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Princess Patricia miscellaneous Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1981

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 rmwcEss
llll i< II
H CPRail
Name
Sailing Date
Room
UPPER DECK CABINS
  RE-ISSUED JUNE 30, 1951
CANADIAN PACIFIC
RAILWAY COMPANY
B.C.  COAST
STEAMSHIP
SERVICE
Pacific
Standard
Time
VANCOUVER - VICTORIA - SEATTLE
In effect April 29 to September 29 Inclusive
DAILY   SERVICE
Read  Down
"Princess Marguerite"
"Princess Patricia"
"Princess  Elizabeth"
or "Princess Joan"
Lv. Vancouver
Ar. Victoria
Lv. Victoria
Ar. Seattle
10:30 a.m.
2:43 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Lv. Seattle
Ar. Victoria
Lv. Victoria
Ar. Vancouver
8:00 a.m.
11:50 a.m.
1:10 p.m.
5:25 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
n effect June 29
to Sept.  16 incl
8:30 a.m.
1:30 p.m.
10:59 p.m.
6:00 a.m.
10:59 p.!
6:00 a.i
PASSAGE   FARE
Vancouver and Victoria
One Way    .$3.75
Return     6.75
Victoria and Seattle
One Way    $3.95
Return     7.10
AUTOMOBILE  RATES
Vancouver and Victoria
$6.00 each way
Victoria and Seattle
$6.50 each way
TIMES SHOWN ARE PACIFIC STANDARD
 WESTVIEW (Powell River)—COMOX
Steamship "Princess Mary"
Read Dewn
Tuesday
Thursday
Sunday
Lv. Vancouver
10:45 p.m. Tue.
10:45 p.m. Thu.
10:45 p.m. Sun.
Ar. Westview
5:30 a.m. Wed.
5:30 a.m.   Fri.
5:30 a.m.  Mon.
Lv. Westview
7:00 a.m. Wed.
7:00 a.m.   Fri.
7:00 a.m.  Men.
Ar. Blubber Bay
a.m. Wed.
a.m. Fri.
a.m. Mon.
Ar, Hornby Island
9:00 a.m. Wed.
—
®
Ar. Denman Island
a.m. Wed.
<—
Ar. Union Bay
p.m. Wed.
a.m.  Fri.
Ar. Comox
p.m. Wed.
p.m. Fri.
p.m.  Men.
Lv. Comox
1:30 p.m. Wed.
1:30 D.m.   Frf.
Lv. Blubber Bay
4:00 p.m. Wed.
4:00 p.m.  Fri.
Ar. Westview
p.m. Wed.
p.m. Fri.
Lv. Westview
10:15 p.m. Wed.
10:15 p.m.  Fri.
Ar. Vancouver
5:30 a.m. Thu.
5:30 a.m.   Sat.
5:30 a.m. Tue.
PASSAGE   FARE
Vancouver and Westview
One Way $4.30
Return     7.75
AUTOMOBILE   RATES
Vancouver and Westview
$6:00 each-way .
(T) Call  will  be made at  Hornby  Island each  Monday,  June   18 te
September 24 inclusive.
NOTE:—Powell   River located  V/*   miles   North   of  Westview by  read.
Passengers  make their own  way by  Bus.
WEST COAST OF VANCOUVER ISLAND SERVICE
"Princess Maquinna" sails from Victoria at 10:00 p.m. for ports
on the West Coast of Vancouver Island; i.e., Port Renfrew, Bamfield,
Port Alberni, Ucluelet, Esperanza Inlet ports, Zebatlos and Chamiss
Bay on  the following  dates:
June  4-12
July    6-14
August  - 7-15
September 	
October    2-10
The round trip takes 5'/2 days.   Round tri
ing   passage,   meals and  berth,   $50.00.
-20-28
-22-30
-23-31
-16-24
-13-26
ip first-class fare, includ-
TIMES SHOWN ARE PACIFIC STANDARD
 GULF ISLANDS SERVICE
In effect to September 29, 1951, Inclusive
Steamship "Princess Mary"
TUESDAY
Lv. Vancouver  .....8:00a.m.
Ar. Mayne Island
Ar. H»pe Bay ©
Ar. Saturna Island
Ar. South Pender
Ar. Ganges Harbour
Ar. Gallano Island ®
Ar. Vancouver 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
Lv. Vancouver    t :00 a.m.
Ar. Galiane Island (?)
Ar. Mayne Island
Ar. Pt. Washington ®
Ar. Ganges Harbour
Ar. South Pender
Ar. Saturna   Island
Ar. Hope Bay ©
Ar. Vancouver .7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
Lv. Vancouver    8:00 a.m.
Ar. Galiane Island ®
Ar. Pt. Washington ©
Ar. Ganges Harbour
Ar. Mayne Island
Ar. Vancouver    5 '30 p.m.
SUNDAY   (See
Note)
Lv.
8:00 a.m.
Ar.
Ganges    Harbour.
12:00 noon
Lv.
Ganges    Harbour.
1:30 p.m.
Lv.
Port Washington.
2:30 p.m.
Lv.
Mayne   Island   ..
3:15 p.m.
Lv.
GaNano Island   ..
4:00 p.m.
Ar.
Vancouver (about)
7:00 p.m.
Note: This sailing w
II be oper-
ated May 27 to September 23,
inclusive.
(T) Montague Harbour and Gossip Island reached via Gallano Island.
(D Call  Is made at  North  Pender  Island either at Hope Bay on
Tuesday or Port Washington on Thursday and Sunday, and at both ports .
on Saturday as indicated In schedule above.   The distance between these
ports by road is about 2'/2 miles.
Passage Fare
Vancouver & Gulf Is. Ports
One Way $2.00
Return  _  3.60
Automobile Rate
Vancouver & Gulf Is. Ports
$5.50 each way.
ALASKA SERVICE
SPECIAL CRUISES to Alaska by the "Princess Kathleen" of 8'/,
days' duration sailing from Vancouver at 8:00 p.m., June 9-20-30, July
11-21, August 1-11-22, September 3, 1951, for as low as $180.00 for
the round trip with calls at Prince Rupert, Behm Canal, Ketchikan,
Juneau, Skagway, Glacier Bay, Wrangell, Grenvilie Channel, Gardner
Canal and Ocean Falls.
REGULAR CRUISES to Alaska by the "Princess Norah" and
"Princess Louise" of 8'/2 days' duration sailing from Vancouver at
8:00 p.m., June 2-6-13-16-23-27, July 4-7-14-18-25-28, August 4-8-
15-18-25-29, September 8-19-29, 1951, for as low as $150.00 for the
round trip with calls at Ocean Falls, Prince Rupert, Ketchikan,
Wrangell Narrows, Petersburg, Juneau and Skagway. 	
TIMES SHOWN ARE PACIFIC STANDARD
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3527 - 30M - 6-51
                 -
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■—-
POSTAGE
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STAMP
Made in Canada
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G-105
The PRINCESS PATRICIA of the C.P. Rail B.C.C.S. plying
the waters of the Inside Passage from Vancouver, B.C. to
A
Skagway,   Alaska.   This   modern   equipped   all-cruise   ship
Traveltime
(6000   ton   gross)   accommodates   347   passengers.   The
entire trip takes 7'/2 days; making 6 Ports of call.
PRODUCT
C.P.R. Photo
LS-4036
^^^^Mg^^^^^^^^^^^^^^|^^^^^a=aM
_^___     .____
-  -
10
  /torn
 We were happy to have
you aboard, and hope you'll return soon
for another Alaska cruise.
Master
M**yovu*.
Master.
Chief Engineer.\
AT^y^^A yAiAt/L
Chief Steward.
SvA^ey^eA*^
Stewardess.
^ ^X,S(^ ^AAyU TTA^lAU/.
Host.
Purser. Hostess.
7/7/9 72 2A7c/^
Gift Shop.
 A
CPRail
Alaska Cruises
B
 Waterfront
skyline
changing
Tokyu Canada Corp.'s Part Pacific
Hotel is starting to dominate the skyline at Canada Harbor Place on the
Vancouver waterfront. The retired CP
ship the Princess Patricia is tied up
next to the The 510-room hotel-office
complex that is scheduled to open its
doors in January.
Staff photo by Rick Loughran
 )n, and our pres-
ery much for the
ree trade."
m of office ends
o the Vancouver
: he said was his
istern Canada.
common market
we might work
would take into
stries that could
n trade," he said,
encompass soft-
ver, that there is
>nism in the U.S.,
dollar, and it may
a policy of freer
stton, he said a
Canadian Press
OTTAWA — Rails, roads, air routes
and shipping lanes will be thrown to
the vagaries of the marketplace with
proposals yesterday for a massive
deregulation of the country's transportation system.
Transport Minister Don Mazan-
kowski announced the planned
changes with the release of a discussion paper which proposes to alter
radically the way transportation is
governed.
Mazankowsid proposes to dismantle
the Canadian Transport Commission,
give the Cabinet power to set transportation policy; let airlines set most of
their own fares and free carriers to do
business they way they see fit.
Most airline spokesmen immediately
hailed the plan as a progressive step,
but the reaction was more cautious
from representatives of other transportation companies.
Most said they preferred to see the
report before commenting.
Mazankowski says his plans can be
achieved without damaging the poor,
remote or underserved areas of the
country.
The minister acknowledged that
some of the bigger carriers might
abandon some communities, but a new
class of transporation entrepreneur
will move in, he said.
| creditor countries has signed a long- |
| delayed agreement with Poland to resche- |
I dule $12 billion (U.S.) of government- |
| guaranteed debts, covering interest and =
| principle due from 1982 to 1984. Banking §
| officials in Warsaw said Poland was seeking |
I about $1 billion (U.S.) in fresh credits in the |
| near term. Poland's debts total about $27 |
| billion. |
Oil rights deal signed
SNAA, North Yemen — Exxon Corp. §
| signed an agreement yesterday for the right |
= icLexnloreJoLoiLandjiiiriej-als inaM flflO- =
mem, saTcTtne COm-
pany, but a spokesman
said later the upgrading
likely won't create any
more permanent jobs.
Texaco said yesterday the aim of the
upgrading is to increase
production of no-lead,
high octane gasolines
and to improve efficiencies at the plant.
The upgrading comes
at a particularly uncer-
, 81/4% . •■: 81/2%      ■ ., . «3/4%
'60-89OAYS ' j 90.-179 DAYS   ,180-364 DAYS'     1
Investment Certificates
#
EARN UP TO
Checking Savings 7%%
Passbook Savings 714%
U.S. Dollar Savings Up To 6V4%
CITIZENS TRUST
MCMBI 'R   . •'. I :.     ):•■).-■-
Ask afcbut 90 monlWy interest cheques
VANCOUVER 815 W Hastings St.
NEW WESTMINSTER 80O McBnde Blvd.
WHITE ROCK 107 -1656 Martm.Dr.
nafcon
682-7171
524-2288
531-1123
AU RATES SUBJECT TO OANGL WITHOUT V >'     E
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
Dividends
NOTICE is hereby given that
dividends on the outstanding shares of
this Bank have been declared payable
for the current quarter at the Bank and
its branches on and after August 23,
1985 to shareholders of record at the
close of business on July 24, 1985 as
follows:
1. Dividend No. 18, in the amount of
$0.47 per share on the $1.88 First
Preferred Shares Series A;
2. Dividend No. 9, in the amount of
$0.3625 per share on the $1.45 First
Preferred Shares Series B;
3. Dividend No. 5, in the amount of
$1,787 per share on the Floating Rate
First Preferred Shares Series C;
4. Dividend No. 5, in the amount of
$1.7006 U.S. per share on the Floating
Rate First Preferred Shares Series D;
5. Dividend No. 15, in the amount
of $0.6875 per share on the $2.75
Second Preferred Shares Series A; and
-«.&M.
^7f% '"«
^k%y
£7%  ^   The
^^^ very
versatile
TERM DEPOSIT
NEW. Interest paid monthly,
semi-annually or annually.
83/4%
30-89 Days
90-179 Days
93/4%
1 Year
Annual Rates shown. Rates vaiy according
to Payment Option.
Monthly, Annual or Semi-Annual Interest
Payment Options.
Flexible Term, any number of days, months
or years you choose.
Early Call Options.
US S Rates Available.
Special Rates $100,000 and over.
Deposits start at $5,000; '	
 7
"PRINCESS PATRICIA"
Alaska Cruise Passenger list - May 7i
1973.
$10.00
 Alaska cruise passenger list
 INSIGNIA
MASTER'S CAP
Gold, Red & White
MASTER
Gold
1st OFFICER
Gold
2nd OFFICER
3rd OFFICER
CHIEF
2nd ENGINEER
Gold
Gold
ENGINEER
Gold & Purple
Gold & Purple
3rd 4th JR. ENGINEER, ELECTRICIAN PURSER
ENGINEER ENGINEER & MAINTENANCE ENGINEER       Gold & White
Gold & Purple Gold & Purple Gold & Purple
ASST.
PURSER
Gold & While
2nd
STEWARD
Gold
PRINTED  IN  CANADA
 LIST OF PASSENGERS
TEV Princess Patricia (Reg. in Canada)
Embarked at Vancouver, B.C.
May 7,  1973
Ship's Officers
PENDRY HARRIS   . Master
K.G. ODGREN 1st Officer
JOHN IRWIN Chief Engineer
DONALD A. HULL 2nd Engineer
HARRY BURCHILL Purser
NORMAN HUNTER Chief Steward
JAMES HALLIDAY 2nd Steward
JOSEPHA BRANDNER Stewardess
TERRY and BETTY .  .  . Cruise Director & Hostess
 Adams, Mrs. Nora, Forest Grove, Ore.
Archerd, Mr. &Mrs. James, St. Helens, Ore.
Bochnak, Mr. & Mrs. Edmund, Portland, Ore.
Borden, Mr. 6k Mrs. Fred, Victoria, B.C.
Boyle, Mr. & Mrs. Arthur P., Tacoma,  Wash.
Brown, Mr. & Mrs. Arthur B., Santa Barbara, Cal.
Calgoun, Mr. Robert,  Yakima, Wash.
Carter, Mr. John L., Portland, Ore.
Christensen, Mrs. J.Ellen, Edmonds,  Wash.
Collins, Mrs. Betty, Port Orchard, Wash.
Collis, Mrs. Winifred J., Victoria, B.C.
Collis, Miss Ruth V., Victoria, B.C.
Connolly, Mr. Charles, Olympia, Wash.
Cordova, Mr. & Mrs. Tom, Burns, Ore.
Cowardin, Mrs. Emma, Seattle, Wash.
Cushman, Mr. & Mrs. William, Vancouver, B.C.
Cyr, Mrs. Louise, White Rock, B.C.
Drummond, Mrs. Mary E., Ganges, B.C.
Ebert, Mr. & Mrs. Gordon, Alameda, Cal.
Ely, Mrs. Myrtle, Tacoma, Wash.
-Estridge, Mr. & Mrs. Hugh, Vancouver, B.C.
Everett, Mrs. Tracie, Hillsboro, Ore.
Farwell, Mr. Patrick, Yakima, Wash.
Foster, Mrs. Flauddie, Seattle, Wash.
Franke, Miss Martha, Cincinnati, Ohio
Fraser, Mrs. Lucile, Portland, Ore.
Garnett,  Mr. & Mrs. George, Vernon, B.C.
Goodykoontz, Mrs. Erma, Edmonds, Wash.
Hallam, Mr. & Mrs. Cecil C, Victoria, B.C.
Hardie, Mr. & Mrs. George B., Vancouver,  Wash.
Henderson, Mr. & Mrs. Samuel, Portland, Ore.
Hoffman, Mr. & Mrs. John R., Sumner,  Wash.
Hortin, Mr. & Mrs. Charles, N. Vancouver, B.C.
Hubler, Mr. & Mrs. Elmer, Portland, Ore.
Jackson, Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd B.,Vancouver, B.C.
Jacobs, Mr. & Mrs. Myron A., San Diego, Cal.
Jones, Mrs. Edna, Seattle, Wash.
Kelly, Mrs. Eleanor D., Scarboro, Ont.
Kelly, Mrs. Marie, Scarboro, Ont.
Koennecke, Mrs. Lydia, Portland, Ore.
Krieg, Mrs. Bertha A., Portland, Ore.
Kuse, Mrs. Frances A., Everett, Wash.
Landess, Mr. & Mrs. Victor S., Portland, Ore.
6>Z
 Lar Rieu, Mr. John, Walnut Creek, Cal.
Le Veille, Mr. & Mrs. Vincent, Tacoma,  Wash.
Lightfoot, Mrs. Elsie, Mercer Island,  Wash.
Lundberg, Mr. &Mrs. H.Clarence, Seattle,  Wash.
Lunken, Mr. Edmund, Cincinnati, Ohio
Mayes, Mr. & Mrs. Derward L., Tacoma,  Wash.
Montgomery, Mrs. Maude,  Port Angeles,   Wash.
Myers, Mrs. Audree, Everett,  Wash.
McCauley, Miss Harriette, Portland, Ore.
McCullough, Mr. & Mrs. Wallace C, Sidney, B.C.
McFayden, Mr. Stewart, Shoal Lake, Man..
McPherren, Mr. & Mrs. Everett C, Portland, Ore.
Neberle, Mr. & Mrs. August J.,  Saginaw, Mich.
Pearce, Mr. & Mrs. Albert E., St. John, N.B.
Pellant, Mr. & Mrs. Ernest R.,N. Vancouver, B.C.
Proctor, Mrs. Feme,  Forest Grove, Ore.
Puetz, Miss Ann,  Portland, Ore.
Ray, Mrs. Marie, Portland, Ore.
Reinart, Mr. & Mrs. John, Gleneden Beach, Ore.
Rempel, Mr. & Mrs. John I., Winnipeg, Man.
-Renyard, Mrs. Hilda E., Ladysmith, B.C. />
.Reznick, Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J., Milwaukee, Or/^pt^
Rice, Mr. & Mrs. Lome, Fruitvale, Ida.
Rice, Miss Leola, Fruitvale, Ida.
Ries, Mrs. Katherine, Port Orchard,  Wash.
Ross, Miss Jean B., Carbonado,  Wash.
Rothgeb, Mrs. Borghild, Seattle, Wash.
Sather, Mr. Alvin, Tacoma, Wash.
Smith, Mr, & Mrs. Vernon, Portland, Ore.
South, Mr. & Mrs. James E.,  Windsor, Ont.
Sutton, Mrs. Minnie L., Renton,  Wash.
Swartz, Mrs. Ruth,  Seattle, Washington.
Sweetman, Mrs. Helen A., Mercer Island,  Wash.
Taylor, Mr. William H., Rossburn, Man.
Terlisner, Mrs. Louise, Portland, Ore.
Thate, Mr. Louis J., Vancouver, B.C.
Thompson, Mr. & Mrs. Maurice W., Vancouver, B.C.
Thornton, Mr. &Mrs. Elmer A., Portland, Ore.
Wallace, Mrs. Lorretta, Port Angeles,  Wash.
Warmbier, Miss Arlene, Seattle,  Wash.
Wilson, Mrs. Alice, Seattle, Wash.
Wilson, Dr & Mrs. M. Weldon, Portland, Ore.
Zaharuk, Miss Patricia L., Vancouver, B.C.
In
't>
 AUTOGRAPHS
 Princess of Vancouver
When returning home, take time out for a visit to Vancouver
Island. Canadian Pacific operates the Princess of Vancouver, a large passenger car and train ferry on a three
time-a-day schedule between Vancouver and Nanaimo. A
downtown departure from Vancouver takes you in 2% hours
to Nanaimo, the hub of Vancouver Island. Spend some time
exploring this historic city and then travel 68 miles in your
car or comfortable Esquimau and Nanaimo Railway "Day-
liner" over the scenic Malahat route to Victoria ... a beautiful city with the quite charm reminiscent of the Victorian
era. Stay at the famous Empress Hotel. Visit the quaint old-
world shops featuring fine British woolens, English China,
silverware and beautiful antiques.
From a dock immediately in front of the Empress Hotel, the
"Princess Marguerite" sails each afternoon for downtown
Seattle — or you can return to Vancouver by one of several
routes.
Daily schedules are as follows:
VANCOUVER - NANAIMO
Lv. Vancouver      Ar. Nanaimo
3:00 a.m. 5:45 a.m.
11:00 a.m. 1:45 p.m.
7:00 p.m. 9:45 p.m.
VICTORIA - SEATTLE
Lv. Victoria
5:30 p.m.
Ar. Seattle
9:30 p.m.
Ask at the Purser's Ottice for full information, or after leaving this ship contact
any Canadian Pacific Office.
 l<
CPm
Rail      British Columbia Coast Steamship Service
 20 •   The Province   -Sunday, Nov.,4,1984
LWiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMmiiiuiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiHnHHHiiiiHiiHiMiiiiiiiiiMiiimiiimimmmiiiiiiiuiitmiiHiiiim
I An affair with a love boat!
skipper, has mixed feelings over the ship's
new life.
"Those five years on the Alaskan run
were the happiest years of my life," he
says.
"I'm glad she isn't going to be scrapped.
But I'd have liked to see a Canadian cruise
ship sailing B.C. waters with a Canadian
flag.
"She's a piece of our history."
Desjardins is aiming his floating hotel
squarely at people who remember the
Princess Pat as an Alaskan cruise ship, a
B.C. ferry and as the first "Love Boat" to
sail Califomian waters.
He says he will sink some $5 million
into the project, which will include a
marina complex, restaurant and disco.
The ship will be refurbished at Burrard
Yarrows docks, he says, and will open in
time for the beginning of the 1985 tourist
season.
And Amy is to be on hand to get the
Princess started off right.
| By CHARLIE ANDERSON
= Staff Reporter
I May 6 will be homecoming day for Amy
| Boyd.
| That's the day the Burnaby great-grand-
| mother hopes to celebrate her 84th birth-
1 day on board the Princess Patricia, the
| cruiseship she calls a second home.
| Amy took 12 trips on board the Princess
| Patricia, the former Canadian Pacific ship
| which plied B.C. waters for 36 years.
| And she will be aboard when the Prin-
| cess Pat celebrates its own rebirth that
| week.
| The 6,000-tonne ship, says new owner
1 Gilles Desjardins, will be permanently
| moored near the new convention centre
| at Canada Harbor Place.
| It's slated to open as a floating hotel
| May 1.
= "I've got my dinner date picked and I'm
| ready to go," laughs Amy.
| The Princess Pat was withdrawn from
| service in 1981 after CP decided she was
| uneconomical to run.
| Since then she's been the subject of
| several unsuccessful deals ranging from a
| floating- dormitory for Douglas College
| students, to providing a meeting place for
| men seeking "female companions."
| "She was a wonderful ship," says Amy.
| "I spent many, many happy days on board
f her. It was like going to a nice house-parry
§ for a week.
= "Before you were there a day, you knew
| everyone by their first name.  -
I "I would always sit at the same table in
| the dining room and stay in the same
| stateroom. The same waiter would come
| along and give me a piece of dried-up let-
| tuce. He'd say, 'Here's your supper, eat it.'
| And I'd give him as good as I got. Those
= cruises were a scream from beginning to
| end."
| Amy was aboard the Princess Pat dur-
| ing her last voyage in October, 1981.
1 "There was many a tear shed on that
| trip. A lot of CP officials came from Mon-
i treal to make the last trip and I didn't fee)
| too pleasantly towards them. I was heart-
I broken when I heard she was finished."
1 Ray Hudson, the Princess Patricia's last
5iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii minium iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniir
Owner Gilles Desjardins, left; Amy, and painting of her all-time favorite ship. |
.
ii
ByPAULLOONG
United Press Canada
PENTICTON — For more than 30 years
the last of the paddle-wheeler steamboats
on Okanagan Lake has been sitting on a
Penticton beach — but efforts are under
way to restore it to its former glory.
The SS Sicamous — once the pride of
the Canadian Pacific fleet on the lake — is
now a restaurant.
However, chamber of commerce president Bill Titheridge believes the 70-year-
old steamboat could be restored as a
piece of living history sailing up and down
the lake as a cruise vessel.
"There's nothing like it in the same
state of preservation left in British Columbia, despite the fact that 30 years ago
there were all kinds of these boats
around," Titheridge says.
"The word we have is that this is the
best possibility of preserving something
from a significant part of the B.C. Interior's past."
Titheridge has been heading a fund-
raising drive for a $7,000 feasibility study.
Already about $3,500 has been collected.
At 70 metres (228 feet) in length and
•weighing 1,500 tonnes, the Sicamous was
the largest and most luxurious of all
paddle-wheelers on the lake. It could
carry 400 passengers and 900 tonnes of
cargo and had a crew of 32.
Built in Port Arthur, Ont., it was assembled and launched at the lake in May,
1914.
On its maiden voyage, the captain
shouted an invitation for everyone along
the lakeshore to come aboard for a free
ride.
Some 350 people came for the party
while the Kelowna city band played for
the two-hour voyage.
For 20 years, the steamboat left Pentic
ton each morning six days a week, carrying passengers and freight to other communities.
The dining room was large enough to
hold 70 and seven-course meals were
served as the vessel steamed up the lake.
"It was the most comfortable way to
go," Titheridge said.
The vessel went out of service in 1935.
But even if Titheridge's feasibility study
gives the green light, Penticton would
have to find an estimated $2 million to restore the steamboat to its original state.
Titheridge admits there might be "great
difficulty" in getting help from the provincial and federal governments. But he's
confident the project eventually will take
place.
"When you have a heritage piece like
this, you simply can't let it slip away by
virtue;Of.neglect,:' he says.
mm
mm
 The Province     Sunday, Nov. 4,1984
• 19
BOB CARTER
awaits sentence
CARTER
PLEADS
GUILTY
By KEITH MORGAN
Staff Reporter
Vancouver oil millionaire Bob Carter will
be sentenced Nov. 21
for performing an act of
gross indecency with a
hooker.
Carter, 42, pleaded
| guilty Friday before
provincial court Judge
Erik Bendrodt, although
he claimed not to
remember the May 14
incident.
Prosecutor Bob
Wright told the court
the offence was committed when Carter, former chairman of the
Vancouver Whitecaps,
performed a sexual act
with a 14-year-old
hooker while a second,
older hooker looked on.
Wright stressed
throughout that there
was consent by all
parties. The women accepted $1,000 each in
payment, and there was
no coercion and no evidence to suggest Carter
knew one hooker was a
juvenile.
Defence lawyer Marvin Storrow said Carter
was a good member of
the community and
blamed "serious alcoholism" for his conduct.
ART SALE
ALL THIS WEEK
Saks Fourth Avenue
1943 W. 4th AVE.
Gash
Fast!
We buy, loan or take on
consignment jeweller:-
of any kind.
Crassies Jewellers Loan
Division
599 Seymour Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone: (604)685-2271
J0&&1
&P2
^o
"GOOD RATE
AND CASHABILITY-
CANADA SAVINGS
BONDS HAVE
ALWAYS BEEN
THE INVESTMENT
FORME."
• The new series earns 111/4% the first year, and not
less than 7% for each of the next six years.
(Outstanding unmatured bonds earn 11/4% this
year too.)
• They're liquid-cashable at any time, with no
interest penalty after the first two months.
Plus... Flexibility and Security.
Canada Saving Bonds are available in multiples of $100, up to
$75,000-or more if you're re-investing this year's maturing
bonds. And they're guaranteed by the Government of Canada.
Time's running out!
This coming Wednesday, November 7th, is your last chance
to invest in the new series without
paying accrued interest. And the bonds
may be withdrawn from sale at any time
•before then, so buy yours soon,
wherever you bank or invest. j       Ar    B i[ 9
7
■■:■"■  ■ :.
I
The right choice that
proves itself.. .year after year.     Canada
 PRINCESS PATRICIA PROJECT
—Ian Lindsay photo
GILLES DESJARDINS • • . There is nothing like it on the west coast of Canada/
Developer hopes to convert
old cruise ship into a hotel
One man's dream for the Princess
Patricia is to convert it into a floating
hotel permanently berthed on the Vancouver waterfront.
Gilles Desjardins, who says he is a B.C.
real estate developer and gave his address as a boat moored at the Granville
Island Hotel, says the cost of the project
will be $3% to $4 million.
He said he can raise the money in Vancouver, he has an agreement with CP Rail
to buy the ship — and he hopes to be in
business by Christmas. He has applied to
city hall for a development permit and
will begin the conversion as soon as approval is given.
Desjardins, 45, called a press conference Thursday on the board the former
Alaska cruiseship to outline his plans and
reveal the architects' drawings.
But he sidestepped all questions about
his background and track record, although he admitted he has no hotel experience.
He would say only that he is the president and sole owner of Foreshore Developments Inc., a company he formed to put
the Princess Pat project together.
"I got the idea after cruising past the
ship one day in my boat and decided to put
it all together in Coal Harbor for all the
liarlite
B&af
Alan Daniels
people of Vancouver to enjoy," he said.
He said he has negotiated a 15-year
agreement with Marathon Realty, the
development arm of Canadian Pacific
Ltd., to lease a site west of CPR Pier A3, a
stone's throw from the Pat's current location near the foot of Burrard.
The proposed 130-room shipboard hotel
will include a 7,000-sqare-foot shore building to house the lobby and reception area,
plus a 24-boat marina.
Architect Bill Rhone, of Rhone Morton
Architects of Vancouver, said the character of the vessel will not be changed. "We
want to maintain its heritage value. We
will massage it into a first class condition,
with new upholstery, new carpets, new
furniture and so on."
Rhone said one of the few major
changes will be to the stern, where three
levels of decks will be glassed in to make
a 315-seat lounge.
"We feel we will have the greatest view
in all of Vancouver, just about 360 degrees
from Stanley Park to downtown. The
project has a lot of merit as a tourist destination. There is nothing like it on the
West Coast of Canada."
The 5,911-ton Princess Patricia, built in
Glasgow in 1948-49, has been laid up on the
Vancouver waterfront since October 1981
when CP Rail retired her from Alaska
cruises because she had become uneconomical. One problem is that she has no
sewage treatment system and no longer
meets environmental control standards
for cruising in Alaska waters.
Rhone said as a hotel the ship will be
hooked up to the city sewage system.
Today, only seagulls and pigeons are
resident on the Princess Patricia and evidence of their occupation encrusts every
exterior surface. Below decks, however,
there are still hints of her teak and brass
Old World charm, although her cabins are
smaller than most modern hotel rooms.
CP Rail confirmed Thursday that Desjardins has an agreement to purchase the
ship, subject to development permit approval. The price has not been disclosed,
but is believed to be in the region of $1 million.
 ■37—49
3S-34—69
36-33-69
36-33-69
35-35-70
34-36-70
35-35-70
36-34-70
3634—70
34-36-70
34-36-70
36-34-70
37-33-70
36-35-71
36-35-71
36-35-71
34-37-71
35-36-71
35-36-71
36-35-71
.3636^72
35-37~,72
35-37-7! ■'■
37-35-72
36-36-72
35-37-72
35-37-72
36-36-72
34-38-72
3636-72
35-37-72
34-38-72
36-37-73
37-36-73
39-34-73
38-35-73
36-37-73
36-37-73
37-36-73
36-37-73
38-35-73
37-36-73
37-36-73
36-37-73
38-35-73
40-34-74
37-37—74
36-38-74
37-37-74
36-38-74
40-34-74
40-34-74
37-37-74
38-36-74
40-34-74
3638-74
39-35-74
37-37-74
35-39-74
37-37—74
36-38-74
38-36-74
35-39-74
35-39—74
37-37-74
34-40-74
37-37-74
38-36-74
37-37-74
36-39-75
37-38-75
38-37-75
37-38-75
39-36-75
38-37-75
37-38-75
40-35-75
37-38-75
37-38-75
/ 35-40-75
35-40-75
37-38—75
\ ■ 38-37—75'
39-36-75
39-36-75
3639—75
40-36-76
38-38—76
41-35-76
40-36-76
39-37-76
39-37-76
39-37—76
38-38-76
34-42-76
38-38-76
40-37-77
38-39—77
38-39-77
38-39—77
38-39-77
41-36-77
41-36-77
39-38-77
41-36-77
39-38-77
37-4(1-77
38-39-77
38-39—77
39-38-77
39-39-78
33-40—78
36-42-78
38-40-78
37-41-78
3841-79
39-40-79
41-38-79
40-39—79
41-38-79
43-36-79
38-41-79
41-38-79
39-40-79
40-39-79
40-39-79
40-39-79
40-39-79
39-41-80
40-40-80
40-40-80
38-42-80
39-41-80
40-40-80
42-39-81
39-42-81
40-41-81
43-38-81
43-39-82
42-40-82
41-41-82
4043-83
. 40-43-83
41-42-83
39-44-83
40-44-84
45-40-85
42-43-85
N AMATEUR
P) - Results of
s Canadian ama-
iip being played
l-72 Sunningdale
Bernard Bodogh
BlairChristieJr.
Ernest Corrigan
Gerry MacMillan
Dick Siderowf
Pierre Archambault
Bruce Brewer
MikeCumberpatch
John Gaff ney
Kirk McGregor
Gordon McKechnie
Donald Norbury
Martin Price
Martin Winslow
Robert Yoder
Gregg Carlin
Robert Bain
DougColby
Steve Douse
Rick Fifield
Herrick Hansen
Willliam Mitchell
Peter Andrln
Grant Barnes
Mike Brown
AlasdairCayley
Jim Duff
Les Edwards
Todd Fanning
NormanGray
JamesHarper.
Craig Marseille
Garry Nelson
Laurie Peet
RobAckford
David Buker
Bill Hryntw
Jamie Kavanagh
Craig Kindrat
Robert Loewen
Graham Mclntyre
Michael Mercier
ToddTeplltski
TomWigle
Michael Breen
Kevin Breivik
George Chault
Charles Crawford
Mike Gottf red
Jack Kay Jr.
GlenSeely
Jamie Train
William Vowell
Rod Bulmer
George Dolomont
Jack Northey
DaneAndreeff
JacquesChenvert
DaveChappel
KenChomyn
Roger Ling
Doug Mader
George Stokes
LesWeslake
Edwin Dickison
William Pistruiak
Allan Anderson
John Sanders
Chris Oockrill
Ken Doig
Kevin Trevor-Wilson
Mark Boulanger
BIIIMorrisey
75-78-15:
7677—153
78-76-153
75-78—153
72-81-153
74-80-154
76-78-154
80-74—154
80-74-154
74-80-154
74-80-154
75-79-154
73-81—154
74-80-154
75-79-154
78-77—155
76-79-155
76.79—155
74-81—155
77-78-155
75-80-155
76-79-155
79-77-156
79-77-156
77-79-156
7680-156
81-75-156
75-81-156
74-82—156
80-76-156
77-79-156
7680-156
7680-156
77-79-156
83-74-157
78-79-157
79-78^-157
79-78-157
75-82-157
77-80-157
76-81—157
78-79-157
7681—157
77-80-157
78-80-158
79-79-158
76-82-158
78-80-158
78-80-158
75-83-158
78-80—158
73-85-158
80-78-158
79-80-159
78-81-159
77-82-159
75-85-160
7684-160
74-87—161
8081—161
74-82-161
77-84-161
79-82-161
80-81-161
80-82-162
84-78-162
8083-163
80-83-163
82-82-164
75-90-165
81-84-165
81-86-167
92-88-180
WILLINGDONCUP
LONDON, Ont. (CP) - Final results after the two-day Willingdon Cup
tnterprovincial team competition at
the Canadian amateur golf championship Thursday (low three scores each
day count in team aggregate):
ONTARIO (424) - G.Cowan,
Kitchener, 73-73-146; S.Hamilton,
Brampton, 69-73—142; D.Miiovic,
Unlonville, 68-71-139; K.Short,
St.Catharines,69-74—143.
ALBERTA (438) - R.Boswell, Calgary, 74-76—150; K.Tamke, Edmonton, 73-72-145; B.Wylie, Calgary, 71-72
—143; M.Zichy, Edmonton, 74-77—151.
B.C. (439) — D.CIaggett, Kelowna,
73-75-148; R.Gibson, Victoria, 71-78-
149; LSawchuk, Victoria, 72-78-150;
W.Stouffer, Vancouver, 70-73-143.
QUEBEC (443J-G.Cooke, Do-
rion, 74-70-144; S.Davies, Nepean,
Ont., 7673-149; J.Duff, Maple Grove,
81-75—154; J.Lemleux, Boischatel, 75-
76-151.
P.E.I. (446) — D.Bowlan, Char-
loffetown, 72-76—148; E.Corrigan,
Charlottetown, 78-76—154; G.Somers,
Summerside, 81-75-156; M.WInslow,
Charlottetown, 74^0-154.
NOVA SCOTIA (451) - C.Dockrill,
Dartmouth, 82-82—164; K.Dugas, Co-
meauville, 7673—149; J.MacLeodJr.,
New Glasgow, 73-76-149; G.MacMillan, Kingston, 75-78-153.
NEW BRUNSWICK (451) -
M.Breen, Saint John, 78-80-158; A.-
Dickison, Saint John, 69-78—147;
H.Hansen, Four Falls, 75-80—155;
A.Mabie, Fredericton, 75-74—149.
SASKATCHEWAN (455) - K.Adams, Prince Albert, 77-73-150;
B.Bamford, Saskatoon, 73-78—151;
D.Mader, Regina, 77-84—161;
K.McGregor, Regina, 74-80—154.
MANITOBA (460) - T.Fanning,
Winnipeg, 74-82-156; C.Kindrat, Selkirk, 75-82-157; G.Kullman, Winnipeg, 74-74—146; T.Teplitski, Winnipeg, 7681—157.
NEWFOUNDLAND (474) -
G.Chaulk, Stephenville, 76-82—158;
G.Dolomont, Corner Brook, 78-81—157;
B.Hrynlw, St.John's, 79-78—157;
B.Morrissev, St.John's, 9248-180,
WOMEN'S CANADIAN AMATEUR
CALGARY (CP) - Second-round
scores in the Canadian amateur
women's golf championship Thursday:
D.Forsberg ,
72-72—144
K.Williams
74-71—145
M.Streit
74-73—147
K.McCarthy
72-75-147
A. La vis
72-75-147
M.Racicot
75-72—147
T.Tombs
76-74-150
A. Dye
75-75-150
T. Murphy
75-75-150
G.Borthwick
75-75-150
L.Goggin
79-72-151
P.Grant
74-77—151
K. Powers
79-72—151
A.Swanson      y' •
80-71-151
N.Harris
78-73-151
D.McHaffie
73-78-151
J.Himmelman
73-79-152
J.Medlicott:
73-80-153
S.Renaud
NMn»n
76-77-153
B1-7S—1S3
icarre
C.OttO 85-82—167
J.Chalmers 79-88—167
N.Callan 85-82-167
F.Limoli 82-86-168
F.Veilleux 80-88-168
A.Orrltt 82-86-168
B.Smail 90-79-169
G.Street 88-81-169
P.Dickeson 82-88-170
L.Ozeroff 87-84-171
S.McCleerv 86-86-172
B.Maslanko 83-89-172
LBoyle 89-85-174
J.Twamley 87-87-174
J.Boudreau 93-81—174
A.McKinna 89-86-175
S.Bacon 90-87—177
K.Proud 87-96-183
E.Murphy 94-90-184
K.Jean 95-92—187
FINALTEAM STANDINGS
(Top three individual scores counted each day)
ONTARIO (444)-A. Lavis, Kitchener 72-75-147; M. Streit, Stouffville
74-73—147; G. Borthwick, Toronto 75-75
—150; J. Rosart, Burlington 81-80-161.
B.C. (459) — P. Grant, Mission 74-
77-151; N.Callan, Victoria 85-82—167;
M. Daku, Kelowna 82-73-155; S. Hil-
dreth, Vancouver 77-76—153.
NOVA SCOTIA (463) - K. Powers,
Halifax 79-72—151; J. Himmelman,
Halifax 73-79—152; J. Johnson, Pictou
81-79—160; J. Boudreau, Dartmouth
93-81-174.
MANITOBA (473) — G. Anderson,
Winnipeg 76-77—153; C. Burton, Selkirk 76-80-156; L. Palahniuk, Winnipeg 80-84—164; S. Gechel, Winnipeg
82-84-166.
ALBERTA (480) B. Cole, Edmonton 81-76-157; C. McMillan, Ponoka
81-84-165; S. Harvey, Edmonton 82-81
-163; K. Schmeekle, Calgary 84-79-
163.
QUEBEC (483) - T. Brecher,
Montreal 80-77—157; J. Smith, Lennox-
ville 84-79-163; F. Veilleux, Boischatel 8088-168; C. Decarie, Montreal 83-
84-167.
NEW BRUNSWICK (491) —M.
Driscoll, Rothesay 79-87—166; K.
Maher, Bathurst 82-83-165; K. Floyd,
Fredericton 8678—164; P. Dickeson,
Fredericton 82-88—170.
PEI (492) - L. Kane, Charlotte-
town 8680-166; S. Mackenzie, Charlottetown 81-76-157; C. Windsor,
Kensington 89-80—169; C. Chandler,
Stanhopel0O99—199.
SASKATCHEWAN (495) - G.
Street, Saskatoon 8841—169; M. Richer!, Saskatoon 82-79—161; B.
McAlpine, Regina 82-84—166; K.
Proud, Regina 87-97—184.
NEWFOUNDLAND-LABRADOR
(529) — R. Stark, St. John's 81-77—158;
K. Jean, Stephenville 95-92-187; E.
Murphy, St. John's 94-90-184; P.
Staples, Corner Brook 110-106—216.
WORLD SERIES OF GOLF
AKRON, Ohio (AP) - First-round
scores Thursday in the $700,000 World
Series of Golf on the 7,173-yard, par 35-
35—70 Firestone Country Clubcourse:
Debbie Half"
35-34-69
Vicki Alvarez
37-33-70
AyakoOkamoto
35-35-70
Sarah Leveque
35-35-70
Kathy Hite
35-35-70
Robin Walton
35-34—71
Kathy Whitworth'
33-38-71
JaneBlalock
3635-71
AmyAlcott
35-36-71
Heather Drew
35-36-71
Valerie Skinner
3635-71
Deedee Lasker
35-36-71
Muffin Spencer-Devlin
35-36-71
Park
. , T<?.,»^*-p ,
Bruce Lietzke
30-36-66
Tom Purtzer
33-35—68
Rex Caicweii
si-sn-m
Craig Stadler
35-34-69
Mark McCumber
.36-33-69
Denis Watson
35-34-69
lanWoosnam
. 37-33-70
Tom Watson
35-35-70
Greg Norman
3634-70
JimColbert
35-36-70
Bob Eastwood
3634-70
Gary Koch
35-35-70
Peter Jacobsen
34-36-70
Pat Lindsey
35-35-70
David Edwards
34-37—71
JohnMahaffey
3635-71
Mark Lye
37-34—71
Nick Price
34-37-71
Andy Bean
35-36-71
Fred Couples
35-36-71
Scott Simpson
34-37-71
Lee Trevino
3636-72
Peter Fowler
37-35-72
JackNicklaus
37-35-72
IsaoAoki
37-35—72
Hale Irwin
37-35-72
NickFaldo
35-38-73
Howard Clark
36-37-73
Ronnie Black
3637-73
Bob Shearer
37-36-73
Tom Kite
3637-73
BenCrenshaw
38-36-73
Corey Pavin
39-35-74
Seve Ballesteros
3638-74
Payne Stewart
38-36—74
Jack Renner       .
35-39-74
Gavin Levenson
3639—75
Scott Hoch
4035-75
TonyJohnstone "
39-36-75
Tze-Ming Chen
37-39—76
Bill Brask
39-39—78
Larry Webb
37-41-78
DENVER LPGA
DENVER (AP) - Results Thursday after the first round of the $200,000
Columbia Savings Ladies Professional
Golf Association tournament on the
6,258-yard, par 35-36—71 Green Gables
Janet Anderson
Allison Finney
ChrisJohnson
Cindy Lincoln
PattiRizzo
Beth Daniel
Betsy King
Lori Garbacz
Debbie Massey
Judy Clark
Pat Bradley
Leann Cassaday
a-Jody Rosenthal
Beverley Davis
Kathryn Young
Laurie Rinker
Diarate Dai ley
Dot Germain
Silvia Bertolaccini
Sue Fogleman
RuthJessen
Sally Quinlan
Lauren Howe
Anne-Marie Palll
Lynn Cooke-Parker
Rosie Jones
Beverly Klass
Debbie Meisterlin
Marie Wennersten
Julie Pyne
Kyle O'Brien
Sandra Palmer
Gail Hirata
Cathy Morse
Joyce Kazmierski
Sandra Spuzich
Joan Joyce
Ml ndy Moore
Lynn Stroney
NoreenFriel
Dawn Coe
Becky Pearson
MissieMcGeorge
Kathy Postlewait
Lynn Adams
Linda Hunt
JaneCrafter
MaryBeth Zimmerman
Jackie Bertsch
Holds Stacy
Shelley Hamlin
Laura Cole
Nanette Circo
Marfene Hagge
Nancy Rubin
Myra VanHoose
Terr! Luckhurst
Karen Permezel
Pam Gietzen
JaneSirmons
BarbThomas
Jane Lock
Carolyn Hill
Carol Hochsprung
Debbie Austin
Jane Geddes
Catherine Panton	
ConnieChillemi
Brenda Goldsmith
Mary Delong
Chris Lehmann
Therese Hession
Marta Figueras-Dotti
Penny Pulz
Alison Sheard
Lisa Young
LenoreMuraoka
Vicki Fergon
Alice Ritzman
Kathy Baker
Cathy Marino
DonnaCaponi
Kathy Williams
Amy Benz
DaleEggeling
Cynthia Figg
Mary Dwyer
Lauri Peterson
Barbra Mizrahie
Bonnie Lauer
Stephanie Kornegay
Cathy Mant
Barb Bunkowsky
Judy Ellis
Susie McAllister
Sherri Turner
Laurie Rusk-Sewell
a-HollevSue Morris
Denise Strebig
Deborah Skinner
Catherine Duggan
DawneKortgaard
Sharon Miller
MaryHafeman
Charlotte Grant
Terrl Carter
Patty Hayes
Joyce Benson
a-Michelle Pandolfo
Judy Kimball-Simon
H.B.Duntz
KathyAhern
Lori West
Sharon Barrett
35-36-71
35-36-71
33-38-71
3636-71
3635-71
3636-72
37-35-72
34-38-72
3636-72
37-35-72
35-37—72
36-36-72
35-37-72
37-35-72
37-36-73
39-34-73
3637-73
37-36-73
33-40-73
37-36-73
38-35-73
38-35-73
37-36-73
37-36-73
36-37-73
3637-73
35-38-73
35-38-73
36-37-73
38-35-73
39-34-73
38-36-74
37-37-74
37-37-74
38-36—74
37-37-74
37-37-74
39-35-74
35-39-74
39-35-74
36-38-74
39-35-74
39-35—74
37-37-74
38-36-74
39-35-74
37-37—74
37-37—74
38-36-74
38-36-74
37-37-74
3639-75
38-37-75
39-36-75
37-38-75
37-38-75
38-37-75
3639-75
38-37-75
38-37-75
38-38-76
40-36-76
38-38-76
40-36-76
39-37-76
3640-76
36-40-76
37-39-76
37-39-76
3640-76
39-37-76
38-38-76
37-40-77
37-40-77
37-40-77
4037-77
38-39-77
4037—77
40-37-77
37-40-77
39-38-77
37-40-77
36-41-77
40-37-77
41-36-77
38-39-77
38-40-78
41-37-78
40-38-78
37-41—78
4038-78
34-44—78
40-38-78
40-38-78
39-40-79
4039-79
37-42-79
37-42-79
41-38-79
39-40-79
40-40-80
41-39-80
41-40-81
40-41-81
41-40-81
40-42-82
42-40-82
41-41-82
38-44-82
41-42-83
41-43-84
42-43-85
43-43-84
44-44-88
Deals
BASEBALL
National League
Chicago Cubs option infielder Dave
Owen to Iowa of the American Association; call up pitcher Rich Bordi from
Iowa.
Cincinnati Reds fire pitching coach
Stan Williams; name Jim Kaat pitching coach.
BASKETBALL
NBA
Cleveland Cavaliers sign centre
Melvin Turpin to mulit-year contract.
FOOTBALL
NFL
Cincinnati Bengals trade defensive
lineman Gary Burley to Atlanta Falcons for a future undisclosed draft
choice.
Green Bay Packers place wide receiver Marvin Neal on waivers; acquire nose tackle Tony De Luca.
San Francisco 49ers announce the
trade with San Diego Chargers for
defensive end Kenny Nell is voided because Neil failed a physical examination.
radio
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL
Canadian League
7:00 — B.C. Lions vs Calgary, B.C. Place
Stadium, radio 1410
Tier One Junior
2:00 — Renfrew vs Okanagan, Kinsmen
Stadium
7:30 — Richmond vs Meraiomas, Minoru
Park
SOCCER
North American League
Minnesota at Tulsa
New York at San Diego
Toronto at Golden Bay
BASEBALL
Pacific Coast League
6:30 — Vancouver at Salt Lake City,
1130
Little League Exhibition
2:00 — Nankyu Baseball Association of
Japan vs Vancouver, Hilicrest Park
LACROSSE
Provincial Senior B Tournament
(At Sun God Arena)
10:00—Surrey vs North Shore
1:00 — Nanaimo vs Ladner
6:00 — Nanaimo vs North Shore
9:00—Surrey vs Ladner
MOTORSPORT
Stock Car Racing
7:00 — LMORA Championship Series event,
Action Raceway, Langley
HOCKEY
Exhibition
Canada vs U.S. at Haiifax
SOFTBALL
9:00 — Robbie Macdonald 14-team senior
men's tournament, ail day, Aggie Park,
PortCoquiBam
HORSE RACING
1:15 — 1O-race thoroughbred card, Exhibition
Park
Television
TODAY
6:00 — Footbaii: Cn. 5, NFL exhibition, Seat-
tie vs San Francisco
6:30 — Football: Ch. 6,8, (able 11, Hamilton
at Edmonton
SATURDAY
10:00 — Football: Ch. 4, NFL exhibition,
Washington vs New Orleans
11:00 — Baseball: Ch. 5, Los Angeles at
Philadelphia
12:00 — Sportsweekend: Ch. 2, cable 3, the
Canadian Derby live from Edmonton,
canoeing competition from Dartmouth,
N.S., Cheltenham, Ont., horse show and
water skiing championships from Sher-
brooke, Que.
1:00 — Tennis: Ch. 6, 8, cable 11, Player's
International, women
2:00 — Football: Ch. 7, cable 8, U.S. College
Pigskin Preview 1984 with region by region coverage, appraisals of major
teams and conference favorites and dark
horses, plus interviews with coaches and
players
2:30 —- Track: Ch. 5, Arco Jesse Owens
Games, U.S. national championships for
children aged 10 to 16, from San Diego
3:00 — Golf: Ch. 7, cable 8, World Series of
Golf, third round, from Akron, Ohio
4:00—Wide World of Sports: Ch. 6,8, cable
11, Eastern Division windsurfing championships from Halifax, Molson Canadian 300 from Cayuga Speedway, bodybuilders' world championship, men's
competition
4:30 — Wide World of Sports: Ch. 4, same
day coverage of the Little League Worid
Series from Williamsport, Pa.
6:00 — Footbaii: Ch. 7, cable 8, NFL exhibi
Hon, Houston vs Dallas
Radio
SATURDAY
6:15 — Baseball: 1130, Vancouver at Salt
 28        The Proving    Friday, Aug. 24,1984
Business Reporter
After 'threj|iears and 250 inquiries, including one, from a Texan businessman
who wanted tfie ship for a floating brothel, the CP Rail Steamship Princess Patricia
may have found abuyer.
Montrealer Gilles Desjardins, president
of Foreshore Developments Inc., announced plans yesterday to turn the 36-
year-old ship into a floating hotel, to be
berthed on the Vancouver waterfront between Bute and Thurlow Streets.
Desjardins said the ship could be in
service with 130 cabins available for
guests by Christmas. He said there is
enough bed linen left aboard the ship to
provide five changes for every cabin.
According to Desjardins, the project,
including provision of shoreside facilities
on leased land, will cost $3.5 million to $4
million. He declined to name the purchase price of the ship or reveal the
source of Foreshore's investment capital.
Purchase of the Princess Patricia appears to be contingent on Foreshore receiving a development permit from the
City of Vancouver. Desjardins said a permit is being applied for.
CP Rail withdrew the 6,000-ton Princess
Patricia from seasonal cruise service to
Alaska and first offered her for sale in
1981. Inquiries from would-be purchasers
have come from as far afield as Singapore.
Most interest has centred on using the
ship as a hotel or floating restaurant. A
few inquirers wanted to steam the
turbine-electric vessel to carry schoolchildren, day trippers or, in the case of
the Texan entrepreneur, men seeking "female companions."
CP Rail believes it twice came close to
clinching deals but was frustrated by the
inability of prospective purchasers to secure necessary regulatory approvals.
All liquids were drained before the ship
was laid up and heaters have been operated in key areas. There have been four
break-ins by humans and several more by
pigeons, whose presence marks the teak
decks.
 The Province
Friday,
August 24,1984
Page 27
O AXE RAISED
fat B.C. Hydro,
i corporation's directors
layoff recommendations
nanagement staff.
lan Olsen met with em-
;ntatives this week to exposition as it plans cut-
lyoffs.
Hydro management and supervisors have been
instructed in a memo from Olsen to reduce "total
controllable expenses" by about 15 per cent, or
$50 million annually over the next three-year period.
A Hydro spokesman said yesterday that Olsen
invited the employee reps to submit ideas on ways
to soften the restraint blow.
ft isn't know whether Hydro will consider measures such as attrition or early retirement in a bid
Ships
IB
Pacific Pilotage Authorit
and was paid $3,300 for pilotage services during the last voyage of the cru
ship Sundancer, even though a pilot
was suspended for 90 days for his part
in an accident which led to the sinking
~esbip.
 history of smooth sailing f?
LEIGH GORDON
T
he Love Boat television series
has its roots in British Columbia
history.
The program was inspired by the
happy cruises made in B.C. and Mexican waters by the all-white Princess
ships of the California-based Princess
Cruise Lines, now a subsidiary of P. &
0. (Peninsular and Oriental Navigation
Co.) of England.
Princess Cruise Lines owes not only
its start to a B.C. ship but also the
Princess name of its current three vessels — the Pacific Princess, Island
Princess and Sun Princess.
The modern concept of pleasure-
cruising originated here more than 100
years ago. Today, for four months of
the year Vancouver is the base for the
Princess cruises to Alaska (38 in 1983).
In addition, their annual refit is normally done in Victoria.
Although TV's Love Boat, mastered
by Capt. Stubing (Gavin MacLeod), is
presented as being only one ship, the
Pacific Princess, actually all three
ships and a shore studio are used for
the filming.
The heritage of the Love Boat or,
more properly, Princess Cruise Lines,
began in 1879. In that year the Hudson
Bay Co. added to its fur-trading fleet
the wooden side-wheel paddle steamship Olympia. The American name was
unacceptable to the very-British
company. A new name was needed.
■ The Princess Patricia: Sailing slowly
up Tracy Arm to Alaska's glaciers.
An event in Europe determined the
name for that ship and, eventually, for
the "love boats." That event was the
marriage of the daughter of Prince
Frederick of Prussia to Arthur William,
third son of Queen Victoria. With their
marriage, Arthur became Duke of Con-
naught and his wife the Princess
Louise, in whose honor Hudson Bay Co.
renamed its new vessel the Princess
Louise. Thus a dynasty of Princess
ships was born.
In August, 1879, the Princess Louise
made the first pleasure cruise in Pacific
Coast waters, carrying holidayers on a
"fun" cruise around Vancouver Island.
Its visits to remote communities, Indian villages and beautiful inland
waterways made the trip an instant
success.
The Princess Louise then pioneered
passenger service between San Francisco and Alaska, the same route used
by the current Princess ships.
The little paddle-wheeler was still
the only Princess ship on the coast
when she passed into the hands of
Canadian Pacific Steamship Co. in 1901.
Canadian Pacific liked the Princess
title and for the next 50 years used it
on all its coastal ships, with their
gleaming white superstructures and
luxury passenger service.
After the Second World War, changing modes of travel made the CP ships
uneconomical and all but two were
sold. The survivors were the Princess
Marguerite II and the Princess Patricia//, both built in 1948.
The Princess Marguerite still provides summertime day cruises between
Victoria and Seattle, but it was the
Princess Patricia that give birth to
Princess Cruise Lines and was the first
of the "love boat" fleet-
In 1962 the "Pat" did a thriving business serving Seattle's World Fair.
After that, based on a precedent set by
Canadian Pacific's all-white trans-Pacific fleet of Empress ships, she was
painted all-white. She made summer
cruises between Vancouver and Alaska
 5  ii- U    'Vlt'l')—r.	
from 1963 until she was retired in 1982.
But during that period she was also
busy in winter, thanks to an alert Seattle entrepreneur.
In 1962, Stanley B. MacDonald used
his ship the Yarmouth to run excursions between San Francisco and the
World Fair. There he saw and took a
liking to the "Pat."
After the fair, he noted there were
no cruises on the American West Coast.
He combined that observation with
another — that the "Pat" was operating successful cruises to Alaska but was
idle in winter.
In 1964, MacDonald leased the lovely
Canadian cruiser and began running
winter cruises between Los Angeles
and the coast of Mexico. His cruises
were popular and profitable because
the "Pat" was so well-liked and he decided to expand his operations with
more ships of a similar type. Thus the
"Pat" became the first of a modern fleet
of cruise ships that gave rise to a television series.
In MacDonald's words: "With the success of the Princess Patricia, which
gave us the idea for the Princess name,
we incorporated as Princess Cruises."
P. & O., which bought Princess
Cruise Lines in 1974, is maintaining the
Princess tradition. The parent company is building the largest and most advanced of cruise ships, to be named the
Princess Royal in honor of Princess
Diana. It is expected that she'will
christen the vessel.
The new ship is expected to be based
in Vancouver for summer cruises to
Alaska in 1985. It, too, will probably become a setting for TV's Capt. Stubing. □
Leigh Gordon is a Vancouver freelance writer.
 h niiisi i&l H<;	
 "destiny even Irom the depths" oi his
exile.
So when I heard that Robert Sam
Anson was looking into Nixon's role
since 1974,1 was intrigued.
Wen; now we have fiisreport, and it
is a reassuring one. Anson tells us that
Nixon's influence in ruling circles is
limited indeed. He is no eminence
grise, no puppeteer, no Ndembo.
them I sent you. They'll take good care
of you." □
Anthony Lukas is the author of Nightmare: The
Underside of the Nixon Years.
One in 11 women contracts breast
cancer. The other 10 will know
someone who does. Elly Van de
Walle's Falling from Grace (Press
Gang, $5.95) tells what it is like to
undergo a mastectomy and cope with
tomorrow.
"Before my surgery," says the 35-
year-old Vancouverite, "I believed that
anyone who had cancer was going to
die." Since her operation six years ago,
Van de Walle has had two more children.
Useful, clear-minded poems document her reactions to the hospital, surgery, check-ups, mastectomy meetings
("How amusing, how pathetic") and the
altered intimacies of family life.
"The sense of loss grows dull," concludes Van de Walle, "but time still
slices each hour with razor-sharp precision, forever altering the very taste of
the seasons."
Falling from Grace triumphs for
other women with the raising of one
courageous voice. Included is a foreword by a breast specialist, and a reading list.
• It seems increasingly important to
remember that Margaret Atwood is the
daughter of an entomologist. In her
tenth collection of poems,Interlunar
(Oxford, $6.95), once again Atwood is
urging us to perceive emotional landscapes with scientific resolve.
"The desire to love is the last illu-
I
sion," she writes. "Give it up and you
will be free."
Atwood weaves her way through 11
unsentimentalized Snake Poems at the
outset of Interlunar, eating serpents
and calmly lecturing on their habits and
psychic influences. "The snake is one
name of God," she declares. "Pick it up,
and you would hold the darkness that
you fear."
The banishment of illogical fear is a
major unifying theme of the volume.
Deciphering the poems provides intellectual pleasure but one is left, due to
the professional tone throughout, with
a nagging sense that Interlunar is too
much an advertisement for the superiority of Atwood's brand of wisdom.
• Ron Smith, of Lantzville's Ooli-
chan Books, is another B.C. publisher
who writes better than many of his authors. Seasonal (Sono Nis, $5.95) is an
exquisitely refined suite of poems inspired by remarks made by the poet's
young daughter.
"Put simply," says Smith, "her words
were refreshing and replete with the
magic and wonder I felt wanting in my
own writing." The lovely musicality of
Smith's phrasing in literally every line
of Seasonal makes his debut volume a
rarity in terms of clarity and sophistication. 	
• Nellie McClung of Vancouver continues to blend historical anecdotes
about painters with her impressions of
their work in Duenda (Third Eye, $5).
A modest volume containing 16 illustrations, Duenda offers an appealing
lightness in the literary strokes of
meandering poems ostensibly for painters. 	
• Admirers of last season's hit musical, Piaf, will appreciate Judith Fitzgerald's tribute to the renowned songstress, Beneath The Skin of Paradise:
The Piaf Poems (Black Moss, $6.95).
Fitzgerald is this year's recipient of the
Fiona Mee Award for literary journalism in Canada. Her book is a testament
to Edith Piaf s spiritual bravery rather
than a biography in shorthand.
• Governor General's Awards: This
year's winners in English are Leon
Rooke for his novel Shakespeare's Dog
(Stoddart), David Donnell for poetry,
with Settlements (M&S), Anne Chislett
for her play Quiet in the Land (Coachhouse) and Jeffrey Williams for his non-
fiction study Byng of Vimy: General
and Giwernor-General (Leo Cooper-
Seeker, Warburg). D
~7
her mother in Malibu but spends every
other weekend with her father in Santa
Monica.
Each parent has a lover, the father a
police detective named Kate, the mother an actor named Win. Megan cooks
up schemes to get rid of Kate and Win
and get her parents back together. She
tells us about her various nannies and
her two dogs, Scruffoon and Emily
Doggenson. She says things like, "I
think divorce is dumb because I never
remember where I left my underpants." She calls Win "Lose." She is relentlessly clever and relentlessly cute.
So is the book, which smoothly
glosses over the considerable pain and
trauma small children suffer when
their parents get divorced.
It's a shame, because Erica Jong is an
intelligent writer who might have
given us something much more useful. □
— New York Times
Erica Jong: Relentlessly clever and
relentlessly cute.
 WHILE PRINCESS PATRICIA peacefully rests at the dock at
the foot of Burrard, the last rays of sun light up the sky and
—Ken Oakes photo
man-made lights begin to illuminate all else Monday
evening.  It's a nice view for contemplation after dinner.
 @llC SUFI TUES., MARCH27,1984    ••••
Son concerned
as roaming mom
disappears again
Ann Robinson, a 69-year-old
deaf East Vancouver woman who
! takes spur-of-the-moment long
I hikes to unplanned destinations,
;has been missing for two weeks
from her home at 2761 Eton.
Her son Bruce Robinson, a
BCIT employee who has taken the
: past two weeks off work to search
for his mother, is appealing for
public help in locating her.
He said daily checks with police, hospitals, hostels and transient centres in the Greater Vancouver area have provided no clue
to her whereabouts.
Robinson said his mother was
dressed in her customary several
layers of clothing and had about
$30 cash in her purse when she left
home early Sunday morning,
March 11.
He said she refuses to carry
identification and never gives her
right name.
"She never wants anyone to
know who she is. She calls herself
Louise Delight, or Josephine
Louise Powderface. or Rosalie
Delight."
"She's capable of anything ex-
cu„ i;.,„,.
lently in a world of her own," he
said.
In the past two years, Ann has
disappeared three times on long
walks, ending up in North Vancouver, the West End, and on the
waterfront.
Six months ago she went missing for 10 days before she was
found at Lookout, a hostel for the
homeless at 346 Alexander. Police
had found her on the docks at the
foot of Clark Drive and took her to
Lookout, where she gave her
name as Louise Delight. Except to
ask for tobacco, she was silent.
Nine days later, news stories resulted in her being reunited her
with her son.
Robinson, one of seven children,
said his mother came to live with
him in Vancouver in 1967 after 20
years as a patient in a Quebec
hospital.
She was treated in the hospital
for a mental breakdown after her
husband was reported missing in
wartime action and her newborn
twins had died. She lost her hearing after the hospital performed a
frontal lobotomy, he said.
ANN ROBINSON
... missing for two weeks
previously hiked up to 19 to 24 kilometres at a stretch and seems to
be attracted to waterfront areas.
He said his mother, born Nov.
16, 1914, appears to be in her late
50s or early 60s. She is about 152
centimetres tall (5 foot 4 inches)
with blue eyes and medium length
grey-blonde hair. She weighs
about 56 kilograms (125 pounds)
but appears heavier because she
dresses in many layers of bulky
clothing topped by a heavy blue
coat.
Anyone with information on her
whereabouts is asked to phone
Vancouver city police or Robinson
„*- OEM   lOOfi
Labor wc
in Socrec
By TOM BARRETT
Sun Victoria Bureau
VICTORIA - Social Credit MLA;
spent Monday airing their beefs con
cerning the province's labor climate
but emerged from their day-lonj
meeting with nothing to report.
Labor Minister Bob McClellanc
told reporters he will have nothing t<
say about the two-month-old pul]
industry lockout until after the nex
cabinet meeting, expected Wednes
day.
Asked if he had any announce
ments following the caucus meeting
Lost key leads
to fine for drugs
Special to The Sun
VICTORIA - A 25-year-old Oal
Bay man who was arrested after po
lice mistakenly thought someone wa
breaking into his apartment has bee
fined $1,000 in Victoria provincia
court for cultivating marijuana.
Peder Jens Ourom was arreste
Nov. 25 when a neighbor saw some
body entering the window of .
second-floor apartment on Rosely
St. and called police.
Officers got no reply when the
knocked on the door so they als
 ^heSun fri.,February 10,1984 •••*
PRINCESS PATRICIA AWAITS BUYER
Floating hotel plan goes adrift
A plan to convert the cruise ship Princess
Patricia into a floating hotel for Expo is "dead
in the water" according to Vancouver ship
broker Maple Shipping Ltd.
But a spokesman for the city's development
permit board said Tuesday the board has granted a two-month extension of its preliminary approval for the project and believes "it is still
alive."
Approval was to have been voided Jan. 31 if
the city did not get more complete details.
"We haven't seen detailed plans, but our
information is they're still working on it and we
have approved an extension," the development
board spokesman said. "They have to get back
to us within two months."
The Sun reported last November that Vancouver businessman Robert Taylor of Meadlow-
lark Developments Ltd., former owner of the SS
Essington, was one of two partners "with longtime waterfront associations", who wanted to
berth the Princess Pat at the foot of Jervis
Street and use it as a hotel for a limited period
7 expiring Dec. 311986.
But the deal collapsed, supposedly because
::tthe Taylor group did not have development
board approval — and, therefore, financing —
before the offer on the ship expired Oct. 31.
Taylor could not be reached for comment, but
according to Bert McAnerin, senior broker for
Maple Shipping, there have been no negotiations with him since that time.
"He's a non-starter with us," McAnerin
added. "There is nothing going on with respect
to the Taylor group."
The 1949-vintage Princess Patricia, owned by
the Canadian Pacific Railway, has been laid up
on the Vancouver waterfront since she was re-
Marlne
Beat
Aian Daniels
tired from Alaska cruising at the end of the 1981
season.
Despite worldwide advertising and considerable interest, so far there have been no buyers.
•
The financially troubled Cast container group
of Montreal is going after a modestly increased
share of the Western Canadian market, president Peter Keller said in a telephone interview
Tuesday.
He said Cast currently moves between 3,000
and 4,000 containers a year through the port of
Vancouver.
"We are continuing to solicit certain cargoes
out of Central and Western Canada and are continuing to study the action in that market, although we don't look for a significant increase,"
Keller added.
"I wouldn't expect, even with a concerted effort, we would be looking at more than a 20 to 30-
per-cent increase.
A Cast representative was in Vancouver last
week talking business with with Anchor Shipping Ltd. president Stan Webber.
But Keuer said Cast has no plans to appoint a
general agent in Vancouver and will continue to
do its own selling, athough it will likely appoint
an operating agent.
The Cast group is one of the biggest container
companies operating across the highly compe-
tive North Atlantic, with five ships and roughly
a third of the trade.
It was 18 per cent owned by Canadian National Railways, until the railway bailed out last
year and wrote off its $62 million investment in
Cast's parent company Eurocanadian Shiphold-
ings Ltd.
Cast was bailed out subsequently by the
Royal Bank of Canada, which had reportedly
loaned the company $200 million to keep it afloat
during the recession.
Recently, following 18-months of what were
described in the industry as "suicidal freight-
rate wars," Cast decided to join five Canadian
Conferences on the Atlantic, a move that is expected to result in relative peace — at least for
the time being.
•
Our item about the arrival in Vancouver last
week of the 37,000 deadweight ton Moku Paku, a
U.S-flag integrated tug/barge unit, rang bells in
Mission, where James Swan reports it was the
second visit of such a vessel, not the first.
Swan said he was captain of the pusher tug
Sea Eagle and its integrated barge Velasco,
which arrived in Vancouver on July 11,1981, en
route from Beaumont, Tex., via the Panama
Canal.
Capt. Swan points out that Sea Eagle underwent a six-week refit at Vancouver Shipyards
Ltd. and the bow of the barge was ice-strengthened at Burrard Yarrows North Vancouver
division.
When it left the Gulf Oil refinery at Port
Moody on Aug. 26, 1981, it carried 5.5 million
gallons of diesel oil, at that time the largest single cargo ever taken into the Beaufort.
 ill
9
€
\
1    Stock
Sales High
Low
Ch'ge
<enedy
500
35
35
35
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1000
17
17
17
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2500
130
130
110
<ng slm
1100
350
330
3a
<ngdm
4500
25
25
25
<londx
1100
105
105
105
Cnle
6000
50
48
48
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2000
32
32
32
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.a Teko
3450
155
151
155
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18000
34
26
33
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6000
10
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11000
45
42
42
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2000
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38
38
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24000
75
75
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43
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52
46
46
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2000
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50
50
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35
35
35
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27
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131
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3400
42
42
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1575
475
475
475
2500
28
28
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5000
32
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32
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3000
40
40
40
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Mhgny
500
87
87
87
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29000
65
62
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700
72
72
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500
60
60
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800
495
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495
+5
Maymc
1500
305
300
300
-15
Mecca
1000
35
35
35
Mesa In
2500
30
28
28
-2
Welrse
Merit rs
3000
75
70
70
-5
2000
40
40
40
Mlchm
2200
180
179
180
+5
Mid cda
7500
66
65
64
-1
Mldnpr
Moly mlt
1500 470
460
470
+5
1000
37
37
37
-5
Monca w
220000
3
3
3
Monica
24500
43
43
43
M Christ
2000
25
25
25
Montor
500
485
485
485
+5
^onshn
Morn str
3000
30
30
30
-2
500
17
17
17
Mosqto
12000
60
58
60
+ 2
Mt clvry
Multlnt
Musto E
2500
90
88
90
+2
21500
85
75
85
+9
15600 365
355
360
+5
Mutual
1000
59
59
59
-9
lat res
1100
325
325
325
Reveal
3600 122
116
116
-4
v. arcdla
14050
140
130
130
-8
New beg
N Cinch
New frn
New rid
N Scope
N strtglc
N tyee w
New tye
Nwbry
Newhk
Nexus
N hawk
Nlrvna
Nolan w
Nolan
Nor  rnn
1300 80 80
3700 22 22
2000 210 205
22500 40 40
3400 255 245
3830 200
30000     2
18900 38
3615 130 120
5051 35 34
20600 67 60
2800 $1214 1214.
3000 38 38
260000 16     14
144500 44 40
ijwi inn me
190
2
36
22
210    +5
40
250   -5
200   +10
2   +1
37   +1
130
34   -1
60   +3
12V*
38
16   +2
44    +4
TORONTO 2:20 P.M. STOCKS
Distributed by CP
Toronto Stock Exchange—Feb. 1
1
Quotations in cents unless
marked 5.
z-Odd lot,
xd—Ex-divldenr.
, xr-
Ex
rights, xw-
Ex-warrants, o—Subject to
special TSE reporting rules, f
-Restrlct-
ed or non-voting shares
. Net change is
from previous board-lot closing sale
2:20  Net
Stock    Sales High Low p.m. Ch'ge
A and
B
AMCA Int
14700 $23
22'/*
22%+ %
AMCAP
1100 $25tt
25%
25% +
it
Abeford
200   $8
8
8   -
14
AMI Prce
1642 $26
25%
25%-
14
Acklands
300 $18%
18%
18%
Adanac Mi
2500   47
45
45   -
5
Agasslz
3000 175
175
175   -
2
Agnlco E
2525 817%
17%
1714 +
%
Alt Energy 56097 $16%
17%
18% +
%
Alt Enr A
4000 $31%
31'A
31'/4
Alta Nat
300 $25%
25%
25%-
%
Alcan       111170 $42
41% 41% + %
Alcan w
8825 $18
17%
17%+ %
Also Cent
216 $21% 21'A
2114-
1%
Algoma St
1700 $28% 28% 281* —
%
Alum A
6050 $27
26%
26% +
'A
Alum 1st p
500 $26
26
26
Alum B
see below
Amco O
6000   44
40
40   -
0
Am Eagle o 2000 167
166
166   -
1
Am Leduc
166   27
27
27
Andrs WA
100 $27
27
27   -
%
Andres W E
200 $28
28
28   -
%
Ang CT 265
100 $28
28
28    +114
Ang CT 290
Z22 $2974
29
29'/4
Arbor A
800 $10!*
9%
10% +
%
Arbor B f
1100 $101*
10
10% +
',*
Argus
200   $71*
7>/i
7% +
'A
Asamera
2450 $12%
12%
12% +
'A
Atco 1 f
8400   $71*
7
7   -
14
Atco II
400   $714
7V4
7'/4
Atco 11'A
1100 $29% 29'/* 29%-
%
Atco w
2250 155
150
150
Atlas Yk o
2000   31
31
31    +
1
Augmltto o
1100 175
173
175   +
5
Aur Res o
3000   92
92
92   +
1
BC Sugar A
637 $23
23
23
BGR A
700   $714
714
7'A-
Vs
BGRw
1700 215
205
215
8MB Comp
550   $5
5
5
BP Res
1478 $23%
2314
23'/4 +
%
Bachelor o
9260   $7
7
7
Bkrtlc
2000   60
60
60
Banister C
250   $6%
6%
6%
BankBC.
40700 $15
14%
14%-
%
Bk BC 228
100 $25
25
25
Bk BC 222
411 $251* 25%
25% +
'A
Bank Mtl
35494 $26%
26',*
26% +
'A
Bk Mtl 285
8250 $34'/* 3414
3414
Bk Mtl 250
1000 $31'A 31
31% +
'A
Bk Mtl w
14400   $5%
5%
5%
Bank N S
44551 $14%
14%
14% +
>A
Bankenoo 16500 295   285   285   -15
Bankeno w  1500   30    30    30
Barrlck o     Z62 190   170   190
Baton 8       200 $13% 13% 13% + 14
Becker B P   300 $21% 21% 21% + %
Bell Ent     83710 $31     30% 31    + %
Bell 1.80        300 $23     23    23   + %
Bell 2.05        600 $30% 30% 30% + %
Bell 2.70      4410 $33% 33% 33% + %
Black Phot    500 $17% 17% 17%- %
Blkdom o     100 250   250   250   -10
Rl.l/O p°
M4WI    !«_
.17        10_
L11/.
!"-.. ■■--'■:■-■■' A:.. 4v '.,.::,-:;' : .. ■   .. .-A:-:.,.,. ,.;■■!.-,...;,.:,
Stock    Sales High
CIBC35625  6400 $31%
CIBCw        500   $7%
C Marconi   3400-$23%
CNat R       Z200   71
C Ocdental 23025 $28%
CP Ltd       34036 $46%
Cdn Tire       300 $14
CTIre A f   20423 $12
CUtll A f    25081 $14%
C Utll B        594 $14%
CU 10'A       1500 $25%
C Utll 9.24     200 $25%
C Utll 7.30     101 $21'A
CUtll 2nd D 1901 $27
CUtll 2nd E10901 $28
CUtll 2nd F   101 $30%
CUtll 2nd G  401 $30%
CUtll 2nd H 9026 S2314
CUtll 2nd I   1301 $26'A
CUtll Aw     200 220 •
CUtll B w     237 210
CWNG4pr 700   $8%
CWN 5% P    500 $11
C Wrld        200   $6
C Wrldwd p 400 $22%
Cnamax o    821   $6%
Cantor       9600 $24%
Canuc o     2500  69
Cara        113900 $10%
Carl OK     10771 $1914
Carl A p       201 $24%
Carl B p        zl $29%
Carma A     3000   70
Carolino    11800   $9%
Celanese     1027  $9
Celan 175 p  z50 $18
CFund A f 58900   $7%
CFundw     5700   21
Cenfrl Tr      z93 $1214
Cntrl Tr p      zl $25%
Chnclr        2500   62
Chateau A f 2600 $12%
Chleftan       100 $15%
Chieftain C   200 $51%
Chrysler       400 $3614
CHUM B f   1400 $24%
Clmarono   1000 350
Clneplex o   1100 245
CoastlAf    9700   $9
CohO At     1500 445
Colonial 0   2500 255
Cominco      4328 $5714
Comlnco A    100 $24%
Cominco 0 1400 $29
Cmrcl OG     400 200
Cmp inv 0 23700 250
Conlagas 0 15200   $7%
Con Bath A 2400 $25%
C Bath 575     Z2 $5714
Con Bath p     zl $14'A
C Bath 525 see below
C Copper 0  1500   25%
C Durham 21200 114
Cons Pipe   4000 $12
C Rambler 5000  $4%
Cons Gas    1700 $2014
C Gas 13%   701 $33
C Gas 9'A     840 $27
Cons Gas w 4900 450
Con Glass    400 $13%
CTL Bank   2400 $13
Conventrs    5000 420
Conwst B f   584   $9%
Conwst 12     100 $33%
Low     Ch'ge
31% 31%- %
7%   7%
2314 23'A
71     71
2814 28%+ %
45% 44'A + %
14 14 + 'A
11% 11% + %
14% 14%
1414 14%+ %
25% 25%- %
25% 25%
21'A 21'A + %
24% 27   + %
28 28
30% 30%+ 'A
30% 30%
23% 23%
26 26'A+ 'A
220   220
210   210
8%   8%- %
11 11
6      6
22% 22%
6%   6%
24% 24%- %
66    69   + 5
10% 10%- 'A
19 19'A + 'A
24    24%+ 'A
29% 29%
70    70-1
9%- %
9
18
7%- %
20
1214 12'A
25% 25%
62    62-2
12'A 1214- %
15% 15% + 'A
51% 51%
35% 36'A + %
26% 26%
350   350   -10
245   245
8%   9
465   445
252   252
54% 57'A + %
24% 24%
29 29
200 200
225   245    +30
7%   7%-'A
25% 25% + %
57'A 57'A
I4'A 16'A
25% 25%- %
105   116   + 4
12 12
6%   4%- Vi
20 20
33    33    + Vt
27 27
445 445   -5
13% 13%- 'A
12% 12%-%
415 420 + 5
9% 9% + %
33% 33%+ %
-■"     "        "
9%
9
18
7
20
+ 4
+ 10
-3
HH
ange
Stock    Sales High Low     Ch'ge
Inverness    1200  $4%. 4%   4%+ 'A
Invents 875 2125 $17% 17% 17%-%
Irwin Toy    2400   $6%   4'A   4% + 'A
Irwin Toy f 1200   $5%   5%   5%- %
Island Tel     100 $20% 20% 20%
Ivaco A f      225 $15    15    15
IvacoDp     250    $24% 26% 26%
Ivaco E P     875 $26% 2614 2614- %
Ivaco F p    1250 $26    25% 26
Ivaco w      1680   $5%   5%   5%
Jannock      2300 $11% 11% 11% + %
Jannock 8     193 $12% 12% 12%
Janockwf2 500   $5%   5%   5%
Joutel O       3000   50    50    50
Keg Rest      800   $5%   5%   5%- %
Kerr Add     2853 $19'A 19    19   - 'A
K Anacon o 2100 HI   111   111    + 1
Labatt        12042 $22'A 22% 22%- %
Lac Mnrls   8741 $32'A 31% 32   + 'A
Lacana      3150 $11% 10% 11%
Lafarge        758 $13% 13% 13% + 'A
LaldlawA 11100 $12% 12'A 12'A
Laldlw B f 800 0 $11% 11% 11% + 'A
Ldl 9% 300   $9%   9%   9%
Laldlaw 8 400 $8 8 8 - Vt
LOntCem 200 $8% 8% 8%
L Shore 3630 $45% 45 45%- 1
Lanpar 1400 445 440 440 + 5
Larder o 4500 40 58 58
Lava Cap o 1000 100 100 100-2
Leigh Inst 30200 259 235 240 -15
Linear T 1000 $8'A 7% 7%-%
LL Lac z8 $34% 34% 34%
Loblaw Co   2500 $14    13% 14   + %
LOb Co pr     240 $25'A 25'A 25'A
Lochel A I f 1100 200   195   195
Lochlel B     1100 195   195   195
Lumonlcs    1392 $15% 15    15%+ %
Lytton M O 10748 110   107   107   - 8
M  to  0
100 $15% 15% 15%- %
100 $14% 14% 14%
100 $5 5 5
1300 $10% 10% 10% + 'A
1200 $17% 17% 17% + Vt
3331 $30% 30'A 30% + %
27% 27%- 'A
24    24   + Vt
MDSH A
MDS Bf
MSR Exp
Mcknz
Mclan H X
Macmllan
Mcmlln 200 1170 $28
Mcmlln 208 417 $26
Madeline 2000   40    40    40
Magna A f 4850 $16% 16% 14%- %
Magna B z30 $20    20    20
Mahr p Z50   $5%   5%   5%
Malstc Con 700 380   370   380   +10
Manrldgo 7500   93    91    91-2
Maritime f 344 $35    35    35
MartlmAp    zl   S8%   8%   8%
Mar T 840 zl $10    10    10
Mar T 940 Zl $10% 10% 10%
Mar T 745 201   $8%   8%   8%
MarkSpnc 200 $14    14    14
Mark Wrk f 6900 175   165   145   -10
Mascan 9 1500 $29% 29% 29%
Mass Fer 43884 440   455   455
Mas F A 400 $12     11% 11%- Vt
Mas F B 500 $12'A 12'A 12'A
Matchano 7000   24    24    24-2
McChlp 100 105   105   105   -5
Mc Intyre 330 $34'A 36'A 36'A- 'A
Mentor 600   $6%   6%   6% + %
Mercantll 450 $15% 15    15%
Mercntl 1 see below
Merldan w 10000   25    25
Merland E 6434   $5%   5
Metalor
25
5%+17
417 475   445   475   - 5
«M 34O-J40    340    -10
Stock    Sales High
PanCan P   2500 $23%
Parkland o   200  $5
Pathflndo   4000   70
Pe Ben 0     200 155
Pegasus      990 $15
Pembina     2500 $18
Penn Wst o 1000 126
PenWst A f   400 130
Pennant o   z500 48
PJewl At 25800 $13
PC Prods B 1114 $14%
Petro Sun o 300 130
Phonlx Oil   1825   $7%
Pine Point 14700 $34%
Place GO o 11300 130
Placer      38015 $20%
Placer w    2450  $5%
Pocg o        4300 400
Pysr pr       100 $28%
Pomlnex 0 27800 100
Pomlnx w 15500   57
Potter At    2301 185
PowrCorf 2250 $19%
Prado Ex o zlOO   29
Precamb     1800  $4
Proviso       300 $18
Quartet o    4000 315
Que Sturg 0 3300   $8%
Quebcor       200 S14'A
Qenstk       2000 470
Quenstn 0     500 223
Ram Pet o 14150 510%
RnchmAf 1000  $5%
Rnchm B f  1400   $5
Rnchmnp    500 $25
Ranger     23000 $11%
Rayrockf    400  $9%
Redpath      1000 $23
Regional o  3200  $5%
Relchhold     300 $11
Relt A f     100 $17%
Renlsanc O 4223 405
Res Serv f   1400 281
Res Serv w z250  52
Revlstk A f 1400   $8%
Revlstk B     200   $8%
Revn Prp A  Z49 162
Revnu B f    5400 138
Rio Alsom 14955 $14%
RIO 580 pr     240 $42
Rio 8.5 z88 415
RIO Alto O 1000 345
Rogers B f 25198 $10%
Rolland A f 400 $13%
Roman 1464 $16
Ronyx Cor 700 $6%
Rothman 360 $49%
Rothm2p 401 $14%
Rxmk 5000   28
Roxy A      4100 250
Roxy B      10600 255
Royal Bnk 29718 $33
Ry Bk 1.88   301 $21%
Ry Bk 2.75 9911 $32%
Ry Bk 1.45  5325 $17%
Ry Bk w     3600   $6%
RylGldO    4000   72
RylGldw     500   20
Ryl T J. M   240 $!0'A
RyTrco A f 1500 $28%
RyTrco D psee below
Ruprtlndo    248   43
Ruprtlndp    500   $6'A
Scarboro 0   4400 160
Sceptre     11731   $5%
Low    Ch'ge
23'A 23%- %
5     5
70     70   -1
155   155   + 4
14% 14%-%
17% 17% + %
126   126
125   125-5
48    48
13     13
14% 14%
130   130   + 2
7%   7%-'A
36% 36% + Vt
129   130   + 7
19% 20
5%   5%
395   395   -5
28%-%
100   + 1
56   + 4
185
19%
29
6
98
52
180
19
29
5%
17% 17%
315   315   +15
8%   8%
14% 1614
470   470
223   223   + 3
9%   9%- 'A
5%   5%-%
5 5
25 25
ll'A 11%+ %
9%   9%-%
23    23
5%   5%+ %
10% 11    + 'A
17% 17%- 'A
400   400
280   280+5
53    52
8%   8%-'A
8%   8%-%
162   162
134   138   +12
16% 16%-%
62    62
415   415
360   340   +10
10% 10%- 'A
13% 13%
15% 14
6 6%- 'A
49    49
1414 14%+ %
27% 27%
235   240
247   247   -3
32% 33   + %
21% 21%+ %
32% 32% + %
17% 17%
6%   6%-%
70     72   + 2
20    20
10'A 10'A
27% 28   -%
43    43
4'A   4'A
150   150   -10
5%   5% + %
Stock Sales
Total Pet 4800
TotalPAP 'A%7?
Total P w 1150
Traders A f 6525
Trader B p 300
TrCan R A 2717
TrC R p 300
Trns Mt 600
TrAlt R PB 4000
TrAlt A 24250
TrAlt B - Zl
trAlta 4% z20
TrAlta 2.36
TrAlta 12
TrAlt 14.25
TrAlt 9
TrAlt w
TrCan PL
TrP 2.80 P
TrP 4.50 p
TrP lit D
TrP 1st E
TrP 1st F
Trpacfc w
Trillium
Trilogy o
Triton A
Triton w
Trlmac
Trc 9.12
Trlzec A f
Trlzec B
Trlzec p
Tudor o
Turbof
Turbo sp
Turbo 10%
Tut Ent o
UAPAf
UAPw
Ulster P o
Unlcan S
Unlcorp A f
100
200
6475
1300
26700
38733
Z50
171
5020
450
750
2000
500
8576
5175
3650
14900
100
500
913
15036
650
12183
1600
2000
9000
400
500
7002
1000
278
Un Carbld    z60
Union Gas 10496
zl
100
4110
127
100
UGas 5%
U Gas 1438
U Canso
Un Corp
UKeno
UnReefo 29500
Un Wburn 100
Verstl A f 4300
Verstl CI B 16500
Verstl Corp 1101
Verstl 2625 600
Verstl w
Vestgron
VG Trstco
Vulca
Ind
Walax A
Walker R
Walker 7%
Walker 9%
Wlkr 14.16
Walker w
Wlkr 1988 W10448
Walwyn 1200
WardalrAf 275
Wardalr B Z50
Warn Can 200
Wrlntn 100
Wasabi o     7000
Westar A p 3250
1200
200
2025
500
700
8143
4101
1400
200
4200
High Low     Ch'ge
$1414 14% 14'A + %
!%%% 33'A 33% +
289   289   289   +9
$17    17    17
$23    23     23
280   271   280   +5
$17% 17     17% + H
$7%   7%   7%- %.
525'A 25% 25'A + % '
$22% 21% 21% - %
$21% 21% 21%-w
$53    53    53        "J
$25% 25'A 25'A       '1
S28V4 2814 2814  ...    1
$31% 31    31   .™».' J
$25% 25% 25%
375   365   370   +5,
$31% 31'A 31%+ Vf
$31% 31% 31%      A
$51     51     51    + 'A"
$52% 52% 52% + % '
$55    55    55      -
$61'A 61     61'A + 'A "i
49    49    49   + 4   I
$8%   8%   8% + % ,
202   200   202    + 2"
$27% 27% 27%- %/
$414   6%   614 + %
$7%   7%   7%- %
$22    22    22+1
$19% 19% 19% + %
$20     20     20   -'A 1
$9%   9%   9%
350   350   350   -5
48    46% 47   -1%
63    60    60   -4
120   120   120   -5"
36    35    35
$26     26    26   -14
480   475   475   -5
132   129   130   + 1''
$6      5%   6
$6%   6%   6%
$14% 14% 14%
$11% 11% 11% + %
$3214 32'A 32'A
$25% 25% 25%- Vt
320   320   320   -5
$24% 24% 24%
$17     17     17
23     17    21    +>i!
$11% 11% 1!%+Vij
$8%   8%   8%-%
$8%   8%   8% '
$13% 13    13   -
$34'A 36'A 36'A- 'A
140   160   160   -J
$15     14% 14%+ %
$15% 1514 15%-%
375   375
$15% 15%
$25% 25'A
$26% 25%
$29    28%
$31     30%
490   470
490   490
450   450
490   465
465   465
$17% 17%
114   114
37    37
$25% 25'A
375   +5
15%
25%
26   -%
>+ %
+ %
+10
31
490
490
450
490
465
17% + %
114   + 2
37
25%-%
 Province photos by Rick Loughran      ,
Bare pips blamed for spewing sewage filth into harbor.
 .-*.. i^uiii anu miure use ui ine cnuucai   - nuspuai. rs> a
heart. doubted it."
jJllJi,IV.JU..,     .
le pedal up Everest
JOHN GLENN
treated him with respect and I am at a
loss to understand why he is making
these statements."
in a New Concord, Ohio, high
school that bears his name, Democratic Senator John Glenn declared
his U.S. presidential candidacy on
Thursday and vowed to push for an
immediate freeze of nuclear weapons,
repeal of future tax cuts and a return
to "the simple values we learned in
this small town."
•     •     •
When Charlie Daniels cleans
house, the Country Music Foundation
cleans up.
The Nashville-based museum and
Hall of Fame took a few items off Dan
iels' hands after his latest cleaning
spree — a 10-gallon hat, a fiddle used
to record The Devil Went Down to
Georgia, a guitar used at the Volunteer Jam, and a rope used to rope cattle.
The country-rocker said the hat
was a good-luck charm.
• •     •
Baron Lord Brownlow is looking
for a buyer with about $15 million to
spare for one of the grandest stately
homes in Britain.
Brownlow, latest victim of the
curse of the English aristocracy —
the cost of running a mansion — is
selling Belton, his family's home since
1617.
He wants $11.3 million for the
house in Lincolnshire and its 2,000
hectares (4941 acres) of woods,
farms, parks and a 27-hole golf
course. The rest of the price is for art
treasures that the baron wants to sell
with the house.
Brownlow needs to sell because his
father, who died in 1978, virtually cut
him out of his will for eloping with a
farmer's daughter in 1964.
• •     •
Harold Ballard, the owner of the
Toronto Maple Leafs and the Hamilton Tigef-Cats, says he wants to buy
Twenty-One McGill, an exclusive
Toronto women's club and turn it
into a Playboy-style club for men.
The crusty 79-year-old Ballard says
he doesn't care what women's groups
say.
"They can do what they want, and
I'm going to do what I want."
The club, open to public tender, is
worth between $2.5 and $6 million.
IOPHItESALE
)logy of sound recording has improved enormously in recent
ither the recording process is direct-to-disc, digital, half-speed
)r high quality analog, the application of modern technology,
hip and care, and the use of only pure virgin vinyl will enable alii
:e and dynamics of the original performance to be preserved for
ent of te discerning listener.
pBIE
5E
Ls & CROFTS
W BAEZ
RITA
1EE GEES
BiE
NAUTILUS
Arrival— ABBA
Finesse— JOHN KLEMMER
Life Beyond L.A.—AMBROSIA
Cornerstone— STYX
Worlds Away— PABLO
CRUISE
Don't Cry Out Loud— MELISSA
MANCHESTER
24 Carrots— AL STEWART
Diana— DIANA ROSS
ITV
Jl«AHH C CinCl ITV
 Business
Wnt %ncouuer Sun
STOCK QUOTATIONS
COMMODITIES
10
THIS WEEK
11
H
• •••C   SATURDAY, SEPT. 19,1981
Farewell
to a
Princess
By ALAN DANIELS
Sun Marine Writer
When the steamship Princess
Patricia heads to Alaska for the last
time under CPR's colors Oct. 5,
Gladys Livesey will be at her usual
place in the dining room, a window
table on the starboard side.
For Mrs. Livesey, a widow "pushing 60", it will be her 22nd voyage on
the Pat since 1974. She works in the
luggage department at the Bay
downtown, selling lightweight vinyl
suitcases to the standby set, while
her own thoughts are of steamer
trunks and the stars above a pewter
sea.
The crew has become like family,
she says. A voyage on the Pat is like
going home.
"It's company. It's like having a
happy family reunion every year.
I've been on other ships. The officers walk right by you and don't
even say 'Good morning,' but on the
Pat it's just the friendliest ship. I
was very upset when I heard they
were selling it. I shed a few tears at
the time, I really did. It's meant a
lot to me."
The ditching of the princess, after
33 years on this coast, will cost 153
jobs, siphon millions of dollars from
downtown cash registers and close
the final chapter in the history of
Canadian Pacific Railway's B.C.
coast passenger service.
Officially, the reason is that the
Alaska cruise market has softened
after a decade of growth, because
high interest rates have nobbled the
luxury of big-ticket holidays.
Unofficially, it's because the Pat
is an old and increasingly costly retainer — and the CPR brass in Montreal want out of the passenger business.
Since 1901, CPR has operated a
total of 48 Princess ships in B.C.
Their names were legion: Mary,
Elaine, Joan, Elizabeth, Louise,
Charlotte, Alice, Kathleen ....
During the fleet's heyday, prior to
the Second World War, there were
no fewer than 14 of them on nine different routes. The Princess Patricia, built in 1949, is the last. She will
be sold following her final cruise because of projected losses this year of
$750,000.
Sentimentally, the demise of the
last of the princesses is shared by
communities from Vancouver to
Skagway and by the 90,000 passengers the world over who have been
with the Pat to Alaska and back.
Financially, the big loser is Vancouver.
"Our operating costs this year
were $6.6 million and everything we
PAT'S PURSER HARRY BURCHALL . . . The local touch comes across to the passengers.
—Bill Keay photo
spend is spent right here — wages,
provisions, maintenance, dock dues,
port taxes, you name it," says Ray
Purdy, CPR's general manager of
coastal marine operations. "When
she goes, there's a big chunk of this
place disappears."
In contrast, the bigger, more
glamorous foreign flag cruise ships
spend very little in town. TV's Love
Boat and the others, although based
in Vancouver throughout the summer, truck in everything they need
in bond from U.S. suppliers, from
toothpicks and bathroom tissues to
smoked salmon and filet mignon.
They spend less in the port than the
Polish fishing fleet.
But the Pat is Canadian all the
way and the buck turns here.
In an era of glamorous, floating
hotels, with their swimming pools
and slot machines, the Princess
Patricia projects the Victorian elegance of an English seaside boarding house. With her twin smokestacks and two masts she belongs
more to the era of the African Queen
or the ferry to Macau; inside she is
polished brass and mahogany, her
wooden decks bow slightly as if
under the weight of the years.
She was built in Scotland in the
same year as her sister ship, the
Princess Marguerite, now operated
by the B.C. government between
Victoria and Seattle.
"We had released two vessels to
the British ministry of shipping during the war," says CPR director of
marine operations, Al Cairns. "At
the end of the war there was an obli
gation by the British to replace
them. They didn't give us the money
to spend in Canada, or we would
have built something more like a
modern B.C. ferry. The Pat and the
Marguerite were side-loaders. They
only had space for 54 cars. They
were 15 years out of date when we
got them."
Cairns was quartermaster aboard
the Pat when she left Glagow on her
maiden voyage to Vancouver. It was
not, he remembers, an auspicious
beginning. They had problems with
one of the shaft bearings and tossed
about for eight hours in hurricane
winds in the Bay of Biscay before
they could fix it. But the 15,000 kilometre journey to Victoria via the
Panama Canal took only 21 days 19
hours and her top speed (recorded in
SAILING OUT OF THE PICTURE ... The Princess Patricia's days as a cruise ship to Alaska are numbered.
—Hob Draper photo
the Caribbean with a following wind
and sea) was a racy 26 knots.
Today the Pat seldom reaches
half that speed. The Inside Passage
to Alaska is one of the world's most
scenic waterways and with her
vibrationless turbo-electric engines,
the Pat seems to ghost along, as silent as the ice floes in Glacier Bay.
Since she was converted to cruising in 1963, she pioneered Alaska
holidays and the people there hold
her in special esteem.
"She's part of Alaska. She's family," says Ketchikan Trading Post
owner Boots Adams. "The Pat is
very special. She's been coming
here for so many years. The whole
town is just sick that she's being
taken out of service."
For the crew of 90, some of whom
have served on her since she started
on this coast on the triangle run between Vancouver, Victoria and
Seattle, the selling of the Pat is like
pawning a family heirloom.
"We don't entertain with big-
name bands and first-run movies,"
says purser Harry Burchall. "But
all our captains are born and bred
on the coast. They navigate with a
great deal of familiarity and it
comes across to the passengers in a
very real way. It's a way of seeing
Alaska that the others can't duplicate."
Burchall believes the end might
have been avoided if the Pat had
stayed with an 8-day schedule rather than the 7-day package preferred
by most of the foreign flag ships.
"We threw ourselves into the ballpark with the big guys and they batted us over the fence," he added. "I
never thought they'd do it to us in
one season, but they sure as hell
did."
Meanwhile the Princess Pat has
been advertised worldwide. As yet
there have been no takers.
 H2
VANCOUVER SUN: SAT., SEPT. 19,1981      ••••
BUSINESS
Reagan defends policy,
derides 'Chicken Littles'
DENVER (AP) — President Ronald
Reagan, deriding "those Chicken Littles who proclaim the sky is falling,"
said Friday he is standing firm behind
his economic program despite new
signs the economy might be in a recession.
The ominous signs came earlier
Friday when the government disclosed
that preliminary figures showed U.S.
economic activity continued to slide
modestly during the third quarter after
falling in the second quarter.
Reagan repeated earlier pledges that
he will seek a $42.5 billion deficit for
1982, a balanced budget by 1984 and increased defense spending. He acknowledged the battle of the budget will be
difficult for himself, the Congress and
the American people.
"I am not about to stop this long cru
sade," Reagan said in remarks prepared for delivery to the National
Federation of Republican Women in
Denver. "Let me say we did not sweat
and bleed to get the economic package
passed only to abandon it when the
going gets a little tough."
Commerce department sources said
a very preliminary estimate of economic activity during the July-September period showed a slim decline at an
annual rate of 0.5 per cent.
At the same time, the department issued a revised report confirming that
economic activity declined during the
second quarter of 1981. But the revision
showed a smaller decline than reported
last month.
During the first quarter of 1981, the
economy surged at an unusually high
annual rate of 8.6 per cent.
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F
SUNDAY,
OCTOBER 11,1981
ClassiB«d... F2-8
A family says goodbye
Immigration inspector Jan Ross wipes away tear as cruise ship sails away.
JUNEAU, Alaska — More than
200 people here are holding a wake.
This last cruise of the Princess
Patricia is a sentimental one for
many on board — they are here to
mourn the passing of a princess.
The ship's ghostly white hull
steams slowly through Tracy Arm,
a passage so narrow the Patricia is
the only cruise ship capable of
making the spectacular side trip on
the cruise to Alaska.
Eighty-one-year-old Amy Boyd
knows the ship well. She occupies
the same cabin and sits at the same
seat in the dining room that she has
had for her 12 voyages.
This is a cruise she says she had
to make, despite the sadness it
brings.
"I'm very, very sad at the
thought that the Patricia is going to
be sold," the spry South Burnaby
woman says.
"I feel like I'm saying goodbye to
a dear and good friend."
Her first cruise was in 1967 when
her husband Allon died. He worked
for the Canadian Pacific Railway
for 51 years, earning a gold card
which allowed him and Amy to
travel free with the company. But
he died soon after retiring and
never made the trip.
Boyd has "been around the world
twice," and has cruised on other
ships. The Pat is her favorite.
"There isn't another ship afloat
like it. The old Patricia is something else. It's just like a great big
house-party — like a big happy
family," she says with a smile.
The Pat was built at Govan, Scotland, in 1947. Although her elegance is somewhat faded these
days, like an old hotel, veteran passengers still think of her as
"home."
With room for only 320 passengers and 90 crew, the Pat is small
Tears flow for classy old lady
enough — 113 metres and 6,000
gross tons — that faces and personalities quickly become familiar.
The grand old vessel has shunned the fast-track in favor of a
more temperate lifestyle befitting
her age and passengers.
Passenger Mary McKeown reflects those aboard.
"If what I wanted was to go to a
bar, go to a dance, or go to gamble,
I don't know that I would pay for a
cruise. It's the ship, the scenery,
the crew and the passengers that
attract me to the Patricia."
Stories by Steve Berry
Photos by Rick Loughron
She has travelled the ship "23 or
24 times, there's a year in there
that I'm not sure that I made it or
not."
"Friends" and "family" are two
words most often used to describe
the atmosphere aboard.
"The crew and passengers that I
meet on board I consider friends.
It's like a family," say the 60-year-
old ex-schoolteacher from Toronto.
The scenery on the cruise is awesome, even in the grey weather.
Large chunks of crystal-clear and
blue ice bob in the water of Tracy
Arm. Two huge glaciers meet the
ship at the far end of the Arm, glistening blue and white in the distance.
As the Patricia steams gently to-
Crew recalls the fun
of serving on thePat
Capt. Ray Hudson guides the Pat into dock in Wrangell, Alaska.
JUNEAU, Alaska — There's no
love lost on the original Love Boat
by her Canadian Pacific Railway
masters and she's up for sale.
The Princess Patricia has made
more than 300 voyages, carried
more than 90,000 tourists and has
been a veteran of the Alaska cruise
business for 18 years.
She was the originator of the
Love Boat concept when in the winter seasons of 1965-66 and 1966-67
she acted as a charter vessel between Los Angeles and Acapulco.
But now the CPR, her owners, say
she's a loser, and they are cutting
her loose, ending her famous Alaska cruises.
She was built in Govan, Scotland,
in 1947 as the sister ship to the Princess Marguerite, and sailed from
there to B.C. She operated on the
triangle run between Vancouver,
[
A smiling welcoming party gives a flash of thigh and garter to greet the Princess Patricia in Wrangell.
Victoria and Seattle. The Pat was
then converted to an overnight
cruiser in 1962 at a cost of $1 million, with accommodation for 320
passengers in 152 cabins. The Pat
saw Alaska for the first time in
1963.
Ray Purdy, general manager of
CPR on the west coast, says the
ship "actually carried more people
this year than last," but still suffered "substantial losses. The prognosis for the future was not encouraging enough to keep us in the market," he adds.
The ties have been so great between the retiring Princess Patricia and some of her retired crew
that they have come back on this
the last Alaska cruise to say a fond
farewell.
"This is the end of a long era,"
says Norman Hunter, for 10 years
the chief steward on board.
"I had to come on for the last
trip. I made so many friends on the
coast and on board that I had to see
them for the last time. I feel happy
and sad at the same time. It was
really with mixed feelings that I
came."
Hunter worked for CPR from
1928 to 1975 when he retired.
"I've seen it so rough coming
through the Queen Charlottes it's
wiped out the dining room. It took
everything off the tables, everything."
Kathleen O'Sullivan worked for
more than 20 years in the Patricia's gift shop.
She has dozens of stories to tell
and loves to tell them in her broad
Australian accent.
There's the time she helped
organize a search party on Juneau
Mountain. O'Sullivan was one of
the first to find a missing boy.
While at a picnic in Alaska she
had gone swimming in the icy
water. As the park rangers arrived
she was drying off and they didn't
believe she had been swimming. "I
had to go back in again to prove it.
It nearly killed me, but they named
a glacier after me."
She has been adopted by two Indian tribes for work she has done in
their villages.
And she never accepted a tip the
whole time she worked aboard the
Pat. "If I want to do something I'll
do it. I don't believe in tips. In all
those years I've fixed old darlings'
cameras I never accepted a tip."
wards the glaciers, a flock of brilliant white swans takes to the air
silhouetted against the mist-
shrouded mountains.
The rest of the cruise is highlighted by dark mountains and for
the most part calm seas. Only at
Queen Charlotte Sound is there
real "rock 'n rolling," and then
just enough to make life interesting.
Stops in historic Alaskan towns
and villages provide a chance to
stretch legs and spend money on
tourist junk. The townfolk welcome
the Patricia, while not so readily
welcoming the larger ships which
can pour more than 1,000 people
into the villages at once.
"You feel like there's a flood of
people coming at you sometimes,"
one woman said in Ketchikan.
"Two hundred or 300 we can handle, but that many is too much.
Some of us won't come to town during tour days."
Al Cairns, director of marine
operations for CPR and one of the
men responsible for the decision to
stop the cruises, was helmsman
aboard the Pat when she sailed
from Scotland. He's now on board
for the last cruise.
"We're all caught up in the emotional side of it. We don't want to
see it go but it's the bottom line.
It's the bucks. All sentiment aside,
it can't make a profit. There's no
goddamned way we can afford to
carry this ship on sentiment," the
blunt-spoken Cairns says.
"Sure I fall in love with beautiful
automobiles, with luxurious
yachts, but I'm a realist. That's
why I'm in management. I don't let
sentiment cloud my thinking.
Cairns says the company, in a
series of "think-tank sessions,"
tried all possible combinations of
ways to keep the ship operating.
They could not come up with a way
to make money in the current market conditions.
He blames high interest rates,
soaring fuel costs and market
projections which show the ship
would continue to lose money as
the reasons for putting her up for
sale.
Cairns sailed the ship from Scotland, travelled on it on his honeymoon, and celebrated bis 31st wedding anniversary on board. He
went from a seaman to deck officer
on the ship and takes offence when
people suggest he has no feeling for
AMY BOYD
her. Although this is the last cruise
she is running there are only 212
passengers on board, a number at
which the company says it cannot
make a profit.
U.S. Immigration inspector Jan
Ross has dealt with the Patricia
since 1969. She has also fallen in
love with the ship and the people on
board.
As the Patricia steams past her
house near Ketchikan, Alaska, she
hangs the Canadian flag from her
balcony and waves a large American one. The ship signals its presence with a blast from its whistle.
"It's really sad. I guess this is
the ship I'll always remember. I
will really miss her. These people
are kind of like a large family for
me, that I see once a week. You
don't get that kind of feeling from
other ships."
Capt. Ray Hudson, a CPR veteran of 35 years, and the Pat's captain for the last four, says: "I love
the old girl. I have a lot of happy
memories. I've spent more time on
this ship than I've spent at home."
He will probably work on freighters when the cruise is over.
"I don't relish the idea. It's a different world altogether. Those
ships are more like shiftwork, almost like a factory. All the modern
ships are the same. There's no individuality. This old steamer has
class."
*A.
HANKSGMfoy
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THE PROVINCE, Sunday, October 11,1981
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INDEX
TO
~ CLASSIFICATIONS
NOTE: Classifications marked with
an asterisk* denote those in which
_Jjc sale Per«on-to-Person ads are
eligible to appear.
[[Announcements
Births	
7
2
Business Personals	
.     42
..    12
Catering & Party Rentals
Cemeteries	
32
..   22
Deaths	
30
23
8
Florists	
..   19
.    27
Funeral Directors	
18
Funeral Notices	
Halls for Rent	
Information Wanted	
In Memoriam	
Legals	
Letters of Appreciation	
Lodge Notice*	
•Lost 	
Marriages	
Memorial Gifts	
Monumental Work*	
Personal	
Seasons Greetings	
Travel	
Employment
Educational	
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
* Baby Sitting. Child Care ...
"Men	
• Men-Women	
* Women	
SERVICES
Beauticians or Barbers	
Drivers Chauffeurs	
• Domestlc-Daycare	
Hotels-Restaurants	
TRADES
Engineering	
10    Factpry-Warehouse	
34.    Labourers	
36    Trades-Technical	
16 Mining-Lumbering, Const. ..
445 OFFICE & BUSINESS
14    Accounting-Auditors	
28    Data-Word Processing	
26    Medical-Dental	
6    Office Personnel & Clerks ..
17 Secretarial	
20    Employment Agencies	
40 Professional & Management
41 Sales	
**     Part Time	
Retail Clerks & Cashiers ...
GENERAL
Caretakers	
74    Help Wanted	
Investment Positions	
73    Teachers Wanted	
70    * Teachers Available	
50 Educational  74
51 Electricians, Welders  100
52 Furn. Refinish., Uphol  139
53 Floor Surfacing  102
Gardening, etc  112
54 Health Services  S4
55 Home & Business Services ... 90
56 Home Insulation  129
57 Home Modernization  92
58 Hospitals, Private  86
59 Moving & Storage  372
60 Music, Art, Dancing  80
61 Painters, Decorators  110
62 Plastering, Stuccoing  104
63 Plumbing, Heating  106
Professional Services  82
64 Rest Homes  88
66 Roofing, Chimneys, etc  108
67 Talent Agencies  76
68
Busines$&
Professional
45
46
47 Bulldozing, Trucking	
48 Carpenters. Contractors .
Cement, Asphalt, Brick ..
49 Dressmaking, Alterations .
Merchandise
for Sale
Antiques & Art Objects  140
V "Bicycles   159
84 ' Billiard Table  161
96 " Books, Coins, Stamps  168
96 ' Building Materials 128
83 "Cameras. Photo Finishing ... 162
* Clotning, Furs, Jewelry	
" Do-It-Yourself	
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Food Products
* Fruits. Vegetables, Meats ...
" Furniture	
* Heating Fuels	
Heating & Fireplaces	
' Hobbies & Crafts	
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" Lighting Plants & Pumps ...
" Livestock	
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* Miscellaneous For Sale	
' Miscellaneous Wanted	
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' Refrigerators. Freezers	
' Vacuum Cleaners	
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Sales & Serv	
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c
Rentals
166
13C
143
182
152
138 Board & Room 355
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189 Furniture For Rent  141
150 Garages—Parking   370
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183 Motels & Hotel* 382
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154 Rental Agencies  332
134 Retirement Homes  354
177 Room*, Housekeeping    345
1?6 Rooms, Sleeping 340
180 Rooms, Unfurnished 35C
150 Shared Accommodation  315
15° Suites, Furnished   300
150 Suites, Unfurnished   310
142 Wanted To Rent    37f
180 Warehouse*. Factories   375
132
Vacation Spots   43
156    House Sitting, B.C. Mainland,
136    Gulf & Vancouver Island, Ha
waii, Southern United States,
Washington & Oregon. Various
Other Area*. Trailer Space For
Rent, Tourist Rooms, Summer
Cottages. Camps For Boys,
Girl*.
Real Estate
Home Buyers and
Sellers Services 195
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Revenue Houses Wanted  186
Suites, Townhouses
Condominiums For Sale ...   199
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■il     White Rock & District  244
te Langley, Aldergrove  246 ft -a
"    Abbotstord & District 247 I     Automotive
Okanaoan 249 tt '  ■''
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Haney, Maple Ridge  239
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Langley, Aldergrove  246
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Other Cities  250
Apartment Property  263
Business Opportunities  280
Business Wanted  281
Commercial & Ind. Property .. 264
Country Homes. Acreage  252
Farms & Ranches  254
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Money For Mortgages  284
Money To Loan  282
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Money Wanted  288
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Property Wanted  270
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Resort Properties
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Timber & Mills  265
Vancouver island Property ... 256
Waterfrontage  260
Warehouses. Factories  375
' Classic. Antique &
Vintage Cars   400
Auto Parts&
Service
* Auto Parts & Service  410
Car-Truck, Lease-Rent 407
Insurance  399
Aircraft    420
" Automobiles For Sale    400
Heavy Trucks 4 Buses    412
" Trailer*, Campers 437
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Recreation
New Car
Directory
" Boats-Marine Supplies  427
* Sailboats  428
Boats For Charter  429
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" Motorcycles   . 435
" Snowmobiles  436
"Trailers, Campers,
Motor Homes  437
New Car Dealers    396
Sports and
Imported Cars
'The Auction
Block"
" Sports, Imported Cars 405
Auctions  440
Legals  445
BIRTHS
FINALLYI
My parents, Frank and Michelle Fogarty (nee Hall)
have decided to announce
my arrival. Jessica, my
older sister is very happy
to be sharing her childhood with a big 11 lb., 1
oz baby brother, me, Michael Bryan. Being as
large as I was, my Mommy
was relieved when I was
bom on July 30. 1981, at
the Surrey Memorial Hospital, Surrey, B.C.
Signed.
Hello World
My parents, Mr. and Mrs.
W. a Hall of Mission, B.C..
are pleased to announce
the arrival of their 1st
grandson, Michael Bryan.
Michael  is  also  the  4th
Srandchild of Mr. and Mrs.
.   P.  Fogerty of Halifax,
Nova, Scotia.
Signed,
Relived
KADIR — Joe and Diane
(nee O'Neill) are delighted
to announce the birth of
their daughter, Larissa
Diane 6 lbs.. 15 ozs. on
August 27, 1981. Proud
grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Mohammed Kadir of
Burnaby and Mrs. Lisa
O'Neill of Prince George.
Special thanks to Dr. Led-
erman and staff at Vancouver General Hospital
•-province
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MARRIAGES
BRADY-HART
Mr. and Mrs. Brian Brady are
very pleased to announce the
marriage of their only daughter,
Barbara Doreen, to Robin Hart,
son of Mrs. Geoffrey Hart and
the late Mr. Hart of West Vancouver. The wedding took
place on Saturday, October 3,
1981, at St. Catherine's Anglican Church, North Vancouver,
B.C. Rev. Ian Grant officiated
STEGER — BEARD
On September 19, 1981, the
marriage took place in Zurich,
Switzerland, of Brigirte Beatrice, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
L. Stager cf Zurich, to Douglas
Richard, eldest son of Mr. and
Mrs. R. A Beard. West Vancouver, B.C.
DEATHS
BAKER — On October 6,
1981, Alison Lea Baker, of
West Vancouver, in her 35th
year. Survived by her loving
family, husband, Paul; daughter, Megan; son, Andrew; her
parents, brother, and sister, in
New Zealand. A service of
Thanksgiving and Praise will
be held in St. Monica's Church,
6404 Wellington Ave., West
Vancouver, on Monday, October 12, at 2 pm, Rev. John M.
Robertson officiating. Cremation. Hollyburn Funeral Home In
care of arrangements.
BARTER — Georgina C.
(Gassy), of Vancouver, B.C..
on October 6, 1981. She is survived by her nieces and nephews. Funeral service 9:30 a.m.,
Tuesday, October 13, In the
Boal Chapel, 1505 Lillooet Rd.,
North Vancouver. Private Interment in the family plot. Masonic
Cemetery, Burnaby. Flowers
are gratefully declined in favour of donations, if desired, to
the United Church of Canada,
505 Dunsmuir St., Vancouver.
Arrangements through The
Memorial Society of B.C. and
First Memorial Services.
BEACH — Harry, aged 93, a
pioneer resident of Mission,
B.C. Died in the Maple Ridge
Hospital October 7, 1981. Mr.
Beach was predeceased by
hie wife Jean in June. 1979. To
regret his passing, Mr. Beach
is survived by his daughter
Ruth Squire, of Victoria, and his
stepson William Osborn, of
Seattle, Washington; 4 grandsons, and 7 great-grandsons.
Funeral service will De held on
Wednesday, October 14 at 1
p.m. from the All Saints Anglican Church, Mission. In lieu of
flowers, donations to the Mission Branch of the Red Cross
would be greatly appreciated.
BUTLER — Passed
away October 7.
1981, Frank Raymond
Butler, aged 84 years.
Predeceased by his
wife, Lillian H. April 6, 1981.
Survived by 1 son, Charles
(Chuck); 2 daughters. Isobel
Syme and Frances Johnson;
his son-in-law, James Syme
and daughter-in-law, Julie; 11
grandchildren; 3 great-grandchildren; 1 brother, Art Butler
and 1 sister, Bernlce Davis;
also nieces and nephews. Mr.
Butler was connected with B.
C. Game Dept. for 49 years and
was Past Master of University
Masonic Lodge AF & AM. Rev.
Duncan Wilkie will conduct the
funeral service from the Mount
Pleasant Simmons & McBride
Chapel, Kingsway at 11 th Ave.,
on Tuesday, October 13 at 2 p.
m. Interment Forest Lawn Memorial Park.
CODE — On October 8, 1981, Stanley Code of Vancouver, B.C., In his
74th year. Survived by his loving
wife, Margaret; 2
sons, Charles (and
wife, Lois), Richard
(and wife. Donna);
1 daughter, Marilyn Wilson (and
husband, Ralph);
and 3 grandchildren. Mr. Code
was PER. of the
B.P.O. Elk's No. 55 and Past
President of the Mount Pleasant Lions Club. Funeral Service
Wednesday, October 14 at 1
p.m. In the Dogwood Chapel of
HAMILTON MORTUARY, 5390
Fraser St. (at 38th Ave). Cremation. In lieu of flowers donations to the charity of your
choice.
FINNEN — Nora Elizabeth of
North Vancouver on October 8,
1981. age 68 years. Survived
by her loving family, husband
Norman; daughter Shirley;
grandsons Michael and Ronald; sisters Winnifred Dennison
and Viola Thompson; brother,
Arthur Mitchell. Memorial service 12:30. Tuesday, October
13, in the Boal Chapel, 1505
Lillooet Rd., North Vancouver.
Cremation. Arrangements
through First Memorial Services and The Memorial Society of B.C.
GAETZ — Frances Marie
suddenly on October 9, 1981.
Predeceased by her husband,
Gerry Gaetz. Survived by her
son, Gordon of Toronto. Ontario; 2 sisters, Adrienne Sullivan
of Vancouver, Mrs. Alex Dustan
(Eileen) of North Battleford; 1
brother, Percy Sullivan of Regina, Saskatchewan; sister-in-
law, Mrs. Lorene Gaetz of Richmond; and numerous nieces
and nephews. Funeral mass
will be celebrated Tuesday,
October 13th, 10:00 A.M. from
St. Augustines Roman Catholic
Church, 2015 W. 8th Avenue.
Rev. W. Cullinan, O.N.I, celebrant. Kearney Funeral Directors in care of arrangements.
GIBBS — Michael Adair,
suddenly on October 1, 1981,
at 150 Mile House, much loved
husband of Patricia, father of
Christopher and Shannon. He
leaves his parents, family and a
multitude of friends. Memorial
service was held at his home,
on Tuesday, October 6th.
Donations to the new Children's Hospital would be much
appreciated, in lieu of flowers.
GOLOKOLOSOVA — Alexandra, passed away on Octo-
ber9, 1981, AlexandraGoloko-
losova, age 90 years. Survived
by one daughter, Gallna. Funeral service from Holy Trinity
Russian Orthodox Church. 710
Campbell Ave., on Wednesday, October 14, at 11 a.m.
Rev. Vladimir Chekanovsky officiating. Interment Mountain
View Cemetery. Mount Pleasant Chapel In charge of arrangements.
DEATHS
HALSALL — Eileen, of West
Vancouver, B.C., on October8,
1981. aged 69 years. Survived
by her loving family, husband,
Arthur; 2 daughters, Mrs. Colin
(Lois) Prltchard of Langley, and
Mrs. Gordon (Norma) Luccock
of Lions Bay; 5 grandchildren;
and her Bister, Mrs. Marlon Fox
of Vancouver Memorial service at St. Monica's Church,
6404 Wellington, West Vancouver, at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
October 13. Cremation. Flowers gratefully declined.
HYDAMACKA — Ella, suddenly on October 8,1981, in his
18th month. Survived by his father, Eugene; his mother,
Elaine; and his brother, Elton of
Quesnel Funeral arrangements made by Clayton Funeral Chapel, Quesnel, B.C. Memorial services will be held in
St. Ann's Catholic Church,
Quesnel, on Monday, October
12, 1981 at 11:00 a.m. Rev.
John Maolntyre officiating. In
lieu of flowers, donations to the
Vancouver Children's Hospital
would be appreciated. They
may be left at the Royal Bank,
Quesnel.
JOHNSON — On October 7,
1981, Lois Catherine Johnson
of Vancouver aged 58 years.
Survived by her husband
George; son Charles; daughter
Carol; her mother Laura Reid;
5 grandchildren. Memorial service Tuesday, October 13, at 2
p.m. in Knox United Church,
5600 Balaclava St., Vancouver. Rev. Jean Angus officiating. Cremation. Flowers gratefully declined. Donations may
be sent to Canadian Cancer
Society. 955 W. Broadway.
Chapel of Chimes, Harron
Bros. Ltd. in charge of arrangements
KEAR — Florrle late of
Surrey, on October 7,
1981 aged 87 years.
Mrs. Kear was a life
member of Grand-
view Chapter O.E.F. She
leaves to mourn her loving family, 2 sons. William Kear and
wife, Betty, Surrey, Kenneth
Kear and wife, Stephani6, Vancouver; 5 grandchildren,
Cathy, Steven, Harry and wife,
Kathy, Karen and Gregory; 5
great-grandchildren, 1 sister,
Mrs. Blanche Young, Calif.;
many nieces and nephews in
England, New Zealand and
California. Funeral service
Tuesday. October 13 at 1 pm at
the Avalon Funeral Chapel,
13165 96th Ave.. Surrey, with
Rev. Dean Boundy officiating.
Interment Masonic Cemetery,
Burnaby.
LEASK — Passed away October 8, 1981, Robert James
Smith Leask Sr., late of Roberts
Creek, B.C., at the age of 70
years. Survived by his loving
wife, Marie, 1 son, Rob of Gibsons; 1 granddaughter, Cara
Amber, a sister, Jean Muir of
Stennisse Orkney, Scotland.
Memorial Service Wednesday,
October 14, at 3 p.m., in the
Chapel of Devlin Funeral
Home, Gibsons, Pastor Fred
Napora officiating. Cremation.
Remembrance donations to
the Terry Fox Marathon of Hope
appreciated in lieu of flowers.
LYSTER — David Alfred of
Richmond, B.C. on October 8,
1981, aged 54 years. He is survived by his loving family; wife
Joyce; son James; his mother
Lena Lyster; sister Elsie and
brother Richard, both of Maple
Ridge, stepsisters May Fiske of
Winnipeg and Ann Nicholson
of North West Territories. Memorial service 11 a.m. Tuesday, October 13th., in the Gil-
more Park United Church,
8060 No. 1 Road, Richmond.
(Corner of No. 1 Rd. & Blundell)
The Rev. Wes Warren officiating. Cremation. Flowers are
gratefully declined in favour of
donations, if desired, to the Canadian Cancer Society, 955
West Broadway, Vancouver.
Arrangements through First
Memorial Services.
MANZER — On October 7th,
1981 at 100 Mile House General Hospital, Marion Jaan of
Lone Butte, B.C. previously of
White Rock, B.C. and South
Burnaby, B.C. She is survived
by 1 daughter, Sandy of Prince
George; 1 son, Bob and
daughter-in-law, Joyce; 2
grandchildren, Dean and
Dana, all of Lone Butte. Funeral
services will be held at FOREST LAWN MEMORIAL FUNERAL CENTRE, Royal Oak
Avenue at Canada way on
Tuesday, October 13, at 2:00
P.M. Rev. W. Warren will officiate. Interment Ocean View Burial Park. In lieu of flowers the
family would appreciate donations to the Canadian Cancer
Society.
NIVEN — passed away sud
denly at home In Vancouver,
B.C.. on October 8, 1981. Allan
Livingstone Niven age 79
years. Survived by his loving
wife, Florence; sen and daughter-in-law, Ronald and Gloria of
North Vancouver; 2 grandchildren, James and Lisa; 2 brothers, James, Vancouver,
George, Burnaby; 1 sister,
Jean McCullough, New Westminster. Born March the 7th
1902, In Alrdrie Scotland, Mr.
Niven immigrated to Canada
49 years ago. Funeral service
Wednesday, October 14, at
10:30 am in the CHAPEL OF
CHIMES Harron Bros. Ltd. on
10th Ave. 2 blks W. of Main St.
Rev. Mamie Stewart officiating.
Interment Forest Lawn Memorial Park. "Deeply loved and sorrowfully missed."
OLSHASKI — Annie, aged
90, passed away October 8,
1981. Beloved wife of Matthew
Olshaski, 1080 Ewson St.,
White Rock, B.C. Born Annie
Zubach, 1891, in Rouse, Wal-
sonburg County, Colorado,
came to Canada at an early
age, married Matthew in 1925.
in Lethbridge, came to B.C. in
1939 where they have resided
ever since. Survived by son,
Martin Olshaski, White Rock;
and daughters, June Weber of
Lethbridge, Virginia Llkuskl, of
Bellevue. Alta.; also 20
grandchildren; and 33 greatgrandchildren. Predeceased
by daughters, Clara, 1927, and
Hazel, 1979. Prayers, Monday,
October 12 at 7 p.m., Chapel
Hill Funeral Parlor, 14615 North
Bluff Rd., White Rock. Funeral
mass will be celebrated by Father J. Fagan from Star of the
Sea CathoTic Church, Tuesday,
October 13 at 10:30 a.m.
DEATHS
ORR — W. Beryl, of Burnaby.
B.C.. in hospital, on October 8.
1981. She is survived by her
sister. Mrs. Jack (Ha) Ellis, of
Burnaby; her nephew, Jack A.
N. Ellis and her niece Beryl
Runnings, both in the U.S.A.
Memorial service 1 p.m., Tuesday, October 13, in the Wllling-
don Heights United Church,
4304 Parker St., Burnaby. The
Rev. H. Ward officiating. Cremation. Flowers are gratefully
declined, in favour of donations
if desired to the Canadian
Daughters League Memorial
Bursary Fund. 108 South Esmond Ave., Burnaby, V5C4J3.
Arrangements through The
Memorial Society of B.C. and
First Memorial Services
RAYMOND — Beatrice May,
of Vancouver, B.C., on October
5, 1981, in her 88th year. Predeceased by husband Roland,
in 1980. Survived by her loving
family, daughter Joan Rhodes,
of West Vancouver; son Bud, of
West Vancouver; 4 grandchildren, and 4 great-grandchildren. Cremation. A private family service was held. Flowers
and donations gratefully declined. Arrangements through
the Memorial Society of B.C.
and First Memorial Services.
SIESHESKI — Vincent, on
September 29, 1981, aged 88
years. Survived by his family.
Funeral service. Wednesday,
October 14,11 a.m.,atGlenha-
ven Memorial Chapel, 1235
E.Hastings St. Interment,
Mountain view Cemetery.
16       IN MEMORIAM
To assist readers to prepare "In
Memcriam" notices. The Province has a booklet of some very
appropriate verses. Write or
phone Miss Adams for your
copy, 732-2773.	
CASPERSEN — In loving
memory of Carl A. Caspersen,
who passed away October 8,
1978.
The depths of sorrow we can
not tell
Of the loss of one we loved so
well
His memory we shall always
keep.
—Lovingly, Esther and family.
STADY — lr, loving memory
of Ben, who Dassad away October 10, 197*9.
If we could have one lifetime
wish,
One dream that could come
true,
We'd pray to God with all our
hearts
For yesterday and you.
—Sadly missed by Mom, stepfather, sisters Penny and
Conni.
WILLIAMS — In loving memory of the birth of Philemon, on
October 11, 1945, who passed
away April 25,1981.
He bade no one a last farewell,
He said goodbye to none;
The heavenly gates were
opened wide.
A loving voice said "Come."
—Lovingly remembered by his
sister Anita, and brothers Al-
phonse, Tad, and Robert.
16      IN MEMORIAM
To assist readers to prepare "In
Memoriam" notices, The Province has a booklet of some very
appropriate verses. Write or
phone Miss Adams for your
copy, 732-2773.	
WILLIAMS —In loving memory of the birth of Philemon, on
October 11, 1945, who passed
away April 25, 1981.
Sad and sudden was the call,
So dearly loved by one and all;
His memory is as sweet today,
As in the hour he passed away.
—Lovingly remembered by
Mom and Dad.
17     MEMORIAL GIFTS
D!
CANADIAN
CANCER
SOCIETY
IRITIS* couiMim urn yukoh division
955 W Broadway, Vancouver,
V5Z3X8. Phone 736-1211.
Contributions should include
name of deceased and name
and address of next-of-kin (an
acknowledging card will be
sent). Name and address of
donor (for official receipt pur-
poses).	
2 single graves, Garden
Section, Ocean View Ceme-
tery. Bby. $300, 112-792-3918
^
STROKE ASSOCIATION OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1645 W. 10thAve., Vancouver,
B.C.,V6J2A2
Donations  should   include:
Name  and  address of deceased, next-of-kin and donor.
18    FUNERAL DIREQORS
_ KEARNEY
Funeral Services
"We're Here to Help"
Conveniently located between
Granville and Oak St. 1096 W.
Brdw'y. Please call 736-0266
Hamilton Mortuary
38th Ave. and Fraser 324-3851
Wholey Canadian Locally
Owned and Operated
Memorial Funeral Centres
Simmons & McBride 731-4151
Mount Pleasant 876-2161
Forest Lawn 299-7711
Royal Oak - Woodlawn - Bowell
Harold C. Atchison, Mgr.
219-6 St. New West 522-0711
Cloverdale 574-4733
HOLLYBURN FUNERAL HOME
D. E. McKenzie 1807 Marine
West Vancouver        922-1221
COLUMBIA FUNERAL HOME
233 Columbia St.
New Westminster 521 -4881
Bell Funeral Chapel
2746 E. Hastings St. 253-1343
18    FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Harron Bros. Ltd.
FAMILY OWNED
Chapel Of Chimes
10th Ave. & Ontario St.
Vancouver    876-8877
S E Atchison    G. B. Atchlsor
First Memorial
Services Ltd.
Exclusive Undertakers for the
Memorial Society of B.C. Also
serving the public from Church
or Chapel to all locations. Facilities include the beautiful Boal
Chapel & Memorial Gardens.
1505 Lillooet Rd.. North Van.
980-3451 987-7723
Chapel Hill Ltd..
Surrey & White Rock 531-4222
Richmond Funeral Home
8420 Cambie, Rmd 273-3748
Glenhaven Memorial Chapel
1235 E. Hastings St.  255-7811
22
CEMETERIES
2 Interment lots in Valleyview
Memorial Gardens, Surrey.
$375 ea. 521-3930	
23      CREMATORIUMS
Vancouver Crematorium Ltd.
5505 Fraser, 325-8251
26
LOST
Gold watch, October 1, 2400
W. 4th Ave., sentimental value,
reward 733-3924.
Blue motorcycle helmet
nr. UBC turn-around.
Ed. 733-8953.
Golden Retriever "Cindy",
tattoo marking JUU18M. Vic. of
Railway & Blundell. 271-0622
Blk. long-haired female cat lost
E. 47th-49th & Commercial
area. 327-5141. Reward.
Male Grey tabby cat Stunted right ear. Please call 294-
9581.
Oct. 5 Metal Pendant on
chain. Vic. Park Royal or 1600
Blk. E. Hastings. 922-0994
$300 Reward. Light grey
neut. male cat, 1V4 yrs. old
Missed very much. 876-4997
Lady's bifocals In brown zip
case, Oct 4 or 5. Coquitlam or
Cloverdale. 939-8266
Heavy gold chain Guildford.
Keepsake
531-9291.
Blonde Border Collie & gold.
Lab X, "Gypsy", female, call
937-5428. 26th & Knight
Female Min. Poodle, apricot,
Byrs.'Michele'. E.23rd off Renfrew. 433-5419.
2 Spayed Chinese Chow
dogs, Raleigh & 54th. 1 cream.
1 brownish. Reward. 435-8595
Brown briefcase. Friday.
Papers needed. Reward.
261-6052
Large black dog, part male-
mute, "Bjorn", lie. 1483. 922-
9491.
Prescription glasses. Lost in
area of Bay store - Georgia &
Gran. 435-9905.
WANT ADS DON'T COST
THEY PAY
26
LOST
Young black & white fern.
Engiish Sheepdog, blue eyes,
black left ear, wearing red
nylon collar, 11th & Burrard
732-0237 or 270-1591. Reward.
Ruby ring, gold settina Vic
Bank of Montreal, Park Royal
South 980-5154 Judy. Sentimental Value. Reward
Approx. 9 mo. old German
Shepherd, male, missing Mon.
E.43/Rupert. Reward. 434-
3732.
Ladies watch, braided band.
Sentimental value. Reward!
688-0431 or 596-0427 aft 6 &
wknds.
Navy blue bike bag of Jill
Daum. Betw. Granv. Isl. &
downtwn. 876-8241. work
687-5315
Blue stone (Lapis), triangular
shape on chain, W. Kerrisdale.
Dr. F. Bass, 736-2033, 263-
5101.
3 yr spayed fern, grey Tabby
cat. 57 & Inverness. 325-3854
aft 5 $50 Reward 	
1 gold ring, mans, betw.
Hope & Princeton. Reward
266-6181
Black wallet initials DM
downtown area nr. Woodwards
874-2161
Gold bracelet, Kerrisdale or
Oakridge area. Reward. 872-
1155 days. Eves 943-4501
Male tabby kitten, lost Sept.
1,31 St & Dunbar, reward, 5 mo.
old, 224-3306
Brown wallet at the race
track. Please return ID. Reward. 943-9864
Man's gold chain with lions
head, Woodward's store, New
West. Reward. 525-4501.
Lady's silver Seiko watch.
Robson/Georgia area. Kirsten.
669-6485. 689-8591
2 yr. old Ige. friendly male
Malemute. blk. & wht. Lost In
Whistler. 921-7869.
Doberman, black/tan, 2 collars w/Burnaby lie. Vic. Whon-
nock area. 462-7308.
Gold chain with gold Tiki,
Lansdowne area. Sentimental
value Reward. 943-3510.
Grey hair wig, plastic brown
bag, Seymour-Georgia area,
Oct. 7, 669-8911.
Ladies Bulova watch,
w/thln silver band. Vlcin
Broadway & Vine. 734-9551.
Male golden Retriever,
brown collar, tag, Bby. Mount.
Oct. 3rd. 986 7571, 437-7292
Reward. Large black Persian
cat, male, white on paws, stomach, face. 433-5872.
Gold cross, Vancouver-
Kingsway area or on re bus.
254-2782 eves
Gold colored watch, McDonald & U.B.C., Oct. 7th. phone
731-8595
Short-haired Terrier, fern.
Name; Little Girl, Oct. 6, Brent-
wood pkg. lot 437-7291
Gray Cockatiele, 6 mos. old
name Fred", nr. Earles & 38th.
Reward. 437-1169.
Reward. VW car keys, 1200 -
1300 blk. Davie St., lost Thurs
7 a.m. Ph. 669-2408.
Black cat, 4-5 mo., part
Manx, amber eyes with green
rims. Reward. 255-7887
Man's brown wallet, 1st &
Commercial or 14th & Ontario.
Reward 525-3562.
Lost 2V4 yr. dog, grey/black
Austr. Blue Heeler, Wlllingdon
& Moscrop, 433-5404.
The coupon below makes It handy for
you to place your classified ad. Clip it
out, fill it In, and mail it to us todayl
W"
•Ifr50
First
Clas
Miss Adsms Province Classified
2250 Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6H 3G2
Name:	
Address:	
City:	
Tel:	
Classification: Number of days:	
Print your ad In the squares, leaving a blank
, _. after each word. We'll run your ad (minimum 2
j#|Offl llnes),or 4 days- Tne °°st ,or 4 days is the sum
1 ■ ■^*" shown at the end of the last line you use. Mall
••..province tnls coupon to the address shown, with your
cheque or money order.
26
LOST
Good reward, male cat, orange toffee & off-white, some
stripes, 4Vi-5 yrs. strayed long
time, missed very much. Call
anytime 461-7563.	
Lost Fri., Oct. 2. 2 a.m. in the
West Hotel, black leather purse
with blue leather wallet, keys &
make-up bag. Pise. ph. 874-
8283. Reward $50.
Lge. Siamese cat. F. wh.
markings on chest/paws.
Needs daily medication. N.
Van. 986-9204
Presc. glasses in red case,
Royal Oak & Rumble. Precious
poss. of blind woman. 435-
1065.
Small M cocker spaniel, reddish/gold, answers to Zeke. Little Mountain area. 872-5590
4 yr. old black & grey male
tabby, neutered. Answers to
Tiger. 430-5681 aft 6 pm
Bluepomt Siamese cat missing vie. 90th/128th St., Surrey.
Please call 584-2747.
Tommy, Ige. white longhair
cat, black spots. Vic. 28th W. &
Alexandra. 738-4904
Ginger-white male 11 yr. old
cat lost in the 27th Slocan area
Oct. 3, 434-8845. Reward.
Lge. set of keys w/some colored markers on ring. Prob.
Fraser/43rd or Bby. 266-2280.
Aluminum hand cart. Vicinity Vane General Hospital. Reward. 437-0133.
27
FOUND
It costs you nothing but a
phone call to place a found
advertisement.
The Delta S.P.C A. has found
the following dogs, these descriptions are general only.
Sept., No. 71, Lab Shepherd X,
male, cream & brown, no e'r.
ID. No. 76, Lab X, female,
black, white on chin. No 77,
Chihuahua Corgie, spayed female, white & black. Oct., No.
1, Collie X. female, tan & white,
no ID No. 6, LabX, male, black
& tan, 6 mo. No. 7. Terrier X,
male, black & white, no ID., No.
6. Lab X. male, black & white,
white feet. No. 10, Long Haired
Shepherd, male, black & tan,
young adult, No. 20. laDober-
man, black & tan, male, large
-s adult, studded collar.
No. 22, German Shpeherd
male, black & tan, 1 yr. old, No.
25, Chihuahua, black & grey,
old dog. No. 26, Lab X, neutered male, stitched from
neutering, No. 28. Lab X, male,
black & white, flea collar, 6 mo.
old. We also have numerous
cats turned in. For further information please phone 946-
7848
The SPCA has found the following, this descriptions general only. Male dog, Cockapoo
gold, tattoo CHJ3A, white flea
collar, found Parkside Lane,
Deep Cove, N. Van. Please
contact 1205 E. 7th or phone
879-3571.
Beautiful affectionate young
It.grey Persian fern, cat, white
markings on face/chest &
paws, yellow eyes, white flea
collar. 298-1621.
Male kitten, approx. 1 mo.
old, silver grey. White flea collar. Raccoon markings tail-
/legs. Vic. Imperial St., Tsawwassen. 943-7304.
White pigeon-sized bird,
blue band on right foot, tame,
wings clipped. Champiain Hts.
area 437-5655.
Dog. golden brown, may be
cross bet. St. Bernard & Akita,
male, about 25" tall, vie. 16th &
Renfrew. 437-3690.
Found E. 11th, about 6mos.
old cat, black & white, white on
front of face, & piece missing
on right ear. 872-4877
Small black 8. light brown kitten, white on chest, vie. Na-
naimo/Broadway area. 255-
4147. Bob.
Small, off white, Poodle X,
Roseberry & Marine Dr. 438-
2242 days, 437-6790.	
North Van, Oct. 6th, power
tool. Owner please Identify.
Rusty, 255-8211, days
Female German Shepherd
found Sunday, 4th/Commercial
area. 255-7824.
Ladies watch in Arbutus
Square Shopping Mall, 733-
2123.
Dark choc, brown d (Retriever cross), approx. 6 mo. old
vie. 41st & Argyle. 321-0296.
Marine Dr. & 12th Ave. Bby.
beagle terrier cross 12" high
521 -8052
Tabby Manx female kitten, 4
mos. abandoned in Surrey, ph.
588-0172.
Small White Tesco motorcycle helmet. Vic. 4th & Alma.
738-2542.
Lai, pup, black, with chain
vie. of Hastings & Knight Rd
327-1 758 aft. 5:30pm
2 eats, m&f, both dk. grey &
green eyes. Vic. Fromme Rd.,
N. Van. 987-1090 eves.
Golden Retriever, male pup
6 mos. vie Sunshine Hills, N.
Delta. 596-4083.
White short-haired female
dog, no tail, 1 brown ear. 12th &
Ontario, Van. 874-2996.
Small grey & brown Siamese
kitten app. 6 mos. old. McGill &
Nanaimo area. 253-7860.
Gold box-link necklace with
3 gold pendants. If owned ph.
253-0329 aft. 5:30, 254-9964
Gold anklet, Trader Vic's
parking lot, Oct. 8. Inscribed -
Love Steffany. 228-8549
3 mo. old white puppy, vie.
49/Fra8er. Work 278-2319
home 321-4851, Pam,	
Found Como Lake 4 Robinson, blk. & Tan male pup, 931-
7794
Doberman Pincher, 41st &
Knight, young male, Oct. 8th,
873-2305.
Sheltiedog vie. 96 & 116 St..
Surrey, approx. 4-5 yrs. old.
588-4800.
4 keys, vie. rear of 1300 blk
Harwood. 683-1702.
Male cat. black & taupe. At
Arbutus Club. Ph. 228-8145
10 spd. bike, vie. 133rd St. &
80th Ave., Sry. 591-7674.
Canoe
531-0766
Brindle Bull terrier, PB, Na-
naimo/27th. 874-0459
Lg:. set of keys, Edmonds &
Kingsway Oct. 7, 530-6317
Rabbit, vie. South Vancouver. Phone 321-3005.     	
Black/white female Husky, S.
Bby area, call 435-8739
Lrge. black fuzzy female cat,
Nr. 4th & Alma, 687-8407.
Cocker spaniel, rusty col. Female. Neck chain. 435-2759
27
FOUND
It costs you nothing but a
phone call to place a found
advertisement.
The Burnaby SPCA has
found the following, these descriptions are general only: no
12-Male, Pointer cross Terrier, brown, blk 8> white adult:
no 28-Male Terrier cross,
blk/tan, 8 mos: male Poodle
cross, grey/white adult; no 14-
male Irish Setter, dark red
adult; no 34-fem Shep Cross
blk/tan, 10 mos; no 33-fem.
Collie cross, blk/tan adult; no
19-male, yng pup, blk/white;
no 44-male Shep cross,
tan/blk, adult; no 30-male Lab,
blk, adult; no 31-male Norwegian Elkhound. blk/grey, old;
no 37-male Shep cross,
blk/red, adult; no 41 male Lab
cross Shep , 6 rnosold, blk. For
further info, contact Burnaby
SPCA at 3202 Norland, or ph.
291-7201
German Cdn. man, 32, very
attractive, fit, secure, own
home. Unconventional p/t
music writer/performer, successful, very feeling, human,
witty & entertaining, looks for
someone special. Boredom excluded. Please write (snap
would be nice) and expect
immed. response. Reply Box
1064, this paper.
Keys on ring. Kerrisdale
near 45th. 263-7593
Set of keys, Denman & Nel
son. Oct. 9. 681-7991
Black puppy near Kingsway/
Windsor. 874-1059
30      COMING EVENTS
DANCE LESSONS
Social dancing is a must. Learn
today In Fox Trot to Cha Cha
plus all new dances. Call and
ask about our beginners special at our Dance Club. 13 lessons only $15. Please phone:
685-4362, ask for Heidi.
For Unattached People
DANCING
Nightly 8-2 a.m. 2 Bands
Western nights Tues./Wed.
Cowboy Hat Wearers Free!
Wed. Thurs. Ladies Free -
Prizes
ARLINGTON CABARET
1236 W. Broadway    733-2220
Let's Dance Studio
Toucan Can Dance
Announce their relocations to
4603B Main, Van. 872-8215
Inaugural Ball Room Dance will
be held on Sun. Oct. 11th from
8 to 12 P.M. Admission $3.50.
Refreshments served.
Everyone welcome
Swinger dances, socials. See
Swingtime News. Bus. Personals
Life centred training workshop, Oct. 31, Nov. 1. Discover
your true self. 939-7960.
Image Single Scene America
24 hr. rec. mess. 689-3098
32 CATERING & PARTT RENTALS
Rotiman Deli Restaurant. Exotic Caribbean Foods. Roti,
etc. 922 Kingsway, Van. 876-
5055 Take out — Catering.
Open Tues. to Sun. 11:30 am
to 10 p m.        	
Party Trays from Baker
McSweeney's Deli. 4280 No. 3
Rd., Richmond 270-1707.
34      HAUSFORRENT
CAPRI HALL
Book your Xmas or New Years
eve party now!. Ph. 879-1303.
228-9943, eves
McPherson Center, Bby
430-5411
36   INFORMATION WANTED
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of the next-of-kin of JOSEPH HORACE LEON LAN-
GLOIS who was born In St.
Caslmir, Portneuf, Quebec on
September 7, 1897, son of Ho-
nore Langlois and Marie Lan-
glois (nee Godin) kindly contact:—
PUBLIC TRUSTEE,
File No. 620012
Attention: Mrs. S. L. Cormack
800 Hornby Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6Z 2E5
Anyone   knowing   the   whereabouts  of  the  next-of-kin  of
FRANK  KARL OBERMULLER
who was born in Zipf. Upper
Austria,   Austria   on  June   6,
1899, son of Karl Obermuller
and Marie Obermuller (nee
Traunmuller) kindly contact:—
PUBLIC TRUSTEE,
'file No. 660013
Attention: Mrs. S. L. Cormack
800 Hornby Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6Z 2E5
Frederick Williams looking
for brother Harold Edward Williams, born Johannesburg. S.
Africa July 4, 1930. Anyone
knowing his whereabouts
please reply Box 3752 this
paper
To Jerry Dagneault
Please phone Carla Gauthler at
562-8115 in Prince George, for
a family matter. If anyone
knows hiswhereaboOts please
pass the message on to him as
it is very important
Anyone witnessing an accident Mon, Oct 5, 4:45 pm at the
intersection of Valley Drive &
Arbutus, btwn a blue Datsun &
white VW Van . please phone
736-1051
Female adoptee born Mar. 5,
1949, St. Pauls Hosp, Van,
wishes any information about
birth parents. Reply Box 2440,
this paper.	
Anyone witnessing accident
June 24th, 1st & Boundary at
10p.m. with '77 blue Chev. Call
942-8757 aft 4 pm	
Sarah — please contact
Grandma. Confidential. I love
you.	
40 PERSONAL
NAME AND ADDRESS are
required for all advertisers in
this column. Information is held
in strict confidence. Other advertisements that are not person to person are run under "42
— Business Personals."
Can. gent, 50's, good appearance 5'11", with own
home, steady employed, would
like to meet attractive lady for
outings. Confidential, any na-
tlonality. Box 1086. this paper.
Long haired musician, 34,
seeks N/S lady vegetarian or
health nut to live idle life on
boat. No kids. Cats, plants OK.
Box 906, this paper.	
40 PERSONAL
NAME AND ADDRESS are
required for all advertisers in
this column. Information is held
in strict confidence. Other advertisements that are not person to person are run under "42
Business Personals."
Retired farmer, late 50's. single, RC. wishes correspondence with lady. 50-60, single
or widow, non-drinker, honest,
reliable. Some means. Snap returned. Strictly confidential. No
triflers. Object matrimony.
Reply, with particulars, to Box
2998, this paper.	
Man, 40, quiet nature, good
phys. health, adaptable, humorous, travelled, N/S, S/D is
searching nation for compatible business lady, whose talents inol. arts & crafts with a pioneering spirit to join in matrimony. Please reply to Box
1090, this paper.	
Designer, 31. 6'2", 175 lbs.
Loves arts, history, business,
nature, travel, dancing, gd. In-
tall, conversation, wants female
for companionship. All letters
will be answered. Snap & ph.
no. apprec. Box 1118 this
paper	
Attrac. estab. male. 36. 6'2",
180 lbs., lives in New West,
likes outdoors, dining, 4 home-
life. Would like to meet unattached slim attractive career
girl for lasting relationship.
Reply Box 1088. this paper.
MANUEL, Robert, last known
address unknown or anyone
knowing his present whereabouts, please contact box
438 of this paper on a matter of
urgent personal concern.
Lady. 60's, wishes to meet
gent for outings, etc. Companionship. Reply Box 3000, this
pape
Are you adopted? Looking
for Steven, born VGH, Dec. 19,
1954. Reply Box 1114 this
paper.	
German lady, 60, 5'4", slim.
seeks male companion. Box
1040 this paper.	
Sarah — Please contact
grandma. Confidential. I love
you.	
42   BUSINESS PERSONALS
Unattached?
684-1593
Canada's ^rgest and most active dating service invites you
to take the first step in social
happiness by calling us now.
PERSONALIZED
DATING SERVICE
Vane, Victoria, Calgary,
Edmonton, Toronto,
Mississauga, Scarboro
SEE OUR TV ADS
HYPNOTHERAPY
Dr. V. Triffon Ph. D.
Certified Hypnotherapist
Fairmont Medical Building
750 W. Broadway
876-2913 (24 hrs.)
Gentleman's Leisure
Vancouver's most elegant leisure club. Enjoy saunas, showers, plush lounges, pool tables,
shufflebd., exercise rm., backgammon & bar. Bodysage in
private staterooms.
426 HOMER ST. 688-7319
SWINGTIME NEWS
64 pages of pictures, swinger
ads & club listings, published
since 1969, $5 for sample copy
or details free. CY Club, PO
Box 2410, New Westminster,
B.C., V3L 5B6 Ph. 435-7202.
Psychic Mystic
Cards, Teacups & Palm. Even
if you don't believe, things may
come true by Mrs. Earl. Mon.,
Tues. & Fri. 2-5 p.m. Royal C.
Cafe, 634 Columbia St., New
West. Be there full time until
Oct. 21. 522-6633 at 255-8578.
Modern couples & singles:
Meet through correspondence! Swinger bi-monthly
magazine. Current sample,
$5.50 or $20.00 for year's subscription. Cerpent Publishing,
Box 80856 S. Bby., B.C. V5H
3Y1.
Oversea Marriage?
Like to marry a girl or man from
overseas? If so, we have the
answer. Feel free to write us:
Partners Unlimited. Box 790,
Cache Creek, B.C. V0K 1 HO.
5-10 Introductions $79
C0MPAT-A-DATE
Tops in dating since 1970
201-1089 W.Bdwy., Van.
734-9846. 734-8662 (24 hrs.)
MRS. MARIA
Spiritual  reader  & adviser.
Reads palm & Tarot cards. May
help  you  with   all   problems.
32t-2500 Call today.	
The Bible speaks about antichrist. Ph. 522-1144.
Massage & Sauna
Relieve Tension. 684-3434
Alcoholics Anonymous
47 W. Broadway        873-8466
Alpha Hypnosis Clinics
See Yellow Pages
PROVINCE
CLASSIFIED
736-2211
32 CATERING I PARTY RENTALS 132 CATERING ft PARTY RENTALS
MUNRO'S
catering dlv.
For appointment, please call:
522-5233
For large groups: Wedding receptions, banquets,
large family gatherings and business groups,
please book now to assure accommodation for
the date you prefer.
*•
 Boom in Alaska cruises at an end
For years, the doubters watched
the annual growth in capacity on
the seasonal B.C.-Alaska cruise
and wondered when the shipping
lines would outreach themselves.
Lulled by the ability of customers to provide business for extra
vessels and extended sailing periods, they gave up asking about
market saturation.
This year there will be a record
185 cruise ship sailings out of Vancouver. Sales are soggy and the
cruise lines, which have pushed up
accommodation by 35 per cent
since last year, may be facing a
temporary halt in a broken ascent
or they may have breasted the
mountain.
Richard Procopio, marine operations manager with P & O-Princess
Cruises, said his line has experienced slack sales for the end of the
1981 season.
"Last year was a boom year and
we were sold out. Now we appear
to be back to normal and are still
selling with the season under
way," he said.
P & O-Princess Cruises has been
running three ships on the summer
run for five years, operating the
Pacific Princess, Sun Princess and
Island Princess. The only changes
have been in scheduling.
Procopio said the mid-season
period is fully booked and the vacancies remaining are at the end of
the season. He said other lines
have not fared as well, but declined
to st&te who js suffering.
Donald Bower, spokesman for
CP Rail, said his company's 33-
year-old Princess Patricia, the
doyenne of the cruise ship fleet by
virtue of age and continuous service, has space available throughout
the summer.
CP Rail has pressed more
cruises out of the Princess Patricia
this year and "has found the market a little soft. We are not sold out
this time," Bower said.
The ex-CNR steamer Prince
George, of Canadian Cruises Lines
Ltd., of Victoria, has returned to
Alaskan service this year, after an
interruption of six years. She made
a delayed start to the year, with
sailings being cancelled due to
refitting and break-down problems. She is not fully booked for the
balance of the year.
The 28-year-old Universe, owned
by CY. Tung subsidiary Seawise
Foundation Inc., started the season
May 24 and then holed up in Vancouver from June 7 to June 14.
The interruption in sailings is not
blamed on poor bookings. Said a
spokesman for Eckert Overseas
Agency (Canada) Ltd., agents for
Seawise, "There is nothing Wrong,
no break-downs, nothing. It is just
scheduling. We were waiting for a
berth." The Universe first visited
Vancouver in 1978 and has not
previously had a discontinuous pattern of sailings.
Holland America Cruises has
overtaken P & O-Princess Cruises
as the line offering most berths.
MARK WILSON
This year it leads the cruise fleet in
terms of total tonnage and size,
fielding its flagship, the 38,000-ton
Rotterdam, supported by Staten-
dam (25,000 tons) and Cunard Princess (17,495 tons), which is being
operated under lease from Cunard
Line.
Both the Rotterdam and Staten-
dam are being operated at well
below their full passenger load.
Last year, Holland America lost
the Prinsendam, due to fire, on an
Alaska sailing. Hard pushed to provide a replacement, it brought in
the 22-year-old Rotterdam, which
is massive compared to other ships
on the run.
Procopio said that all lines have
been affected by the decision of the
Canadian government to charge
world market prices for bunker oil
lifted in Vancouver by ships sailing
to foreign points. Prior to May 1,
this fuel was available at the sheltered domestic market price.
P & O-Princess Cruises, Holland
America and other major lines
have global marketing agreements
with oil companies. The P & 0 arrangement is withuRojcalJDutehjC,
Shell.
"These are very complex agreements and people at the local level
can't say what the effect of the
Canadian price change has been.
But it has to work through in some
form," Procopio said.
He added that despite the gap between the Canadian and U.S. dollar
exchange rates, it is still proving
cheaper for cruise ship lines to
truck in provisions from the U.S.
"Poultry is half the price there that
it is here and that goes for a lot of
other things. Even after taking account of the exchange differential
and transportation costs, we are
ahead when we buy in the U.S.
"We want to buy in Canada and
wherever possible we do, but we
cannot price outselves out of the
market by ignoring cheap sources
of supply," he said.
Each week during the cruise season a score or more highway rigs
pass through customs between the
U.S. and Canada to pack in liquor,
cigarettes, fresh fruit, vegetables,
meat, poultry and other foodstuffs
to provision ships sailing out of
Vancouver to Alaska. Procopio
said one reason for the cheapness
of U.S. food products is the absence
of marketing boards in that country.
Capt. Richard C. Stevens, executive director of the Chamber of
Shipping of B.C., said his impression is that oil companies have not
been passing on the full increase
resulting from the move to world
market price for fuel used on foreign sailings. The full increase
amounts to $17 a barrel on diesel
oil. Stevens said that oil companies
may be swallowing some of the
price rise.
But if cruise lines escape the full
burden of the fuel hike, they cannot
avoid higher port charges. The
Port of Vancouver is now levying a
head tax of $5.50 on all passengers
boarding or leaving ship in Vancouver.
When the Pacific Princess dock
ed in Vancouver June 5, her owners
had to pay head taxes and berthing
fees of $5,720 for a seven-hour stay.
Longshoring charges amounted to
$4,922 and a further $1,000 went to
cover security, janitorial and other
costs.
Procopio said-head taxes were
light because passengers returned
to the ship. "She was coming up
from San Francisco and we only
paid once for people returning
aboard. Had we been turning round
the passengers, taking a new lot
on, that head tax would have been
doubled," he said.
Stevens said that there is concern in the cruise ship industry
that when Pier B-C is rebuilt to
take cruise ship traffic, head taxes
will go up sharply.
The previous pier, now demolished, was used by both cruise ships
and general cargo vessels and had
year-round revenues. The replacement pier will be used solely by
passenger vessels.
"We don't see how it can be self-
supporting with no revenues coming in for much of the year. Either
the head tax is going to have to go
up or operations are going to be
subsidized by other port operations. There is cause for concern,
either road."
 :"™m
-iiiiiiiiii
viser to government
During his term as a public
governor, Stanley said, he made a
point of examining almost every
filing that went through the exchange.
"That has been an education, I
can assure you," he said. "I made
criticisms about some listings, but
in fairness to the exchange, I
should say I have also been surprised at some things that have
been approved by the superintendent's office.
yvilo n, xirere uas oeeiraTremendous improvement in the exchange's operations. I sincerely
hope the VSE can become the top
venture capital market in North
America — that was the only reason I took this new job (as adviser
to Hyndman), and why I became a
governor back in 1974."
Stanley was also named by the
former NDP government to be the
first chairman of the B.C. Development Corp., a position he held until
1976 when Don Phillips, Social
Credit minister of industry and
small business, took over the chairmanship.
Earlier, he had been appointed
receiver-manager for the Commonwealth Trust group of companies which went into bankruptcy in
1969. Stanley is now receiver for
only some of Commonwealth's affiliated companies, and he said the
winding-up of the group's tangled
affairs is still proceeding.
) carry on fight
The speech was made as leaders
of nine civil service unions differed
over calling a national strike to
force concession of their 15 per
to the company. As well as
carrying out the duties as
Secretary of the company,
Ms. Murchison will continue
to be responsible for office
and mortgage administration.
Cumberland Realty Group
Limited is the leading real
estate consulting firm in
Western Canada. It specializes in professional real
estate planning, financing,
development and management. The Head Office is in
Vancouver, with branch offices in Victoria, Edmonton,
Calgary and Seattle.
CUMBERLAND
REALTY GROUP
LIMITED
^   CUT COSTS
Movs In with us — sail your typewriter, copiers, use our staff & answering
service. Executive high-level location
& decor, booming Lonsdale Quay-
/Seabus area North Van., easy access downtown. Less than coat of 1
secretary.
084*9701
WATERFRONT PLACE
government from its seven-percent offer.
The government is prepared to
take the consequences in the public
_nmwiii —    **iin~      "*     —'- *■   A	
WALNUT
lumber
lumber* Plywood Sondii
West Coast Hardwood Lti
2849 Norland, Bby,
291-9481
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
1623 West 64th Ave.
Vancouver
3 or 4 bedrooms, living
room with fireplace,
hardwood floors. Try
$45,000 down, assume
$135,000 at 13%. Call
A. HaUe
263-1971 days
985-2809 eves.
)wnhouse
iver Lawn & Tennis
e with floor area of
lots of charm & apis. 2 bdrms. & a den
> view please call:
Lynch
274-2306
IDS
or a loan to be issued for
595 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6C2T5 689-0313
Member Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation
FOR SALE
INDUSTRIAL LAND
4.28 acres on rail, located in Surrey.
Bruce Barton
YARDSPACE
For lease. Approximately 24,000 sq. ft. in a prime
Vancouver location near the Knight Street Bridge
and S.E. Marine Drive.
Bruce Barton
INDUSTRIAL WAREHOUSE
FOR SALE
6500 sq. ft. building on .73 acres of land in prime
North Richmond location. This 6-year-old building features 18'6" clear ceiling, 5 grade level
doors and 600 AMP, 3 phase power. Asking
$525,000.00.
David Canning
SURREY WAREHOUSES
FOR LEASE
Two warehouse/office complexes approximately
10,000 sq. ft. each, located just one block off
King George Highway in the prime Newton Industrial District. These facilities feature single
identity, grade levelloading, rail siding and 19
foot ceilings.
David Canning/Ron Emerson
VANCOUVER WAREHOUSE
and office facility FOR LEASE. 10,000 sq. ft. of
warehouse, 1,825 sq. ft! of office. Ideal distribution centre situated on Lougheed Highway with
excellent access to Highway 401 and downtown
Vancouver. Warehouse features covered dock
level loading and 18' ceilings.
David Canning/Ken Fenwick
SOUTH BURNABY
Showroom/warehouse with office. New building
with grade loading, 4200 sq. ft. Must see to appreciate.
Paul MiachiRa' *
FOR SALE
2 M-1 zoned lots totalling 14,760 sq. ft. Vancouver West Side location.
5.04 acres Industrial in Richmond. $95,000.00
per acre.
Near new Commercial bldg. in busy Surrey location. 11,700 sq. ft. on .41 acres.
Chris Midmore
BUILDING SITE
—BURNABY
64.5 x 120 ft. M-4 zoning. Good South Burnaby location.
Craig Smalley
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
— GROWTH AREA
Fully leased at Market Rates. 5500 sq. ft. Asking
$390,000.00
Hendrik Zessel/Craig Smalley
GASTOWN
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Excellent corner property, 71.76' x 59.99', 4-sto-
rey building. Owner will consider lease back.
Hendrik Zessel/Robert Stokes
LEASE OR
BUILD TO SUIT
30,000 sq. ft. site on Kingsway, in Burnaby.
Lease as-is or owner will build to suit.
Hendrik Zessel/Robert Stokes
AUTOMOTIVE CENTRE
25,000 sq. ft. shop area. Prime Vancouver location at Kingsway & Main. C-3A zoned.
Robert Stokes
FAIRVIEW SLOPE
Prime development site located at 7th &. Alder.
_5fVx11Q1 Int   FM.J 7nnerf   AcWna «Bcn nnr\ nn
 D 2     U\\t 'VsmtovLwc Sun sat., aug. 15, isai
••*•
BUSINESS
B.C. cruise line fights for survival
News that the veteran CPR cruise
ship Princess Patricia is being sold at
the end of the summer has focussed
attention on Canada's only other contender in the foreign-dominated Alaska
cruise ship market.
But Canadian Cruise Lines, owner of
the Prince George, is itself struggling
for survival after a season of heavy
losses.
Comparisons are invevitable. Both
ships were built in 1949, both are Canadian flag, both are steam driven, both
carry a crew of about 90.
The Pat was paid for years ago, she
has operated at 75 per cent of capacity
so far this season — and yet reportedly
will lose $750,000.
The George, refurbished this year
after six years tied to a wharf, cost her
new owners, a group of Victoria investors, more than $5 million in start-up
costs and has operated at "between 60
and 70 per cent occupancy," according
to a company spokesman."
Even if this is not an inflated figure,
her operating loss this year is rumored
THE MARINE BEAT
ALAN DANIELS
w
to be in the region of $2 million.
Operations manager Bob Harvey declined Friday to say how big a loss is
projected — but he promised Canadian
Cruise Lines would stay in business
next season come what may. He also
said the company is considering bidding on the Princess Pat, which CPR
expects to fetch between $1 million and
$4 million.
"We've been getting a lot of phone
calls since the announcement about the
Pat because this makes us the only
Canadian ship of this type on the
coast," he added. "Sure, we were competitors, but really we were complementary to one another."
Harvey said he was surprised how
well the Prince George has done during
its first year back in service.
"It was our market entry year and
really we haven't done all that bad," he
added. "We're in this business to stay.
We have the product and we have the
management group and the more you
get, the easier it is."
Harvey also said Canadian Cruise
Lines is considering bidding on the two
Canadian weather ships Vancouver
and Quadra which were taken out of
service this year from duties at Ocean
Station Papa in the North Pacific.
Crown Assets Disposal reportedly
expects in the region of $1% million for
the pair."
"We've looked at them," added Harvey. "The ships are very versatile al
though the insides would have to be
completely gutted."
•
Six vessels designed in Vancouver,
but built in U.S. shipyards/ are now on
their way to the Beaufort Sea for work
in oil and gas exploration off Alaska.
All were designed by naval architects Peter S. Hatfield Ltd., with structural design for ice forces and electrical engineering handled by Swan
Wooster Engineering, in Portland and
Vancouver.
The vessels include three ice-
strengthened barges, a deck cargo
barge and two ice-strengthened shallow draft tugs.
The barges, each 95 metres long, are
double hulled for maximum protection
and incorporate special grades of steel
to withstand extremely low temperatures.
As well as transporting drill rig
equipment, diesel fuel and drinking
water, they are desgined to be frozen in
with the sea ice during winter when anchored near man-made islands or the
natural offshore Barrier Islands.
 -
s
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Page 9
Che %ncoui?er Sun
THIS WEEK
STOCKS
COMMODITIES
COMPANY NEWS
9
D
•••••    SATURDAY, AUGUST 15,1981
s "won't reopen after strike'
Market conditions
cited for pessimism
ByMIKESASGES
San Business Writer
The head of two forest industry employer associations said Friday he believes poor lumber prices will mean
SOme sawmills will mmain ,r>lne«»»1 onH
He said he expects pulp and pape
mills to return to full production one
the strike is settled. "Pulp and pape
markets are stronger than lumbe
markets."
Saunders was commenting on state
 •^province
Mu*s4uc ■ #. ff*/
Bus,
The Princess Patricia will be retired at the end of this season.
CPb
• -   •
etition,
retires Princess Patricia
By MARK WILSON
High interest rates and market
competition are blamed for the
decision of CP Rail to withdraw its
last steamship on the B.C. coast,
the 33-year-old cruise vessel Princess Patricia.
An announcement that the ship
would be retired from seasonal
service between B.C. and Alaska
was made Wednesday. The day before, the U.S. Coast Guard informed CP Rail that it is willing to grant
a further qualified extension to
permit the ship to operate in Alaskan waters in 1982 without being
fully modified to eliminate discharge of raw sewage.
CP Rail general manager of
coastal marine operations Ray
Purdy said that the ship operated
with 96 per cent of berths full and
made a modest profit "in the low
thousands", in 1980.
This year, occupancy is averaging 75 per cent and the vessel is expected to lose $750,000, Purdy said.
CP Rail claims it needs to have 276
of the ship's 320 passenger berths
filled to cover costs.
In 1980, the number of berths
available on cruise ships employed
on the Alaska run increased by 16
per cent. This year, accommodation rose 28 per cent, as cruise lines
increased their sailings out of Vancouver from 157 to 186 and, in some
cases, went to larger vessels.
Purdy said that the chief cause of
the traffic decline appears to be the
high cost of money. People are
loath to borrow money to go on
cruises. Others are unwilling to
withdraw savings which are earning them high interest rates. "Ei
ther way, there is a reluctance to
spend money on big ticket holidays," Purdy said.
Last year, 30 per cent of bookings
were provided by tour operators
and holiday wholesalers. The latter
sign up blocks of vacation bookings
and reassign these to travel
agents.
This year, tour operators and
wholesalers have provided only 11
per cent of bookings and have returned as unwanted three quarters
of the space allotted to them,
Purdy stated.
Retirement of the vessel Oct. 12
will retire 150 people employed
aboard ship or ashore. When operating, the vessel has a crew of 91.
Relief crewmen, salesmen, reservations clerks and managers make
up the balance.
Purdy said that labor, fuel,
maintenance and other operating
costs have all risen sharply, with
fuel up 40 per cent since last year
because of a Canadian move denying cheap domestic oil prices to
vessels sailing to foreign ports.
■ The ship burns 1,900 barrels of
fuel oil each round trip when throttled back to 13 knots and using only
three of her four boilers. The fuel
consumed costs $60,800.
Said Purdy: "All costs have gone
up, but it is the drop in business
which is the chief problem. We are
operating a ship with only a residual scrap value on the books, so
there is virtually no depreciation.
But we face high fixed costs which
have to be met regardless of
whether we sail full or part full.
There is maintenance and fuel and
the heavy expense of promomotion
and advertising."
Currently, the ship is oj>erating
in Alaska waters under the second
and what was supposed to be the
final waiver granted by the U.S.
Coast Guard allowing the vessel to
dump raw sewage after a 1979
deadline calling for vessels to store
sewage on board or treat it before
discharge.
Purdy said that an estimate
made last winter indicated a cost
of $1 million to install a unit to subject sewage to bacterial attack and
then chemical treatment before
discharge. Sealing off outlets in the
hull and installing a gathering system of pipelines to feed the sewage
treatment plant would have
carried the bill to $1.38 million.
A hull survey showed that the
ship, fitted with a sewage treatment plant, could have been expected to have worked for at least
five years without need of further
major investment, Purdy said.
In July, CP Rail asked the U.S.
Coast Guard to consider a low-cost
approach to the sewage prob'em.
Instead of sewage treatment,
chemical toilets would be installed
aboard.
On Tuesday, the U.S. Coast
Guard gave its approval to a trial
installation of 20 such toilets for
use during the 1982 season, to test
customer acceptance. A further
limited waiver would be granted to
permit the dumping of raw sewage
from unmodified toilets.
The approval arrived as CP Rail
staff in Vancouver were drafting
an announcement that the ship
would be stood down.
 ...I s
Stock
Sales High Low   Close
Bid    Ask
Tndra Old
500    50
50
50
Tngco Rs
36
55
Tnkwa Mns
500    42
42
42
TunkwaW
3
6
TutExpl
1000    45
45
45
Tx Rsrces
26
40
like Res
500   60
60
60
Univex Mng
36
Unlvex Wt
4
7
UntdCmbrg 9000 170
160
160
UntdCntl
Zl    63
63
63
Untd Frtne
7500    30
30
30
UntdGunn
50
UntdHrne
3500 700
700
700
UntdRyre
500 610
610
610
UntdWstlnc
21600 825
790
805
ValDOr
1600 140
140
140
VIDorW
1
Valley Oil
4200 110
100
110
Vanstates
2000    90
90
90
Vantex Rs
3000    75
75
75
Vat Pete
175
200
Velvet Ex
43650 150
126
140
Vntora Rs
2600 480
480
480
Veronex Rs
7000 460
450
450
Vestor Ex
500    35
35
36
VUlneuve
4500    50
50
60
Viscount
3100 390
375
390
Waddy Lke
4900 560
500
550
Warrior Rs
460
475
Warstar
14600    94
90
94
Wasabl Rs
3400 180
170
171
Wasp InU
2300 120
120
120
Watsn Intl
1676 260
260
260
Wco Rs Lt
2500    70
65
65
WebbKnpp
700   |6
5
6
WlcmNrth
1000 105
105
106
Wsgld Res
40
44
West Jay
600 120
120
120
West Trad
1700 125
125
126
WstdleOU
2600 466
466
466
Westfort
10800 236
220
236
WstfrtWta 120000     5
5
5
Westley
500 425
426
425
Westmount
1500 410
400
400
Westn Adra
84
95
WstnWrar
86
90
WstwrdEgyllOOO 626
580
600
Wharf Res
2100 370
350
370
Wildcat
500    50
50
50
Wildrose
1400   45
45
45
Wildwood
1500 100
82
82
Wimberley
5000    43
40
43
Windarra
3400 430
425
430
Windmill
176
185
Windsor R
625
675
World Cmt
38
48
Yankee P
4700 120
110
110
YorkCntr
660 425
400
425
Yukon Gd
1500 120
120
120
Yukon Rv
27600 173
160
172
Zenith
12900 400
386
400
Zenith Wt
2600    61
61
61
ZenoreR
5300 360
366
355
Zodiac
8200 160
136
160
Zone Pet
20100 420
420
420
20th Cent
7140 300
275
280
Total volume, 5,498,374
Total value, $12,881,928
Total trades, 5,364
Ch'ge
+ 1
—7
+ 25
HO
+ 6
+ 10
+ 5
+ 10
—1
+40
+ 60
+ 4
+ 1
—6
+ 5
+ 5
+ 15
+ 20
+ 20
+ 3
+ 15
—6
+ 17
+ 15
+ 1
+ 30
WINNIPEG GRAIN
WINNIPEG (CP) — Grain quotes
Wednesday, basis Lakehead (all contracts in tonnes):
Flax
High      Low    Close     Tues
Oct 378.20    374.70   375.70    375.60
Nov        -t—   377.00    377.00
/Dec 377.70    373.50    373.50   375.50
[May 402.00   400.00   400.00   400.00
Rapeseed (basis Vancouver)
Spt 335.50 333.50 333.80 333.50
Nov 350.40 348.00 348.50 348.50
Jan 365.00 362.50 362.90 363.00
Mar 377.00 375.50 376.50 375.80
Jun             388.80    388.80
Oct
Dec
Mar
May
Oct
Dec
Mar
May
Oct
Dec
Mar
May
Oct
Dec
May
Barley
136.60    134.70 135.50
         138.20
140.70 140.50 140.60
Oats
121.00    118.50 12100
121.00    119.40 121.00
         125.00
         125.50
Feed Wheat
157.20    155.50 157.00
154.20    154.00 154.00
         154.50
         157.00
Rye
198.20   193.20 198.10
198.50    194.20 198.50
         208.50
134.70
134.50
137.50
140.20
118.10
118.90
123.00
124.50
156.00
152.50
154.00
155.60
193.20
194.50
206.00
EXCHANGE RATES
MONTREAL (CP) — U.S. dollar in
erms of Canadian funds closed Wednes-
lay up 7/50 at $1.2308; Tuesday's close
[was $1.2294. Pound sterling was up 3 21/
100 at $2.2247.
In New York, the Canadian dollar
was down 9/100 at $0.8125 and pound
sterling was up 2 2/5 at $1.8075.
ALBERTA STOCKS
By The Canadian Press
Alberta Stock Exchange—Wednesday
Complete  tabulation of Wednesday
transactions. Quotations in cents unless
marked $. Net change is from previous
board-lot closing sale.
Net
Stock      Sales   High Low Close Ch'ge
Acroll 520 120    110    120
Am ChromB 1200 $6 5% 6% - Vt
Aquarius 4800 275 260 260 —16
Argus 280   $7%    7%    7% + %
Audax 4700 160    156    166    +4
9       9—1
79     80    +5
2800 $12  11% 11% + %
7600 266 251 252 +2
14350 $10  9% 9%— %
1000 129    129    129    +4
75
80
+ 5
10
14
+4
15
16
Audax wt    16200    11
Aurelain       4000 80
Baretta
Barons
Bearcat
Baton
Calais         17500   68 65 66    +5
Cdn Bashaw 800 130 130 130
Cdn Pioneer  200 460 460 460
Canadex     17350 400 390 400
Carlyle         1500 80 76 80+5
CdnNWAus 27600    38% 36 38%+3%
Concept         600   $9% 9%    9% + %
Clearport      3000 200 200 200    +14
Cochrane      1000 100 100 100   —40
Cultus          13700 62 61 82+2
Deb Cdn 1977 200 $16% 16%  16%—1
Deb Cdn 1978 100 $17 17 17
Dorsett         2500   80
Dorsett wt 11500    14
Expo             2000    16
Fst Devonln 4300 110 105 110
FstDevon wt 6600    18 18 18+2
Flag              1700 210 210 210    -40
Flln Flon     2000 260 260 250   —20
Gane            1100 275 275 275
Gascome      8200 200 190 200
Gascome wt 1500   28 28 28    +3
GenAmProA4000 386 335 335 S
GenEngy A 2000 375 375 375   -6
Goldlake       1000   $7% 7 7   — %
Golden Briar 1300 121 120 121
Gulch             400 360 350 350    —10
Hallmac     26100 180 161 170
Ibex              3000 150 150 160    —1
Tika             7800 200 190 200
Invermere    1000 210 210 210
Jupiter          1700 100 90 90+5
4800 310 300 300    —16
1500 400 400 400
3300 275 250 276    +25
3500 100
Kappa
Katana
Kelvin
Klr.Ua
K T Resourc 3010   66
K T Res wt    500    15
95    100
56     55
Loll
Madre
Marshall
Medcon
600 50
15
50
10000 150 130 130
8600 184 165 175
7900 $6% 6% 6% + %
+5
—2
+ 5
—5
+ 10
Mid East     2000   84
84
84
+ 4
Missi            2000   95
94
95
N FortyFour 400   $8
8
8
N Gateway   1400 350
350
360
Newport       9900 210
200
200
Nlmrod          900 140
140
140
+ 25
Nortex          4000 270
260
270
+ 20
Oakwood     18200   38
34V
36
+ 1
Oakwood wt 4600    15
16
15
+ 1
Parkland       500 330
330
330
—30
Peregrine    1000 230
230
230
Petroco         9500 236
225
236
+ 20
Petro Hntr   1700   85
80
86
—6
Poco             6500 190
190
190
+ 5
QCTV             620 $21V
21V
21%+ %
Rupertslnd 20000   $5V
5*
5*
-1%
Radial       102300 415
102
105
Shadowfax   1400 116
115
116
—2
Southn Tier   100   $6
5
5
+ %
Santa Maria 7300 149
136
140
+.10
S K Pet        1900 460
450
460
—6
Sastex          1500   50
50
50
+ 10
Scimetar        500 380
380
380
—5
Seagull       33812   KM
>    5M
6M
- %
8600    76 70     70
3000    $7%    7%    7% + %
1100 270 260 266     +16
100 150 160 150
12100 103 100 100   —2
240100 226 202 210    +9
1400 306 306 306
12000 206 200 200
900 180 176 175
2200 300 300 300
2000 210 210 210
Twin Rich A 100   $6 5       5
Twin Rich B 800 400 400 400
Universal     1400 270 270 270
XRG Inter    3500   $6%    6%    6%—%
Windjamr     1000 275 266 266   —10
Yellowston   2000 200 200 200   —10
NW Trst prA 31 $66 65     65   —7%
Sparrow
Strand
Strom
Sungate
Sunmlst
Surf
Tiber
Tobe
Trapper
Troy Gold
Turner
+ 16
—5
+40
+ 25
Total sales: 798,303.
CALGARY LIVESTOCK
CALGARY (CP) — Receipts at the
Calgary Public Stockyards Wednesday
totalled 774 cattle and calves.
Receipts were mainly slaughter
steers and heifers with a light offering of
butcher cows and Bologna bulls. Trade
was moderate to strong with a good demand on all classes to local buyers.
DIVIDENDS
Power Corp. of Canada, common, 25
cents, Sept. 30, record Sept. 16; $2,375
pfd. 1965 series, 59.375 cents, Oct. 15,
record Sept. 30.
Superior Acceptance Corp. Ltd.,
classes A and B, 4.2 cents, Nov. 30,
record Nov. 13.
UAP Inc., class A, 26 cents, Sept. 15,
record Aug. 31.
Ships in port
Positions Thursday, showing registry
and ship agency.
VANCOUVER HARBOR
Akademik Yevgemiy Paton (Sov.)
UGG east, Morflot.
Alisher Navoi (Sov.) Pacific Elevators 2, Morflot.
Axel Johnson (Sw.) Vanterm 6, Johnson Walton.
Brooknes (Ge.) Inner Anchorage Y,
Maple Shipping.
Cherry (Gr.) English Bay 7, Maple
Shipping.
Chang Sam (Pa.) English Bay 13,
Kingsley Navigation.
Co-op Grain (Li.) Alta. Pool 1, Morflot.
Daiho Mara (Ja.) Fibreco, Empire
Shipping.
Denebola (Po.) CPR b, Maritime Agencies.
Earobreeze (Cy.) Alta. Pool 1, Montreal Shipping.
Fortune Star (Li,.) Terminal Dock 1/
2, Dodwell.
Global Ambition (Ko.) Lynnterm 1,
Oearbulk Shipping.
Hoegh Marlin (No.) Neptune 3,
Weyerhaeuser..
Hoegh Minerva (No.) Centennial 1/2,
Weyerhaeuser.
Island Princess (Br.) Ballantyne 3, P
&0.
Japan Poplar (Ja.) English Bay 16,
Westward Shipping.
Kretan Glory (Gr.) Van. Wharves 4,
Maritime agencies.
Laarentine (Fr.) UGG east, Intero-
cean.
Pacific Peace (Pa.) Pioneer Grain,
Greer Shipping.
Pan Asia (Pa.) Van. Wharves 5,
Canpotex.
Pravdingk (Sov.) Centennial 6, Morflot.
Rotterdam (Du.) Ballantyne 1, Intero-
cean.
Sea Champion (Pa.) Vanterm 4, Montreal Shipping.
Sea Radiance (Br.) Sask. Pool 1,
North Pacific.
Shinrei Mara (Ja.) Roberts Bank,
Empire Shipping.
Silverland (Sw.) English Bay 6, Van-
port Shipping.
Sirica (Po.) Terminal Dock 3, Maritime Agencies.
Sosnogorsk (Sov.) Pacific Elevators
1, Morflot.
Star Centaarus (Gr.) PCT bulk 1,
Johnson Walton.
Stella Prima (N. A.) Vanterm 4, Westward Shipping.
Toyota Mara No.14 (Ja.) Anchorage
D, Empire Shipping.
Virginia (Gr.) Van. Wharves 3, Kings-
ley.
Young Shinko (Li.) English Bay 19,
North Pacific.
ARRIVALS: Denebola, Axel Johnson, Rotterdam, Sirius, Pravdinsk, Fortune Star, Pan Asia.
DEPARTURES: Irenes Zeal, Royal
Viking Sea, Laurentine, Island Princess, Ad Astra, Kretan Glory, Co-op
Grain. . • ,
WESTMINSTER HARBOR
Crystal Star (Li.) Fraser-Surrey 3,
Nootka Shipping. i '
Daivolezza (Ss.) Fraser-Surrey2,
Nootka.
Irish Oak dr.) Fraser-Surrey 1, Dingwall Cotts.
Mosapijade (Ys.) PCT 3, North Pacific.
Pac lady (Li.) Fraser-Surrey 5, Empire Shipping.
Sibenek (Ys.) PCT 2, North Pacific.
ARRIVALS: Irish Oak.
DEPARTURES: Daiei Maru, Sunrise Ocean.
New York
By Merrill Lynch
Royal Securities
Ltd.
Abbott
AlChem
Allis-Chem
Alcan
Alcoa
Amax
AmerAirl
Am Brdcst
Amer Can
AmHmPr
AmMtrs
AMFlnc
Amer Tel
Am Brands
Amp
ASA Ltd.
Asarco
AtlRich
AtmData
Avnet
Avon
Bally
Bank Amer
Bsh & Lmb
Baxter
Beatrice
Beckman
BeU&Hwl
Beth Steel
Blue BeU
Boeing
Boise Case
BorgWmr
Braniff
Brstl Myrs
Brunswick
Burndy
Bur Nor
Burroughs
CPEnt
CPR
Ctrpillar
Cessna
Champ Int
Chrysler
CICFin
Coca-Cola
Colgate
CBS
Col Gas
Colt
Comsat
CnaFin
Con Edison
Cons Fit
Cont Can
ContData
Corning
CRBard
Crown Zel
CurtsWrt
Dart Kraft
Deere
Delta Airl
Dennys
Digit Eqp
Dillingham
Disney
Dist Seag
Dome Mines    24
Dow Chem      31%
Dupont
East Airl
Eastman
Eaton Corp
El Paso
Esmark
Evans
28%
53%
20%
28%
28%
62
15%
29%
36%
31%
3%
23%
59%
40%
51%
51%
41%
53
29%
49%
38%
24%
24%
50
57%
21%
31%
22%
22%
28
27%
38%
49%
3%
49%
19%
38%
54%
35%
18%
41
64%
28%
24%
5%
20%
34%
15%
52%
35%
84%
52%
ie%
30
38%
27
73%
59%
28%
40%
49%
50%
39%
68%
27%
98
11%
53%
56
44%
8%
73%
33%
28
53%
21%
Exxon
Fed Express
Firestone
Fir Bk Tex
Fir Ch Fin
FMCCorp
Ford
Fruehauf
Fuqua
GafCorp
Gen Dyne
Gen Elec
Gen Foods
GenMtrs
Gen Tel
Gen Tire
Genesco
Genetech
Grgia Pac
Gillette
Goodrich
Goodyear
Grace
Greyhound
Grumman
Gulf Oil
Gulf&Wst
Haliburton
Harris
Hecla Mg
Heller
Kew-Pack
Hilton
Holdy Inns
Homestake
Honeywell
Hughes Tl
Humana
IBM
IntFlvrs
IntHrvst
IntMulti
Int Nick
Int Paper
Int Tel
IntUtil
Itek
Johns-Mans
Jhn& Jhn
JoyMfg
Kais Alum
Kfmn&Brd
Lier Sglr
Litton
Lockheed
Lusina Pac
LTV
McDonalds
McDn Doug
MCAInc
McLean Trk
M J Mays
Merck
Mrrl Lnch
Mdlnd Ross
MGIC Inv
Minn M in
Mobil
Monagram
Mons Chem
Nat Cash
Nat Dist
Nat Medic
NLInd
Nat Semi
Newmont
NWAir
Northrop
OlinCorp
Outboard
Oxy Pete
35%
62%
11%
35%
15%
30%
20%
26%
19%
14%
26%
60%
32
48
31%
26%
9%
35%
25%
30
23%
19%
49
17%
23%
39%
18%
67%
45%
13%
23%
49%
39%
29%
53%
89%
44%
39%
58
18%
11%
19%
18%
47%
27%
14%
29%
19%
32%
42%
20%
13%
34%
67%
39%
23%
20%
63%
36%
48%
9%
4
89%
37%
23%
37%
53%
31%
58%
79
57%
24%
22%
47%
23%
74%
30%
46%
23%
18%
29%
Pac Gas
Pat Pete
Pac Tel
Pan Am
Pfizer Inc
Phillnd
PhilMor
Phil Pet
Phil Sub
Ptny Bowes
Polaroid
ProcGam
PugetSo
Quaker
Questor
RCA
Ramada
Raytheon
Rpblc Stl
Revlon
Reynolds
R Dutch
Safeguard
Safeway
Saxon bid
St Regis
Schermg
Scott Ppr
Searle
Sears floe
Shell Oil
Shell Gib
Singer
Smith Int
Smith-K&F
Sony
Southern
Southland
South Pac
Super Scpe
irRand
23%
Squibb
30%
21%
StdOilln
63%
17
Sun Oil
43%
3%
Sunshine
H •
49%
Sybron
31%
14%
Tandy
50%
Texaco,
38%
46%
Tesero
22%
9
Textren
3{%
27%
Tex Inst
95%
28
TexInU
39%
71%
TigerInt
20 -
13%
Transamer
22%
34
Tragi Pac
21%
10
TW
20%
21%
Unarco
8%
8%
Un Carb
56%
46%
Un Oil Cal
44 .
26%
Union Pac
61%
38%
UnAir
22%
31%
United Mer
5%
35%
10%
Uniroyal
8%
USInd
11%
29%
US Steel
29%
5%
35%
UDjohn
57%
32
Varian
34
19%
Wmr Comm
50%
34%
Wrnr-Lam
18%
17%
Wash Wat
18%
48%
Wells Frgo
30%
10
West Air
m,
19%
West Union
25
54%
Westinghs
28%
74%
Wyrhauser
34%
21%
Whirlpool
26
12%
Wometco
20%
30%
Woolwortbs
22%
51%
Wrigley
36%
4%
Xerox
48%
41%
Zenith
15.
44%
Zurnlnd
29.
msr
BRITISH STOCKS
LONDON (CP) — Closing stock"
quotations Wednesday in new pence unless pounds or U.S. dollars are indicat,-
ed. ,    ,
Associated British Foods 151, Babock
and Wilcox 126, Bass Charrington 234,
BICC 272, Blyvoors $13%, BOC Interna.-
tional 161, Boots 237, Bowater 261, Brit
Am Tob 386, Brit Assets Trust 115, Brit
Petroleum 338, Broken Hill Prop 845,
Buffets $34%, Burmah Oil 135, Canadian
Pacific £23. Charter Cons 270,, Cons
Gold 530, Courtaulds 67, De Beers 735,
Distillers 219, Dunlop 79, F.S. Gediild
37%, Gen Elec 802, Glaxo 412, Grand
Metropolitan Hotels 216, Gr Un Stores A
468, Guest Keen 168, Hawker Siddeley
330, Hoover A107
ICI 286, Imp Tob 64%, InU Thomson
279, Kloof 30, Marks and Spencer 136,
Metal Box 172, Minorco 680, Philips 472,
Pilkmgton Bros 345, Plessey 383, Rank A
171, Rio Tinto Zinc 605, Roan Consol 120,
Second Scott Inv 155, Shell T and T 422,
Tanganyika 323, Thorn EMI 490, Trust-
house 151. Tube Investments 154, Ultramar 515, Unilever 608, Vaals 61%, Vick-
ers 180, Western Deep Level 39, West
Mines 316, W Holding 57%, Woolworth
55, Zambian Copper 28 , ■>
BONDS
Brit Trans £64%, Brit Cons £18%,
Treasury £98, War Loan £27%,
<,
'* 1 wi
■■
s
i ;
Distributed by CP
CanP E Nv 26
3
363 75    $23%
Gulf C
Nv 27%p      4   279140   $29%
Noran
Nv 30   p
2
125126    $33%
Closing prices of all traded options.
CanP E Nv 28   p
3
120 $2    $23%
Gulf C
Nv 30        697 4432 $3% $29%
Noran
Nv 32%
27
780 $3    $33%
Sales  unit is  100
shares.  P denotes
CBth A  Ja   26
5
77 $2% $26%
Gulf C
Nv 30   p- .11   123 $2% $29%
Noran
Nv 32%p
1
226 $2% $33%
puts.  (Trans-Canada options combine
Cmnc      Mr 65   p
2
3 $7% $60
HB Mn
Dc 30          20     23 $3% $30
Noran
Nv 36
145 1216 $2    $33%
Montreal and Toronto exchange option
Cmnc       Sp 60
10
93185    $60
HBOG
Fb 32%        2     35 $15% $46%
Noran
Nv 35   p
1
164 $3% $33%
trading):
Cmnc      Sp 70  p
3
26 $9% $60
HBOG
Fb 35           5   233 $12% $48%
Norcn
Fb 30
101
236 $3% $29%
Wednesday, Ang. is
Cmnc      Sp 75   p
3
4 $14% $60
HBOG
Fb 36   p      1     63 26    $46%
Norcn
Fb 35
2
142130    $29%
Open       Stock
Cmnc      Dc 60   p
10
115 $3    $60
HBOG
Fb 40         7T  365 $9% $46%
Norcn
Ag 30
11
190 20    $29%
Options
Alcan
Vol Int Last Close
Cmnc       Dc 65
20
59185    $60
HBOG
Fb 40   p     20    44 35    $46%
Norcn
Ag 30   p
2
12100    $29%
Fb 30
6   218 $5% $31%
Cmnc       Dc 70   p
3
9 $9% $60
HBOG
Fb 46          25   104 $5% $46%
Norcn
Ag 32%
10
492    5    $29%
Alcan
Fb 32%
7   317 $3% $31%
Cmnc       Dc 75   p
3
5 $14% $60
HBOG
Fb 60          12     11 $2% $46%
Norcn
Nv 27%
10
48 $3% $29%
Alcan
Fb 40
1   322110    $31%
CP Ltd    Fb 50
6
330  $6%$5G%
HBOG
Fb 50   p     10     10 $4    $46%
Norcn
Nv 27%p
5
10 50    $29%
Alcan
Ag 32%
9   449 35    $31%
CP Ltd    Fb 55
2
207 $3% $60%
HBOG
Ag 20          11   226 $26% $46%
Norcn
Nv 30
32
356 $2    $29%
Alcan
Ag 35
9   452    6    $31%
CP Ltd    Ag 45
226
963 $5% $50%
HBOG
Ag 27%        8   191 $19% $46%
Norcn
Nv 30   p
2
13150    $29%
Alcan
Ag 40   p
2      2 $8%$31%
CP Ltd   Ag 50
78 1280120    $50%
HBOG
Ag 30          38   907 $16% $46%
Nova  A
Fb 10
60 1010 $2% $10%
Alcan
Ag 45   p
1      6 $13% $31%
CP Ltd   Ag 50   p
21
318 60    $50%
HBOG
Ag 32%       17   372 $14    $46%
Nova A
Fb 12%
12
356 95    $10%
Alcan
Nv 30
10   211 $3% $31%
CP Ltd    Nv 46
6
786 $8% $50%
HBOG
Ag 35        190 2198 $11% $46%
Nova A
Fb 16   p
8
36 $4% $10%
Alcan
Nv 30   p
26     76 86    $31%
CP Ltd   Nv 46   p
16
247110    $60%
HBOG
Ag 40        887 3053 $6% $46%
Nova A
Ag 10
17
389 80    $10%
Alcan
Nv 32%
63   568 $2% $31%
CP Ltd    Nv 60
45 1197 $4% $60%
HBOG
Nv 30          20   235 $17% $46%
Nova A
Ag 11%
7 1342 10    $10%
Alcan
Nv 35
27 1074115    $31%
CP Ltd   Nv 50   p
8
396 $2% $50%
HBOG
Nv 32%      44   277 $15    $46%
Nova A
Nv 10
30 2508166    $10%
Alcan
Nv 40
20 1188 50    $31%
CP Ltd    Nv 55
75 1056 $2    $50%
HBOG
Nv 36        186 1029 $13    $46%
Nova A
Nv 12%
74 1898  65    $10%
Alcan
Nv 40   p
1     18 $8% $31%
CP Ltd   Nv 56   p
10
159 $4% $50%
HBOG
Nv 35   p    42   101  15    $48%
Nova A
Nv 15
10
564 20    $10%
Alt Em-
Mr 20
3    65 $4% $21%
CRL        Mr 15
12
111 $6% $20%
HBOG
Nv 40        545 2644 $9    $46%
Nova A
Nv 15   p
4
38 $4% $10%
Ait Enr
Mr 22%
3     29 $2% $21%
CRL         Mr 17%
2
58 $4% $20%
HBOG
Nv 40   p    30   339 35    $46%
Placer
Mr 25   p
1
1 $7% $17%
Alt Enr
Dc 20
32    47 $3% $21%
CRL     N  Mr 20
1
69 $3% $20%
HBOG
Nv 45        324   497 $5    $46%
Placer
Sp 20
1
123 46    $17%
Alt Enr
Dc 27%
1     89 70    $21%
CRL         Mr 20   p
2
20 $2    $20%
HBOG
Nv 46   p   100   137 95    $46%
Placer
Sp 25   p
3
64 $7% $17%
Aqutin
Sp 56
26   111 $13% $66%
CRL        Sp   15
20
68 $5    $20%
HBOG
Nv 60        113     73 $2% $46%
Placer
Dc 17%
155
181 $2% $17%
Aqutin
Sp 60
10   323 $8% $66%
CRL        Sp   18%
57
289 $2% $20%
HBOG
Nv 60   p    40     40 $3% $46%
Placer
Dc 20   p
10
19 $2% $17%
Aqutin
Sp 65
8   265 $5% $66%
CRL        Sp   18%p
65
246 60    $20%
Husky
Ja 16         63   390 $4% $17%
Placer
Dc 22%
1
172 70    $17%
Aqutin
Sp 70
33   460 $3    $66%
CRL        Sp   20
112
797125   $20%
Husky
Ja 17%      99 1339 $3   $17%
Placer
Dc 26   p
3
101 $7% $17%
Aqutin
Dc 50   p
5     97 75    $66%
CRL        Sp   20   p
20
151145    $20%
Husky
Ja 20        286   668185    $17%
Powr C
Fb 17%
10
20 $4% $20%
Aqutin
Dc 70
12   321 $6    $66%
CRL        Sp   21%
68
491 50    $20%
Husky
Ja 20   p      3      7 $3% $17%
Powr C
Fb 25
5
16100    $20%
tsama
tsama
Asama
Ja  17%
Ja 20
Ap 20
2   180166    $16%
26   186 75    $16%
1       1125    $16%
CRL        Sp   21%p
CRL        Sp   23%
CRL        Sp   23%p
5
5
5
83186    $20%
491 25    $20%
9 $2% $20%
Husky
Husky
Husky
Ap 15           1     30 $5% $17%
Ap 17%        6     97 $3% $17%
Oc  16        716 1398 $3% $17%
Rang
Rang
Rang
Rang
Rang
Rang
Rang
Rang
Rane
Ja 12%
Ja  16
Ja 17%
Ja 20
Ap 12%
no
32
54
22
16
377 $6% $16%
685 $3% $16%
416175    $16%
185100    $16%
39 $5% $16%
tsama
Asama
Oc 15
Oc 17%
71   205 $2% $16%
8   768 85    $16%
CRL         Dc  17%
CRL         Dc 20
11
184
190 $3% $20%
922 $2% $20%
Husky
Husky
Oc  17%   1140 3969190    $17%
Oc  17%p     25   183115    $17%
Asama
Oc 20
20   619 40   $16%
CRL      , Dc 21%
2
131140    $20%
Husky
Oc 20        529 1918 90    $17%
Bell Can Fb 17%
Bell Can Fb 20
Bell Can Fb 20   p
Bell Can As 17%
4   197155    $17%
47 1522 60    $17%
17     57 $2% $17%
1     910   9R      *1Ttt
CRL        Dc 21%p
CRL         Dc 23%
D Pete   Ja   18
n n,i,   _r     n»
9
12
16
67 $2    $20%
106100    $20%
608 $7    $23
Husky
Husky
Husky
Oc 20   p     25     27 $3% $17%
Oc 22%       60   522 66    $17%
Oc  22%p      5     12 $5% $17%
Ap  17%
Oc  12%
Oc  15
Oc  15   n
xi     a wn 9ion
409   909 $4% $16%
174 2962 $2% $16%
12   422 50    $16%
 t.tfi
n/*>
CANADIAN     PACIFIC.LIM.I TED
Coastal Marine Operations
Vancouver, B.C.
OPORD .
DISTRIBUTION
SUBJECT
#80-03        Date: 13 May 1980
Groups 1 & 3    File: CC-401
"Princess Patricia" Schedule
A. "Princess Patricia" will conduct sea trials
1800 - 2200 Wednesday, 14 May 1980.
B. "Princess Patricia" will commence 1980 Alaska
cruise schedule Thursday, 15 May, departing
Ballantyne Pier 2030, continuing through 6
October 1980.
 /i^iiNiii*:*^-*'
CPRail
Internal Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, May 21, 1980
From R. L. Purdy
To   A. N. Cairns
T. King -/
I had a call from Bill Kozak of Tahsis Company last week enquiring
as to whether or not the "Princess Patricia" might be available as
a hotel accommodation facility for their use.
I told Bill Kozak that it was rather doubtful that we would be'
interested, however I would have to know from him what time frames
were involved before any decision on our part could be formally
taken.
I understand this is a subject that has been brought up before.
What are your views?
R. MJmrdy
Gemfan Manager
Coastal Marine Operations
i^Form 102-R
 CPRal!
interna! Correspondence
Date   VANCOUVER, November 23, 1979
From   r.l. Purdy
To   A.N. Cairns
*T4.W. Holland
D.A. Hall
File:  MM-100
The following are the subjects for our Director's
Meeting on Monday, November 26, at 0 930:
- Status of Northland Plan
- Future of "Princess Patricia" - Alternative
courses of action and program to evaluate
- Organization and people needs
- Alternatives for B.C. Coast capacity expansion
- Alternatives for fleet responsibility
- Office space
- 1980 objectives
- Other business
ey,—
e> Operations
)Form 102-R
  ftRANDE
*
POST     CARD
Made in Canada
POSTAGE
STAMP
G-105
The PRINCESS PATRICIA of the CP. Rail B.C.C.S. plying
the waters of the Inside Passage from Vancouver, B.C. to
Skagway, Alaska. This modern equipped all-cruise ship
(6000 ton gross) accommodates 347 passengers. The
entire trip takes 714 days; making 6 Ports of call.
C.P.R. Photo
Traveltime
PRODUCT
LS-4036
10
 ■;'£'••!.,
  We were happy to have
you aboard, and hope you'll return soon
for another Alaska cruise.
Master.
Master.
Chief Engineer.^
Purser.
c^e^^d /^4e>4z_
Chief Steward.
Stewardess.
22  Host
yL^^€^^ Cy2y   Tta^^J/
Hostess.
Gift Shop.
 CPRail
Alaska Cruises
H
 from the desk of
R.L. PURDY
OO
 Mapie Shipping
7135 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver, B.C. \I6E3H4
Tel (604) GMmm, Telex 04-55343, Cable Maploshlp
685-6411
April  1,   1975
Mr. B.D. Margetts,
General Manager,
Coastal Marine Operations,
Canadian Pacific,
Windsor Station, Room 137*
Montreal, Quebec.
Dear Barry:
Further to my letter dated March 26, 1975* in connection
with car/passenger vessels available for sale, I am now
able to complete my list as follows:
"NORDLICHT"
Built:
/
1973
Gross Tonnage:
999
Delivery:
Germany
-  April/May, 1975
Price:
"CORSICA FERRY"
/Deutsch
/
Marks 12,500,000.
Built:
1964
Gross Tonnage:
1004
Delivery:
Inspection and delivery Livorno
by arrangement.
Price:
U.S. Dollars 1,300,000.
"PRIMULA"
t
Built:
Gross Tonnage:
Delivery:
Price!
I960
IO64
Prompt.  Inspectable Helsingborg/
Elsinore.
Swedish Kroner 5,000,000.
"R0SLAGEN"
Built:
Gross Tonnage:
Delivery:
Price:
Maple Shipping Company Limited
1964
12.14
Inspection and delivery by arrangement.
As brokers would try Norwegian Kroner
14/. 5/15,000,000.
'  /2
 <? D MJi gaits,
GPRail
Coastal
Windsvi
May 9, 1975
File:  103-6
Mr.  Alan Sears,
Maple Shipping,
1155 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 3H4
'-.-..  i l 1975
^nS5v^serv/cEJ
Dear Alan:
Thank you for your letters of March 26 and April 11 regarding
a possible replacement for the Princess Patricia.
I certainly appreciate the efforts which you have gone to on
our behalf.
By copy of this letter I have asked Mr. J. Yates, R.R. Reid
and Mr. A.L. Cairns to review the material and discuss the
matter with you.
As I believe I mentioned in other correspondence, in my opinion
we should be thinking of a diesel powered vessel of about 18-20
knots, no more than 10 years old, which would carry up to 400
passengers (or maybe more) in cruise style accommodation with
adequate entertainment facilities and public areas. The car
deck should allow us to carry a minimum of 40-40 foot drop
trailers.
If we do proceed further with this matter, I would anticipate a
further review in September. This should enable our own staff
to come up with outline specifications and recommendations for
a replacement possibility.
Yours truly,
Barry D. Margetts
Messrs.
J. Yates
R.R. Reid
A.L. Cairns
Mr. Yates - As you will be on vacation in Europe, you might
consider looking at one or two of these vessels if they
appear particularly suitable for our purpose. Perhaps you
would discuss this further with me.
 \
- 2 -
cc.  Chief Engineer
Purser
Catering Officer
Chief Steward
Stewardess
Gift Shoo Attendant
"Princess Patricia"
Will you please be governed accordingly and avail yourselves
and those concerned, at Master's call.
Host & Hostess, "Princess Patricia" - For your information.
Mr. A. Meijer
Mr. T. King
 CPRali
internal Correspondence
m
Date    VANCOUVER, May  9,   1980.
From    A. N.   Cairns
jo    Master
"Princess Patricia"
FIRST AID COURSE - "PRINCESS PATRICIA," MAY 15, 1980
As required by Chief of Medical Services, CP Rail, Dr. W.L. May,
Mr. Kirk Pickering, First Aid Instructor, accompanied by Mrs.
Pickering, occupying Cabin 200, will take the May 15th cruise
for the purpose of upgrading expired First Aid certificates and
instructing those in First Aid requiring to be in possession of
First Aid certificates.
As time will permit en route the cruise, it will be appreciated
if Department Heads will arrange for those concerned under their
jurisdiction, including themselves, as the case may be, to make
themselves available for this purpose, and would ask that you
arrange a time for a Departmental meeting with Mr. Pickering as
soon after departure Vancouver as possible, to determine his requirements and establish a schedule.  No overtime will be paid
in this connection.
The last occasion we held a First Aid course en route the cruise
proved most beneficial to our crew, and as you will have an expert
instructor travelling with you, anticipate similar results.
As we will be reporting to Dr. May on the results of this endeavour,
will you please let me have list of those taking the course, and
who will receive First Aid certificates
Director, Marine Operations
Coastal Marine Operations
)Form 102-R
 /"
November 1st, 1978.
Vacusan Systems Limited
111, 2931 Olafson Avenue
Richmond, B.C.  V6X 2R4
Telephone: (604) 270-1561
Telex: 04-355709
B.C. Coastal Steamship Co.Ltd.,
CP. Rail Ltd.,
Pier B.C.,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 2R3
Attention: Mr. Jim McCowatt,
Assistant Superintendent Marine Engineer.
Ref: Vacusan Sewage Collection System for Princess Patricia.
Dear Sir:
We thank you for the opportunity to offer a Vacusan Marine Sewage
System for the contemplated refit of the Princess Patricia. Also
for your co-operation and assistance whilst visiting the vessel
reviewing the plans and specifications, also for the valuable
information supplied by Chief Medford.
We feel that a Vacusan black water holding system will provide
you with the following major benefits:
A) Minimal disruption of existing cabin decor.
B) Low costs.
C) Demonstrated long term reliability.
The information supplied indicates that most of the existing
sanitary black water piping may be re-used or modified, hence
minimizing renovation requirements within the cabins and reducing
costs for the overall installation.
Also, by re-using an existing holding tank and customizing the vacuum
central equipment to be located in unused space within Hold No.2, the
installation can be speedily achieved. Additionally, the low flush
vacuum toilet system (95% reduction over conventional toilets) will
reduce the frequency and cost of service by sewage tanker truck along
with the associated administration.
/2
VACUSAN
 7
B.C. Coastal Steamship Co.Ltd,
Vancouver, B.C.
November 1st, 1978.
We would estimate the cost of collecting 5000 I.G. once per 8 days at
$125.00 per load, assuming a contract based on a season of 20 weeks.
(Annual operating budget cost approximately $525.00)
The Vacusan Marine Toilet has proven over the past 15 years, in service
aboard 500 vessels worldwide, to require minimal maintenance, in fact,
on larger passenger vessels, is trouble free when compared to conventional toilets thus reducing the potential for passenger inconvenience.
A Vacusan holding system not only complies with existing United States
Coast Guard Regulations, but will be certified within the next seven
days for the proposed Canadian Coastal Regulations. Furthermore, a
vessel using a reduced volume Vacusan holding system, may be operated
anywhere throughout the world and is not subject to obsolescence as is
a sewage treatment device. This will enhance the vessels resale value
if needs dictate.
The system described can be installed by any of the local shipyards,
we would estimate between 6-8 weeks for complete installation.
Alternatively, if required, we would be prepared to offer a 'turnkey'
installation by Vacusan's mechanical contractor at your docking
facility.
In closing we would like to state that the inherent conditions and
requirements of this refit are typical of our most successful Vacusan
installations.
Yours very truly,
VACUSAN SYSTEMS LIMITED,
xv>y_/U, .
J. W.  Archery-
Marketing.
JWA:kmp
End.
VACUSAN
 o
PROPOSAL FOR SERVICING
B. C. COASTAL CRUISE SHIP
"PRINCESS PATRICIA"
WITH A
VACUSAN VACUUM SEWAGE SYSTEM
Proposal #78-11-100
B.C. Coastal Steamship Co.Ltd.,
Pier B.C., Vancouver, B.C.
November 1978.
 XX
vx
Ref: Conversion of Princess Patricia Toilets/Urinals
to a vacuum black water holding system.	
November 1st, 1978.
Contents:
1) Brief
2) Definitions
3) Assumptions
4) Proposal
BRIEF:
To conform to future regulations in regard to coastal waters, this
proposal covers utilization of Vacusan low volume vacuum toilet
and sewage retention system.
DEFINITIONS:
Black Water (B.W.)
Grey Water (G.W.)
ASSUMPTIONS:
Soil waste from urinals and toilets.
Waste water from sinks, showers, galley, etc.
1) The vessel has a split black water and grey water system,
i.e. There are no connections from any pipes connecting
black water from W.C. and urinals to any pipes connecting
grey water from sinks and showers etc.
2) The vent pipes for the B.W. system and the G.W. system
are also independent with no interconnection.
3) All the vents in the B.W. system can be sealed off at
various places.
4) The existing W.C. soil connections can be modified for
connection to the W  discharge outlet from the vacuum
toilet. This will involve reducing the size of the
current pipe connections for the W.C. to W  or 2"
diameter spigot for connection to the vacuum toilet
rubber connector.
/2
	
USAN
 B.C. Coast Steamship Co. Ltd.,  - 2 -       November 1st, 1978.
Vancouver, B.C.
5) The existing B.W. pipes on the ship are suitable for
containing 20" of vacuum pressure. That is, when the
vents are sealed, the vacuum toilets installed, there
will be no leaks in the ships existing piping. Any
vacuum leaks would be corrected either by re-making
joints or changes in pipe work.
6) The system will consist of a small vacuum collection
tank and a large atmospheric holding tank (see below).
7) Total maximum vessel compliment will be 420 passengers
and crew. Total daily black water volume from the
vacuum toilets plus urinals, will be 1.5 imp. gallons
per person per day for a total of 630 gallons per day
of B.W. Total volume for the eight day turn around
voyage (pump out facilities only in Vancouver) will be
in the order of 5000 Imp. gallons.
8) The vacuum collecting station, pumps and tanks etc.,
can be located in Hold #2 Port Side. The atmospheric
storage tank can be fabricated out of existing storage
tank aft of the engine room gear box, presently being
used as "Engine Room Tunnel Stores".
9) A shore pump out station can be suitably located on the
vessel for service by shore side sewage truck (Port Side
aft).
PROPOSAL:
We propose that the vessel be modified to accept a Vacusan Sanitary
holding system, which by reducing the overall volume of black water
to 630 gallons per day or 5000 gallons per return voyage, will allow
the vessel to hold the black water sewage for shore side disposal,
and therefore conform to the regulations pending in regard to black
water sewage control.
/3
VACUSAN
 B.C. Coast Steamship Co.Ltd.
Vancouver, B.C.
- 3
November 1st, 1978.
Each existing water closet would be replaced by a floor mounted
Vacusan vacuum toilet with a water consumption of approximately
one quart per flush. The toilet can use either fresh or salt
water for flushing. On refits of this type, due to the relatively small amount of water consumed, it is normal to connect
the vacuum toilet to the fresh water system thereby eliminating
the salt water flushing system. The existing soil connection
pipes at each toilet location would be modified by reducing
the pipe size to the vacuum toilet discharge size depending
upon existing piping and toilet configurations, this reduction
would be to either IV or in some cases a reduction of 2" would
be adequate. This will depend on the number of pipe bends etc.,
required to connect the vacuum toilet to the existing deck penetration.
VENTS:
Since the vacuum toilet relies upon  sealed piping, any and all
vents on the existing black water piping system must be sealed
off either at the location of the toilet or at any other accessable
point.
EXISTING BLACK WATER SOIL PIPES:
From our inspection of the vessel
that existing W.C.'s are combined
and taken down a gravity stack to
located just below the Orlop deck
spaces). It is proposed that all
and that a vacuum header (2") be
on the inboard side of the storm
typically two mains on each side
and aft to the vacuum collection
vacuum tank will require
40 toilets on each).
and the drawings, it appears
in groups (typically three)
the overboard storm valves
(usually in the machinery
storm valves be sealed off
connected to all the stacks
valves. This will result in
of the ship running from forward
tank located in Hold #2. (i.e.
four incoming 2" mains with approximately
/4
 B.C. Coast Steamship Co.Ltd.,  - 4 -       November 1st, 1978.
Vancouver, B.C.
VACUUM COLLECTING STATION:
This station will consist of:
2  -  Vacuum collecting tanks each approximately
500 gallons, 48" diameter x 6 ft. length.
2-3 h.p. vacuum pumps
2  -  2 h.p. sewage transfer pumps
1  -  Set of control equipment including panel
c/w motor starters etc.
1  -  Set of valves and equipment
NOTE: Power Supply. The system can be supplied to run off
either A.C. or D.C. power. Our prices are based on
an A.C. power supply.
The vacuum collecting station maintains the vacuum in the piping and
periodically transfers the collected sewage via the transfer pump
to the atmospheric holding tank (see below). This will require
a 2V sch. 40 steel pipe to be run from the V.C.S. to the holding
tank.
HOLDING TANK:
Located aft of the engine room is a space known as the "Engine
Room Tunnel Storage". This store room has been made out of an
original tank which is presently substantially in tact. We
propose that this tank be re-used with modifications for use
as an atmospheric holding tank for the sewage. The turn around
voyage holding requirement is in the order of 5000 gallons. This
tank would be modified to hold approximately 7500 gallons and would
incorporate two deck discharge sewage pumps arranged in a dry pit
configuration (situated outside the tank and drawing suction from
the bottom of the tank). This tank should be given internal
protection (e.g. epoxy coating). The sewage pump will discharge
into a force main pipe which will run up the escape hatch, under
the deck head of the Stewards wash place on the main deck and up
through C-Deck level to an outside hydrant at the edge of the deck
and ships Port Side aft.
"A
VACUSAN
 B.C. Coast Steamship Co.Ltd.,  - 5 -        November 1st, 1978.
Vancouver, B.C.
Vacusan proposes to supply the following holding station equipment.
2 h.p. sewage discharge pumps
Set tank level indicating equipment
Set sewage discharge pumps control and panel
starter etc.
Sight gauge equipment set
Set of valves for sewage pumps and holding tank
Set of valves for deck station
Remote discharge pump control for location
at deck station.
The above equipment can be supplied for A.C. or D.C. power. Our
pricing is based on A.C. power supply.
v.
SUPPLY OF VACUSAN EQUIPMENT:
Central vacuum collecting station complete   $27,630.00
Equipment set for atmospheric holding
tank complete   $7,756.00
Vacuum toilets (Floor mounted style
c/w seats and rubber connectors)   $62,370.00
(154 at $405.00 each)
Urinal vacuum pick up valves
estimated six at $265.00 each   $1,590.00
TOTAL FOR VACUSAN EQUIPMENT $99,346.00
All prices are less all taxes and F.O.B. Richmond, B.C.
 /6
VACUSAN
 B.C. Coastal Steamship Co.Ltd., - 6 -       November 1st, 1978.
Vancouver, B.C.
VACUSAN:  FIELD ENGINEERING SERVICES:
We recommend that during the installation, a Vacusan field service
representative be on hand from time to time to inspect the installation. We estimate that this would require 10 days at $250.00 per
day plus expenses.
INSTALLATION:
For your information we have prepared an estimate of what we feel
the install costs should be.
Installation of 154 toilets at $140 each $21,560.00
Urinal modifications   $1,000.00
Installation of vacuum collecting station
equipment $15,000.00
s—.        Installation and modification to holding tank
and pump out equipment $15,000.00
New steel piping   $11,000.00
Header connections at storm valves   $8,800.00
(55 at $160.00 each)
Sealing Vents   $5,000.00
Testing of gravity pipes and repairs   $22,000.00^^
Bulk head penetrations   $5,000.00
(Where needed)
Misc. allowance $20,000.00
INSTALLATION TOTAL $124,360.00
We trust you find the above in good order. Should you wish further
clarification or information on our proposal, we would be pleased to
provide further comments.
VACUSAN
 dinner
*> *•
 • '•
 dinner
CHILLED TOMATO OR PINEAPPLE JUICE
SARDINES PARMESAN        RIPE OR GREEN OLIVES       CHEESE STRAWS
SEAFOOD COCKTAIL
CHICKEN BROTH
COMBINATION SALAD BOWL, MAYONNAISE OR FRENCH DRESSING
FRUIT SALAD WITH COTTAGE CHEESE
STEAMED ALASKA RED SPRING SALMON, BECHAMEL SAUCE
BAKED CANADIAN HAM, PINEAPPLE RING
PRIME ROAST RIBS OF BEEF, AU JUS
ROAST YOUNG TOM TURKEY, CRANBERRY SAUCE, DRESSING
STEAMED, BROWNED OR MASHED POTATOES       VEGETABLES IN SEASON
STEAMED FRUIT PUDDING, SWEET SAUCE        RASPBERRY PIE & DEEP APPLE PIE
SLICED PEACHES AND CREAM        NEAPOLITAN ICE CREAM
SCOTCH SHORTBREAD       ASSORTED CAKE       SWEET BISCUITS
IMPERIAL, GORGONZOLA OR KRAFT CHEESE       SALTED CRACKERS
FRESH FRUITS
TEA       COFFEE       MILK
Invalids or Passengers on Diet Please Consult the Chiet Steward for Specially Prepared Dishes
A-7 Printed In Canada
  /^k^
Of'.   ■
PASSENGER LIST
£/•  >3
 BY AIR, Canadian Pacific Super DC-8 Jet Empresses wing swiftly
across Canada ... to Europe's most exciting cities via the Polar
Route and Southern Route ... as well as to Tokyo, Hong Kong,
Mexico, South America, Hawaii, Australia and New Zealand.
BY LAND, Canadian Pacific's Scenic Dome Train, The Canadian,
travels daily across Canada between Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal,
via the spectacular Canadian Rockies Banff—Lake Louise route.
BY SEA, , Canadian Pacific White Empress liners sail the sheltered
St. Lawrence to Europe . . . cruise the warm colorful waters of the
Caribbean and Mediterranean.
A tradition of more than 75 years of service . . . and more than
85,000 route miles serving five continents by land, sea and air . . .
makes  travel  with  Canadian  Pacific  a  truly  delightful  experience.
/O TRAVEL,. /~)        ...
GENERAL INFORMATION
VALUABLES: The Company will not be responsible for passengers' money,
jewellery or other valuables. Passengers are advised not to keep such
articles in their staterooms, they should be left with the Purser, suitably
sealed and marked with the owner's name for deposit in the ships safe.
Envelopes are provided for this service . . . the Company undertakes no
responsibility for  loss  or damage,  however arising.
 NANAIMO
VICTORIA W%^
VANCOUVER WmX
LEGEND
FERRY H|
BUS OR
RAILWAY       ■■ I
I SEATTLE
CANADIAN  PACIFIC SERVICE
BETWEEN
VANCOUVER - NANAIMO — VICTORIA - SEATTLE
When returning home, take time out for a visit to Vancouver Island.
Canadian Pacific operates the Princess of Vancouver, one of the largest
passenger car and train ferrys in the world on a three time-a-day schedule
between Vancouver and Nanaimo. A downtown departure from Vancouver takes you in 2% hours to Nanaimo, the hub of Vancouver Island.
Spend some time exploring this historic city and then travel 68 miles in
your car or comfortable Air-ride Motor Coach over the scenic Malahat
route to Victoria ... a beautiful city with the quiet charm reminiscent of
the Victorian era. Stay at the famous Empress Hotel. Visit the quaint
old-world shops featuring fine British woolens, English China, silverware
and beautiful antiques.
From a dock immediately in front of the Empress Hotel, the "pocket
liner" "Princess Marguerite" sails each afternoon for downtown Seattle
- or you can return direct to Vancouver by one of several routes.
DAILY SCHEDULES ARE AS FOLLOWS:
VANCOUVER - NANAIMO
VICTORIA - SEATTLE
Lv. Vancouver
4:45 a.m.
11:45 a.m.
8:30 p.m.
Lv. Nanaimo
8:15 a.m.
3:00 p.m.
12:30 a.m.
Lv. Victoria
5:30 p.m.
Ar. Seattle
9:30 p.m.
Lv. Seattle
8:00 a.m.
Ar. Victoria
11:50 a.m.
LOCAL TIMES
Ask at the Purser's Office for full information, or after leaving this ship contact
any Canadian Pacific Office.
 ■r
■jMBBreaMBBlBi^^
After ALASKA...
see the Canadian Rockies
Your playground is twenty-five thousand square miles of Canada's fabulous Banff National Park. Among cloud reaching
mountains, verdant, flower strewn valleys and rushing torrents,
you'll ride, boat, fish, climb and golf. And in the baronial elegance of Banff Springs Hotel, you'll live the gracious life . . .
dining like a gourmet, dancing in beautifully appointed ballrooms, relaxing in intimate lounges or breathingcrisp mountain
air while you tan on sun-swept terraces. Vacation "on top of the
world" at Banff Springs Hotel... as near to you as the Canadian
Pacific Transcontinental main line and Trans Canada Highway.
ACROSS CANADA YOU'LL ENYOY
SUPERB ACCOMMODATION AND SERVICE AT...
VICTORIA The Empress
VANCOUVER The Hotel Vancouver*
LAKE LOUISE Chateau Lake Louise)
BANFF Banff Springs Hotelf
CALGARY The Hotel Palliser
REGINA The Hotel Saskatchewan
WINNIPEG The Royal Alexandra
TORONTO The Royal York
QUEBEC The Chateau Frontenac
KENTVILLE The Cornwallis Inn
DIGBY The Digby Pines Hotelf
ST ANDREWS-BY-THE-SEA The Algonquin Hotelf
*The Hotel Vancouver is operated by the Vancouver Hotel Company
on behalf of the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National Railway
Companies.
fHotels marked thusly are open during the Summer Season only.
Reservations at any of the above hotels can be made through
your Travel Agent or any Canadian Pacific representative
Gmodiaa Ohofa
TRAINS/TRUCKS/ SHIPS/PLANES/HOTELS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS
WORLD'S MOST COMPLETE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
 SHIP'S    OFFICERS
CAPT.  HARRY  J.  MURRAY       Master
MR. GEORGE C BLACK   First Officer
MR. ARCHIBALD LOGIE   Chief Engineer
MR.   LYALL  WEDMAN       2nd   Engineer
MR.  ARCHIBALD  P.  WOOLLETT       Purser
MR.  SIDNEY J.  MUNDY     Asst.  Purser
MR. FRANCIS T. LINES   Chief Steward
MR.  COLIN  TURNBULL     2nd  Steward
MRS. ALTHEA S. STEELE   Social Hostess
LIST    OF    PASSENGERS
(S.S.    PRINCESS    PATRICIA)
SAILED FROM VANCOUVER, B. C. TO  SKAGWAY, ALASKA
— JUNE  1,  1963 —
Akhurst, Mrs. Winnifred, Vancouver, B. C.
Alexander, Miss Arenia, Victoria, B. C.
Altland, Mr. and Mrs. Lee W. Eugene, Ore.
Andersen, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur D., Chicago, 111.
Anderson, Mrs. Laura,  Toronto,  Ont.
Andrews, Mr. Orlo L., Cloverdale, B. C.
Archer, Mr. and Mrs. Dayton F., Seattle, Wash.
Arnold, Mr. and Mrs. John R., Portland, Ore.
Arnold,  Mrs.  Sarah,  Port Coquitlam, B. C.
Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey, Haney, B. C.
Ball, Mrs. Emily, Woodbridge, Ont.
Barrett, Miss Wilhelmina,  Toronto, Ont.
Bennett, Dr. E. Earl, Missoula, Mont.
Bennett, Dr. and Mrs. Harold E., China Lake, Calif.
Bennett, Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert, Vancouver, B. C.
Binns, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph G., Seattle, Wash.
Boyd, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie O., Christchurch, N. Z.
Booth, Mr.  and Mrs.  Bronson,  Bradford, Pa.
Breed, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jr., Piedmont, Calif.
Breed, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert, Piedmont, Calif.
Brenen, Mr. and Mrs. Earl S., Victoria, B. C.
Brick, Mrs. Gertrude H., Vancouver, B. C.
Browne,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Clifford A.,  Detroit,  Mich.
Browne,   Miss  Phyllis,   Detroit,  Mich.
Catterall, Mrs. Minnie V., N. Vancouver, B. C.
Chaytor, Mr. George, Cooksville, Ont.
Chowne,  Mrs.  Rae,  El  Sobrante  ,Calif.
Cleland, Mr. and Mrs. James, White Rock, B. C.
Clewlow, Mr. Harry, Toronto, Ont.
Cobb, Mr. and Mrs. John J., Toronto, Ont.
Cobb, Mr. and Mrs. Perry, Montreal, Que.
Coleman,  Mr. and Mrs. Wesley,  Calgary, Alta.
Cook, Mrs. Mary B., Portland, Ore.
Crichton, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander, Alhambra, Calif.
Crockett, Mr. and Mrs. Harold, Berkely, Calif.
Daem, Mr. Edmund, Vancouver, B. C.
Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Reginald, Calgary, Alta.
 Dawson, Mr. Harry, Edmonton, Alta.
Deetrick, Mr. and Mrs. John W, Reno, Nev.
Delaney, Miss Agnes C, Winnipeg, Man.
Denman, Mr. and Mrs. John, Montreal, Que.
Dewitt, John W., Portland, Ore.
Dickinson, Mrs. Alice, Santa Rosa, Calif.
Disher, Mrs. Iris, Vancouver, B. C.
Downes, Mr. and Mrs. John D., Brandon, Man.
Driscoll, Mr. and Mrs. Jerome, Burlingame, Calif.
Elholm,  Mrs.   Lillian,   Oakland,   Calif.
Evans, Miss Millicent, Vancouver, B. C.
Findlay, Mr. and Mrs. W. Gordon, Dorval, P. Q.
Fitzgerald, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest T., Ottawa, Ont.
Folkard, Mr. and Mrs. J. Howard, Ottawa, Ont.
Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander, N. Vancouver, B. C.
Frank, Miss Margaret A., Vancouver, B. C.
French, Mr. Philip F., Ottawa, Ont.
Gallagher, Mrs. Kathryn A., Ottawa, Ont.
Gardner, Mr. Charles H., Weston, Ont.
Garner, M. Harold J., Daly City, Calif.
Garnett, Mr. and Mrs. Walter, Montreal, Que.
Gillis, Mr. and Mrs. James A., Burlingame, Calif.
Goodfellow, Mr. and Mrs. Richard L., Denver, Colo
Goold, Capt. George, Vancouver, B. C.
Graham, Mr. Angus, Hanelock, Ont.
Gunning, Miss Evelyn, Sherbrooke, Que.
Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh, Calgary, Alta.
Harley, Senator Clinton S., O. B. E., Seattle, Wash.
Hayman, Mr. Charles, Powell River, B. C.
Hertel, Mr. and Mrs. David W., Lakewood, Calif.
Hewett, Mrs. Martha, N. Vancouver, B. C.
Hewlett, Mrs. Mabel B., Toronto, Ont.
Higley, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin, Calgary, Alta.
Hoppa, Mr. Charles, Windsor, Ont.
Hopkins, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred E., Oakland, Calif.
Horn, Miss Elizabeth, Portland, Ore.
Howker, Mrs. Sara, Vancouver, B. C.
Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred E., London, Ont.
Hughes, Miss Kathleen, Victoria Harbour, Ont.
Hull, Mr. Norman, Vancouver, B. C.
Hurst, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel D., Pleasant Ridge, Mich.
Hyde, Mr. and Mrs. Pitt, Ontario, Calif.
Imhoff, Mr. Maurice, Belleville, Ont.
Johnson, Miss Olive, Vancouver, B. C.
Jukes, Mrs. Margaret A., Toronto, Ont.
Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. John H., Portland, Ore.
Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. Howard R., Calgary, Alta.
Knapp, Mr. James, San Francisco, Calif.
Kneeland, Capt. and Mrs. Omer H., Arlington, Va.
Lane, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde, Hollywood, Calif.
Langton, Mr. and Mrs. Tom O., Red Deer, Alta.
Leach, Mr. and Mrs. William H., Chalk River, Ont.
Lehman, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil P., Seattle, Wash.
Low, Mr. James, Winnipeg, Man.
Lupton, Mr. and Mrs. Francis D., Toronto, Ont.
Mabbutt, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar, Montreal, Que.
Mahowald, Mr.  and Mrs. Anthony, St. Cloud,  Minn,
Manning, Mr. and Mrs. A. Burchill, Toronto, Ont.
 Martin, Mr. and Mrs. George E., Dixon, Calif.
Masson, Mr. and Mrs. James, Vancouver, B. C.
Matthews,  Mr.  John,  Bounty,  Sask.
Mentzer, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard, Los Gatos, Calif.
Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Warren M., Los Angeles, Calif.
Mills, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley S., Portland, Ore.
Mochel, Mr. and Mrs. Paul, Hollywood, Calif.
Mochel, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, So. Laguna, Calif.
Moore, Mr. Robert, Toronto, Ont.
Morris, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur, Calgary, Alta.
Munro, Mrs. Ruth B., Kamloops, B. C.
Murray, Mr. Fred W., Edmonton, Alta.
McArthur, Mrs. Pauline M., Vancouver, B. C.
McConnell, Miss Eva, Sherbrooke, Que.
McConnell, Miss Mary, Sherbrooke, Que.
McCorquodale, Mr. and Mrs. Colin C, Winnipeg, Man.
McFadyen, Mr. John H., Vancouver, B. C.
McLellan, Miss Catherine, Montreal, Que.
McPherson, Mr. and Mrs. Norman A., Vancouver, B. C.
McRae, Mr. Alexander, Red Deer, Alta.
McQueen, Mrs. Ethel, N. Vancouver, B. C.
Oesterle,  Mr.  William W., Philadelphia, Pa.
Pace, Mr. Wilfred, Victoria, B. C.
Painting, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, Kamloops, B. C.
Payne, Dr. and Mrs. Robert L., Norfolk, Va.
Porteous, Dr. James O., China Lake, Calif.
Perkin, Mr. and Mrs. John H., Victoria, B. C.
Porter, Mr. Keith L., Bridgetown, N. S.
Paulence, Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas, Calgary, Alta.
Pinther,   Mr.  Alfred,  Kentfield,  Calif.
Prideaux, Miss Gladys W., Vancouver, B. C.
Price, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E., Vancouver, B. C.
Ralston, Mr. and Mrs. David, White Rock, B. C.
Redhead, Mrs. Goldie, St. Agincourt, Ont.
Redman, Mrs. Mildred G., Hardisty, Alta.
Reed, Mr. and Mrs. William B., San Pedro, Calif.
Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert W., Montreal, Que.
Richardson,  Mrs.  Sara M.,  Vancouver,  B.  C.
Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Avery E., San Francisco, Calif.
Roemer, Mr. and Mrs. Robert, Milan, 111.
Rowley,  Mrs.  Frances  D.,  Bellevile,  Que.
Rutherford, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, Brandon, Man.
Sauter, Mr. and Mrs, Frederick, LaPorte, Texas
Scherer, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew C, Evanston, 111.
Schmucker, Mrs. Eurith, Wilmington, Delaware
Seaburn, Mr. Arthur G., Toronto, Ont.
Sellwood, Mr. Alfred J., Vancouver, B. C.
Senay, Mr. and Mrs. Paul E., Lougueuil, Que.
Shelley,  Mrs.  Mary J.,  Sherbrooke,  Que.
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. J. Eldon, Marion, Ind.
Speirs, Mr. Archibald, Winnipeg, Man.
Speirs, Miss Annie, Winnipeg, Man.
Stahl, Mr. and Mrs. Edward, Belleville, Ky.
Stevens, Mr. and Mrs. Bertram C, Vancouver, B. C.
Stevenson, Mr. Joseph, Vancouver, B. C.
Stiver, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E., Toronto, Ont.
Stocks, Mrs. Alice E., Porltand, Ore.
Sturrock, Mrs. Gladys, Vancouver, B. C.
 Tallon, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J., Ottawa, Ont.
Taverner, Mr.  and Mrs. Lou, Houston, Texas
Teepe, Mr. and Mrs. August G., Portland, Ore
Thompson,  Mrs.  Mildred,  Sebastopol,  Calif.
Toyne,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph,  Calgary,  Alta.
Tyson, Mr. Henry, Victoria, B. C.
Van, Mr. Charles N., Medicine Hat, Alta.
Venables,  Mrs.  Eva,  Portland,   Ore.
Wallace, Mr.  and Mrs.  Andrew, Teeswater,  Ont
Walls, Mrs. Ruth E. O., Wilmington, Delaware
Walton, Mr. Clarence O., White Rock, B. C.
Waters, Mrs. Albert E., Toronto, Ont.
Weise, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore R., Winnipeg, Man.
Weizel, Mr. Henry, Winnipeg, Man.
Whalen, Mrs. Dora, Sydney River, N. S.
Whiteford, Mrs. Josephine, Bala, Ont.
Wilber, Mr. and Mrs. Ray, Hemet, Calif.
Willett, Mrs. Vera, Victoria, B. C.
Williams,  Mrs.  Mazie,  Glendale, Calif.
Wilson, Mrs. Gladys S., St. Helena, Calif.
Winlo,  Miss Elizabeth T., Toronto, Ont.
Wright,   Mrs.  Tommy,   Seattle,  Wash.
Wright, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar, Marion, Ind.
-AUTOGRAPHS-
 INFORMATION FOR PASSENGERS
Mail received at Prince Rupert or Skagway will be
delivered to your room. Mail received at Vancouver
after the ship has sailed will be held at the Information
Bureau, Canadian Pacific Station. If not called for in 30
days; it will be returned to sender or the Post Office.
Telegrams addressed care of the ship at scheduled ports
of call will be delivered on board.
Skagway — If you wish to stay on board ship while in
port please leave your name and room number with the
Purser.
White Pass and Yukon Route — Purser's Office will
supply information regarding service from Skagway to
Bennett, Carcross and Whitehorse.
APPROXIMATE DISTANCES   y-
Miles
Vancouver to Prince Rupert    572
Prince Rupert to Ketchikan  108
Ketchikan to Juneau     270
Juneau to Skagway       117
 Trave
SCENIC DOME
ACROSS CANADA
It's definitely the most pleasant way! On your swift, ultramodern "Canadian" you enjoy all the comforts of a first-class
hotel - deluxe dining room, attractive coffee shop, club-like
lounges, luxurious overnight accommodation. Then of
course, there's the wonderful experience of seeing Canada's magnificent countryside from wide Scenic Domes. So
economical too, with all-inclusive fares. Ask your Canadian
Pacific travel agent how to plan your trip for extra savings.
/^TRAVEL.. yQ      ./•
La/tarfian (jwafttc
TRAINS/TRUCKS/ SHIPS/ PLANES / HOTELS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS
WORLDS MOST COMPLETE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
 Uniform Regulations
2H." OFFICER     3R.° OFFICER       CHIEF
coio eoio ENGINEER
GOl£>CPt/PPJ.e
2M.° ENGINEER
G01& cpvfipie
5R,° 4™ JR. ENGINEER, ELECTRICIAN PURSER
ENGINEER       ENGINEER      & SANITARY ENGINEER eoiocw^rr
COt£> CPUPPlf COlO C PUPPIS GOID £ Pt/PPl£
ASST.      FREIGHT       CHIEF 2N.°
PURSER       CLERK       STEWARD    STEWARD
coto c Htt/rE   coi p c wtt/rf COL £>
WIRELESS
OFFICER
CO 10
5-63 — Printed  in  Canada
  Ca/iacfcaa Gaxu^ic
)\A)\A
TPT
AJ1
7/Cc
 EfflEWEUL BWIER
COMMEMORATING
SUMMER CRUISE TO ALASKA
There's a land where the mountains are nameless,
And the rivers all run God knows where;
There are hardships that nobody reckons;
There are valleys unpeopled and still;
There's a land . . . oh, it beckons and beckons,
And I want to go back . . . and I will.
—ROBERT W. SERVICE
S. S. PRINCESS PATRICIA
 MIMJ
HORS D'OEUVRES VARIES
ICED CELERY MIXED OLIVES
ICED GRAPEFRUIT CHUNKS EN MARASCHINO
CREAM OF CELERY
ALASKA CHICKEN  HALIBUT CHEEKS, TARTARE SAUCE
CHEF'S SALAD WITH MAYONNAISE OR FRENCH DRESSING
CREAMED DICED CHICKEN ON PATTY SHELLS WITH MUSHROOMS
GRILLED LOIN BEEF STEAK, MUSHROOM SAUCE
BRAISED OX TONGUE, CAPER SAUCE
STEAMED OR FRENCH FRIED POTATOES GREEN PEAS
STEAMED GOLDEN PUDDING, ORANGE SAUCE        ASSORTED CAKE
PINEAPPLE CREAM PIE WINE JELLO WITH WHIPPED CREAM
ASSORT FRESH FRUITS IN SEASON VANILLA ICE CREAM
KRAFT OR CANADIAN CHEESE       SALTED CRACKERS
CAFE NOIR
DINNER MINTS
BRITISH  COLUMBIA COAST STEAMSHIP  SERVICE
A-9 - 5-63 — Printed  in Canada
 AUTOeiAPIS
 EtSSEHGER
■.-■■$■¥
mifllCESS
111 Ell IA
k^k cz:f=<l_jisi
 INSIGNIA
MASTER'S CAP
Gold, Red & White
MASTER
Gold
1st OFFICER
Gold
2nd OFFICER
3rd OFFICER
CHIEF
2nd ENGINEER
3rd
Gold
Gold
ENGINEER
Gold & Purple
Gold & Purple
ENGINEER
Gold & Purple
4th JR. ENGINEER &      1st ELECTRICIAN     2nd ELECTRICIAN    3rd ELECTRICIAN
ENGINEER MAINTENANCE Gold & Green Gold & Green Gold & Green
Gold & Purple ENGINEER
Gold & Purple
&& JS^
PURSER
AS ST.
CATERING
Gold & White
PURSER
OFFICER
Gold & White
Gold
CHIEF
STEWARD
Gold
PRINTED IN CANADA
 Ship's Officers
CAPTAIN J. RAYMOND HUDSON Captain
MR. DAVID CHAMBERLAIN First Officer
MR. JAMES FOULKES Chief Engineer
MR. TERRY TURNER 2nd Engineer
MR. HARRY BURCHILL Purser
MR. JOHN PETRUCCI Assistant Purser
MR. THOMAS IRVINE Catering Officer
MR. ERNIE RUDE Chief Steward
MISS JOSIE BRANDNER Stewardess
MISS MARLENE O'CONNELL Beautician
MR. DARRYLL McNARY Gift Shop
TERRY & BETTY HASWELL Cruise Host & Hostess
LIST OF PASSENGERS
TEV Princess Patricia
Embarked at Vancouver, B.C.
May 18, 1981
ALLAN, M/M Edward, Victoria, B.C.
ANDERSEN, Mrs. Doris, Richmond, B.C.
ANDERSEN, Mrs. Ellen, Ridley Park, PA
BANCROFT, Mr. Glen E., Burnaby, B.C.
BEAM, M/M Harold, San Clemente, CA
BECKER, Miss Lori A., Redmond, WA
BECKER, Mrs. J. Louise, Redmond, WA
BOEING, M/M Alan, La Mirada, CA
BLACKHAM, Mrs. Irene, Shawnigan Lake, B.C.
BLACK, Mr. Kenneth, N. Delta, B.C.
BLOTT, M/M William,
BLUE, Miss Elaine, Victoria, B.C.
BOND, M/M Lennie, Houston, TX
BRACEY, Dr. & Mrs. Elwood D., West Palm Beach, Fla.
BROOKS, M/M Alvin, West Vancouver, B.C.
BROWN, Commander & Mrs. Richard T., Australia
BUDINICH, M/M Anthony M., Vancouver, B.C.
BURGENER, M/M Ernest, Mississauga, Ont.
BURNS, M/M Raymond, Medicine Hat, Alta.
CAMPBELL, M/M George M., Tulsa, OK
CHAFFEY, Mrs. Edna, Los Angeles, CA
COLLISON, Miss Joyce B., Vancouver, B.C.
 COWEN, M/M Clinton, Ottawa, Ont.
DAVID, Dr. Charlotte, Sooke, B.C.
DYCK, Mrs. Rita L., Wetaskiwin, Alta.
ELVIN, M/M Ernest R., Winnipeg, Man.
EVANS, M/M Hershel, Fullerton, CA
EVANS, Master David, Fullerton, CA
FENTON, M/M William W., Port Coquitlam, B.C. t
FERLAND, M/M Maurice, LacNominingue, Que.
FORBES, M/M Archibald, Florida, Transvaal, S. Africa
FORD, M/M John, Victoria, B.C.
FOWLIE, M/M James A., Port Alberni, B.C.
FRAPE, M/M William, Ottawa, Ont.
FUTCHER, M/M Ralph A., Victoria, B.C.
GASCOIGNE, Miss Mildred, London, Eng.
GEPPERT, M/M Walter, Hornby Island, B.C.
GILLIES, M/M William, Mt. Hope, Ont.
GIVEN, M/M George, Sequim, WA
GOODHAND, M/M Neil E., Sidney, B.C.
GORNALL, Mrs. Annie, London, England
GRAHAM, Dr. & Mrs. William M., Fenelon Falls, Ont.
GRANT, M/M William E., Edmonton, Alta.
GRILL, M/M Gerhard H., Centralia, WA
GUBINS, M/M Arnold, San Francisco, CA
HADLEY, M/M George, Louisville, KY
HALL, Mr. E. Stanley, Sequim, WA
HANNA, Mrs. Joan A., Regina, Sask.
HARRIS, M/M Laurence, Toronto, Ont.
HARRISON, M/M Elmer J., Peterborough, Ont.
HEINIG, Mr. Peter, West Germany
HORNUNG, Mr. Otto, West Germany
HUNT, Captain & Mrs. William A., Isle of Palms, S.C.
LANGLEY, M/M Jack C, Seattle, WA
LOUDERMILK, Mrs. Mary B., La Grande, OR
LOWDEN, M/M John, Port Carling, Ont.
LUCAS, M/M James, Lakewood, CO
LYNCH, Mr. Brian J., So. Milwaukee, Wise.
KAUPP, Mr. William J., Carlsbad, CA
KIRKPATRICK, M/M Claude D., Vancouver, B.C.
KLAVER, M/M Jake, Coquitlam, B.C.
 LEE, Mr. Glenn C, Jr., Kennewick, WA
McCLEAN, M/M Ronald D., Vancouver, B.C.
McDONALD, M/M George, White Rock, B.C.
McPHERSON, Mr. Jim, Vancouver, B.C.
McSPADDEN, Ms. Jane, Beaumont, TX
MALIN, M/M Jack, Mission Viejo, CA
MARSHALL, Mr. David, San Francisco, CA
MASON, Miss Sandra, Calgary, Alta.
MASON, Mrs. Vera, Moose Jaw, Sask.
MAY, M/M Sherman L., Salt Lake City, UT
MILNE, Mrs. Marjorie, Surrey, B.C.
MITCHELL, M/M James A., Winnipeg, Man.
MORGAN, M/M Raymond, Patterson, CA
MOGDEN, M/M Walter, Seattle, WA
MORSON, M/M Frederick, Courtney, B.C.
MURRAY, M/M Eldon, Easton, PA
MURRAY, Ms. Jessica, Fulford Harbour, B.C.
MURRAY, Mrs. Nicolette, Los Angeles, CA
OBLIN, Miss C, Montreal, Que.
O'HARE, M/M Christopher, Broad Channel, N.Y.
ONASES, Mr., Long Beach, CA
PAGE, Dr. & Mrs. Thomas, San Diego, CA
PAULL, Mr. Albert H., Burnaby, B.C.
PECKOVER, Mrs. Winnfred, Vancouver, WA
PIAZZA, M/M Garry A., Revelstoke, B.C.
PIAZZA, Master Nicholas A., Revelstoke, B.C.
PINCKNEY, M/M Frank, Anacortes, WA
POOLE, M/M Bennis, Glen Miles, PA
READ, M/M Ernest A., Delta, B.C.
READ, Master Michael E., Delta, B.C.
REIMCHE, Mrs. Diann V., Regina, Sask.
REZNICK, M/M Maurice, St. Laurent, Que.
ROBINSON, M/M Theodore, Sacramento, CA
ROBBINS, Mr. Henry L., Chatsworth, CA
ROSENGREN, Mr. Harold, Hazlet, N.J.
ROTH, Miss G. Kathleen, Toronto, Ont.
ROUSSEAU, M/M Louis P., Gananoque, Ont.
ST. RUTH, Mr. Jack L., White Rock, B.C.
SAULINO, Mrs. Bette, Glendale, CA
 SAULINO, Miss Anne, Glendale, CA
SAWYER, M/M Thomas E., Nashua, N.H.
SCHOLEFIELD, M/M John, Surrey, B.C.
SCOTT, Mrs. Cora, Lake San Marcos, CA
SHAW, M/M James, Silver Spring, MD
SHUDER, M/M Russell M., Las Cruces, N.M.
SHUTT, M/M Charles E., St. Hippolyte, Que.
SIMPSON, Mrs. Jean, Richmond, B.C.
SLATER, M/M John M., Easton, PA
SMILLIE, Mrs. Dorothy E., Victoria, B.C.
SMITH, Miss Heather L., North Vancouver, B.C.
SMITH, Mrs. Jane, Ridley Park, PA
SNOWDON, M/M George, Okanagan Centre, B.C.
SODERBERG, M/M James, Kingston, WA
SPROAT, Mrs. Esther A., Richmond, B.C.
STEINBERG, M/M Harry, Brooklyn, N.Y.
SOUTH, Jr., Dr. & Mrs.. Charles, Portland, OR
STUCKENBERG, Ms. Leanne, Nanaimo, B.C.
STUCKENBERG, M/M Edgar J., Nanaimo, B.C.
SUTTON, M/M Claude, Vauxhall, Alta.
TAYLOR, Mrs. Elna, Weiser, ID
TEWS, Mrs. Elva T., Seattle, WA
THOMAS, M/M William, Winter Park, Fla.
TILLSON, Miss Dorothy, Scarborough, Ont.
TOOMEY, M/M Edward, Tulsa, OK
TROWSDALE, M/M Percy, Victoria, B.C.
TURNER, Mrs. Margaree, La Grande, OR
VARLEY, Mr. Peter, Australia
WANKLYN, M/M David, Sidney, B.C.
WATKINS, Mr. Victor C, Wetaskiwin, Sask.
WEBB, M/M J., Gordon, Woodstock, Ont.
WELLS, Mrs. Eunice, Spokane, WA
WESTRAN, M/M Wilbert T., Peterborough, Ont.
WHITNEY, M/M F. Abbott, Charleston, SC
WILLARD, Mrs. Harriet, Jacksonville, III.
WILLOUGHBY, M/M Stuart, Seeley's Bay, Ont.
WILTSE, M/M Albert, Maple Ridge, B.C.
WIRT, Miss Dorothy J., Chatsworth, CA
ZIMAN, Miss Mary, So. Milwaukee, Wise.
 T. E. V. "PRINCESS PATRICIA"
The T E. V. "Princess Patricia" was launched on October 5, 1948,
in Govan, Scotland, by Lady Patricia Ramsay, former Princess
Patricia, daughter of the Duke of Connaught, and was built as an
identical sister-ship to the T E. V. "Princess Marguerite" (now owned
by the B.C. Government).
Entering the Vancouver-Victoria-Seattle service as a day ship on
June 16, 1949, the "Patricia" was capable of handling 2000
passengers and 60 automobiles.
At a cost of $1 million, the "Patricia" was converted 1962/1963 to
replace the popular "Princess Louise;' which had been in Alaska
service for 40 years.
During the winter season of 1965- 66 and 1966-67, the "Patricia"
was under charter to Princess Cruises Inc. for service between
Los Angeles and Acapulco, Mexico.
The lure of gold during the Gold Rush in the Yukon in the late 90's,
and the attendant publicity which it generated, attracting thousands
of get-rich-quick adventurers, subsided as the Gold Rush fever
abated, to be replaced by a growing tourist interest by reason of the
natural beauties of the British Columbia and South-eastern Alaska
coast. Today, the "Princess Patricia" carries on the tradition
established early in this century by the pioneers who developed the
British Columbia Coast Steamship Service from its origin in 1903.
 tffo —- -^f —-
El
CPRail
Alaska Cruises

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