prince George,
five hundred miles to the Eastward. This is also
the southern terminus of the Alaska sea-ferry
service connecting with the Alaska highway at
Haines, Alaska, via Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau.
The name Prince Rupert was selected from a
competition by school children and is derived from
English History at the time of James 1st (1670).
Approximately 12 miles out from the city the
Columbia Cellulose Company has established a
large pulp and paper plant at Port Edwards, which
has steadied the economy considerably for this
area.
Prince Rupert also has a large grain elevator
where grain from the Prairie Provinces is stored
before export overseas, mainly to the Orient.
The City has a totem Pole Park, where specimens of early Indian Art are found. These are principally from the Queen Charlotte Islands and are
made by the Haida Indians. The City Museum is
well worth a visit. It boasts an interesting display
of Indian Art and articles of pioneer days.
KETCHIKAN, Alaska
Ketchikan is your first port in Alaska on this
cruise. It is a city of approximately 10,000 people,
situated on Revillagigedo Island. Like Prince
Rupert its economy is also based on the Fishing
and Pulp and Paper Industries.
It was founded in 1880 by Mark Martin, a
sawmill operator. At one time Ketchikan had 12
fish canneries operating in its vicinity, but now,
in light of more modern methods of refrigeration,
fish are kept in cold storage until they are required.
The city has modern apartment blocks, two
of which are nine stories high. It has T.V. and a
Radio Station, large schools, and new shopping
centres.
Saxman Park has some very good examples of
Indian Totem Poles, Curios and photographic
stores are on the main street. Daily Aircraft flights
carrying passengers and mail, land on Annette
Island and keep Ketchikan in direct contact with
the outside world.
WRANGELL, Alaska
Wrangell, situated on Wrangell Island near the
mouth of the Stikine River, is a fishing and lumbering town of 1500 people. St was first founded by
the Russians in 1831 and in 1834 and was known
then as Fort Dionisyus. It was first settled by
Russian Cossacks, who found they were unable
to farm the surrounding country. There is little
or nothing left of the old Russian occupation, at
the present day.
Wrangell is surrounded by hills of virgin forest
overlooking a beautiful wide bay, known as Etolin
Bay which sometimes is the setting for fantasticly
14
colourful sunsets. Gardens abound and beautiful
flowers grow in the damp soil which seems to suit
them so well. Dahlias, pansies, and wild sitka
(purple) roses do very well here. The people are
very friendly and the town has a settled look about
it. Curios stores are on the main street.
JUNEAU, Alaska
Juneau, the Capital of Alaska, is situated on
Gastineau Channel; is a city of 9000 people. It
was first founded in 1881 by the discoverer of
gold - Joseph Juneau, a French Canadian. For
many years the city prospered on the operation
of two large gold mines, the Treadwell Mines at
Douglas, on the opposite shore to Juneau. However,
both mines are now closed and Juneau biggest
industry is being the capital, the seat of the various
government agencies.
A fish cold storage plant operates full time and
a lumber mill processes timber for the area.
Aircraft fly in and out of Juneau to neighbouring cities, such as Sitka, Anchorage and Fairbanks,
making Juneau the transportation centre. The
Baranof Hotel in the centre of the city is a modern
structure, and is the social centre for community
activities. Eighteen miles out of Juneau by way of
a modern highway, lies the Mendenhall Glacier, a
large expanse of frozen ice. The Government recently completed a fine Observation building,
where one can get an excellent view of this vast
expanse of ice. Sightseeing buses take passengers
from the ship to the Mendenhall Glacier and back
for a moderate charge.
The Glacier drains into Auk Lake, where the
beautiful log Presbyterian church nestles on the
shore. This is a wonderful spot for the camera
fans to shoot some typical northern scenery.
15
 In the evening the curio shops are open for
the tourist. One of the musts is to pay a visit to
the State's Museum, located on the third floor
of the Administrative Building. Here displays of
local Indian Art; such as totem poles, Eskimo
Ivory, and samples of minerals, as well as wild
animal life of the north are on view.
SKAGWAY, Alaska
Skagway, with a population of approximately
500, is located at the head of the Lynn Canal,
and known in history as the gateway to the rich
Klondike Rush of 1896-98. It was here that tens
of thousand people disembarked from ships and
made their way over the Chilkoot Train to Lake
Bennett and down the Yukon River to Dawson.
It was also here that the famous character
"Soapy Smith" held the town in his grip and by
means of games of chance and fraud, relieved
the traveller of his hard-earned gold nuggets.
In time he stirred up some opposition and a
vigilante committee was established. One night
the town's people held their meeting on the end
of the wharf to decide what to do with Soapy and
his men. At the entrance to the wharf, a man
named Reid stood guard at a point where the
dock joined the shore. Here "Soapy" in a angry
mood met Reid. Reid would not let him through
to the meeting at the end of the Dock...both men
fired simultaneously and Soapy died soon after
- Reid a few days later as a result of his wound.
They were buried in a little cemetery not far
from the White Pass Railway Round House, and
for years people have come to see "Soapy's"
grave. Chips of stone have been removed so many
times from his grave stone that new stones had to
be installed. Strange as it may seem, Reid, the
man who saved the town, received little attention,
but the stories of the many sided "Soapy" has
lived on to be one of the memorable characters
of the North.
Commercially, Skagway is to this day, as in
the past, the jumping off place to entrain for
Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. All Canadian cargo
for the Yukon comes up by ship and is discharged
at Skagway for reloading into the little Freight
Cars of the White Pass & Yukon Railway.
Many town buildings constructed at the turn
of the Century show their date of architecture by
the overhead balconies and fancy cornices.
Scenically it is nicely located on the delta of
the Skagway River with towering mountains on
both sides, capped with the eternal snows. Flowers
bloom profusely, and lupins and fireweed are in
season everywhere.
16
KITIMAT, B.C.
Kitimat is a new community, situated at the
head of Douglas Channel, approximately 60
miles from the sea, whose entire economy is
based on the manufacture of aluminum ingots.
It is a romantic story of the uniting of natural
elements with modern science to produce a
product that can be sold at competitive prices
on the world markets.
The basic requirement of this industry is
intense heat. Heat can be made from coal, gas,
even atomic power. Here in this relatively isolated area the Aluminum Company was able to
obtain water rights from the British Columbia
Government giving them access to abundant
hydro-electric power. This was a huge capital
investment for a private Company, but with the
heavy annual rainfall, tremendous river and lake
systems in the interior of the Province, a constant source of power was available without the
use of a pound of coal or any other allied heating
agency.
To reduce the Kitimat story to a few facts,
here is what happened. In 1951, when it was decided to go ahead with the project, it was
divided into four essential parts. First the construction of the Kennedy Dam, (third largest earth
filled dam in the world) which diverted the flow
of the rivers and lakes of this area of the interior
from the upper regions of the Thompson and
Fraser River Systems to Tahtsa Lake. Second a
tunnel ten miles long and twenty-five feet wide
was drilled thru a mountain to drain the waters
of Tahtsa Lake with a fall of water some two
thousand feet. At Kemano Bay a Power House
was built into the mountain for the generation
of the power, amounting to over one-million
horse-power. Thirdly, a transmission line was
built over five thousand foot mountains for a
distance of fifty miles. Fourthly, the building of
the town of Kitimat itself.
This is a modern community equipped with
everything a city of 10,000 people would have,
modern schools, shopping centres, Churches and
Hospitals, all laid out in accordance with modern
town planning. Deep sea docks were built to
accommodate the aluminum ore ships that come
in from the West Indies via the Panama Canal.
Branch roads and rail lines connect with its
neighboring community of Terrace on highway
16 and the Canadian National Railways System.
Between these two centres lies Lakelse, a favourite
natural Hot Spring Spa of great beauty. Special
excursion by bus to Lakelse, also a tour of Kitimat will be available, announcements will be
made from the Purser's Office, in this regard.
17
 NOTES
ALERT BAY, B.C.
Alert Bay is a community of some 1500 persons, situated on an Island approximately 175
miles north of Vancouver on the main shipping
route of the famous "inside passage" to Alaska.
It is also the home of one of the larger and
more progressive Indian tribes of the coast, as
well as being a transportation centre for the area.
Considerable fishing and logging is done by its
inhabitants. A large Indian residential school is
maintained by the government. The community
is also served by a hospital, Wireless and Radio
Telephone Station.
18
19
 NOTES
INFORMATION AND CUSTOMS
SOUTHBOUND-Canadian Customs and immigration will board vessel on arrival at Kitimat.
ALL ONE-WAY PASSENGERS boarding vessel
at Skagway, Juneau or Wrangell, on arrival at
Kitimat should stand by their rooms until Canadian Immigration Officer has completed his
examination.
ROUND TRIP UNITED STATES PASSENGERS
may proceed ashore at Kitimat upon arrival and
on presentation of white Immigration card at the
gangplank.
ROUND TRIP CANADIAN   PASSENGERS  on
arrival at Kitimat should stand by their rooms
until Canadian Immigration Officer has completed
his examination.
CANADIAN  CUSTOMS  EXAMINATION  - Ail
one-way southbound passengers, as well as all
round trip Canadian passengers, are requested to
stand by their rooms on arrival in Kitimat until
Canadian Customs officer has called and cleared
them. Canadian passengers who have made purchases in Alaska exceeding $5.00, should complete usual declaration form available at Purser's
office for delivery to Customs officer. Upon completion of examination passenger should have
officer stamp his blue or buff coloured landing
card for presentation to officer at the gangplank
to go ashore.
20
TRAINS/TRUCKS/SHIPS/PLANES/HOTELS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS
WORLD'S MOST COMPLETE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
)1967
 r^LLF.:
.- '■• -a VAV:
Vancouver, b.c.
<° SKAGWAY, ALASKA
 PRINCESS   LOUISE
CANADIAN   PACIFIC  RAILWAY
STEAMSHIP LINES
DAILY BULLETIN
—*-
Foreword
This Bulletin has been prepared for the
assistance and guidance of passengers. The
times shown are necessarily approximate,
and exact times of arrival and departure at
ports may be obtained by reference to the
Bulletin Board. Chart showing the vessel's
course is hung in the Social Hall. Do not
fail to read the notices on the Bulletin
Board.   They are for your information.
PRINCESS   CHARLOTTE
-w?C^?.-FIEST DAY
6.00 a.m.—We proceed through Seymour
Narrows in Discovery Passage. On our
left is Vancouver Island, and on our
right Quadra Island. This is the narrowest part of the channel between Vancouver Island and the Mainland, and at
certain stages of the tide the water
rushes through like a mill-race, due to
the ebb and flow of the tide around the
north end of Vancouver Island.
7.00 a.m.—We pass through Johnstone
Straits, still with Vancouver Island on
our left and the Mainland on our right,
passing a number of logging camps, from
which logs are rafted and towed to the
sawmills on the Lower Island and Mainland.
10.30 a.m.—We arrive at Alert Bay, a village
on Cormorant Island, a small island close
to Vancouver Island, and land at the
wharf of the Alert Bay cannery, obtaining
our first glimpse of the salmon canning
PRINCESS   ALICE
industry, one of the largest in British
Columbia. There will be time allowed
for a walk ashore. To the right is the
Indian cemetery and a number of interesting totem poles. To the left the village and Anglican missionary hospital
and school.
2.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m^_We have had our
last glimpse of the north end of Vancouver Island on our left, and are crossing
Queen Charlotte Sound, the longest
stretch of open water on the entire voyage. Two-thirds of the way across we
get a glimpse of the entrance to Smith's
Inlet and Rivers Inlet, where are located
numerous salmon canneries.
5.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m.—After crossing the
Sound we enter Fitzhugh Sound, thence
through a narrow channel called Lama
Passage, and see the old Indian village
of Bella Bella on the left, then through
Seaforth Channel.
 10.00 p.m.—We cross Millbank Sound, about
ten miles of open water.
SECOND DAY
8.30 a.m.—Digby Island, with the Canadian
Government wireless station and buoy
depot, is on the left.
9.00 a.m.—We arrive at Prince Rupert,
population 8,000, the Pacific terminal of
the Canadian National Railways, where
the ship will remain for two or three
hours. Sailing time will be posted on the
blackboard at the foot of the gangway.
There will be plenty of time to see the
city. Automobiles are available on the
dock, and it is only a short ride to the
Government Floating Drydock, 600 feet
long, capable of lifting vessels of 20,000
tons deadweight, or to the large cold
storage plant in the upper harbor, where
immense quantities of frozen halibut
from the banks of Southeastern Alaska
may be inspected.
Prince Rupert is an important fishing
centre. Large quantities of fish, particularly halibut, are continually being
shipped from this point to Eastern Canada and the United States.
11.30 a.m.—Shortly after leaving Prince Rupert we pass on our right the old Indian
village of Metlakatla, and about thirty
minutes later, Port Simpson, one of the
oldest settlements in Northern British
Columbia, where the Hudson's Bay Company established a trading post over
sixty years ago.
2.30 p.m.—On the right is Green Island
Lighthouse, six miles south of the International Boundary. Next, the steamer
crosses Dixon Entrance, with the Pacific
Ocean on the left, and passes along
Revilla Gigedo Channel to Tongass Narrows, on which is located our first port
of call in Alaska, Ketchikan.
5.00 p.m.—Shortly before arrival at Ketchikan the ship will be boarded by Immigration Officials, and passengers will be
required to present their immigration
cards and pass immigration inspection
before going ashore. Ketchikan is one
of the largest and most prosperous towns
in Alaska. There are fifteen salmon canneries located in this vicinity, and a large
cold storage plant. Visitors will find a
number of interesting curio stores, where
Alaska curios may be purchased. A
pleasant fifteen - minute walk up the
stream to the waterfall will in the late
summer months give the visitor an opportunity to see salmon ascending the
swift waters of the rapids in large numbers.
The ship's sailing hour will be posted
on the blackboard at the foot of the gangway as you go ashore.
THIKD DAY
4.00 a.m.—We arrive at Wrangell, an old
Russian settlement named after Baron
von Wrangell, a former Russian Governor of Alaska, situated near the mouth
of the Stikine River, which is navigable
for about 180 miles to Telegraph Creek,
in Northern British Columbia, an outfitting point for big game hunters entering
the Cassiar District. A regular service
on the Stikine is operated by the Barrington Transportation Company during
the open season of navigation.
Part of the old Russian fort still exists,
and there are some very old totem poles
to be seen. Only a short stop will be
made, but a call will be made again
southbound.
9.00 a.m. — About two hours after leaving
Wrangell, ship enters Wrangell Narrows,
a narrow, tortuous channel about twenty
miles long, between Kopreanof Island on
the left, and Mitkof on the right. The
channel is well marked with buoys and
beacons, and the ship passes at half
speed through some very beautiful scenery. At the north end of the Narrows
on the right lies the old town of Petersburg, settled originally in the days of the
Russian occupation, and now a flourishing fishing centre.
11.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. —After passing
Petersburg a beautiful panorama of
mountains opens before us, and away to
the northeast may be seen the Devil's
Thumb, a sharp needle of rock 9,100 feet
high. For several hours we pass along
a wide stretch of water called Frederick
Sound,  thence  along  Stephen's  Passage
to the magnificent Taku Glacier. (Pronounced Ta-koo.) During the afternoon
we will probably pass numerous small
bergs which have broken off the glacier,
and as we arrive at the head of Taku
Inlet we pass on the left a dead or receding arm of the glacier, while directly
ahead is the mighty mass of the Taku, a
river of ice a mile wide, originating in
the mountains ninety miles inland, the
face of the ice as it enters the sea being
over 100 feet in height above the water.
7.00 p.m.—A short run from Taku Glacier
brings us to Gastineau Channel, and on
our right, as we enter, is the town of
Thane, and on the left on Douglas Island
is the famous Treadwell Mine, formerly
the largest free milling stamp mill in the
world. This mine was flooded by a cave-
in in 1917, and has not since operated.
Adjoining the site is the town of Douglas.
Near the end of the channel lies the town
of Juneau, the capital of Alaska, population about 3,500. Here are splendid
stores and curio shops, modern hotels
and many beautiful residences and public
buildings.
On the side of Mount Roberts, overlooking the city, can be seen the mine of
the Alaska Juneau Gold Mining Company, the largest gold quartz mill in the
United States or Alaska, with a capacity
of 9,000 tons of ore per day.
Do not fail to visit the Territorial Museum, where can be seen a collection of
Eskimo curios said to be the finest and
only complete one of its kind in the
world. A motor trip of fourteen miles
will take you to the Great Mendenhall
Glacier, or a twenty-minute hike will
take you into the Gold Creek Basin, often
called the Grand Canyon of Alaska, the
scene of the first placer gold strike in
Alaska, made by Joe Juneau and Richard
Haines in the early 80's.
12.00 Midnight—We leave for Skagway.
FOUKTH DAY
6.00 a.m. to 9.00 p.m. (Ship's time) — The
trip up the Lynn Canal from Juneau
takes us between towering mountains,
many of them covered with glaciers and
snow, which on a sunny morning is a
beautiful sight indeed.
On the west side of the Canal, one hour
before we reach Skagway, are the towns
of Haines and Fort Seward, the latter a
United States military post. Our sea trip
ends at Skagway, where connection is
made with trains of the White Pass &
Yukon Route for interior points.
There are several points of interest in
and around Skagway, including Reid's
Falls, Dewey Falls and De~Wey Lake,
Alpine Bridge and Skagway Park, and
the grave of "Soapy Smith." There are
also good trails to A. B. and Dewey
Mountains.
Mail this to a friend.
 ALASKA ROUTE   T^-^Ba
Canadian Pacific Railway Co.
B. C CoasT   Steamship Service
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 CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RAILWAY
STEAMSHIP LINES
DAILY  BULLETIN
-*-
Foreword
For the assistance and guidance of passengers this Daily Bulletin has been
prepared. The times shown are necessarily approximate and exact time of
arrival and departure at ports may be obtained from the Purser's Office or upor
reference to the Bulletin Board. Chart
showing the vessel's course is hung in the
Social Hall. Do not fail to read the notices
on the Bulletin Board. They are for your
information and assistance.
FIRST DAY
6.00 a.m.—Ship passes through Seymour
Narrows. This is the narrowest par1
of the channel between Vancouver Is-
landj and the Mainland and at Certain
stages of the tide the water pushes
through like a mill-race. This is. due
to the ebb and flow of the tides around
the North end of Vancouver Island.
7.00 a.m. —Passing through Johnstone
Straits and later Broughton Straits.
Along these Straits a number of logging camps are located from which logs
are rafted and towed to the various
sawmills on the lower Island and
Mainland.
10.30 a.m?—Arrive at Alert Bay, situated
on Cormorant Island, a small island
close to Vancouver Island. The ship
lands at the wharf of the Alert Bay
Cannery, one of the principal salmon
canneries on the coast. Passengers
will be allowed time for a walk ashore.
The Indian cemetery on the right and
the Indian village on the left are worth
a visit.
2.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m.—Ship crosses
Queen Charlotte Sound which is open
to the Pacific Ocean. During the
voyage the ship is only three times in
the open ocean and then only for short
periods.
9.00 p.m.—Passing through Lama Passage, Bella Bella.is on the left, a very
old and practically deserted Indian
village.
10.00 p.m. —We enter Milbank Sound.
Crossing the second stretch of open
ocean, about ten miles in extent.
SECOND DAY
8.30 a.m.—Digby Island is on the left,
on which may be seen the Canadian
Government Wireless Station and
Buoy Depot.
9.00 a.m.—Arrive at Prince Rupert,
where the ship will remain for from
two to three hours. For exact information, note the blackboard at the
gangway as you pass ashore. Ample
time will be given to see the city.
This is the Pacific Terminal of the
Canadian National Railways. Here
there is a very large floating drydock
capable of lifting vessels of 20,000 tons
weight.    It is 600 feet long.
/* c^a^a^t y«<* I
mm
 Prince Rupert is now an important
fishing centre. Large quantities of fish,
particularly halibut, are being shipped
from this point to Eastern Canada and
United States.
A large cold storage plant is located
in the Upper Harbor. At this point the
fish are unloaded, put into cold storage
or iced, as the case may be, for shipment to the East.
11.30 a.m a  short  time    after    leaving
Prince Rupert we pass the old Indian
village of Metlakatla, and about thirty
minutes later,- Port Simpson. These
villages may be seen in the distance.
At Port Simpson is an old Hudson's
Bay Company's post, and it is one of the
oldest settlements in Northern B. C.
Here the Hudson's Bay have been
trading wifh the Indians for over sixty
years.
2.30 p.m.—About three hours after leaving Prince Rupert the steamer passes
Green Island Lighthouse on the right.
This is six miles South of the International Boundary.
Next the steamer crosses Dixon
Entrance, another wide entrance from
the open sea, and we wind our way
through Revilla Gigedo Channel. At
this point the channel is called the
Tongass Narrows, and leads you to
Ketchikan, which town is located on the
Revilla Gigedo Island.
5.00 p.m. —jUst prior to arriving at
Ketchikan, the ship is boarded by the
Port Doctor, Customs and Immigration
Officials and all passengers are required  to   present   their   Immigration
Cards and  pass the Official  Inspection
before going ashore.    Ketchikan is ona*.
of  the  largest   and    most   prosperous
towns in Alaska, and has several canneries and a large cold storage plant.
Visitors will find on walking
through the town a number of curio
stores where furs and Alaskan curios
may be purchased.
There is a pleasant walk up the
stream to the Waterfall, which takes
about fifteen minutes and is well worth
the visit. In the late summer months
salmon may be seen ascending the
shallow waters of the rapids in large
numbers, even to the point of crowding
one another out of the water.
THIRD DAY
4.00 a.m.—We arrive at Wrangell after
a six-hour run from Ketchikan.
Wrangell is an old Russian settlement
named after a former Russian Governor
of Alaska. It is situated near the
mouth of the |>tikine River, which is
navigable for about 180 miles to Telegraph Creek in Northern British Columbia, the outfitting point for big
game hunters entering the Cassiar
District. There is a regular service on
the Stikine River operated by the Barrington Transportation Company. Part
of the old Russian fort still exists and
there are also some very old Totem
Poles to be seen. Only a short stop
will be made, but call will be made
again  southbound.
9.00 a.m. —About two hours after leaving Wrangell the ship enters Wrangell
Narrows.     These   narrows   are   twenty
 miles in length, being very narrow and
shallow with many turns and windings
which are well marked with buoys
and beacons. The scenery here is very
beautiful and the ship proceeds at half
speed. At the north end of the Narrows,
on the right, lies the old town of Petersburg, at one time a Russian settlement
and now a flourishing~iishing centre.
5.00 p.m.—A run of about seven hours
across Frederick Sound and along
Stephen's Passage brings us to Taku
Glacier (pronounced Tak-oo). During
the afternoon we will, in all probability,
pass some small iceflows from the
glacier. There are two glaciers. The
one on the left is a "dead" glacier,
which is gradually receding. The other
one is "alive" and continually moves
forward. Taku Glacier is a mile wide
and 90 miles long, the ice on the face
of the glacier being over 100 feet thick.
7.00 p.m.—We enter the Gastineau
Channel. On our right is the town of
Thane. On the left of the channel, on
Douglas Island, can be seen the old
buildings of the famous Treadwell
Mine, where formerly stood the largest
free-milling stamp mill in the world.
This mine was flooded by a cave-in in
1917 and has not been operated since
that time. Adjoining the site is the
town of Douglas. At the end of Gastineau Channel lies the town of Juneau,
the capital of Alaska, population about
3,500. Here are splendid stores and
curio shops, modern hotels and many
beautiful residences and public buildings.
On the side of Mount Roberts, overlooking the city, can be seen the mine
of the Alaska Juneau Gold Mining
Company, the largest gold quartz mill
in the United States or Alaska, capacity
9,000 tons of ore per day.
Do not fail to visit the Territorial
Museum where can be seen a collection
of Eskimo curios said to be the finest
and only complete one of its kind in the
world. A motor trip of fourteen miles
will take you to the great Mendenhall
Glacier, or a twenty-minute hike will
take you into the Gold Creek Basin,
often called the Grand Canyon of
Alaska, the site of the first placer gold
strike in Alaska, made by Joe Juneau
and Richard Haines in the early 80's.
12.00 mdt.—We leave for Skagway.
FOURTH DAY
6.00 a.m. to 9.0(1 a.m. (ship's time)—The
trip up the Lynn Canal from Juneau
takes us between towering mountains,
m^ny of them covered with glaciers and
snjpw, which on a sunny morning is a
beautiful sight indeed.
On the West side of the canal, one
hour before we reach Skagway, are the
towns of Haines and Fort Seward, the
latter a U. S. military post. Skagway
is the terminus of the voyage.
There are several points of interest
in and around Skagway, including
Reid's Falls, Dewey Falls and Lake
Dewey, the Alpine Bridge and the
Skagway Park. The grave of "Soapy
Smith" is also interesting. For those
who enjoy mountain climbing there is
a good trail to A. B. Mountain and
Dewey Mountain.
 MAIL THIS TO A FRIEND
For further information and descriptive folder
apply to nearest
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY AGENT
or to N. R. DesBRISAY, General Passenger Agent,
Vancouver, B. C.
PRINTED    IN    CANADA
 2   *" 7 / / /T/Zr/fr T/777//W v'^'v//Tf/7^w^'^/7W^
 PRINCESS   LOUISE
CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RAILWAY
STEAMSHIP LINES
DAILY BULLETIN
' -£-
Foreword
This Bulletin has been prepared for the
assistance and guidance of passengers. The
times shown are necessarily approximate,
and exact times of arrival and departure at
ports may be obtained by reference to the
Bulletin Board. Chart showing the vessel's
course is hung in the Social Hall. Do not
fail to read the notices on the Bulletin
Board.   They are for your information.
PRINCESS   CHARLOTTE
FIRST DAY
6.00 a.m,—We proceed through Seymour
Narrows in Discovery Passage. On our
left is Vancouver Island, and on our
right Quadra Island. This is the narrowest part of the channel between Vancouver Island and the Mainland, and at
certain stages of the tide the water
rushes through like a mill-race, due to
the ebb and flow of the tide around the
north end of Vancouver Island.
7.00 a.m.—We pass through Johnstone
Straits, still with Vancouver Island on
our left and the Mainland on our right,
passing a number of logging camps, from
which logs are rafted and towed to the
sawmills on the Lower Island and Mainland.
10.30 a.mr-We arrive at Alert Bay, a village
on Cormorant Island, a small island close
to Vancouver Island, and land at the
wharf of the Alert Bay cannery, obtaining
our first glimpse of the salmon canning
PRINCESS   ALICE
industry, one of the largest in British
Columbia. There will be time allowed
for a walk ashore. To the right is the
Indian cemetery and a number of interesting totem poles. To the left the village and Anglican missionary hospital
and school.
2.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m_we have had our
last glimpse of the north end of Vancouver Island on our left, and are crossing
Queen Charlotte Sound, the longest
stretch of open water on the entire voyage. Two-thirds of the way across we
get a glimpse of the entrance to Smith's
Inlet and Rivers Inlet, where are located
numerous salmon canneries.
5.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m.,—After crossing the
Sound we enter Fitzhugh Sound, thence
through a narrow channel called Lama
Passage, and see the old Indian village
of Bella Bella on the left, then through
Seaforth Channel.
 10.00 p.m. —We cross Millbank Sound, about
ten miles of open water.
SECOND DAY
8.30 a.m.-—Digby Island, with the Canadian
Government wireless station and buoy
depot, is on the left.
9.00 a.m.—We arrive at Prince Rupert,
population 8,000, the Pacific terminal of
the Canadian National Railways, where
the ship will remain for two or three
hours. Sailing time will be posted on the
blackboard at the foot of the gangway.
There will be plenty of time to see the
city. Automobiles are available on the
dock, and it is only a short ride to the
Government Floating Drydock, 600 feet
long, capable of lifting vessels of 20,000
tons deadweight, or to the large cold
storage plant in the upper harbor, where
immense quantities of frozen halibut
from the banks of Southeastern Alaska
may be inspected.
Prince Rupert is an important fishing
centre. Large quantities of fish, particularly halibut, are continually being
shipped from this point to Eastern Canada and the United States.
11.30 a.m.—Shortly after leaving Prince Rupert we pass on our right the old Indian
village of Metlakatla, and about thirty
minutes later, Port Simpson, one of the
oldest settlements in Northern British
Columbia, where the Hudson's Bay Company established a trading post over
sixty years ago.
2.30 p.m.—On the right is Green Island
Lighthouse, six miles south of the International Boundary. Next, the steamer
crosses Dixon Entrance, with the Pacific
Ocean on the left, and passes along
Ptevilla Gigedo Channel to Tongass Narrows, on which is located our first port
of call in Alaska, Ketchikan.
5.00 p.m.—Shortly before arrival at Ketchikan the ship will be boarded by Immigration Officials, and passengers will be
required to present their immigration
cards and pass immigration inspection
before going ashore. Ketchikan is one
of the largest and most prosperous towns
in Alaska. There are fifteen salmon canneries located in this vicinity, and a large
cold storage plant. Visitors will find a
number of interesting curio stores, where
Alaska curios may be purchased. A
pleasant fifteen - minute walk up the
stream to the waterfall will in the late
summer months give the visitor an opportunity to see salmon ascending the
swift waters of the rapids in large numbers.
The ship's sailing hour will be posted
on the blackboard at the foot of the gangway as you go ashore.
THIRD DAY
4.00 a.m.—We arrive at Wrangell, an old
Russian settlement named after Baron
von Wrangell, a former Russian Governor of Alaska, situated near the mouth
g^gZfr
of the Stikine River, which is navigable
for about 180 miles to Telegraph Creek,
in Northern British Columbia, an outfitting point for big game hunters entering
the Cassiar District. A regular service
on the Stikine is operated by the Barrington Transportation Company during
the open season of navigation.
Part of the old Russian fort still exists,
and there are some very old totem poles
to be seen. Only a short stop will be
made, but a call will be made again
southbound.
9.00 a.m. — About two hours after leaving
Wrangell, ship enters Wrangell Narrows,
a narrow, tortuous channel about twenty
miles long, between Kopreanof Island on
the left, and Mitkof on the right. The
channel is well marked with buoys and
beacons, and the ship passes at half
speed through some very beautiful scenery. At the north end of the Narrows
on the right lies the old town of Petersburg, settled originally in the days of the
Russian occupation, and now a flourishing fishing centre.
11.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. —After passing
Petersburg a beautiful panorama of
mountains opens before us, and away to
the northeast may be seen the Devil's
Thumb, a sharp needle of rock 9,100 feet
high. For several hours we pass along
a wide stretch of water called Frederick
Sound,  thence  along  Stephen's  Passage
to the magnificent Taku Glacier. (Pronounced Ta-koo.) During the afternoon
we will probably pass numerous small
bergs which have broken off the glacier,
and as we arrive at the head of Taku
Inlet we pass on the left a dead or receding arm of the glacier, while directly
ahead is the mighty mass of the Taku, a
river of ice a mile wide, originating in
the mountains ninety miles inland, the
face of the ice as it enters the sea being
over 100 feet in height above the water.
7.00 p.m.—A short run from Taku Glacier
brings us to Gastineau Channel, and on
our right, as we enter, is the town of
Thane, and on the left on Douglas Island
is the famous Treadwell Mine, formerly
the largest free milling stamp mill in the
world. This mine was flooded by a cave-
in in 1917, and has not since operated.
Adjoining the site is the town of Douglas.
Near the end of the channel lies the town
of Juneau, the capital of Alaska, population about 3,500. Here are splendid
stores and curio shops, modern hotels
and many beautiful residences and public
buildings.
On the side of Mount Roberts, overlooking the city, can be seen the mine of
the Alaska Juneau Gold Mining Company, the largest gold quartz mill in the
United States or Alaska, with a capacity
of 9,000 tons of ore per day.
Do not fail to visit the Territorial Museum, where can be seen a collection of
Eskimo curios said to be the finest and
only complete one of its kind in the
world. A motor trip of fourteen miles
will take you to the Great Mendenhall
Glacier, or a twenty-minute hike will
take you into the Gold Creek Basin, often
called the Grand Canyon of Alaska, the
scene of the first placer gold strike in
Alaska, made by Joe Juneau and Richard
Haines in the early 80's.
12.00 Midnight—We leave for Skagway.
FOURTH DAY
6.00 a.m. to 9.00 p.m. (Ship's time) — The
trip up the Lynn Canal from Juneau
takes us between towering mountains,
many of them covered with glaciers and
snow, which on a sunny morning is a
beautiful sight indeed.
On the west side of the Canal, one hour
before we reach Skagway, are the towns
of Haines and Fort Seward, the latter a
United States military post. Our sea trip
ends at Skagway, where connection is
made with trains of the White Pass &
Yukon Route for interior points.
There are several points of interest in
and around Skagway, including Reid's
Falls, Dewey Falls and Dewey Lake,
Alpine Bridge and Skagway Park, and
the grave of "Soapy Smith." There are
also good trails to A. B. and Dewey
Mountains. I
Mail this to a friend.
 / /       %**2
ALASKA ROUTE
Canadian Pacific Railway Co. -
B. C. Coasf   Steamship Service
 %\\iaB\Wrvv "AV 'n\\\\\w
m
ini|i(v-.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAI
pB^fe-Goa-st—S.S. Ser
Mm
 •i i| IW
OF  THE I-ROM
VAN • to SKAGWAY ALASKA
 ~	
Princess Louise
Canadian xacilic Railway
B.C.  Coast Oteamsmp iService
Daily Bulletin
foreword
This Bulletin has been prepared for the
assistance and guidance of passengers. The
times shown are necessarily approximate,
and exact times of arrival and departure at
ports may be obtained by reference to the
Bulletin Board. Chart snowing the vessel's
course is hung in the Social Hall. Do not
fail to read the notices on the Bulletin
Board.    They are for your information.
Princess Charlotte
FIRST DAY
6.1/1/ a.m. —"We proceed through Seymour
Narrows in Discovery Passage. On our
left is Vancouver Island, and on our right
Quadra Island. This is the narrowest part
of the channel between Vancouver Island
and the Mainland, and at certain stages of
the tide the water rushes through like a
mill-race, due to the ebb and flow of the
tide around the north end of Vancouver
Island.
7.00 a.m. —We pass through Johnstone
. Straits, still with Vancouver Island on our
left and the Mainland on our right, passing a number of logging camps, from
which logs are rafted and towed to the
sawmills on the Lower Island and Mainland.
10.00 a.m.—We arrive at Alert Bay, a
village on Cormorant Island, a small island
close to Vancouver Island, and land at the
Princess Alice
wharf of the Alert Bay cannery, obtaining
our first glimpse of the salmon canning
industry, one of the largest in British Columbia. There will be time allowed for a
walk ashore. To the right is the Indian
cemetery and a number of interesting
totem poles. To the left the village and
Anglican missionary hospital and school. .
2.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. —We have had
our last glimpse of the north end of Vancouver Island on our left, and are crossing Queen Charlotte Sound, the longest
stretch of open water on the entire voyage.
Two-thirds of the way across we get a
glimpse of the entrance to Smith's Inlet
and Rivers Inlet, where are located numerous salmon canneries.
5.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. —After crossing
the Sound we enter Fitzhugh Sound,
thence through a narrow channel called
Lama Passage, and see the old Indian
village of Bella Bella on the left, then
through  Seaforth  Channel.
 10.00 p.m.—Wt   cross   Millbank   Sound,
about ten miles of open water.
SECOND DAY
8.30 a.m. —Digby Island, with the Canadian
Government wireless station and buoy
depot, is on the left.
9.00 a.m. —We arrive at Prince Rupert,
population 8,000, the largest city in
northern British Columbia, where the
ship will remain for two or three hours.
Sailing time will be posted on the
blackboard at the foot of the gangway.
There will be plenty of time to see the
city. Automobiles are available on the
dock, and it is only a short ride to the
Government Floating Drydock, 600 feet
long, capable of lifting vessels of 20,000
tons deadweight, or to the large cold
storage plant in the upper harbor, where
immense quantities of frozen halibut from
the banks of Southeastern Alaska may be
inspected.
Prince Rupert is an important fishing
centre. Large quantities of fish, particularly halibut are continually being shipped
from this point to Eastern Canada and the
United States.
11.30 a.m.—Shortly after leaving Prince
Rupert we pass on our right the old
Indian village of Metlakatla, and about
thirty minutes later Port Simpson, one of
the  oldest  settlements  in  Northern  British
Columbia,  where  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company established a trading post in 1834.
2.30 p.m. —On the right is Green Island
Lighthouse, six miles south of the International Boundary. Next, the steamer
crosses Dixon Entrance, with the Pacific
Ocean on the left, and passes along
Revilla Gigedo Channel to Tongass Narrows, on which is located our first port
of call in Alaska, Ketchikan.
5.00 p.m. —Shortly before arrival at Ketchikan the ship will be boarded by Immigration Officials, and passengers will be
required to present their immigration
cards and pass immigration inspection
before going ashore. Ketchikan is one of
the largest and most prosperous towns in
Alaska. There are fifteen salmon canneries located in this vicinity, and a large
cold storage plant. Visitors will find a
number of interesting curio stores, where
Alaska curios may be purchased. A
pleasant fifteen-minute walk up the stream
to the waterfall will in the late summer
months give the visitor an opportunity to
see salmon ascending the swift waters of
the rapids in large numbers.
The ship's sailing hour will be posted
on the blackboard at the foot of the gangway as you go ashore.
THIRD DAY
4.00 a.m.—We arrive at Wrangell, an old
Russian settlement named after Baron von
Wrangell, a former Russian Governor of
Alaska, situated near the mouth of the
Stikine River, which is navigable for about
180 miles to Telegraph Creek, in Northern
British Columbia, an outfitting point for
big game hunters entering the Cassiar
District. A regular service on the Stikine
is operated by the Barrington Transportation Company during the open season of
navigation.
Part of the old Russian fort still exists,
and there are some very old totem poles
to be seen. Only a short stop will be
made, but a call will be made again southbound.
9.00 a.m. —About two hours after leaving
Wrangell, ship enters Wrangell Narrows,
a narrow, tortuous channel about twenty
miles long between Kopreanof Island on
the left, and Mitkof on the right. The
channel is well marked with buoys and
beacons, and the ship passes at half
speed through some very beautiful scenery.
At the north end of the Narrows on the
right lies the old town of Petersburg,
settled originally in the days of the Russian occupation, and now a flourishing
fishing centre.
11.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.—After passing
Petersburg a beautiful panorama of mountains opens before us, and away to the
northeast may be seen the Devil's Thumb,
a sharp needle of rock 9,100 feet high. For
several hours we pass along a wide stretch
of water called Frederick Sound, thence
along Stephen's Passage to the magnificent Taku Glacier.    (Pronounced Ta-koo).
 During the afternoon we will probably
pass numerous small bergs which have
broken off the glacier, and as we arrive at
the head of Taku Inlet we pass on the
left a dead or receding arm of the glacier,
while directly ahead is the mighty mass
of the Taku, a river of ice a mile wide,
originating in the mountains ninety miles
inland, the face of the ice as it enters
the sea being over 100 feet in height above
the water.
7*00 p.m.—A short run from Taku Glacier
brings us to Gastineau Channel, and on
our   right,   as   we   enter,   is   the   town   of
. Thane, and on the left on Douglas Island
is the famous Treadwell Mine, formerly
the largest free milling stamp mill in the
world. This mine was flooded by a cave-
in in 1917, and has not since operated.
Adjoining the site is the town of Douglas.
Near the end of the channel lies the town
of Juneau, the capital of Alaska, population about 3,500. Here are splendid stores
and curio shops, modern hotels and many
beautiful   residences   and   public   buildings.
On the side of Mount Roberts, overlooking the city, can be seen the mine of the
Alaska Juneau Gold Mining Company, the
largest gold quartz mill in the United
States or Alaska, with a capacity of 9,000
tons of ore per day.
Do not fail to visit the Territorial Museum, where can be seen a collection of
Eskimo curios said to be the finest and
only complete one of its kind in the world.
A motor trip of fourteen miles will take
you   to   the   Great   Mendenhall   Glacier,   or
a twenty-minute hike will take you into
the Gold Creek Basin, often called the
Grand Canyon of Alaska, the scene of the
first placer gold strike in Alaska, made by
Joe Juneau and Richard Haines in the
early 80's.
12.00 Midnight —We leave for  Skagway.
FOURTH DAY
6.00 a.m. to 8.00 a.m.   (Ship's   time)—
The trip up the Lynn Canal from Juneau
takes us between towering mountains,
many of them covered with glaciers and
snow, which on a sunny morning is a
beautiful sight indeed.
On the west side of the Canal, one hour
before we reach Skagway, are the towns
of Haines and Fort Seward, the latter a
United States military post. Our sea trip
ends at Skagway, where connection is
made with trains of the White Pass &
Yukon Route for interior points.
There are several points of interest in
and around Skagway, including Reid's
Falls, Dewey Falls and Dewey Lake,
Alpine Bridge and Skagway Park, and
the grave of ''Soapy Smith." There are
also good trails to A. B. and Dewey
Mountains.
Mail this to a friend.
^GCLTd.
PRINTED    IN    CANADA
 ALASKA ROUTE  _ ,
Canadian Pacific Railway Co. -&-3£^
B. C. Coasf   Steamship Service I-       -L ^^-S^Ml
 \n*
B-C-0        r S-S-SERVICE
J

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