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Alaska Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1951

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  CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
ON THE PACIFIC COAST
Hotel Vancouver The largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, overlooking the Strait
Vancouver, B.C. of Georgia, and serving equally the business man and the tourist.
Situated in the heart of the shopping district of Vancouver.   Golf,
motoring, fishing, hunting, bathing,  steamer excursions.   Open all
year.   European plan.   One-half mile from station.
Empress Hotel A luxurious hotel in this Garden City of the Pacific Coast.   An
Victoria  B.C. equable climate has made Victoria a favorite summer and winter
resort.    Motoring, yachting, sea and stream fishing, shooting and
all-year golf.    Crystal Garden for swimming and music.    Open all
year.    European plan.    Facing wharf.
IN THE ROCKIES
Hotel Sicamous Junction for the orchard districts of the Okanagan Valley, and
Sicamous, B.C. stop-over point for those who wish to see the Thompson and Fraser
Altitude 1,153 feet. Canyons by daylight. Lake Shuswap district offers good boating and
excellent trout fishing and hunting in season. Open all year. American
plan.   At station.
Emerald Lake Chalet A charming Chalet hotel situated at the foot of Mount Burgess,
near Field, B.C. amidst the picturesque Alpine scenery of the Yoho National Park.
Altitude 4,272 feet. Roads and trails to the Burgess Pass, Yoho Valley, etc.    Boating
and fishing.    Open June 15th to September 15th.    American plan.
Seven miles from station.
Chateau Lake Louise, A wonderful   hotel   facing an  exquisite  Alpine   Lake  in   Banff
Lake Louise, Alberta National   Park.     Alpine  climbing  with  Swiss  guides,  pony  trips
Altitude 5,670 feet. or walks to Lakes in the Clouds, Saddleback,etc., drives or motoring
to Moraine Lake, boating, fishing.     Open June 1st to October 1st.
European plan.   3% miles from station by motor railway.
Banff Springs Hotel, A magnificent hotel in the   heart  of the  Banff National   Park,
Banff, Alberta backed   by   three   splendid   mountain   ranges.    Alpine  climbing,
Altitude 4,625 feet. motoring and drives on good roads, bathing, hot sulphur springs,
golf, tennis, fishing, boating and riding.   Open May 15th to October
1st.   European plan.   1V£ miles from station.
THE PRAIRIES
Hotel Palliser A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard, in this prosperous
Calgary, Alberta city of Southern Alberta.   Suited equally to the business man and
the tourist en route to or from the Canadian Rockies.   Good golfing
and motoring.   Open all year.   European plan.   At station.
Hotel Saskatchewan A new hotel in the old capital of the Northwest Territory, head-
Regina, Sask. quarters of the Mounted Police.  Golf, tennis.  Most central hotel for
the prairies.
Royal Alexandra Hotel A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada, appealing
Winnipeg, Manitoba to those who wish to break their transcontinental journey.    The
centre of Winnipeg's social life.   Good golfing and motoring.   Open
all year.  European plan. At station.
EASTERN CANADA
Toronto, Ont. The Royal York—-The largest hotel in*the British Empire.  Open all year.
Montreal, Que. Place Viger Hotel—A charming "hotel in Canada's largest city.  Open all year.
Quebec, Que. Chateau Frontenac—A metropolitan hotel—in the most historic city of North
America.  Open all year.
McAdam, N.B. McAdam Hotel—A commercial and sportsman's hotel.   Open all year.
St. Andrews, N.B. The Algonquin—The social centre of Canada's most fashionable seashore summer
resort.   Open June 21st to September 5th.
HOTELS  AND BUNGALOW CAMPS REACHED
BY CANADIAN PACIFIC
Moraine Lake, Alta...Moraine Lake Camp Field, B.C Yoho Valley Camp
»     j* «»   j 1 Castle   Mountain Penticton, B.C Hotel Incola
Banff-Windermere ^ Bungalow Camp Cameron Lake, B.C., Cameron Lake Chalet
Automobile Highway   ( Radium    Hot £.en°ra' 9>nt: ^.D.evil'sr>9aP Camp
) Springs Camp Nipigon, Ont Nipigon River Camp
Agassiz, B.C...Harrison Hot Springs Hotel French River, Ont.,. .French River Camp
Hector, B.C Wapta Camp Digby, N.S The Pines
Hector, B.C Lake O'Hara Camp Kentville, N.S     Cornwallis Inn
 t>
r.)
/jU
\ima\ pacific fc
SKA
i
T  CAME  as
a whip to
men's greed
and a chall-
■ enge to men's
courage, that
first ringing call
of the Northland.
Until then — a
little over thirty
years ago—Alaska was almost
unknown, a
white space on
the map over
which was sha-
kily scrawled
"Come - and '
find-me." That
is, to most of the
world; for the
Northland had
even    then    its
Atlin La\e reflects Cathedral "Mountain.
pioneers,       its
prospectors, who had fished its teeming
coasts, trapped its furs, started small
towns, and panned the first coarse colorings of gold along its creeks. But outside
of these sturdy old-timers, Alaska, with its
side-partner, the Yukon, was hardly more
than a geographical curiosity—a huge, unpopulated, unexplored, inhospitable block
of land over three-quarters of a million
square miles in size, forming the northern
tip of the American continent. It had,
as far as one could estimate then, no very
remarkable resources or trading possibilities; on the contrary, it was apparently
a land of perpetual winter, frozen permanently under solid snow and ice—in
this and many other ways exactly resembling Russia, to which it had once
belonged and from which, at the Bering
Strait, it was so narrowly separated.
A pity, perhaps, that the first real revelation of a  real Alaska—an Alaska
PRINTED IN U.S.A. , 1930
different from all one's conceptions, and
richer than Monte Cristo—should have
come through that basest of motives, avarice. The discovery of gold in the Klondike
in 1896, in such vast quantities as to astound humanity, let loose so much sensation that overnight the new bonanza
became almost the most famous place on
earth. That feverish stampede to the
north (one does not have to be very
middle-aged to remember it) was like
nothing that had ever happened before,
or that has ever happened since.
The Trail of V8
Back in '98 someone took a photograph
of an everyday scene in the White
Pass. It shows, struggling over the
steep, dangerous snow-clad wastes, a
thin black streak nearly two miles long
—a streak composed entirely of men,
mushing "inside" to the Klondike, with
 PPIN€TSS STEAMSHIPS to AIASHA
nearly 600 miles of travel ahead of them,
and treading so close to one another
in the narrow trail that they very nearly
kicked the previous man's ankles. And
this was an everyday scene—happening all the time.
They had their hardships, those early
days, before the railway was built, and
when cheechako and sourdough alike had
to travel that arduous path over the
Chilkoot Pass (or later, the White Pass)
and down the Yukon River. Greed
pulled them forward; the crowd behind
pressed them onwards; if they could not
endure the strain they fell out and perished. There was no turning back. It
was truly no place for weaklings, for one
was beset not only by a hostile Nature,
but also by the wickedness and depravity
of mankind. The opportunities drew to
the Northland some of the most lawless
characters of the earth, and had it. not
been for the swift justice meted out
by the Royal Northwest Mounted
Police, it might have been   true   that
"There's never a law of God or man
Runs north of Fifty'three."
The Spell of the Korth
The Northland put a spell on those who
made its acquaintance then. It will put
the same spell on us to-day. It is a land
of mystery—a magnet that will always
draw men and women, even though the
lure of the gold is fainter now. It is still
a land of romance, its atmosphere impregnated with memories of those sad, glad
days when the century was just turning
over. Gold has ceased to be its principal advantage—has, indeed, proved a
false hope in those many ghost-like
"cities" that parade their empty shells
from Dyea to Nome; but there is equally
the romance of to-morrow, the discovery
of other and richer resources, the development of a vigorous, prosperous northern empire.
Alaska is a land of contrast. Never was
so mistaken an idea as that it is all winter.
If it were, whence come the gorgeous, vivid
flower gardens that one sees everywhere,
such masses of color that they dazsle the
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to AXIL A §HA
Seymour Narrows
eye? The answer is simple: the warm Japan
current, striking Vancouver Island, is deflected northward, and carries to the land of
the Midnight Sun the same delightful humidity that the Pacific Coast knows. But in
winter, inland over the White Pass, how
cold it can be!
Alaska is a land of gold, of flowers, of
black fox farms, of salmon, of Indians, of
curious Indian totem poles. It is a land of
magnificent scenery. The journey there,
by steamer, is one of nearly a thousand miles,
through scenery of a character unknown
elsewhere on the continent. For four days
the steamer threads a long, almost landlocked channel known as the "Inside Passage," winding through mountain-hemmed
fiord-like waterways as through a fairyland,
with wooded islands, tremendous glacier-
clad peaks, fascinating Alaskan towns and
queer old settlements as continuous episodes.
No water journey in America, either in
beauty or in romantic appeal, can quite compare with this trip to Alaska.
The final contrast one meets is in transportation. For the Chilkoot Pass has been
superseded by the comfortable railway
journey over the White Pass, and the extraordinary, haphazard and overcrowded steamer experiences of the early days have been
superseded by the magnificent service provided by the Canadian Pacific "Princess"
steamships.
Leaving Vancouver
The voyage to Alaska can be divided into
two parts. From Vancouver to Ketchikan
the journey is mostly through narrow channels, with steep shores heavily timbered to
the water's edge. The second part, from
Ketchikan to Skagway, is through wider
stretches of water, with glaciers, waterfalls and rugged mountains on either side,
and richly colored with the purple twilights
of  Alaska.
The Princess steamship slips away from
Vancouver on its four-day northbound trip
at 9.00 o'clock at night, when the long
summer dusks have begun to darken. After
trunks have been stowed and opened,
dining room reservations made, and casual
=i
 princess Steamships to aiasha
first impressions formed of one's fellow-
travellers, there is still time for a stroll up
and down deck before turning in. By this
time the ship has left Burrard Inlet, passed
Brockton Point, and has entered the Gulf of
Georgia. On the right is still to be seen
the dark bulk of the mainland; on the left,
but invisible yet, is Vancouver Island, in
whose lee the route is sheltered for over
two hundred miles.
The First Day
The course is south of long, narrow
Texada Island and through Discovery
Passage, between that island and Vancouver
sland. The early risers—and they only!
—will see Seymour Narrows, for this, the
narrowest part of the channel, is passed
about 6.00 a.m. An hour or so later the
ship passes through Johnstone Straits and
Broughton Straits, along whose shores a
number of logging camps can be seen. And
then after breakfast, we reach our first stop,
Alert Bay.
Alert Bay
Alert Bay is a small village on a small
island—Cormorant Island—situated so close
to Vancouver Island that the maps are
almost unable to make any distinction; but
it is nevertheless one of the principal
salmon canneries on the Coast. Here, in
fact, will be our first glimpse of this important industry, and during the time in port
the canneries invite visitors to inspect the
highly interesting processes of turning a
large, handsome salmon into shiny little
round cans.
Alert Bay is an old settlement, with a
considerable Indian population; and here,
too, we make our first contact with another
object typical of the Northland—the totem
pole. The Indian cemetery, with some
modern poles, is well worth the short stroll
to see it.
Queen Charlotte Sound
After lunch we leave the shelter of
Vancouver Island, reaching Queen Charlotte Sound—with its short experience of
open Pacific Ocean. From Cape Scott, on
Vancouver Island, to Cape St. James, at
*\T      Campbell River
' ^^fJoUrteaay  •%
Comox '
 PRINCESS STEAM/SHIPS to ALASKA
\wj,^m
Dundas fy-JpSm f
^^     ^o'jr /Tic-di I - *-^
*>ce   § t/~ X$\ ( O/, 3
■^     * |>MetlaW^aA^" *%$
^       JFRJNCE^RUPERT
OiQb.y^V) V-oi^Essington    O
the southern end of the Queen Charlotte
Islands, is about 150 miles; but we bear
away from that wild and rather primitive
group, and keep instead close inland,
reaching Calvert Island in three hours—
the longest of the three times we shall see
the wide horizon of the open Pacific Ocean
during the entire trip.
Passing through Lama Passage, Bella
Bella is on the left—a very old and practically deserted Indian village. At 10.00
at night, or so, we enter Old Ocean again,
this time at Millbank Sound, but only for
ten miles, "and so" (as Samuel Pepys says)
The Second Day
Entering the Tolmie Channel, between
Princess Royal Island and the mainland, we
pass Swanson Bay in the night, and then
enter Grenville Channel, in the shelter of
60-mile-long Pitt Island. At about breakfast time we pass the mouth of the Skeena
River, and shortly, with Digby Island on
the west, on which may be seen the Canadian Government wireless station, arrive
at about 9.00 a.m. at Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert is the most northerly city
of any size in Canada, with a population of
about 7,000. Built on a circle of hills
formed of very hard rock, the city is considerably above the level of the wharf and
is reached by a long flight of steps. It is a
very important fishing centre, and has a
very large floating dry dock, 600 feet long and
capable of lifting vessels of 20,000 tons weight.
Entering Alas\a
Shortly after leaving Prince Rupert, the
old Indian village of Metlakatla is passed.
Here is a very successful mission for the
natives, founded by Father Duncan. About
30 minutes later, Port Simpson is passed—
one of the oldest settlements in Northern
British Columbia, with an old Hudson's
Bay Company's post that has been a
trading centre with the Indians for about
sixty years.
About three hours after leaving Prince
Rupert, Green Island Lighthouse indicates
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to ALASKA
our nearness to the international boundary
line between Canada and Alaska (United
States). Dixon's Entrance, last entrance of
the open Pacific Ocean, is crossed, and we
wind our way through Revilla Gigedo
Channel—here called Tongass Narrows—
to Ketchikan.
Ketchi\an
Ketchikan (an Indian word meaning
"the town under the eagle") is the southernmost town in Alaska, situated on Revilla
Gigedo Island. It might also be said to be
now the most prosperous town in Alaska,
for salmon and halibut have made it rich and
given it large canneries and cold storage
plants. It is also a mining centre for
copper, gold, platinum, silver and lead, the
well-known Salt Chuck platinum mines
being within 30 miles. Ketchikan has a
bustling air, with hotels, stores and banks.
There is also a pleasant walk to the
waterfall in Ketchikan Creek (about 15
minutes), where in the late summer months
thousands of salmon may be seen leaping
and struggling through the rushing, foaming water on their way to the spawning
banks. There are two splendid totem
poles—the Chief Johnson totem, surmounted by Kajuk, a fabled bird of the
mountain which amuses itself by throwing
rocks at ground hogs, with below the Raven
and the Frog Woman with her children,
the Salmon, and the Kyan totem, surmounted by the Crane, followed by the
Kyak, another legendary bird, and the Bear.
The Third Day
A distinct change of scenery occurs
from now on. The stretches of water
become wide, and mountains rise on
either side, with waterfalls tumbling
down and glaciers crowning their crests.
The steamer winds along Clarence Strait,
with Prince of Wales Island on the west,
and turning round between Etolin and
Zarembo Islands reaches Wrangell about 4.00
a.m., and leaves before breakfast time. We
shall, however, have ample time to visit it
on the southbound voyage.
 Ta\u Glacier — a
mile wide, one hun*
dred feet thic\.
Wrangell
Wrangell, situated on the island of
the same name, is one of the oldest cities
of Alaska, and is named after Baron
Wrangell, who was governor about 1830.
It was originally a trading post, populated mainly by Indians under the
protection of the Russians, but came
under white dominance during the gold
rush of '98. Part of the Russian fort
still remains, and there are also some very
old totem poles near the wharf. Wrangell is at the mouth of the Stikine River,
which, navigable for about 170 miles, is
the entry point to the celebrated Cassiar
big-game country.
Wrangell farrows
Two hours after leaving Wrangell the
ship enters Wrangell Narrows, and for
twenty miles proceeds at half speed
through this narrow, winding channel
of a remarkable beauty. Well marked
with buoys and beacons, this passage
between the wooded islands saves a long
detour around Cape Decision.
At the north end of the Narrows lies
the   old   town   of  Petersburg,   whose
name indicates its origin in the days of
the Russian regime. It is now a flourishing fishing centre. Kupreanof Island is
on the west, and after crossing Frederick
Sound and Cape Fanshaw, we enter
Stephen's Passage.
Taku Glacier
We are now surrounded by the typical
grandeur of Alaska and, turning up Taku
Inlet, the Taku Glacier sends out hundreds of odd-shaped ice floes to meet us—
as blue as indigo, floating by to melt gradually in warmer waters, as slowly the
steamer approaches this famous sight.
This glacier, a mile wide and 100 feet
thick, extends for over 90 miles back
over the mountains to join Llewellyn
Glacier at the head of Atlin Lake
It really is two glaciers, one — a
mixture of brown, white and blue
colors—"dead" and receding, the other
very much alive and continually moving
forward. Showing all the colors of the
rainbow, according to the time of day or
position of the sun, huge masses of ice
frequently break off into the sea with
deafening thunder and float majestically
away.
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to ALASKA
Ketchi\an is seen above; and at the centre left, the harbor of Prince Rupert; centre right and bottom left,
the main street and the water-front at Juneau.    The village of Alert Bay completes the group.
 PRINCESS STEAM/SHI PS to ALASKA
The Princess Steamships are splendid, roomy vessels.    This is the Princess Charlotte.    J^pte the spacious
dining saloon and the broad open dec\s.
 PRINCESS STEAM/SHIPS to ALASKA
Juneau
Three hours' steaming up Gastineau
Channel brings us to Juneau, clinging to
the base and sides of Mount Juneau,
which towers 3,500 feet almost perpendicularly above, near the mouth of
the Taku River. Juneau, named after
its French-Canadian founder, is the
capital of Alaska, the residence of the
Governor, and the seat of all government departments. With a population
of about 4,000, it is a bright and interesting city, built (like so many of these
coast settlements) partly on piles over
the water, partly on bare rock, with
modern hotels and stores, and many
attractive residences and public buildings.
Juneau has good roads and automobiles a-plenty; one particularly interesting
ride is to the face of the Mendenhall
Glacier (2^ hours return) or to Auk Lake
(an hour longer). A short hike away is
the Gold Creek Basin, the site of the first
placer gold strike in Alaska, made by Joe
Juneau and Richard Haines in the early
eighties.
The Lynn Canal
The steamer leaves Juneau at midnight, and reaches Skagway about 9.00
am.; but on the southbound journey
"Soapy Smith's S\ulVy at S\agway.
there is ample opportunity to see the
beautiful Lynn Canal, which, with the
possible exception of the Taku Glacier,
provides the most wonderful scenery of
all. For over 80 miles we steam up this
arm of the sea, which varies in width
from one to five miles. Mountains of
rock capped with snow, towering
glaciers and gushing waterfalls, canyons
of all sizes and wild shapes, and colors
in restless variety surround us. Davidson Glacier is a huge ice wall seen on the
west. Passing the town of Haines and
Fort Seward, we suddenly turn a point
to see Skagway ahead of us.
S\agway
Skagway, the end of the northbound
run, is a town that has loomed large in
the history of the North. When the
gold rush started to the Yukon in 1896,
the landing was made at Dyea, which
lies on the western branch of the Lynn
Canal, and the trail inland led over the
dangerous Chilkoot Pass; but word came
of the discovery of the White Pass, and
in a day fifteen thousand people left Dyea,
and in a day Skagway arose where before
was chiefly swamp.
Amongst the marvels of Skagway—to
those at least who have never considered
Alaska as aught but
perpetual winter —
are its beautiful
flower gardens. The
background of mountains that enclose it like
a cup offers many attractive outings, such as
"hikes" along the Skagway River, to Fortune
Bay, Smuggler's Cove,
or the great Denver
Glacier. There are fine
launch trips available
and good fishing. The
steamer lays over about
36 hours before starting on its southbound
journey.
10
 Ohe Ml HI III IE PASS end \YIUM1DN RCUTE
Inland from S\agway
Interesting though
Skagway is, the shortest
visit would be incomplete without a journey
to the equally interesting
and fascinating "inside."
Such a journey, difficult as it was in the
early days of the gold
rush, can now be easily
undertaken, for Skagway is the southern
terminus of the rail line
of the White Pass and
Yukon Route. A comfortable train, with large
windowed observation cars, will carry one through the magnificent scenery of the White Pass into
the Yukon Territory, connecting at Car-
cross and at White Horse with the commodious steamers of the same company.
For those who are returning south
by the same "Princess" steamship, there
are available the excursions to West
Taku Arm or to White Horse. For
those waiting over until the next steamship there is the trip to Atlin Lake—
where, indeed, many linger longer than
they originally intended. But those
with more time will continue on to
White Horse, whence there is the wonderful trip down the Yukon  River to
The White Pass
The rail journey is a most spectacular
one. The salt tang of the sea is left
behind, and the sweetness of lake and
mountain air fills the nostrils. The
scenery grows rugged and awe-inspiring.
We climb steadily around gorges, along
the brink of deep canyons, past roaring
cataracts, and near dead cities to which
cling memories of the trail of '98. Such
names as "Dead Horse Gulch" and
"Log Cabin" help vividly to recall those
grim days.
At White Pass Summit— nearly 3,000
feet higher  than Skagway in  twenty
La\e Bennett near the Tu\on border.
miles!—we leave American territory,
and the scarlet-coated Mounted Policeman greets us as we enter Canada. A
bronze monument, where the flags of the
two countries float side by side, marks
the boundary line. For a very short
distance we travel through British Columbia, and then at Pennington cross into
the Yukon Territory.
On our left, Lake Bennett begins—a
long narrow body of water which the
railway will follow for twenty-six miles.
A stop is made for lunch at Bennett.
Then along the ever-winding shores of
this blue lake, out on a long mountain
ridge, the railway runs, until the little
town of Carcross is reached.
White Horse
Lewes and other little lakes are
passed and then Miles Canyon and
White Horse Rapids. On still days, the
roar of these rapids can be heard even
in the town, about an hour's walk distant. As we stand on the brink of this
famous gorge, no very highly colored
imagination is necessary to conjure up
pictures of the old days. We can
imagine the bold adventurers in their frail
craft nearing these death-dealing rapids,
whose waters are thrown from side to
side in a long serpentine series of twists,
11
 OheUVIH/IITE PASS tocf YUKON-ROUTE
and which are so troubled that the water
rides higher in the middle than at the
sides. Down they came in their mad
rush to the Klondike—not at intervals,
but in a continuous procession that was
(in the words of an eye-witness) Ike
traffic on a city street. Some, becoming
scared, jumped ashore as they saw their
dangers, and watched from the high
cliffs the agonies of their boats; but the
majority stayed with their craft. And
so few came through unpunished!
Those who did wasted no time in going
back to warn their competitors, but
hurried on.
White Horse is a busy little town on
the west bank of Fifty-Mile River (also
known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the Upper Yukon). There is
comfortable hotel accommodation to be
obtained. Trips to the rapids and other
points may be made by automobile over
good roads. It is the terminus of the
railway, and the point of departure for
the steamer trip to Dawson.
To the   Klondike
The journey from White Horse to
Dawson and back, one that can be made
in about a week, is the fitting climax to
the trip "inside." White Horse is the
present head of navigation on the Yukon
waterway (the river in its upper reaches
is really a system of tributaries), which
empties into the sea at St. Michael,
Alaska, over 2,000 miles distant. It is
a constantly changing succession of pictures—rolling hills, sometimes bare,
again heavily wooded, towering mountain ranges, awe-inspiring rapids, with
14
 She WHITE' P
)^i tr tr  31**4 %/ki
YUKON ROUTE.
T^o less attractive is Alastys wealth of bloom.
now and then a quiet stretch of water
between forested banks. Here and
there is an occasional trading-post, or a
mining camp—perhaps the ghost of a
dead "bonanza"—or a hermit settlement where the steamer stops awhile to
Sam McGee
Lake Lebarge, a beautiful widening of
the stream (on whose shores, incidentally, occurred the episode that inspired
Robert Service's celebrated poem about
the cremation of Sam McGee), Hootal-
inqua, Little Salmon and Carmacks, with
its coal mine, are some of the interesting
places passed. The shooting of Five
Finger Rapids, and their postscript Rink
Rapids, gives plenty of thrill to even the
most jaded. At Yukon Crossing, the
overland winter trail to Dawson, used
when the river is frozen up, is passed,
and then Fort Selkirk—an important
trading-centre founded early in the nineteenth century by the Hudson's Bay
Company.
The mouths of mighty tributaries are
passed, amongst them White River—
the only large river that enters the Yukon
from the west or south—and Stewart
River, entrance to the new Mayo silver-
lead camp 175 miles east. Smaller
steamers ply the Stewart as far as Mayo,
whence it is a case of tractor and auto
transport. Swede Creek has a Government Experimental Agricultural Station,
and then we are at Dawson. The trip
from White Horse takes about two days
—the return trip owing to the current, about four days.
Dawson
Dawson, once the focus of the world's
greatest gold rush, the headquarters of
the whole Klondike region, is now hardly
more than a shadow of its former glory.
Mining operations are still in progress,
but they are carried on under hydraulic
and dredging conditions; the picturesque
days of which one reads in Service and
Jack London have departed. Gone with
them are the highly colored, sensational
chapters of Dawson's history, when the
city was the rendezvous of outlaws as
well as greed-crazed miners, when dance
halls, saloons and gambling places ran
wide open for the full twenty-four hours.
But to be able to recall that "them was
the days" makes one a real old-timer, a
sourdough—but not necessarily a more
than middle-aged man.
15
 ~3he WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
Dawson is the administrative centre
of the Yukon Territory, and the headquarters of a large detachment of that
fine body of men, the Mounted Police.
It is beautifully situated on a bend of the
Yukon River, up-to-date, well-built,
with comfortable hotels, fine homes and
pretty flower gardens.
Over good roads one can visit mining
plants and old, played-out but famous
bonanza claims. The Indian village of
Moosehide and the fox farms, are worth
a visit; while the old cabin of Robert W.
Service, the poet-laureate of the Northland, is the objective of many pilgrimages.
To Atlin
To Atlin is another delightful excursion from Skagway, either as a side trip
on the Dawson trip or as one in itself.
The route is the same as before to Car-
cross, but here the commodious steamer
Tutshi is taken.
The steamer first cresses Lake Nares,
and then through the narrows enters
Tagish Lake, horseshoe-shaped and
guarded by high peaks. Old mining
towns and fox farms are seen along the
way. Presently we turn into the Taku
Arm of the lake, a beautiful sheet of
water encompassed by the most inspiring
scenery, and then into Taku Inlet as far
as Taku Landing. Here, a transfer is
made across a three-mile neck of land by
a unique little train.
At the end of the portage we reach
Lake Atlin, and board the twin-screw
motorship Tarahne for a six-mile run to
the little town of Atlin.
There is an indescribable tonic effect
in the Atlin climate. Numerous side
trips can be taken by automobile,
steamer, launch or on foot to many points
of interest. Amongst these are the
placer gold mines, the fox farm, the
Warm Springs and the Indian Village,
and wherever one goes, one will find a
profusion of beautiful wild flowers in
almost endless variety. Then, too,
there are delightful walks along the
shores. Atlin is the base of supplies
for one of the richest hydraulic mining
camps in British Columbia. Those who
like fishing can try their luck at lake
trout, whitefish, or the smaller but
gamey grayling.
Llewellyn Glacier
The principal event of the trip to
Atlin is the afternoon excursion on the
steamer Tarahne. For about forty
miles the boat winds its way through
the narrow mountain-ribbed passage of
the   West   Channel.    The   boat   then
Dawson—hub of the Klondike region.
16
 Mount McKinley.
passes out through Copper Island
Narrows, and the return is made down
the other side of these islands on Lake
Atlin, where a magnificent view is
obtained of the huge Llewellyn Glacier
and the Coast Range.
West Ta\u Arm
Another beautiful scenic trip is that
to the West Taku Arm, which has been
especially designed for passengers who
are making the round trip from Vancouver to Skagway and back on the same
steamship, and who cannot spare sufficient time to avail themselves of one of
the other tours "inside."
The route followed is the same as to
Atlin, except that at Golden Gate,
instead of turning into the Taku Inlet,
the steamer continues a southerly course
and then west, reaching West Taku
Arm Landing and Ben-My-Chree homestead. Passengers sleep on board and
reach Carcross in the morning in time to
catch the southbound train and their
steamer.
A Fine Circle Trip
From Dawson the journey can be continued into central-western and south
western Alaska on a truly magnificent
circle tour. During the summer season
the White Pass and Yukon Route operates steamers down the Yukon River,
actually—at Fort Yukon—crossing the
Arctic Circle. Turning round up the
Tanana River, which flows in from the
south, the steamer brings one, in about
five days from Dawson, to Nenana.
Here the Alaska Railroad is met—
running north to Fairbanks and Chat-
anika, the centre of a great placer gold
mining district, and south to Seward,
on the Gulf of Alaska. The latter takes
one fairly close to Mount McKinley
National Park, and the majestic Mountain itself—highest peak of the North
American continent—is in sight practically all day. Farther south is Anchorage, where the U.S. Government
commenced construction of the Alaska
Railroad into the interior in 1915.
Another route from Fairbanks is by
the Richardson Automobile Highway to
Chitina—a splendid 23^ day motor trip
through a very primitive country, connecting with the Copper River and
Northwestern Railway back to the seaport of Cordova.
17
 Ohe WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
S.S. Whitehorse in Five Finger Rapids
From either Seward or Cordova
steamer can be taken to Juneau, and the
southbound journey resumed there by
Canadian Pacific.
Historical Nptes
The region now known as Alaska
was first visited by white men in 1741,
when two Russian officers, Captains
Bering and Chirikov, explored the coast
as far south as Dixon Entrance. Many
traders and trappers followed them, and
Kodiak Island was settled in 1784.
Owing to the excesses committed by
private traders, who robbed and massacred the Indians, Russia created in 1799
a semi-official corporation called the
Russian-American Company. Alexander
Baranov, a famous administrator, founded
Sitka in 1804. The monopoly of this
company ended in 1861, with the appointment of Prince Matsukov, an imperial governor. The United States had
already made overtures for the purchase
of "Russian America," and in 1867 the
purchase was consummated for the price
of $7,200,000.
But thus far the Northland had been
considered only in terms of fisheries and
the fur trade. The discovery of mineral
wealth was made much more slowly,
and  it was not until   the   sensational
finds of rich "placers"
in the Klondike in 1896,
which culminated in
one of the most hectic
gold rushes of modern
times, that the attention of the world was
riveted upon this fea-
ture. The Yukon
Territory was constituted in 1898. The
Yukon River was explored by Russians as
long ago as 1842, and
in 1883 Lieutenant Frederick Schwatka crossed
the Chilkoot Pass,
descended the Lewes
River to Fort Selkirk, and so down the
river to the sea.
The entrance to the interior country
of the Yukon, back as early as 1860, was
via Dyea and the Chilkoot Trail. When
the Klondike was discovered, the stam-
peders used this trail until the discovery
of the trail from Skagway over the White
Pass to Lake Bennett. The Chilkoot
Trail was practically abandoned during
1897; the White Pass was the "Trail of
'98," and was not abandoned until the
White Pass Railway was completed.
Boo\s About the Tiprthland
A great many interesting books can
be obtained about Alaska and the
Yukon. By all means read some before
you start. There are the well-known
stories by Rex Beach—"The Spoilers,"
"The Barrier," and "The Silver Horde";
Jack London's famous "Call of the Wild"
and many others; Elizabeth Robins*
"Magnetic North" and "Come and
Find Me"; James Oliver Curwood's
"Alaskan"; Edison Marshall's "Seward's
Folly"; and Robert W. Service's "Trail
of Ninety-Eight."
Service's poems, "Songs of a Sourdough" and "Ballads of a Cheechako,"
are, we imagine, so well known as hardly
to need mention.
18
 Indians
The natives of the West Coast are
strikingly different from other North
American Indians; to many they are not
Indians at all, but a race apart, whose
characteristics are reminiscent of Asia.
Their ancestors are indeed likely to have
come to these shores across the sea or
over the Strait of Bering, long ago, after
earlier migrations had already peopled
most of the two American continents.
The name of "Siwash," ignorantly
given them, is derived from the French
sauvage. They really belong to more
than five races, whose languages are
totally different; the Salish, whose habitat once covered much territory around
Victoria, Vancouver, and the main
coast north and south—the Nootka,
who dwell on the west coast of Vancouver Island and their distant relatives,
the Kwakiutl, whose territories stretch
northwards from Vancouver Island to a
point near the Skeena River—the Tsim-
shian of the Skeena and Nass Rivers and
the adjacent coast, near the present
town of Prince Rupert—the Haidas of
Queen Charlotte and Prince of Wales
Islands—and the Tlingit of the Alaskan
coast. Another race, whose name is Dene
or Athapascan, inhabit much of the interior, beyond the boundaries of the
above-named nations.
The west coast natives are essentially
fisher folk; they formerly secured their
food almost wholly from the sea. It con
sisted of seals, whales, salmon, halibut,
fish roe and oolachen, or candle fish.
Their dug-out canoes stood to them as
did the horse to the buffalo-hunting Indians of the prairies a century ago.
Before the advent of Europeans they
could hardly ever venture beyond their
frontiers. War and daring raids were
most common among them, for they
were bold, venturesome and cruel. Even
to this day they are fond of relating
tales of adventure of the none too distant past.
They were not nomadic, as were their
eastern neighbors, but each family
claimed hunting grounds and territories
within the national boundaries. They
migrated to their hunting and fishing
camps in the spring and returned to their
villages on the coast in the autumn.
Community life was active only in the
winter—that is, during the potlatch
season. The leaders then proceeded
sternly to their business—the exchange
of goods, the promotion of their children
and nephews, and the various ceremonies
that appertained to their social welfare
and dutiful commemoration of the deeds
of their ancestors. They were keen and
thrifty, and their will unbending. Their
numbers were formerly considerable, but
they are now passing away like the other
natives; and their culture has forever
given way to that of invaders from the
West and the East who are gradually
driving them off the land.
'::7mmf^:rM27im. 77Xr
r'-,'v'
■   .77     ;..
ftft:-;ft
.     .   '"\ .7;77m>m7  ' '   "
'7:!;;'; ■"^^XXXXi:
19
 Ohe WHITE PASS and YUKON ROUTE
Totem  Poles
The totem poles of the Indians of British
Columbia constitute one of the most striking
features of the whole north-west coast. These
long shafts, irregularly planted on the seashore
among smoke and feast houses, convey impressions from a strange world. The rugged peaks
and wooded gorges beyond, with their ever-
changing shades of dark greens and soft blues,
provide a unique setting for them. And the
squat, Mongolian features of the Indians themselves carry one's imagination into the mysterious realms of Asia.
These remarkable carvings should not be
mistaken for idols or deities. They were
never worshipped. But they are pictorial records of history and mythology, as the Indians understand them. Some of them represent the Raven, the Eagle, the Killer-whale
and the Wolf, which are the emblems of the
largest social groups in the nation. The
Bear, the Frog, the Sea-Lion, the Beaver, the
Thunder-Bird and many others are the crests
of various clans. Here we have to do only
with coats-of-arms.
Other characters are occasionally introduced
among these figures, which are understood
through the medium of myths and tales of the
past. These are the ancestors of the owners,
and often the "uncle" in whose honor the pole
was erected after his death, by his nephew or
legitimate successor. Battles and other noted
events are also commemorated on poles. A man
who wishes to ridicule a rival or discredit
an insolvent debtor may represent him head
downwards on whatever pole he may erect
in a feast.
There were once many native artists of
great repute, who were hired at large for
carving poles, according to definite instructions furnished them. Large logs were
hauled over long distances for the purpose.
When the carving was finished, numerous
guests assembled for the potlatch or feast of
commemoration. Lavish presents were made
to the guests, whose function it was to remember the meaning of the figures on the poles
and acknowledge the rights of the legitimate
owners.
^,
I
20
 Ohe WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
Sporting
The "roof of
the world" has
been so richly endowed by Nature
with mighty snowcapped mountains,
expansive inland
seas, vast areas of
trackless wilderness
and lonely tundra
that it offers the
sportsman a wonderful variety of
hunting. In the
interior country of
Northern British
Columbia, the
Yukon Territory
and Alaska, the giant moose, the
stately caribou, the wary deer, savage
silver-tip grizzlies, mountain sheep, mountain goat and many other varieties of
game roam at large.
Several species of bear are to be found
in this mountainous domain, ranging
from the huge polar bear and terrible
Kodiak, down through the different
varieties to the common black bear once
found all over America.
The northern moose, the largest member of the deer family, is plentifully
distributed throughout the greater part
of this country. Magnificent trophies
are brought out each season. Caribou,
too, are abundant, and inhabit the treeless and tundra sections of the interior.
Mountain sheep and goat are among the
most prized game animals.
The fishing affords an interesting side
line to a big game hunt, and the swift,
tumbling rivers, well stocked with gamy
fighting trout, and the mountain-rimmed
lakes of unequalled beauty, all combine to make this a paradise for the
sportsman.
Reliable outfitters and guides are
available, through
whom complete ar-
rangements for
hunting trips can
be made; and the
General Tourist
Agent, Canadian
Pacific Railway,
Montreal, has
gathered consider-
%v able information
about hunting
M territories, which
will gladly be
imparted on request.
21
 JA? WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE'
Clothing, Meals, Etc.
Passengers should provide themselves
with a good, warm top-coat. The
general weather is very fine and warm,
but a good covering for the evening or
a damp day is very desirable. The
Canadian Pacific does not supply steamer
rugs, but has arranged to carry on the
steamships a limited supply of rugs,
which will be rented to passengers for
the round trip at a nominal charge. The
company does not supply the regulation
ocean liner deck-chair, but supplies
comfortable camp chairs with backs,
free of charge. Barbers, ladies' hairdressers and manicurists are carried on all
steamships.
The meals provided on the "Princess"
steamships are breakfast, lunch and
dinner, with light refreshments served
in addition in the dining saloon at night.
Breakfast is served from 7-30 to 9 a.m.
and the first sittings of luncheon and
dinner at 12 noon and 6 p.m., with
second sittings forty-five minutes later.
While the steamship is in port at Skagway, meals and berth are not included in
the passage money, but can be secured if
the passenger prefers staying aboard.
Victrolas are carried, with a suitable
supply of records, as well as a piano.
Rail   Connections
The quickest and most picturesque
route to Vancouver from the East is by
Canadian Pacific through the Canadian
Rockies, six hundred miles of the most magnificent mountain scenery in the world.
Immigration Inspection
Passengers entering Alaska from Canada are required to pass United States Immigration Inspection at Ketchikan, the
port of entry. So far as bona fide tourists
are concerned, this inspection is not
strict. Passengers will be asked by
purser for certain information regarding
age, place of residence, business, etc.,
and will be given a card by him. This
card is presented by the holder to the
immigration inspector, who boards steamer at Ketchikan, and as soon as particulars shown by purser on manifest are
checked by the inspector, the passenger
can go ashore. There is a similar inspection by the Canadian Immigration
Department on arrival of steamer southbound at Prince Rupert.
Passports  are not necessary.
Times
Times of arrival and departure at the
various ports are posted on the bulletin
board of the ships.
22
 Cfhe WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
From
To
Distances
The distances between the different
ports of the Alaska trip, and the approximate time between each, are as follows:
Nautical
Miles
183
287
92
99
148
100
Hours
Vancouver Alert Bay. . .   14
Alert Bay Prince Rupert 22
Prince Rupert. Ketchikan 8
Ketchikan.... Wrangell 7
Wrangell Juneau 11
Juneau Skagway. 8
Baggage
Free allowance on "Princess" steamships of 150 pounds on whole tickets,
and 75 pounds on half tickets, will be
granted with the customary charge for
excess weight. Steamer trunks intended
for use in staterooms must not exceed 14
inches in height.
Through passengers from eastern or
southern points making the Alaska trip
will be granted free storage at Canadian
Pacific wharves at Vancouver, Victoria
or Seattle for thirty days, after which
regular storage  charges will accrue.
Hotels
The following hotels are situated at
points en route to Alaska, and at inland
points beyond Skagway:
Ketchikan,   Stedman,  T^elson,   Inger'
soil; Wrangell, Wrangell; Juneau, Gastineau, Zynda; Skagway, Pullen House,
Golden Tsforth, Portland; Carcross; Caribou; Atlin, Atlin Inn, Royal, Kootenay;
White Horse, White Pass, Commercial,
Regina, White Horse Inn; Dawson, Royal
Alexandra, Regina, Tukpnia, Principal,
Rochester.
Most of the above are run on the
European plan, rates from $1.50 up.
Those on American plan, $5.00 up.
Meals a la carte.
Customs
Baggage checked through from any
United States point to any point in
Alaska, or from any Canadian point to
any point in the Yukon territory, or
vice-versa, and not required en route, is
not subject to Customs examination.
Hand baggage, or checked baggage required en route, is subject to examination
northbound by the United States Customs at Ketchikan, and southbound by
the Canadian Customs at Prince Rupert.
Checked baggage, if desired, may be forwarded to destination in bond.
The baggage of passengers making the
White Horse, Atlin or Dawson trips will
also be examined by Canadian Custom?
on entering Yukon territory, and by the
United States Customs on returning.
23
 ...........
CAHADIAH   PACIFIC   PRINCESS   STEAMSHIPS
To Alaska by the Inside Passage, and
back, is a two-thousand-mile nine-day
journey from Vancouver, with six ports
of call. To handle the tourist business,
the Canadian Pacific operates during the
summer months three of the finest of its
well-known "Princess" steamships,which
are large, modern vessels of the most
comfortable sea-going type.
Staterooms on the Princess Steamships are light, cozy and well-ventilated.
They are not overcrowded, but designed
to accommodate only two passengers per
stateroom. On each ship there are a
few "de luxe" rooms with private
bath-rooms, and also some with sofa
berths.
The community rooms—dining room,
observation room, lounges, smoking
room, etc.—are bright, cheerful and
charmingly furnished. All three ships
have dance floors.
The PRINCESS LOUISE is 330 feet
long, with a passenger capacity o~ 264.
The PRINCESS CHARLOTTE is
330 feet long, with a passenger capacity
of 248.
The PRINCESS ALICE is 289 feet
long, with a passenger capacity of 226.
These three ships are oil-burners, and
are fitted with wireless telegraph.
Northbound Sailings
Canadian Pacific Alaska Steamships
leave Vancouver every Wednesday and
Saturday (from early June until late
August). During the balance of the
year—at regular intervals. See current
time-tables.
Steamships also sail from Victoria at
12.00 midnight previous to advertised
sailing date. Passengers from Seattle
can connect at Vancouver by leaving
Seattle by local steamer on morning of
sailing day, or previous night.
Arrive at Skagway on the morning of
the fourth day after leaving Vancouver.
Southbound   Sailings
Canadian Pacific Alaska Steamships
leave Skagway every Monday and
Thursday during the summer tourist
season (June, July, August). Regular
sailings at other times of year.
Sailing hour from Skagway—7-00 p.m.
(Alaska time is one hour slower than
Pacific Standard Time.)
Arrive Vancouver—4 days later, about
7 a.m.
Arrive Victoria—4 days later, afternoon.
Arrive Seattle—4 days later, evening.
24
 CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA AND UNITED STATES
Atlanta Georgia—K. A. Cook, General Agent Passenger" Dept 1017 Healey Bldg.
Banff Alberta—J. A. McDonald, District Passenger Agent C. P. R. Station.
Boston Massachusetts—L. R. Hart, General Agent Passenger Dept  ,405 Boylston St.
Buffalo . . New York—W. P. Wass, General Agent Passenger Dept " 160 Pearl St.
Calgary Alberta—G. D. Brophy, District Passenger Agent.. C. P. R. Station.
Chicago Illinois—T. J. Wall, General Agent Rail Traffic..: .71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati Ohio—M. E. Malone, General Agent Passenger Dept 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland Ohio—G. H. Griffin, General Agent Passenger Dept 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas Texas—A. Y. Chancellor, Travelling Passenger Agent 906 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit Michigan—G. G. McKay, General Agent Passenger Dept 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton Alberta—C. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent C. P. R. Bldg.
Fort William Ontario—H. J. Skynner, City Passenger Agent  108 So. May St.
Guelph Ontario—W. C Tully, City Passenger Agent.  30 Wyndham St.
Halifax. Nova Scotia—A. C. McDonald, City Passenger Agent. ; 117 Hollis St.
Hamilton Ontario—A. Craig, City Passenger Agent  . .Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu T.H.—Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau Alaska—W. L. Coates, Agent.
Kansas City Missouri—R. G. Norris, City Passenger Agent.: 723 Walnut St.
Ketchikan Alaska—E. Anderson, Agent.
Kingston. Ontario—J. H. Welch, City Passenger Agent 180 Wellington St.
London  Ontario—H. J. McCallum, City Passenger Agent 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles California—W. Mcllroy, General Agent Passenger Dept 621 So. Grand Ave.
Memphis Tennessee—E. A. Humler, Travelling Pass'r Agent Porter Bldg.
Milwaukee Wisconsin—F. T. Sansom, City Passenger Agent 68 East Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis Minnesota—H. M. Tait, General Agent Passenger Dept 611 2nd Ave. South
.__ i '  ,       j P. E. Gingras, District Passenger Agent Windsor Station
Montreal  .Quebec  [F> c  LydoI1) General Agent Passenger Dept 201 St. James St.
Moose Jaw Saskatchewan—T. J. Colton, Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson British Columbia—J. S. Carter, District Passenger Agent Baker and Ward Sts.
New York New York—F. R. Perry, General Agent Rail Traffic Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay. Ontario—C. H. White, District Passenger Agent  .87 Main Street West
Ottawa Ontario—J. A. McGill, General Agent Passenger Dept 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro .'. .Ontario—J. Skinner, City Passenger Agent George St.
Philadelphia Pennsylvania—J. C. Patteson, General Agent Pass'r Dept 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh ..... .Pennsylvania—C. L. Williams, General Agent Passenger Dept 338 Sixth Ave.
Portland Oregon—W. H. Deacon, General Agent Passenger Dept 148A Broadway
Prince Rupert. .British Columbia—W. C. Orchard, General Agent.
Quebec Quebec—C. A. Langevin, General Agent Passenger Dept Palais Station
Regina Saskatchewan—J. W. Dawson, District Passenger Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John..... .New Brunswick—G. E. Carter, District Passenger Agent 40 King St.
St. Louis Missouri—Geo. P. Carbrey, General Agent Passenger Dept  .412 Locust St.
St. Paul Minnesota—W. H. Lennon, General Agent Passenger Dept., Soo Line.Robert and Fourth St.
San Francisco California—F. L. Nason, General Agent Passenger Dept 675 Market St.
Saskatoon Saskatchewan—R. T. Wilson, City Ticket Agent :. 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie Ontario—R. S. Merifield, City Passenger Agent 529 Queen Street
Seattle Washington—E. L. Sheehan, General Agent Passenger Dept 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke  . .Quebec—J. A. Metivier, City Passenger Agent... 91 Wellington St. North
Skagway Alaska—L. H. Johnston, Agent.
Spokane    . .Washington—E. L. Cardie, Traffic Manager, S.I. Ry Old Nat. Bank Bldg.
Tacoma  Washington—D. C. O'Keefe, City Passenger Agent 1113 Pacific Ave.
i W. Fulton, Assistant General Passenger Agent Canadian Pacific Building
Toronto Ontario {H. R. Mathewson, General Agent Passenger Dept... .Canadian Pacific Building
(G. B. Burpee, District Passenger Agent Union Stn., Room 367
Vancouver British Columbia—F. H. Daly, District Passenger Agent 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria British Columbia—L. D. Chetham, District Passenger Agent . ., 1102 Government St.
Washington.District of Columbia—C. E. Phelps, General Agent Pass'r Dept 14th and New York Ave.
Windsor , Ontario—W. C. Elmer, City Passenger Agent 34 Sandwich St., West
Winnipeg Manitoba—C. B. Andrews, District Passenger Agent  Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp Belgium—E. A. Schmitz.  . .25 Quai Jordaens
Belfast Ireland—W. H. Boswell 14 Donegall Place
Birmingham England-—W. T. Treadaway 4 Victoria Square
Bristol England—A. S. Ray 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Brussels Belgium—G. L. M. Servais . . .98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
Glasgow Scotland—W. Stewart 25 Bothwell St.
Hamburg Germany—T. H. Gardner Gansemarkt 3
Liverpool England—H  T. Penny Pier Head
^    ,     .   /C. E. Jenkins  62-65 Charing Cross, S.W. 1
London England  |G> Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall St. E.C. 3
Manchester. England—J. W. Maine     31 Mosley Street
Paris France—A. V. Clark 24 Blvd des Capucines
Rotterdam , Holland—J. S. Springett   v. Coolsingel No. 91
Southampton England—H. Taylor   .7 Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong China—G. E. Costello, General Agent Passenger Dept  Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe Japan—B. G. Ryan, Passenger Agent 7 Harima Machi
Manila Philippine Islands—J. R. Shaw, General Agent 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai China—A. M.-Parker, General Agent Passenger Dept  .No. 4 The Bund
Yokohama  Japan—E. Hospes, General Agent Passenger Dept 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, ETC.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand, Union House, Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for New Zealand, Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide South Australia—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland New Zealand—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane Queensland—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch New Zealand—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Dunedin  ,New Zealand'—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Fremantle West Australia—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart Tasmania—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Launceston . .Tasmania—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
A/r~iK~,„.«~ ™^™-;o  /Harry  Boyer,   Pass'r  Rep., C.P.R., 59 William  St.
Melbourne Victoria { ^m  &J£ Cq q{ Ngw z£a'land (U'd } Thog Cook & g^.
Perth West Australia—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva Fiji—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Sydney New South Wales—Union S.S. .Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Wellington New Zealand—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd).
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques—Good the World Over
This cover printed in Canada, 1930.
 CIFIC
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to ALASKA
Ohe WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
Looking down on Wrangell
Over the White Pass and Tu\on Route
"BensMyChree"
JSLm
Another view of Juneau
A "pan" valued at $1,000
12
13
  CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver, B.C.
Empress Hotel
Victoria, B.C.
ON THE PACIFIC COAST
The largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, overlooking the Strait of
Georgia, and serving equally the business man and the tourist. Situated in
the heart of the shopping district of Vancouver. Golf, motoring, fishing,
hunting, bathing, steamer excursions. Open all year. European plan. Onchalf
mile from station.
A luxurious hotel in Canada's Evergreen Playground. An equable climate
has made Victoria a favorite summer and winter resort. Motoring, yachting,
sea and stream fishing, shooting and alLyear golf. Crystal Garden for swimming
and music. Open all year. European plan. Facing wharf.
Hotel Sicamous
Sicamous, B.C.
Altitude 1,153 feet.
Emerald Lake Chalet
near Field, B.C.
Altitude 4,272 feet.
Chateau Lake Louise,
Lake Louise, Alberta
Altitude 5,670 feet.
Banff Springs Hotel,
Banff, Alberta
Altitude 4,625 feet.
IN THE ROCKIES
Junction for the orchard districts of the Okanagan Valley, and stop-over
point for those who wish to see the Thompson and Fraser Canyons by day-
light. Lake Shuswap district offers good boating and excellent trout fishing
and hunting in season.  Open all year. American plan. At station.
A charming Chalet hotel situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, amidst
the picturesque Alpine scenery of the Yoho National Park. Roads and trails
to the Burgess Pass, Y(3ho Valley, etc. Boating and fishing. Open summer
months.   American plan.  Seven miles from station.
Facing an exquisite Alpine Lake in Banff National Park. Alpine climbing
with Swiss guides, pony trips or walks to Lakes in the Clouds, Saddleback, etc.,
drives or motoring to Moraine Lake, boating, fishing. Open summer months.
European plan.  3>£ miles from station by motor railway.
A Scottish baronial hotel in the heart of the Banff National Park, backed by
three splendid mountain ranges. Alpine climbing, motoring and drives on
good roads, bathing, hot sulphur springs, golf, tennis, fishing, boating and
riding.  Open summer months.   European plan.  1% miles from station.
Hotel Palliser,
Calgary, Alberta
Hotel Saskatchewan
Regina, Sask.
Royal Alexandra Hotel
Winnipeg, Manitoba
ON THE PRAIRIES
A hotel of the metropolitan standard, in this prosperous city of Southern
Alberta. Suited equally to the business man and the tourist en route to or
from the Canadian Rockies. Good golfing and motoring. Open all year.
European plan.   At station.
A new hotel in the old capital of the Northwest Territory, headquarters
of the Mounted Police. Golf, tennis. Most central hotel for the prairies.
Open all year. European plan.
A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada, appealing to those
who wish to break their transcontinental journey. The centre of Winnipeg's
social life. Good golfing and motoring. Open all year. European plan. At
station.
Toronto, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Quebec, Que.
McAdam, N.B.
St. Andrews, N.B.
IN EASTERN CANADA
The Royal York—The largest hotel in the British Empire.  Open all year.
Place Viger Hotel—A charming hotel in Canada's largest city. Open all year.
Chateau Frontenac—A metropolitan hotel—in the most historic city of North America.   Open
all year.
McAdam Hotel—A commercial and sportsman's hotel. Open all year.
The Algonquin—The social centre of Canada's most fashionable seashore summer resort.  Open
summer months.
HOTELS AND  BUNGALOW  CAMPS  REACHED
BY CANADIAN PACIFIC
Moraine Lake, Alta Moraine Lake Camp Field, B.C.. . Yoho Valley Camp
«     «. ™T.   v ^ Castle Mountain Penticton, B.C  . HotelIncola
Banff-Windermere (Bungalow Camp Cameron Lake, B.C.,.. Cameron Lake Chalet
Automobile Highway        (Radium Hoi £.ei^ra' 9,nt; XT.Devil«GaP£amP
J Springs Camp Nipigon, Ont Nipigon River Camp
Agassiz, B C Harrison HotVSprings Hotel French River, Ont French River Camp
Hector, B.C.. Wapta Camp Digby, N.S  The Pines
Hector, B.C Lake O'Hara Camp Kentville, N.S  Cornwallis Inn
 ^m
k   \\WW\\K% PACIFIC   to . .
Alaska
T
he Inside
Passage of
the   coast
of British
Columbia and
Alaska's "panhandle" ' is one of
the sights of the
world. SirW.M.
Conway, the celebrated traveller,
writing of the
three great Inside Passages,
that of this long
littoral, that of
the far taper-end
of the dual continent, and that
of the Norwegian coast, was
inclined to give
the palm to this
one — the spectacular thousand miles from Vancouver to
Skagway—and relegate the Norwegian
one to third place. The main difference, he
commented, between the inside passage
at the taper-end of South America and
this northern one is the almost entire
absence of man. in the former, and the
frequent evidence of his presence here
among similar majestic scenes.
But few are those who can institute
the comparison between these two from
personal observation, because it is only a
privately chartered steamer that ever
prys into the Chilean fiords, all others,
apart from the passage through the
Strait of Magellan, keeping out in the
ocean. Up here it is otherwise. From
the decks of one of the Princess steamers,
all who care for such sights can see them.
The voyage to Skagway and back is an
experience and leaves memories for life.
Creature comforts are well attended
to on the Princess steamers.   If between
PRINTED IN CANADA, I93I
MBS
Atlin La\e reflects Cathedral Mountain
breakfast and lunch the ozone blent with
the odour of pines and firs makes you
feel the need of sustenance, the stewards
will give you a forenoon's cup of bouillon. If, after dinner in the evening,
pacing the deck to take it all in, lose as
little as you may of the experience, you
feel you can't last till breakfast unfed,
there's a late supper set in the dining
room.
To see that quiet loneliness and austere beauty, tree-clad uninhabited islands
slipping past and, through gaps to east,
the glaciers of the coast range hanging
along the sky, to the accompaniment of
the music of the ship's orchestra, gives a
dream-like quality to the long twining
voyage. And there's a sense, an effect,
as of far and foreign travel here. It is a
strange land. The barbaric old totem-
poles of the coast Indians, when we go
ashore, play their part, no doubt, in
creating that effect.
r- *{0<sC£*^
Hu,   tfti
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to ALASKA
To begin with, churning up the coast,
one is impressed by the vast serenity of
it all, but as the voyage continues something else enters into one. At night you
notice the Pole Star drawing nearer;
and you notice how long the summer
day lasts. It lingers in the sky above us,
it is still clinging to the water-highway
ahead of us, when our watches tell us it
is night. We begin, in fact, to feel that
spell of the north of which we have
heard. Not only the desire for quick
fortune in gold out of the land makes
that spell. There is an invitation, a lure,
in the silent and austere balsam-scented
immensity. Tourists we may be, walking
the decks of a Princess steamer on a
tourists' trip, but we share the curiosity,
surging along this coast, not only of the
gold-seekers who came this way only
yesterday, so to speak, but of Captain
Vancouver and all the other entranced
early voyagers who reconnoitred along
here wondering what next they might
see.
"There's never a law of God or man
Runs north of Fifty-three"
Until a little over thirty years ago
Alaska was almost unknown, a white
space on the map over which was
scrawled "Come-and-find-me." That is,
to most of the world; for the Northland
had even then its pioneers, its prospectors, who had fished its teeming coasts,
trapped its furs, started small towns, and
panned the first coarse colorings of gold
along its creeks. But outside of these
sturdy old-timers, Alaska, with its side-
partner, the Yukon, was hardly more
than a geographical curiosity—a huge,
unpopulated, unexplored, inhospitable
block of land over three-quarters of a
million square miles in size, forming the
northern tip of the American continent.
It had, as far as one could estimate then,
no very remarkable resources or trading
possibilities, and was generally looked
upon as a land of perpetual winter,
frozen permanently under solid snow
and ice. The discovery of gold in the
Klondike in 1896, in such vast quantities
as  to astound humanity,  let loose so
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to ALASKA
much sensation that overnight the new
bonanza became almost the most famous
place on earth. That feverish stampede
to the north was like nothing that had
ever happened before, or that has ever
happened since.
The Trail of '98
Back in '98 someone took a photograph of an everyday scene in the White
Pass. It shows, struggling over the
steep, dangerous snow-clad wastes, a
thin black streak nearly two miles long
—a streak composed entirely of men,
mushing "inside" to the Klondike, with
nearly 600 miles of travel ahead of them.
And that was an everyday scene—
happening all the time.
They had their hardships, those early
days, before the railway was built beyond Skagway, to which we are sailing,
when cheechako and sourdough alike had
to travel that arduous path over the
Chilkoot Pass or, later, the White Pass.
Greed pulled them forward; the crowd
behind pressed them onwards; if they
could not endure the strain they fell out
Trail of '98 from Inspiration Point
and perished. There was no turning
back. It was truly no place for weaklings,
for one was beset not only by a hostile
Nature, but also by the wickedness and
depravity of mankind. The opportunities drew to the Northland some of the
most lawless characters of the earth,
and had it not been for the swift justice
meted out by the Royal Northwest
Mounted Police, it might have been true
that
"There's never a law of God or man
Runs north of Fifty'three."
The Spell of the Tiprth
The Northland put a spell on those
who made its acquaintance then. It can
put a spell on us to-day, long before we
reach the voyage's end, throbbing our
way through the Inside Passage. It is a
land of mystery and of contrast. Never
was so mistaken an idea as that it is
always winter in the North. If it were,
whence come the gorgeous, vivid flower
gardens that one sees everywhere, at
the landings on the way and on arrival
there? The answer is simple: the warm
Japan current, striking Vancouver
 PRINCESS STEAM/SHIPS to ALASKA
The Midnight Sun
Island, is deflected northward, and
carries to the land of the Midnight Sun
the same delightful humidity that the
Pacific Coast knows. Not but what in
winter, inland over the White Pass, it
can be cold!
Marked contrast between the old
days and to-day is observable in transportation. For the Chilkoot Pass Trail
has been superseded by the comfortable
railway journey over the White Pass,
and the extraordinary, haphazard and
overcrowded steamer experiences of the
early days have been superseded by the
magnificent service provided by the
Canadian Pacific Princess steamships.
Leaving Vancouver
The voyage to Alaska can be divided
into two parts. From Vancouver to
Ketchikan the journey is mostly through
narrow channels, with steep shores
heavily timbered to the water's edge.
The second part, from Ketchikan to
Skagway, is through wider stretches of
water, with glaciers, waterfalls and
rugged mountains on either side, and
richly colored with purple twilights of
Alaska.
Memorable effects are sometimes provided in the narrows of this Inside
Passage, different on every trip according
to the weather or the season. On nights
of full moon the voyagers may be held
spell-bound on deck by the spectacle of
not one but many moon-rises. It sounds
like a miracle—to see the moon rise four
or five times one night; but thus it is
sometimes. It swims up in a saddle of
the high, night-flattened ranges to east,
and the mountains to west, that were
similarly flattened, are illumined. Their
ultimate peaks show; their high snow-
creases glitter. The light runs down
them and reveals their lower flounces of
sleeping forest. Then swiftly the light
rushes up them, pursued by darkness,
and again they are just silhouettes of
mountains. A peak to east has doused
the moon. It swims up again in the next
saddle, and the spectacle is repeated.
One wonders if it can happen yet again,
or if the roll of the world will bring the
moon, next time, above the highest
peak, set free in the sky for the night.
But no. Over and over again, though
higher each time, it floats up to disclose
the scene, then a great flaunt of peak
 PRINCESS STEAM/SHIPS to ALASKA
following a saddle obscures it. Things
like that go into one's box of memories
from this strange voyaging, great quiet
manifestations of Nature.
Alert Bay
Our first stop is at Alert Bay, a small
village on a small island—Cormorant Island—situated close to Vancouver Island.
It is nevertheless one of the principal
salmon - canning centres of the Coast.
Here, in fact, will be our first glimpse
of this important industry, and during
the time in port the canneries invite
visitors to inspect the highly interesting
processes of turning a large, handsome
salmon into shiny little round cans.
Alert Bay is an old settlement, with a
considerable Indian population; and
here, too, we make our first contact with
another object typical of the Northland
—the totem pole. The Indian cemetery,
with some modern poles, is well worth
the short stroll to see it.
Prince Rupert
On the morning of the second day we
reach Prince Rupert, the most northerly
city of any size in Canada, with a population of about 7,000. Built on a circle of
hills formed of very hard rock, the city is
considerably above the level of the
wharf and is reached by a long flight of
steps.
And here you see, and smell, where
the halibut come from, Prince Rupert
being an important fishing centre. If
luck be with you the fishing boats may
be coming in and slipping alongside the
wharf while the Princess steamer lies
there to give you an hour- or two for
sight-seeing ashore. You see the fish
swung up by the derrick-load and
slithering onto the clean-scrubbed platforms on which, in thigh-high rubber
boots, men await them, two men to a
platform—to give them their first
attention ashore.
Entering Alas\a
About three hours after leaving Prince
Rupert, Green Island Lighthouse indicates our nearness to the international
boundary line between Canada and
Alaska (United States). Dixon Entrance,
last entrance of the open Pacific Ocean,
is crossed, and we wind our way through
Revilla Gigedo Channel—here called
Tongass Narrows—to Ketchikan.
Prince Rupert, B.C.
5
J
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS'to ALASKA
Ketchikan
Ketchikan (an Indian word meaning
"the town under the eagle") is the
southern-most town in Alaska, situated
on Revilla Gigedo Island. It might also
be said to be now the most prosperous
town in Alaska, for salmon and halibut
have made it rich and given it large
canneries and cold storage plants. It is
also a mining centre for copper, gold,
platinum, silver and lead, the well-
known Salt Chuck platinum mines being
within 30 miles. Ketchikan has a bustling air, with hotels, stores and banks.
There is also a pleasant walk to the
waterfall in Ketchikan Creek (about 15
minutes), where in the late summer
months thousands of salmon may be seen
leaping and struggling through the rushing, foaming water on their way to the
spawning banks. There are two splendid
totem poles— the Chief Johnson totem,
surmounted by Kajuk, a fabled bird of
the mountain which amuses itself by
throwing rocks at ground hogs, with the
Raven and the Frog Woman with her
children and the Salmon below; and the
Kyan totem, surmounted by the Crane,
followed by the Kyak, another legendary
bird, and the Bear.
The Third Day
A distinct change of scenery occurs
from now on. The stretches of water
become  wide,  and mountains  rise on
either side, with waterfalls tumbling
down and glaciers crowning their crests.
The steamer reaches Wrangell about 4.00
a.m., and leaves before breakfast time.
We shall, however, have ample time to
visit it on the southbound voyage.
Wrangell
Wrangell, situated on the island of
the same name, is one of the oldest cities
of Alaska, and is named after Baron
Wrangell, who was governor about
1830. It was originally a trading post,
populated mainly by Indians. Part of
the Russian fort remains, and there are
also some very old totem poles near the
wharf. Wrangell is at the mouth of the
Stikine River, which, navigable for about
170 miles, is the entry point to the celebrated Cassiar big-game country.
Two hours after leaving Wrangell the
ship enters Wrangell Narrows. At the
north end of the Narrows lies the old
town of Petersburg, whose name indicates its origin in the days of the
Russian regime. It is now a flourishing
fishing centre. Kupreanof Island is on
the west, and after crossing Frederick
Sound and Cape Fanshaw, we enter
Stephen's Passage.
Taku Glacier
We are now surrounded by the typical
grandeur of Alaska and when we turn
Petersburg, Alaska
6
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to ALASKA
Taku Glacier — a
mile wide, one hundred feet thic\
aside up an inlet there comes a sudden
hush on deck; there is a look of astonishment on the faces round us. We slow
down. We lie still. We are making a
call upon no little coastal town but upon
Taku Glacier.
Taku Glacier is one of the loneliest
and most majestic things in the world.
We get so close to it in comfort that here
again contrast makes an experience more
memorable: on the one hand the Princess
(temporarily dwarfed when confronting
its vastness), with all the sophistication
of trig berths and settees and vases of
cut flowers on the tables, on the other
that terrific product of the high snows
and immense ranges. On calm days it is
all beauty and grandeur. On misty days
it is perhaps as impressive, coming down
out of nothing, taking dim shape as if it
were a solidification of the mist that
veils its height. It fills the inlet's end
with its blue-green base, cracked and
caverned. Ice-calves break off and drift
toward us. A sun-glow sifts through
the haze and gulls scream their white
lines across it. Or full sun may be on it,
accentuating the hyaline quality of that
living blue-green ice, making it irrides-
cent, deepening the shadows in its
crevasses and frontal caverns to indigo.
After some while of silent staring we
creep away from it as though apologetic
for our intrusion and it hides itself again
in mist, or flashes farewell to us.
There is something almost uncanny
about glaciers, frozen rivers. This one
comes down from an enormous snow-
field of the interior, and just as many
rivers may take their rise in the same
uplands to flow different ways, so it is
with the glaciers created by that interior
snow-field. From the same vast dome of
snow, constantly refreshed, there flows
down the Llewellyn Glacier to plunge
not into ocean as does the Taku here,
but into Lake Atlin, a hundred miles or
so inland. And between these points,
similarly fed, is the Denver Glacier that
slips down into the lap of the mountains
back of Ben-My-Chree at the end of
West Taku arm. And the Mendenhall Glacier, to which you can motor to
pay your respects to when the Princess
stops at Juneau, is but another member
as it were of that family.
 'PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to:ALASKA
Ketchikan is seen above; and at the centre left, the harbor of Prince Rupert; centre right and bottom left
the main street and the water-front at Juneau.    The village of Alert Bay completes the group
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to ALASKA
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The Princess Steamships are splendid, roomy vessels.    This is the Princess Charlotte.    J^pte the spacious
dining saloon and the broad open decks
9
 ..PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to ALASKA
Juneau
About an hour's steaming up Gastineau
Channel brings us to Juneau, clinging
to the base and sides of Mount Juneau,
which towers 3,500 feet almost perpendicularly above. Juneau, named after its
French-Canadian founder, is the capital
of Alaska, the residence of the Governor,
and the seat of all government departments. With a population of about 4,000,
it is a bright and interesting city, built
(like so many of these coast settlements)
partly on piles over the water, partly
on bare rock, with modern hotels and
stores, and many attractive residences
and public buildings.
Juneau has good roads and automobiles a-plenty; one particularly interesting ride is to the face of the Mendenhall
Glacier (23^ hours return) or to Auk Lake
(an hour longer). A short hike away is
the Gold Creek Basin, the site of the first
placer gold strike in Alaska, made by
Joe Juneau and Richard Haines in the
early eighties.
The Lynn Canal
The steamer leaves Juneau at midnight, and reaches Skagway about 9.00
a.m.;  but on the southbound journey
"Soapy Smith's SkulV at Skagway
there is ample opportunity to see the
beautiful Lynn Canal, which, with the
possible exception of the Taku Glacier,
provides the most wonderful scenery of
all. For over 80 miles we steam up this
arm of the sea, which varies in width
from one to five miles. Mountains of
rock capped with snow, towering glaciers
and gushing waterfalls, canyons of all
sizes and wild shapes, and colors in
restless variety surround us. Davidson
Glacier is a huge ice wall seen on the
west. Passing the town of Haines and
Fort Seward, we suddenly turn a point
to see Skagway ahead of us.
S\agway
Skagway, the end of the northbound
run, is a town that has loomed large in
the history of the North. When the
gold rush started to the Yukon in 1896,
the landing was made at Dyea, which
lies on the western branch of the Lynn
Canal, and the trail inland led over the
dangerous Chilkoot Pass; but word came
of the discovery of the White Pass, and
in a day fifteen thousand people left
Dyea, and in a day Skagway arose where
before was chiefly swamp.
Amongst the marvels of Skagway—to.
those at least who have never considered
Alaska as aught but a
land of perpetual winter — are its beautiful
flower gardens. The
background of mountains that enclose it like
a cup offers many attractive outings, such as
"hikes" along the Skagway River, to Fortune
Bay, Smuggler's Cove,
or the great Denver
Glacier. There are fine
launch trips available
and good fishing may be
had. The steamer remains here about 36
hours before starting on
its southbound journey.
10
 She WHITE-PASS end YUKON ROUTE
Inland from S\agway
Interesting though
Skagway is, the shortest
visit would be incomplete without a journey
to the equally interesting
and fascinating "inside."
Such a journey, difficult as it was in the
early days of the gold
rush, can now be easily
undertaken, for Skagway is the southern
terminus of the rail line
of the White Pass and
Yukon Route. A comfortable train, with large
windowed observation
cars, carries one through the magnificent
scenery of the White Pass into the Yukon
Territory, connecting at Carcross and at
White Horse with the commodious
steamers of the same company.
For those who are returning south by
the same Princess steamship, there are
available the excursions to West Taku
Arm or to White Horse. For those
waiting over until the next steamship
there is the trip to Atlin Lake where,
indeed, many linger longer than they
originally intended. But those with
more time will continue beyond White
Horse on the wonderful trip down the
Yukon River to Dawson.
The White Pass
The rail journey is a most spectacular
one. The salt tang of the sea is left
behind, and the sweetness of lake and
mountain air fills the nostrils. The
scenery grows rugged and awe-inspiring
as we climb steadily around gorges and
along the brink of deep canyons.
There are tourist-centres, tourist-
resorts, at which, among the attractions,
may be one single and noble waterfall
framed in a window, or to which one
hikes or is spun along in a car. But here
(no slur intended upon any other spot
of beauty or grandeur on earth!) there is a
riot of cascades. Photographers of water-
Lake Bennett near the "Yukon border
falls become first ecstatic and then dum-
foundered. All the way up that pass, as
we twist and twine upon our way, our
neighbours are the empty upright wilderness and the falls that hang white over
their precipices. When the train stops
that you may look down on the site of
the once busy "city" of White Pass that
clustered at the foot of Dead Horse
Gulch, where now there is nothing but
the shadow of a cloud passing over the
emptiness, you hear the roar of all these
waters like the sound in a shell held to
the ear.
Some few years ago one could still see
the bleaching bones of the dead horses
that gave the gulch its name, and still,
looking down from the train as it climbs
upward, you can pick out fragments of
the trail of '98, a foot-wide rut up a
narrowing and steep gulch. In places
rockslides have obliterated it, as though
Nature would wipe out the memory of
it, but in these various stretches it shows
clear from the tread of uncounted vanished seekers for quick fortune. That
was a bitter trail, and though stories
survive that give evidence of humanity
in individuals who went over it, and of
man's capacity for nobility and care for
his weaker fellows, it is, in the main, a
trail of callousness.     "Devil take the
11
 PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS to ALASKA
3he WHITE PAXSS end
12
Over the White Pass and Yukon Route
"Ben-My-Chree"
A "pan" valued at $1,000
13
 Ohe WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
hindmost" was the motto of it. Here
men died of exhaustion and beyond, also,
in the bleak desert of the divide, they
succumbed to winter blizzard or summer
weariness. Further on, others were to
perish in river rapids.
Near the summit of White Pass, by
the track-side, is a symbol of regret for
part of the cruelty of these days that
were. It is a memorial, erected by the
Ladies of the Golden North and the
Alaska Yukon Pioneers, to the three
thousand pack-animals that were done
to death on that incompassionate and
truculent trail to the gold-fields.
At White Pass Summit—nearly 3,000
feet higher than Skagway in twenty
miles!—we leave American territory,
and the scarlet-coated Mounted Policeman greets us as we enter Canada. You
see, when the train stops, a black-board
on the station-wall and written on it an
imperative notice that all mushers must
report there. The word is one more hint
—if more be needed—that we are
entering the north. Even in summer,
here, mushers is the word, not hi\ers.
A bronze monument, where the flags of
the two countries float side by side,
marks the boundary line. For a very
short distance we travel through British
Columbia, and then at Pennington cross
into the Yukon Territory.
Lake Bennett, which we have been
skirting these last miles, and along the
shores of which we shall continue all
the way to Carcross, has an additional
interest if one remembers that once it
was part of the highway to the luring
north. As many as four hundred rafts
have been on its waters at one time, the
gold-hunters hauling on sweeps, or
sculling with them, or aiding themselves
on the way with blankets for sails rigged
upon lopped trees for masts. Now there
are only the rufflings of wind on it, the
twinkling of points of sunlight. It winds
its watery loneliness round the cliffs
and bases of the rockslides, and in comfort we travel in the train along its shores
to Carcross, one of the jumping-off places
for side trips— that was once, by the
way, called Caribou Crossing. The
change in the name to Carcross (that is
less vocal of the land) was due to muddles
with the mail caused by the existence of a
district called Cariboo in British Columbia's interior.
White Horse
Lewes and other little lakes are passed
and then Miles Canyon and White
Horse Rapids. On still days, the roar of
these rapids can be heard even in the
town, about an hour's walk distant.
As we stand on the brink of this famous
gorge, no very highly colored imagination
is necessary to conjure up pictures of the
old days. We can imagine the bold
adventurers in their frail craft nearing
these death-dealing rapids, whose waters
are thrown from side to side in a long
serpentine series of twists, and which
are so troubled that the water rides
higher in the middle than at the sides.
Down they came in their mad rush to
the Klondike not at intervals, but in a
continuous procession that was (in the
words of an eye-witness) like traffic on a
city street. Some, becoming scared,
jumped ashore as they saw their dangers,
and watched from the high cliffs the
agonies of their boats; but the majority
stayed with their craft.    And so few
14
 Dhe WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
?^o less attractive is Alaska's wealth of bloom
came through unpunished! Those who
did wasted no time in going back to warn
their competitors, but hurried on.
White Horse is a busy little town on
the west bank of Fifty-Mile River (also
known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the Upper Yukon). There is
comfortable hotel accommodation to be
obtained. Trips to the rapids and other
points may be made by automobile over
good roads. It is the terminus of the
railway, and the point of departure for
the steamer trip to Dawson.
To the Klondike
The journey from White Horse to
Dawson and back, one that can be made
in about a week, is the fitting climax to
the trip "inside." White Horse is the
present head of navigation on the Yukon
waterway (the river in its upper reaches
is really a system of tributaries), which
empties into the sea at St. Michael,
Alaska, over 2,000 miles distant. It is
a constantly changing succession of pictures—rolling hills, sometimes bare,
again heavily wooded, towering mountain ranges, awe-inspiring rapids, with
now and then a quiet stretch of water
between   forested   banks.      Here   and
there is an occasional trading-post, or a
mining camp—perhaps the ghost of a
dead "bonanza"—or a hermit settlement where the steamer stops awhile to
"wood-up."
Sam McGee
Lake Lebarge, a beautiful widening of
the stream (on whose shores, incidentally, occurred the episode that inspired
Robert Service's celebrated poem about
the cremation of Sam McGee), Hootal-
inqua, Little Salmon and Carmacks, with
its coal mine, are some of the interesting
places passed. The shooting of Five
Finger Rapids, and their postscript Rink
Rapids, gives plenty of thrill to even the
most jaded. At Yukon Crossing, the
overland winter trail to Dawson, used
when the river is frozen up, is passed,
and then Fort Selkirk an important
trading-centre founded early in the nineteenth century by the Hudson's Bay
Company.
The mouths of mighty tributaries are
passed, amongst them White River—■
the only large river that enters the Yukon
from the west or south—and Stewart
River, entrance to the new Mayo silver-
lead   camp   175   miles   east.      Smaller
15
 Cfhe WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
steamers ply the Stewart as far as Mayo,
whence it is a case of tractor and auto
transport. Swede Creek has a Government Experimental Agricultural Station,
and then we are at Dawson. The trip
from White Horse takes about two days
—the return trip owing to the current,
about four days.
Dawson
Dawson, once the focus of the world's
greatest gold rush, the headquarters of
the whole Klondike region, is now a
changed place. Mining operations are
still in progress, but they are carried on
under hydraulic and dredging conditions.
The hectic life of which one reads in
Service and Jack London is of the past.
Gone are the highly-colored, sensational
chapters of Dawson's history, when the
city was the rendezvous of desperadoes
as well as miners; and dance halls,
saloons and gambling places ran wide
open for the full twenty-four hours.
To be able to recall that "them was the
days" makes one a real old-timer, a
sourdough—but not necessarily a more
than middle-aged man.
Dawson is the administrative centre
of the Yukon Territory, and the headquarters of a large detachment of that
fine body of men, the Mounted Police.
It is beautifully situated on a bend of the
Yukon River, up-to-date, well-built,
with comfortable hotels, fine homes and
pretty flower gardens.
Over good roads one can visit mining
plants and old, played-out but famous
bonanza claims. The Indian village "of
Moosehide and the fox farms, are worth
a visit; while the old cabin of Robert W.
Service, the poet laureate of the Northland, is the objective of many pilgrimages.
To Atlin
To Atlin is another delightful excursion from Skagway, either as a side trip
on the Dawson trip or as one in itself.
The route is the same as before to Car-
cross, but here the commodious steamer
Tutshi is taken.
The steamer first crosses Lake Nares,
and then through the narrows enters
Tagish Lake, horseshoe-shaped and
guarded by high peaks. Old mining
towns and fox farms are seen along the
way. Presently we turn into the Taku
Arm of the lake, a beautiful sheet of
water encompassed by the most inspiring
scenery, and then into Taku Inlet as far
as Taku Landing. Here, a transfer is
made across a three-mile neck of land by
a unique little train.
Dawson—hub of the Klondyke region
16
 She WHITE PASS end YUKON RCUTE_
Mount McKinley
At the end of the portage we reach
Lake Atlin, and board the twin-screw
motorship Tarahne for a six-mile run to
the little town of Atlin. Atlin is the
base of supplies for one of the richest
hydraulic mining camps in British Columbia. Those who like fishing can try
their luck at trout, whitefish, or grayling.
Llewellyn Glacier
The principal event of the trip to
Atlin is the excursion on the steamer
Tarahne. For about forty miles the boat
winds its way through the narrow
mountain-ribbed passage of the West
Channel to the foot of Cathedral Mountain. Here, on a still day, the reflections
of the mountains are even more beautiful
than the mountains themselves.
West Ta\u Arm
Another beautiful scenic trip is that
to the West Taku Arm, which has been
especially designed for passengers who
are making the round trip from Vancouver to Skagway and back on the
same steamship, and who cannot spare
sufficient time to avail themselves of one
of the other tours "inside."
Far down Taku Arm, where the peaks
rise from a wilderness of low spruce
trees that have a blue bloom on them,
you will see a small white cross on the
shore near the narrows called Golden
Gate. A story of the north it tells: Here
it was that an old-timer of that vast land
—Jack Fox— ended his life with a
valiant gesture that keeps his name alive.
He was mushing out along the lake with
an important letter from the Engineer
Mine (which you will come to later,
under the majesty of Engineer Mountain), and the ice broke before him. He
fell in. Attempts to clamber out
unavailing, before the chill stopped his
heart-beats he stretched down and took
off a snow-shoe, tied the letter to it and
sent it flying over the ice like a light sled.
When he did not return on time a search
party set out to look for him, found the
snow-shoe with the letter—delivered
to the best of his ability— and saw by
the condition of the ice where he had
gone down. The north holds many such
stories of resolute men whom the touch
of Death could not "rattle," but who
have gone out bravely.
17
 3he WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
S.S. Whitehorse in Five Finger Rapids
The route followed is the same as to
Atlin, except that at the Golden Gate,
instead of turning into the Taku Inlet,
the steamer continues a southerly course
and then west, reaching West Taku
Arm Landing and Ben-My-Chree homestead. Passengers sleep on board and
reach Carcross in the morning in time to
catch the south-bound train and their
steamer.
Inquire, at Carcross, if the Indian
who remembers the great discovery of
gold in the Klondike is going to make a
tal\. And, if he is, ask then at what
hour, and go and hear him. It is worth
much more than the twenty-five cents
that his daughter will collect from you
at the door. Here is a lecture that is
different. He tells of the coming in, from
outside, of Mr. Carmacks, and the going
on of Mr. Carmacks, and how some
years later they went in search of Mr.
Carmacks wondering if he was alive,
wondering if he was dead in rapids, or
otherwise, and how they found not only
Mr. Carmacks but another white man
who had found much gold. You hear it
all from the angle of the Indian, spoken
in English of which you may miss a word
or two, to be sure, if not accustomed to
listening to such talk, but utterly
enthralling.    When he has told you of
18
the gold-rush as the In'
dians saw it, he explains
how his people trap
(with specimen traps
round him to aid in the
exposition), and then
gives you the calls they
make to lure the wild
animals. To hear Patsy
Henderson tell of these
things is one of the great
experiences of this remarkably varied trip into the strange north.
A Fine Circle Trip
From    Dawson    the
journey can be continued
into central-western and
south-western Alaska on a truly magnificent circle tour. During the summer season
the White Pass and Yukon Route operates steamers down the Yukon River,
actually—at Fort Yukon—crossing the
Arctic Circle.    Turning round up the
Tanana River, which flows in from the
south, the steamer brings one, in about
five days from Dawson, to Nenana.
Here the Alaska Railroad is met—
running north to Fairbanks the centre
of a great placer gold mining district,
and south to Seward, on the Gulf of
Alaska. The latter takes one fairly close
to Mount McKinley National Park, and
the majestic Mountain itself—highest
peak of the North American continent
—is in sight practically all day. Farther
south is Anchorage, where the U.S. Government commenced construction of the
Alaska Railroad into the interior in 1915.
Another route from Fairbanks is by
the Richardson Automobile Highway to
Chitina—a splendid lYz day motor trip
through a very primitive country, connecting with the Copper River and
Northwestern Railway back to the seaport of Cordova.
From either Seward or Cordova
steamer can be taken to Juneau, and the
southbound journey resumed there by
Canadian Pacific.
 Ohe WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
Historical 7<[otes
The region now known as Alaska
was first visited by white men in 1741,
when two Russian officers, Captains
Bering and Chirikov, explored the coast
as far south as Dixon Entrance. Many
traders and trappers followed them, and
Kodiak Island was settled in 1784.
Owing to the excesses committed by
private traders, who robbed and massacred the Indians, Russia created in 1799
a semi-official corporation called the
Russian-American Company. Alexander
Baranov, a famous administrator, founded
Sitka in 1804. The monopoly of this
company ended in 1861, with the appointment of Prince Matsukov, an imperial governor. The United States had
already made overtures for the purchase
of "Russian America," and in 1867 the
purchase was consummated for the price
of $7,200,000.
But thus far the Northland had been
considered only in terms of fisheries and
the fur trade. The discovery of mineral
wealth was made much more slowly,
and it was not until the sensational
finds of rich "placers" in the Klondike in
1896, which culminated in one of the
most hectic gold rushes of modern times,
that the attention of the world was
riveted upon this feature. The Yukon Territory was constituted in
1 8q8 .  The Yukon River
was explored by Russians as long ago as 1842,
and in 1883 Lieutenant
Frederick Schwatka crossed the Chilkoot Pass,
descended the Lewes
River to Fort Selkirk,
and so down the river
to the sea.
The entrance to the
interior country of the
Yukon, back as early as
i860, was via Dyea and
the Chilkoot Trail.
When the Klondike was
discovered, the stampeders used this trail
until the discovery of the trail from Skagway over the White Pass to Lake Bennett.
The Chilkoot Trail was practically abandoned during 1897; the White Pass was
the "Trail of '98," and was not abandoned until the White Pass Railway waa
completed.
Boo\s About the Northland
A great many interesting books can
be obtained about Alaska and the
Yukon. By all means read some before
you start, such as Rockwell Kent's
record of his Alaskan travel, or, in
another vein, Archdeacon Stock's reminiscences of his service in the Northland.
There are the well-known stories by Rex
Beach—"The Spoilers," "The Barrier,"
and "The Silver Horde;" Jack London's
famous "Call of the Wild" and many
others; Elizabeth Robins' "Magnetic
North" and "Come and Find Me;"
James Oliver Curwood's "Alaskan;"
Edison Marshall's "Seward's Folly;"
and Robert W. Service's "Trail of
Ninety-Eight."
Service's poems, "Songs of a Sourdough" and "Ballads of a Cheechako,"
are, we imagine, so well-known as hardly
to need mention.
Boundary between Alaska and Yukon
19
 Me WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
Totem Poles
The totem poles of the Indians of British
Columbia constitute one of the most striking
features of the whole north-west coast. These
long shafts, irregularly planted on the seashore
among smoke and feast houses, convey impressions from a strange world. The rugged peaks
and wooded gorges beyond, with their ever-
changing shades of dark greens and soft blues,
provide a unique setting for them. And the
squat, Mongolian features of the Indians themselves carry one's imagination into the mysterious realms of Asia.
These remarkable carvings should not be
mistaken for idols or deities. They were never
worshipped. But they are pictorial records of
history and mythology, as the Indians understand them. Some of them represent the Raven,
the Eagle, the Killer-whale and the Wolf, which
are the emblems of the largest social groups in
the nation. The Bear, the Frog, the Sea-Lion,
the Beaver, the Thunder-Bird and many others
are the crests of various clans. Here we have to
do only with coats-of-arms.
Other characters are occasionally introduced
among these figures, which are understood
through the medium of myths and tales of the
past. These are the ancestors of the owners,
and often the "uncle" in whose honor the pole
was erected after his death, by his nephew or
legitimate successor. Battles and other noted
events are also commemorated on poles. A man
who wishes to ridicule a rival or discredit an
insolvent debtor may represent him head
downwards on whatever pole he may erect in a
feast.
There were once many native artists of great
repute, who were hired at large for carving poles,
according to definite instructions furnished them.
Large logs were hauled over long distances for
the purpose. When the carving was finished,
numerous guests assembled for the potlatch or
feast of commemoration. Lavish presents were
made to the guests, whose function it was to
remember the meaning of the figures on the poles
and acknowledge the rights of the legitimate
owners.
20
 Indians
The natives of the West Coast are
strikingly different from other North
American Indians; to many they are not
Indians at all, but a race apart, whose
characteristics are reminiscent of Asia.
Their ancestors are indeed likely to have
come to these shores across the sea or
over the Strait of Bering, long ago, after
earlier migrations had already peopled
most of the two American continents.
The name of "Siwash," ignorantly
given them, is derived from the French
sauvage. They really belong to more
than five races, whose languages are
totally different; the Salish, whose
habitat once covered much territory
around Victoria, Vancouver, and the
main coast north and south—the Nootka,
who dwell on the west coast of Vancouver Island and their distant relatives,
the Kwakiutl, whose territories stretch
northwards from Vancouver Island to a
point near the Skeena River—the Tsim-
shian of the Skeena and Nass Rivers and
the adjacent coast, near the present
town of Prince Rupert—the Haidas of
Queen Charlotte and Prince of Wales
Islands—and the Tlingit of the Alaskan
coast. Another race, whose name is
Dene or Athapascan, inhabit much of the
interior, beyond the boundaries of the
above-named nations.
The west coast natives are essentially
fisher folk; they formerly secured their
food almost wholly from the sea.  It con
sisted of seals, whales, salmon, halibut,
fish roe and oolachen, or candle fish.
Their dug-out canoes stood to them as
did the horse to the buffalo-hunting
Indians of the prairies a century ago.
Before the advent of Europeans they
could hardly ever venture beyond their
frontiers. War and daring raids were
most common among them, for they
were bold, venturesome and cruel. Even
to this day they are fond of relating
tales of adventure of the none too distant
past.
They were not nomadic, as were their
eastern neighbors, but each family
claimed hunting grounds and territories
within the national boundaries. They
migrated to their hunting and fishing
camps in the spring and returned to their
villages on the coast in the autumn.
Community life was active only in the
winter—that is, during the potlatch
season. The leaders then proceeded
sternly to their business—the exchange
of goods, the promotion of their children
and nephews, and the various ceremonies
that appertained to their social welfare
and dutiful commemoration of the deeds
of their ancestors. They were keen and
thrifty, and their will unbending. Their
numbers were formerly considerable,
but they are now passing away like the
other natives; and their culture has
forever given way to that of invaders
from the West and the East who are
gradually driving them off the land.
 She WHITE LASS end YUKON ROUTE
Clothing, Meals, Etc.
Passengers should provide themselves
with a good, warm top-coat. The general
weather is very fine and warm, but a
good covering for the evening or a damp
day is very desirable. The Canadian
Pacific does not supply steamer rugs,
but has arranged to carry on the steamships a limited supply of rugs, which
will be rented to passengers for the
round trip at a nominal charge. The
company does not supply the regulation
ocean liner deck-chair, but supplies
comfortable camp chairs with backs,
free of charge. Barbers, ladies' hairdressers and manicurists are carried on
all steamships.
The meals provided on the Princess
steamships are breakfast, lunch and
dinner, with light refreshments served
in addition in the dining saloon at night.
Breakfast is served from 7.30 to 9.00 a.m.
and the first sittings of luncheon and
dinner at 12.00 noon and 6.00 p.m., with
second sittings forty-five minutes later.
While the steamship is in port at Skagway, meals and berth are not included in
the passage money, but can be secured if
the passenger  prefers  staying aboard.
Victrolas are carried, with a suitable
supply of records, as well as a piano.
Rail Connections
The quickest and most picturesque
route to Vancouver from the East is by
Canadian Pacific through the Canadian
Rockies, six hundred miles of the most
magnificent mountain scenery in the
world.
Immigration Inspection
Passengers entering Alaska from Canada are required to pass United States
Immigration Inspection at Ketchikan, the
port of entry. So far as bona fide tourists
are concerned, this inspection is not
strict. Passengers will be asked by purser
for certain information regarding age,
place of residence, business, etc., and will
be given a card by him. This card is
presented by the holder to the immigration inspector, who boards steamer at
Ketchikan, and as soon as particulars
shown by purser on manifest are checked
by the inspector, the passenger can go
ashore. There is a similar inspection by
the Canadian Immigration Department
on arrival of steamer southbound at
Prince Rupert.
Passports are not necessary.
Times
Times of arrival and departure at the
various ports are posted on the bulletin
board of the ships.
22
 3he WHITE PASS end YUKON ROUTE
^m
Distances
The distances between the different
ports of the Alaska trip, and the approximate time between each, are as follows:
From                   To             Hours *fjjj^
Vancouver Alert Bay ... 14 183
Alert Bay Prince Rupert 22 287
Prince Rupert. Ketchikan ...    8 92
Ketchikan . Wrangell....    7 99
Wrangell Juneau   n 148
Juneau Skagway. ...    8 100
Baggage
Free allowance on Princess steamships of 150 pounds on adult tickets, and
75 pounds on half-fare tickets, will be
granted with the customary charge for
excess weight. Steamer trunks intended
for use in staterooms must not exceed 14
inches in height.
Through passengers from eastern or
southern points making the Alaska trip
will be granted free storage at Canadian
Pacific wharves at Vancouver, Victoria
or Seattle for thirty days, after which
regular storage charges will accrue.
Hotels
The following hotels are situated at
points en route to Alaska, and at inland
points beyond Skagway:
Ketchikan, Stedman, K[elson, Ingersoll;
Wrangell, Wrangell; Juneau, Gastineau,
Zynda; Skagway, Pullen House, Golden
K[orth, White House; Carcross, Caribou;
Atlin, Atlin Inn, Royal, Kootenay; White
Horse, White Horse Inn, White Pass,
Commercial, Regina; Dawson, Royal Alexandra, Regina, Tu\onia, Principal,
Rochester.
Customs
Baggage checked through from any
United States point to any point in
Alaska, or from any Canadian point to
any point in the Yukon territory, or
vice-versa, and not required en route, is
not subject to Customs examination.
Hand baggage, or checked baggage
required en route, is subject to examination northbound by the United States
Customs at any point of debarkation and
southbound by the Canadian Customs
at Prince Rupert. Checked baggage, if
desired, may be forwarded to destination
in bond.
The baggage of passengers making the
White Horse, Atlin or Dawson trips will
also be examined by Canadian Customs
on entering Yukon territory, and by the
United  States  Customs  on  returning.
23
 CANADIAN    PACIFIC    PRINCESS    STEAMSHIPS
To Alaska by the Inside Passage, and
back, is a two-thousand-mile nine-day
journey from Vancouver, with six ports
of call. To handle the tourist business,
the Canadian Pacific operates during the
summer months three of the finest of its
well-known Princess steamships, which
are large, modern vessels of the most
comfortable sea-going type.
Staterooms on the Princess Steamships
are light, cozy and well-ventilated. They
are not overcrowded, but designed to
accommodate only two passengers per
stateroom. On each ship there are a few
"de luxe" rooms with private bathrooms, and also some with sofa berths.
The community rooms—dining room,
observation room, lounges, smoking
room, etc.—are bright, cheerful and
charmingly furnished All three ships
have dance floors.
The PRINCESS LOUISE is 330 feet
long, with a passenger capacity of 264.
The PRINCESS CHARLOTTE is
330 feet long, with a passenger capacity
of 248.
The PRINCESS ALICE is 289 feet
long, with a passenger capacity of 226.
These three ships are oil-burners, and
are fitted with wireless telegraph.
Canadian Pacific "Princess Kathleen"
24
 CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
CANADA AND UNITED STATES
Atlanta    Georgia— K.  A.   Cook, General Agent Passenger Dept 1017 Healey Bldg.
Banff Alberta—J. A. McDonald, District Passenger Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Boston     Massachusetts— L.   B.   Hart,   General Agent  Passenger  Dept 405  Boylston  St.
Buffalo New York—W.  P.  Wass,  General Agent Passenger Dept 160  Pearl St.
Calgary    Alberta—G. D. Brophy, District Passenger Agent Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago    Illinois—T. J. Wall, General Agent Bail Traffic 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati    Ohio—M. E. Malone, General Agent Passenger Dept 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland    Ohio—G. H.  Griffin, General Agent Passenger Dept 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas Texas—A. Y.   Chancellor, Travelling Passenger Agent 906 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit   Michigan—G.  G. McKay, General Agent Passenger Dept 1231  Washington Blvd.
Edmonton    Alberta—C.  S.  Fyfe,   City Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Fort William  Ontario—H.  J.   Skynner,  City Passenger Agent 108 So.  May St.
Guelph      Ontario—W.  C. Tully, City Passenger Agent ...30 Wyndham St.
Halifax    Nova  Scotia—A.  C. McDonald, City Passenger Agent 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton     Ontario—A.  Craig,  City Passenger Agent Cor.  King and James Sts.
Honolulu    T.H.—Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau Alaska—W.  L.  Coates, Agent.
Kansas City    Missouri—B.  G. Norris, City Passenger Agent 723 Walnut St.
Ketchikan     Alaska—E. Anderson, Agent.
Kingston    Ontario—J- H. Welch, City Passenger Agent 180 Wellington St.
London    Ontario—H. J. McCallum, City Passenger Agent 417 Bichmond St.
Los  Angeles   .... California— W.  Mcllroy,  General Agent Passenger Dept 621 So.  Grand Ave.
Memphis     Tennessee—M.  K. McDade, Travelling Passenger Agent Porter Bldg.
M ilwaukee    Wisconsin— F. T.  Sansom, City Passenger Agent 68 East Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis Minnesota— H. M. Tait, General Agent Passenger Dept 611 2nd Ave.  South
n»..<..»■ r\„«u„n  J*\  E.  Gingras,  District Passenger Agent Dominion Square Bldg.
Montreal    Quebec  j F   c   Lydon, General Agent Passenger Dtept 201 St.  James St.  W.
Moose Jaw Saskatchewan— T.  J.   Colton,  Ticket Agent Canadian Pacific  Station
Nelson    British   Columbia— J.  S. Carter, District Passenger Agent Baker and Ward Sts.
New  York New York—F.  B.   Perry,  General Agent Bail Traffic Madison Ave.   at 44th  St.
North   Bay    Ontario— C. H. White, District Passenger Agent 87 Main Street West
Ottawa     Ontario—J.  A.  McGill,  General Agent Passenger Dept 83  Sparks  St.
Peterboro       Ontario— J.  Skinner, City Passenger Agent   George St.
Philadelphia    Pennsylvania—J.   C.   Patteson,   General   Agent  Passenger   Dept 1500   Locust   St.
Pittsburgh     Pennsylvania—W.   A.   Shackelford,   General   Agent   Passenger   Dept 338   Sixth   Ave.
Portland   • Oregon— W. H. Deacon, General Agent Passenger Dept 148A Broadway
Prince  Rupert   ...British Columbia—W.C   Orchard,  General Agent.
Quebec    Quebec-^ c.  A.  Langevin,  General Agent Passenger Dept Palais Station
Regina    Saskatchewan—j.   \y.  Dawson,  District Passenger  Agent Canadian Pacific  Station
Saint John    New Brunswick—o.   S.   Beer,  District Passenger Agent 40  King  St.
St.   Leu is    Missouri—Geo.  P.  Carbrey,  General Agent Passenger Dept 412 Locust St.
St.  Paul   Minnesota—w. H. Lennon, General Agent Passenger Dept., Soo Line. .Bobert and Fourth St..
San   Francisco    California—f.   L.  Nason,   General Agent Passenger Dept 675   Market   St.
Saskatoon     Saskatchewan—r. t. Wilson, City Ticket Agent 115 Second Ave.
Sault St.  Marie   Ontario—j.   o.  Johnston,  City Passenger Agent 529 Queen Street
Seattle    Washington—e. L.  Sheehan, General Agent Passenger Dept 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke Quebec—j.  a.  Metivier,  City Passenger Agent 91 Wellington St.  North
Skagway    Alaska— l.  H.   Johnston,  Agent.
Spokane   Washington—E. L   Cardie, Traffic Manager, S.I. By Old Nat. Bank Bldg.
Tacoma    Washington—D   c   o'Keefe, City Passenger Agent 1113 Pacific Ave
_ ■      ,    .    \ W. Fulton, Assistant General Passenger Agent Canadian Pacific Building
Toronto    Ontario •< g. e. Corbin, General Agent Passenger Dept Canadian Pacific Building
r G.   B.  Burpee,   District  Passenger Agent Union  Stn.,  Boom  367
Vancouver British Columbia—F.  H.   Daly,  District Passenger Agent 434 Hastings  Street West
Victoria    British Columbia— L.   D.   Chetham,   District   Passenger  Agent 1102   Government   St.
Washington.. .District  of  Columbia—C. E. Phelps, General Agent Passenger Dept 14th and New York Ave.
Windsor  .Ontario— W.  C.  Elmer,  City Passenger Agent 34  Sandwich St.,  West
Winnipeg     Manitoba— C. B. Andrews, District Passenger Agent Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp  .Belgium— E. A.  Schmitz 25 Quai Jordaens
Belfast   Ireland— W.  H.  Boswell 14 Donegal  Place
Birmingham     England—W.  T.   Treadaway 4  Victoria  Square
Bristol     England—A.  S.  Bay 18 St.  Augustine's Parade
Brussels  Belgium—G.  L. M.  Servais 98 Blvd.  Adolphe-Max
Glasgow     Scotland—W.   Stewart 25  Bothwell  St.
Hamburg    Germany— T.  H.  Gardner Alsterdamm,   9
Liverpool    England— H.  T. Penny Pier Head
,,.„„ 'iL„i«nA J c-   E-   Jenkins 62-65   Charing  Cross,   S.W.I
London     England J G   Saxon Joneg 103 Leadenhall  st.  KC>3
Manchester    England—J. W. Maine 31 Mosley Street
Paris     France—A.   V.   Clark 24 Blvd.  des  Capucines
Rotterdam    Holland—J.   S.  Springett Coolsingel No.  91
Southampton  England—H.   Taylor 7  Canute  Eoad
ASIA
Hong  Kong   China— G.  E.   Costello,  General Agent Passenger Dept Opposite Blake  Pier
Kobe    Japan— B.  G.  Byan,  Passenger Agent 7  Harima  Machi
Manila   Philippine Islands—J.  B.   Shaw,   General Agent 14-16   Calle  David,  Boxas  Bldg.
Shanghai China—A. M. Parker, General Agent Passenger Dept No. 4 The Bund
Yokohama  .Japan— E.  Hospes,  General Agent Passenger Dept 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, ETC.
J. Sclaiter, Traffic Manager,  Can. Pac. By., for Australia and New Zealand, Union House,  Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. By. for New Zealand, Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide    South Australia—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland    New Zealand—Union S.S.  Co.  of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane   .......... Queensland— Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Ghristchurch    New Zealand—Union S.S.  Co.  of New Zealand  (Ltd.)
Dunedin New Zealand— Union S.S.  Co.  of New Zealand  (Ltd.)
Fremantle   .West Australia— Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart Tasmania— Union S.S.  Co.  of New Zealand  (Ltd.)
Launceston     ..Tasmania—Union S.S.  Co.  of New Zealand  (Ltd.)
....   „„„„ irin***** fH-  F. Boyer, Pass'r Bep., Can. Pac. By., 59 William St.
Melbourne     ...Victoria {Uniorl s s> Co   of New Zealand (Lt<i#)
Perth   West Australia—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva Fiji—Union S.S.   Co.   of New Zealand  (Ltd.)
Sydney New South Wales^-Union S.S.  Co.  of New Zealand  (Ltd.)
u#Aii:n.^M tvtw   ?fl0i„^ 5J- T- Campbell, Trav. Pass'r. Agt., Can. Pac. By., 11 Johnston St.
Wellington   ..........New  Zealand j Union ss   Co> of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques—Good the World Over
This cover printed in Canada, 1931.
  ^m^
*mtfp
iltatce*?
fotusi
*7
SHELTERED ,WS|0f pASSACf .,CaMJtutlaM (Hudfe
^i  " WORLD'S   GREATEST TRAVEL SYSTEM
 LURE of the  FAR NORTH
Alaska! Yukon! There is glamour, a suggestion of high adventure in
the very names.
At almost the turn of the twentieth century, Alaska and its Canadian
neighbour, the Yukon, leaped into world prominence as a fabulous land
of wealth that lay in the golden sands of its rushing creeks and rivers.
The name of the Northland was on millions of lips. Men begged and
borrowed the wherewithal to reach its rocky shores and push into the
bonanzas of Dawson Creek and the Klondike.
For centuries a well-nigh impenetrable wilderness, Alaska became
overnight a centre of universal attraction. With its gold and its furs it
began to yield its ancient secrets of Indian lore; its beauties, its mysteries
of climate and soil and the charms that lay hidden in hundreds of
fjords and bays along a thousand miles of rugged, timbered coastline.
Each year vacation-wise travellers cruise on smart Canadian Pacific
Princess liners to this romantic, awe-inspiring North . . . revelling in
its beauty, caught in its glamour and thrilled by the vastness of its
shoreline panorama unfolding mile after mile along the sunlit waters
of the far-famed Inside Passage.
Answer the ageless call of Alaska this year, and enjoy its magic spell.
You are bound for adventure and vacation days that will live with you
always, evergreen in your memory.
 Jlllx
xxxi
MIDNIGHT    SUN
"7mm
Thrill to a new kind of vacation this year! Cruise north to a
land of romance and mystery ... to alluring Alaska and the
storied Yukon . . . and go in holiday-comfort with the world's
greatest travel system—the Canadian Pacific. A smart Princess
liner will be your home . . . gay with congenial companions and
happy social life . . . dancing, deck sports and informal parties
on board ship . . . visiting fascinating ports of call.
On this cruise of sunny days and lingering twilights, you'll
thrill to a majestic pageant of changing scenery . . . the smooth,
almost land-locked Inside Passage, reflecting the rich rays of
lingering sunshine . . . fjord-indented mountains with towering
trees and snowy peaks . . . frontier towns perched on rocky
cliffs or built on stilts . . . giant northern flowers .-. . awesome
glaciers, great salmon runs, active gold mines, weird totem
poles, old Russian landmarks, early Indian trading posts. And
then, by a railway connecting with the cruise, you may follow
the Gold Rush Trail of '98 and the magic of the Yukon River!
This Land of Northern Lights and Midnight Sun is yours to
enjoy and remember. This summer make your dreams come
true . . . let your voyage of discovery take you up the sheltered,
picturesque Inside Passage aboard a stately Canadian Pacific
Princess liner. [1]
 The charming ivy-clad Empress Hotel
Beautiful
Gardens,
Victoria
C2]
V
V vv
ICTORIA
the everqreen playqround
Your cruise has a beautiful embarkation point. Victoria
and Vancouver are Canadian Pacific ports, and are linked
with Seattle by the triangle service of the Princess ships.
These Pacific Coast cities merit lengthy visits in themselves.
VICTORIA, capital of British Columbia, is the garden-city
of Canada's Evergreen Playground, and is a blaze of color,
with its hydrangeas, roses, hedges, oak trees, holly and
parks. The handsome Parliament Buildings include an
interesting museum illustrating the life and handicrafts of
the Coast Indians. The social centre is the ivy-clad Empress
Hotel, set in beautiful gardens. Victoria owes much of its
charm to its balmy climate. On Vancouver Island, just
beyond the limits of Victoria, are the spectacular Malahat
 WMmM
WmSi   7
JS
Harbour and City of Vancouver, B.C
V V v
«*/ Vancouver.
Canada'* qatewaij Io rhe Pacific
Drive, combining coastline and mountains in a panorama of rare
magnificence . . . championship golf courses ... the famous
Gorge with its reversible falls . . . and the Dominion Astrophysical
Observatory.
VANCOUVER, Canada's commercial metropolis on the Pacific
Coast, is situated on Burrard Inlet and the Gulf of Georgia. Built
regally upon hills sloping down to sheltered waters, with the
Coast Range of mountains as a background, Vancouver has many
attractions, commercial and recreational. Stanley Park, a natural
reservation of 1,000 acres within the city limits, is famed for the
primitive unspoiled beauty of its giant trees and sub-tropical
foliage. Nearby are Capilano, Lynn and Seymour canyons,
Grouse Mountain, and Indian River Park with many seashore
summer resorts. Port for busy lumber and mining shipments,
Vancouver harbour is a hive of industry.
Big  trees,
Stanley Parh.
A "Princess" liner
A and
_  IASKA..
 ■ Hi: ,;
totem poles beckon a
picturesque welcome
to • • • •
"AiertRa
ALERT BAY on Cormorant Island off the east coast of Vancouver Island is the first
port of call on the cruise to Alaska. Here you are on the southern frontier of Totem
Pole Land, which extends north akng the Pacific Coast as far as Wrangell. Turn to
the left from the quay on which you land and you find these colorful heraldic emblems
lining the street, while other totem poles decorate the cemetery, which you soon reach
if you turn to the right.   Great logs mark the pillars and framework of an old Indian
 a livinq.. romantic museum
of ancient Indian lore is your
first port of call
• "..:-, ■ ft;   .'ft.;'...:-."'       :      ft ft ft        '
communal lodge. This is the tribal capital of
thirteen Coast Indian communities, whose main
activity consists of fishing. The native children
are picturesque and of happy disposition. The
totems are not idols, but represent animal spirits
friendly to the clan—the particular friend of the
Alert Bay Indian being the Raven.
Leaving Alert Bay you cross Queen Charlotte
Sound from Johnstone Straits and then enter the
archipelago of islands along the Pacific Coast of
British Columbia.
..  .  .   .   ,*£"**
fcMs£N^
b|
Quaint
streets
ona t°lcm V
oles
West Coast In
Children
hilt
l\x  ?k
Each   totem  has   a   meaning,   signifying
animal  spirits   friendly   to   the   clan.
. Alert M&y §wmi§
6Pwim€@ss
[5]
:7777.
 fXiii 1 Jl
Chief Johnson s
famous  totem pole
©R. D.
[6]
i|l*^ii^?
;.| -^f^-
Prince Rupert
Ketchikan
ixlix-x
11 gmm,
daqliqbt lingers lonqcr
and majestic peaks
qlow with f lantinq
hues!
PRINCE RUPERT and KETCHIKAN
are the ports of call on the following
day on the regular northbound
course of the Princess liners.
Many millions of dollars have been
spent in building Prince Rupert
from a village on stilts into a substantial town, market and harbour for
a large fishing industry—Canada's
largest settlement in Northern British
Columbia.     Here  is   a  small  but
mM:$W27W^W^:
;«|7t^i-7::-ft:77,;:iftft.:
tlxx
Hill
EfBft$.
Approaching
Ketchikan
 ■     ,;Xl7:
«#ftft:X|p|g   f J|| f X
„,--i.
«
IX.
^3^^^
.^^^^^;;-
Kefcfsi&ctn, Alasha
© Ao S. N.
rushinq waterfalls
roar tbe call of tbe
wild!
WM,
WmW'Vm
A Far-North  "penthouse"
interesting   museum,    and   totem   poles   have
been   saved   for   erection   on   dominant   sites.
North of Prince Rupert we pass Port Simpson,
an old Hudson's Bay Company trading post, to enter the first
port of Alaska at Ketchikan.  In addition to being an important
fishing centre, Ketchikan is the rallying ground of the Metlakatla,
Thlinget and Haida Indians. Three notable totem poles—
Kyan's Totem, Johnson's Totem and the Captain Cook Totem,
the latter surmounted by a stovepipe hat, attract the visitor.
Not far from the quay is a stream where in season the salmon
can be seen leaping the falls. If there is time, walk up one of
the stairways that climb the hill back of the Ketchikan school
building which commands a fine view.
  >*'    ,
i
lililllll
\\KVf/6/a<l
the lure of an ancient
tradinq post.. unmatched
brilliance of the*lce*£iant*
Russian   rule   over   the   North   Pacific   is   recalled  in  the  name  of  Wrangell,   so  designated from a former Russian Governor, Baron
Wrangell.     Gateway to the Cassiar and the
Stikine  River,   Wrangell  at  one  time  hoped
to  benefit  by  the  gold  rush  to  the  Yukon,
and still is the point of landing for big game
hunting  parties.     Opposite  the  dock  is  the
interesting Goonyah Totem,  and visitors will
find much of interest in Chief Shakes' house,
with  a notable grizzly bear mask  among its
curios.      Passing   through
Wrangell Narrows,  the
Princess liner comes within
view of many glaciers, and
at Taku Inlet pays a visit,
at   a   respectful   distance,
to   Taku   Glacier,   which
breaks off as it touches the
sea   water,   leaving   sheer
cliffs    of    blue-green    ice.
Bergs are continually drift-
"Princess" liner paying a visit to Taku Glacier
ing off shore,  and icefloes swing past our steamship.    No
more thrilling spectacle can be imagined than that of this
huge,   mile-wide    arid    ninety-miles-long,    frozen-yet-living,
river—suggestive of a majestic force held
in   leash   by   Nature.      The   opalescent
surface  of the  water  and the  fringe  of
dark forest on the slopes verging on the
glacier accentuate the luminous sapphire
and   emerald  facets   of   the   rampart   of
Taku's ice cliffs.   Here indeed one begins
to   feel   something   of   the   mystery   and
grandeur of the North.
[9]
Mighty   fish    leap    up
these    northern   streams
 Alaska's lapilal
City kerns with
native art and Far
East treasures
Juneau
JUNEAU, our next port of
call, is the capital of
Alaska, and epitomizes the history, romance, culture and industry of that vast
territory. Perched on the lower slopes of a
mountain, it owes its birth and growth to
gold mines such as the Glory Hole of the
Treadwell, though other industries have
come along to add stability. If time permits, the visitor should not omit a trip
to the Mendenhall Glacier, where the
mysterious action of a frozen river can be
studied at close quarters. Here one can
see a huge cave out of which pours the
underground river of the moraine. The
bus that takes you to the glacier returns
by way of lovely Auk Lake, following a
road fringed with countless wild flowers.
The museum at Juneau has fascinating
relics of Russian and even Chinese civilization in Alaska, as well as notable
specimens of Esquimaux and Coast Indian
handicraft. Lectures are given at convenient hours.
There are sightseeing aeroplanes available at Juneau for those who desire a
rapid bird's-eye view of this romantically
beautiful country. Gold Creek Basin, a
short hike  from  the  city,  is  the  site  of
Kmmmm^
 qood roads and
"Cold Rush' landmarks
In addition to its political importance,
Juneau is a busy industrial and commercial
centre, serving as a distributing point for the
surrounding territory.   There are churches
Joe Juneau's and Dick Haines' first gold strike. Launches
will take you to Thane and Douglas, sites of the low-
grade gold-crushing plants. The fur and curio stores
should not be overlooked, as they provide the opportunity of picking up curios and works of native craft.
Nearby Petersburg
of many denominations, including the Pro-Cathedral
of the Episcopal diocese of Alaska. Greek Catholics,
Roman Catholics, Methodists, Presbyterians and Lutherans are among others represented. The educational
facilities are good, for this is essentially a home town.
 master of ceremonies holds
sway, arranges entertainment, makes certain that
you enjoy yourself. Every
tourist travels first class.
Everyone has an opportunity
to know everyone else . . .
very much after the style
of a house party!
A m
Princess decks ore sunny
sailinq verandas for
fun afloat
The "Princess Charlotte" is 330 feet long,
with berthing capacity for 232 persons.
The "Princess Louise" is 317 feet long,
with berthing capacity for 210 persons.
The "Princess Alice" is 289 feet long, with
berthing capacity for 206 persons.
There's a rhythmic orchestra aboard to
provide inspired dance-music under the
twilights of near-midnight sunsets. Last
night out there's a Masquerade Ball . . .
no ordinary affair when you consider that
the merry throng have been under the constant spell of happy adventure. That glorious, carefree fun should reign supreme on
such a night, in such a setting, is inevitable.
Over the  whole scene  an experienced
[14]
 the summer sun seldom sets
on the silvery waters of
Lynn Canal
The last lap of our northbound voyage is through the wildly beautiful
fjord named the Lynn Canal, in memory of a lieutenant who served under
the explorer, Captain Cook. Together with Chatham Straits, of which it is
an extension, the Lynn Canal is one of the deepest and longest "faults" in
the geology of the Pacific Coast. The mountains on either side rise from
4,000 to 6,000 feet above sea level, and show near their tops traces of
ancient glaciers.
Aerial view
of an
Alaskan glacier
Actual glaciers are seen on the western
side—Davidson, Rainbow, Garrison and
Bertha—all offshoots from the great
Muir Glacier.    Shortly before we reach
[16]
 ftftftfti:ft';ft''f-!-:'-v:ft':;?!;:ft::ft'-.,ft,!-'
S&Simm
a peaceful panorama • •.
amid roarinq waterfalls
cliffs and canyons
Aerial view of the Lynn Canal
Skagway, Haines is seen on the left—the gateway the hair of the mountain goat, is also on the left. Here
to the Porcupine mining region. Chilkoot or Chilkat, was the landing stage for the historic Chilkoot Pass
source of the celebrated Chilkat blankets made from     of Gold Rush days.
[17]
 Skagway, on the Lynn Canal
© A. S. N.
Soapy Smith's Skull" painted on rock near
Skagway
blossoms so huqe.. so brilliant   C_. .__.,._,
they call U Hte cily of flowers v v v JK AG WAY
v vi
SKAGWAY is our northern terminal port—celebrated in
the Trail of '98—once the notorious stronghold of Soapy Smith
and his outfit, and now more pleasantly associated with a
beautiful flower garden. Here, if you do not wish to go inland
before the return cruise to Vancouver, you can arrange to
stay on board the liner while she is in port or go to a local
hotel, enjoying pleasant rambles in the vicinity or short ex-
[18]
cursions by launch. Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove or the
Great Denver Glacier are within hiking distance. Old timers
at Skagway can entrance you with stories of Gold Rush days,
and others can expatiate on the wild and garden flowers which
grow so luxuriantly in northern sunshine. And always there
is the view looking down the Lynn Canal, one of the most
spectacular in North America.
  Carcrossg Yukon Territory
A  Yukon "Huskie"
The White Pass and Yukon Railroad takes
us in comfortable observation cars over a
mountain track which engineers blasted,
mostly through solid rock, to reach the
plateau from which the Yukon River draws
its tributary sources. From the car window
you can see patches of the trail up which
toiled the first prospectors, and at Dead
Horse Gulch you read the moving memorial
tablet to the pack animals that perished by
the way. At the International Boundary,
Canadian and American flags wave side by
side, and the red-coated "Mountie" takes
charge of law and order, for now you are in
the Yukon. Bennett, with its shell of a log
church, is the halting place for luncheon
and for those who wish to return on the
same day to Skagway.     Carcross  (Caribou
INIAND
from Skaqway
where the lure of tbe
Gold Rusti' linqers!
Crossing) is the junction for a steamer trip
down Lake Tagish to Ben-My-Chree, an
exquisite garden growing at the foot of a
glacier. Here one realizes that the Yukon
is the home of huskies, those handsome
wolfdogs who in summer are as easygoing as they are energetic in winter. At
Carcross is the grave of Bishop Bompas,
pioneer missionary of the North, and here
a local Indian, Patsy Henderson, gives a
talk from personal recollections on the
discovery of Bonanza Creek and on Indian
methods of trapping.
x'|
Patsy Henderson, Yukon Lecturer
[20]
Log  cabin,
Carcross
 G&rien ml BeWlMf:^I
Pipe Fingew Rmpid§
ailing on a n&wthewm
lake ©
V
Whitehorse is for those who plan to take the sternwheel
steamer down the Yukon to Dawson or beyond.^ Just
before reaching Whitehorse, you get from the train a glimpse
of Miles Canyon, which, as a rule, you have time to revisit by
motorcar before the steamer leaves for Dawson.
Alongside the river banks at Whitehorse are some of the pioneer
sternwheelers, while newer ones may be seen under construction. For this is the head of navigation on the Yukon River.
It is also an important outfitting point for big game parties
who nowadays are often conveyed by aeroplane to the game-
lands of the interior.
[21]
 m>-mw-7
s   ■ m
wx^,«
W*&£> xl
ima of Dawson City
) Sheelor Photo.
LONDIKE
on old sfronqhold of
dauntless pioneers
Famed in fact and fiction, the Klondike now lies
open before you. Go by sturdy sternwheeler from
Whitehorse to Dawson—two days downstream,
four days to return upstream. See herds of caribou
swimming the river on their way to summer
pasture. Enjoy the thrill of a life-time "shooting"
Five Finger Rapids. Visit famed old Dawson City.
See Robert Service's cabin, the Indian village of
Moosehide and the beautiful gardens of Mrs.
George Black, Member of Parliament for the Yukon.
If the North still beckons, continue by the Yukon
River Circle Tour down the Yukon and up the
Tanana and over the Alaska Railroad to Seward.
In this way you may visit Mount McKinley National
Park, Kenai Lake, Placer River Canyon and
Spencer Glacier.
.7X7
[22]
Photographs in this booklet marked:   (R.D.)  are by .
R. Dauphin;  (A.S.N.) by Associated Screen News Limited,
Others are by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.
■^jsm
Robert Service's  Cabin,
Dawson Q i. D.
Whitehorse^starting point of Yukon River  bomts
C A, «* *f.
Oldest cmhin in Dwroon
 :7:7m^0777777m
immv7mm7m»mm$mPiMmmm,.
Modern  busses  for sightseeing
Enroute to or from Alaska
■v   Sfop at     m _
B*nh«hi Lhe Louise
in   the   CANADIAN    ROCKIES
You add so much beauty and interest to the trip by travelling via the Canadian Pacific Railway. Enjoy ever-changing
scenery ... stop-overs at Banff, Lake Louise and Emerald
Lake in Banff and Yoho National Parks ... a low-cost
motor tour from Lake Louise to the spectacular Columbia
Icefield and return . . . and then over 600 miles of Alpine
grandeur through the glorious Canadian Rockies.
CANADA WELCOMES U.S. CITIZENS—NO PASSPORTS!
Cfc*— Ui,
°^swimi
ict°'*« Glacier
 GmaJli
4M%
• Canada and the United States
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (comprising 21,065
miles of operated and controlled lines) stretches from the
Atlantic to the Pacific, across Canada and into the United States.
The main line, Montreal to Vancouver, 2,882 miles, passes
through the heart of the lofty Canadian Rockies, with their
crowning jewels of Banff, Lake Louise and Emerald Lake,
unsurpassed as vacation resorts. Modern and comfortable
transcontinental and local passenger train services link the
important cities, industrial sections, agricultural regions and
holiday resorts. Fast and efficient freight service. Convenient
coastal and inland lake steamship services. Builds and operates
air-conditioned equipment.
ALASKA . . . Frequent service by Canadian Pacific "Princess"
liners from Vancouver (connections from Victoria and Seattle)
to Skagway and return via the "Inside Passage."
TRIANGLE SERVICE—Canadian Pacific "Princess" liners
operate a daily service, the year round, between Vancouver,
Victoria and Seattle.
GREAT LAKES ... Canadian Pacific inland steamships
sail semi-weekly during the summer months between Port
McNicoll and Fort William via an attractive lake and river route.
Summer cruises from Owen Sound and Port McNicoll.
#39% Less Ocean to Europe
AIR-LINE ROUTE . . . Sailings via the short St. Lawrence
Seaway from Montreal and Quebec (summer) . . . (Saint John,
N.B., in winter) ... to and from British ports.
FAST FREIGHT SERVICE provided by passenger and cargo
ships.
• Honolulu, Orient and South Seas
Service between Vancouver and Yokohama, Kobe, Nagasaki,
Shanghai, Hong Kong, Manila provides convenient passenger
and freight schedules.
SOUTH SEAS . . . Canadian Australasian liners ply between
Vancouver and Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia.
• Hotels, Express, Communications
HOTELS ... A chain of comfort across Canada from Atlantic
to Pacific . . . Fourteen hotels in leading cities and resorts,
including the Chateau Frontenac, Quebec; Royal York, Toronto;
Royal Alexandra, Winnipeg; Hotel Saskatchewan, Regina;
Hotel Palliser, Calgary; *Banff Springs; *Chateau Lake Louise;
Empress Hotel, Victoria . . . *Six rustic lodges in the Canadian
Rockies and at Ontario fishing resorts.
COMMUNICATIONS AND EXPRESS . . . owned and
operated by the CANADIAN PACIFIC . . . trans-Canada
service .  .  . world-wide connections .  .  . travellers cheques.
*Open summer months only.
For further information and reservations, consult your
travel   agent  or  any   Canadian   Pacific   ticket   office.
(%4c
Canadian Pacific Transcontinental Train near Banff
Chateau  Frontenac overlooking Quebec
WORLD'S       GREATEST       TRAVEL        SYSTEM
[24]
 Your Host Across Canada
CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
Hotels of Beauty and Efficiency . . . Noted for Comfort, Service
and Cuisine at Moderate Rates
Empress Hotel
Victoria, B.C.
Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver, B.C.
PACIFIC COAST
A gracious hotel in Canada's Evergreen
Playground, which, by its equable climate,
is a favorite summer and winter resort.
Motoring, yachting, fishing, shooting and
all-year golf. Crystal Garden for swimming
and music.   Open all year.   European Plan.
This new hotel in Vancouver is operated by
the Vancouver Hotel Company on behalf
of the Canadian Pacific and Canadian
National Railways. Its central location and
modern appointments make it deservedly
popular.  Open all year. European Plan.
THE ROCKIES
Emerald Lake Chalet Situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, in picturesque
Near Field, B.C. Yoho National Park.   Roads and trails to the Burgess
Altitude 4,272 feet Pass, Yoho Valley, etc.    Boating and fishing.    Open
summer months.   American Plan.
Chateau Lake Louise Facing an exquisite Alpine lake in Banff National Park.
Lake Louise, Alberta Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips, swim-
Altitude 5,680 feet ming, drives or motoring, tennis, boating, fishing  in
neighbouring waters. Open summer months. European
Plan.
In the heart of Banff National Park. Alpine climbing,
motoring, golf, bathing, hot sulphur springs, tennis,
fishing, boating and riding. Open summer months.
European Plan.
THE PRAIRIES
A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard. Open
all year.   European Plan.
In the capital of the Province of Saskatchewan. Golf
and motoring.   Open all year.   European Plan.
The Royal Alexandra A popular hotel in the  capital of the Province  of
Winnipeg, Man. Manitoba and the centre of Winnipeg's social life.
Open all year.   European Plan.
Banff Springs Hotel
Banff, Alberta
Altitude 4,625 feet
Hotel Palliser
Calgary, Alberta
Hotel Saskatchewan
Regina, Sask.
Toronto, Ont.
Quebec, Que.
McAdam, N.B.
St. Andrews-by-the-
Sea, N.B.
Digby, N.S.
Kentville, N.S.
Yarmouth, N.S.
Halifax, N.S.
EASTERN CANADA
The   Royal  York—The   largest  hotel  in  the   British
Empire.   Open all year.   European Plan.
Chateau Frontenac—A metropolitan hotel in the most
historic and romantic city of North America.  Open all
year.   European Plan.
McAdam Hotel—A commercial and sportsman's hotel.
Open all year.   American Plan.
The Algonquin—New Brunswick's popular holiday
colony.   Open summer months.  American Plan.
The Digby Pines—Nova Scotia's premier resort hotel.
Golf, tennis, swimming pool. Open summer months.
American Plan.
The Cornwallis Inn — Centre for excursions to
Evangeline Land. Open all year. American Plan.
Lakeside Inn—Designed in attractive bungalow style.
Golf available for hotel guests. Tuna fishing. Open
summer months.  American Plan.
Lord Nelson Hotel. Open all year. European Plan.
(Operated by the Lord Nelson Hotel Co.)
Other Hotels and Lodges reached by Canadian Pacific
Yoho Valley Lodge, Field, B.C. Devil's Gap Lodge, Kenora, Ont.
Lake Wapta Lodge, Hector, B.C. French   River   Chalet-Bungalow   Camp,
Lake O'Hara Lodge, Hector, B.C. French River, Ont.
MoraineLakeLodge,LakeLouise,Alta.   Hotel Sicamous, Sicamous, B.C.
RadiumHotSpringsLodge,Radium,B.C. Hotel Incola, Penticton, B.C.
(Operated by Miss C. Armstrong)     Harrison Hot Springs Hotel, Agassiz, B.C.
Mount Assiniboine Lodge, Banff, Alta.   Cameron  Lake  Chalet,   Cameron  Lake
(Operated by Erling Strom) (Vancouver Island), B.C.
Columbia Icefield Chalet, near Lake Louise, Alta.
(Operated by Brewster Transport Co.)
For further information and reservations apply to hotel manager,
your local travel agent, or nearest Canadian Pacific Office.
PRINCIPAL
CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga	
Banff, Alta. (Summer).
Boston, Mass	
Buffalo, N.Y	
Calgary, Alta	
Chicago, 111	
Cincinnati, Ohio	
Cleveland, Ohio	
Dallas, Texas	
Detroit, Mich	
Edmonton, Alta	
Fort William, Ont	
Guelph, Ont	
Halifax, N.S	
Hamilton, Ont	
Honolulu, T. H	
Juneau, Alaska	
Kansas City, Mo	
Ketchikan, Alaska	
Kingston, Ont	
London, Ont	
Los Angeles, Cal	
Milwaukee, Wis	
Minneapolis, Minn	
Montreal, Que	
Moose Jaw, Sask	
Nelson, B.C	
New York, N.Y	
North Bay, Ont	
Ottawa, Ont	
Peterboro, Ont 	
Philadelphia, Pa	
Pittsburgh, Pa	
Portland, Ore	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Quebec, Que	
Regina, Sask	
Saint John, N.B	
St. Louis, Mo	
St. Paul, Minn	
San Francisco, Cal	
Saskatoon, Sask	
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont...
Seattle, Wash	
Sherbrooke, Que	
Skagway, Alaska	
Spokane, Wash	
Toronto, Ont	
Trois Rivieres, Que	
Vancouver, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Washington, D.C	
Windsor, Ont	
Winnipeg, Man	
Belfast, Ireland	
Birmingham, England.
Bristol, England	
Dublin, Eire	
Glasgow, Scotland	
Liverpool, England	
London, England	
Manchester, England...
Southampton, England.
W. A. Shackelford 950 C. & S. Natl. Bk. Bldg.
E. Officer Canadian  Pacific  Station
L. R. Hart 405 Boylston St.
W. P. Wass 22 Court Street
J. W. Dawson Canadian Pacific Station
T. J. Wall 71 East Jackson Blvd.
L. P. Dooley 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
G. H. Griffin Union Commerce Bldg.  (Arcade)
P. G. Jefferson 1304 Kirby Bldg.
M. E. Malone 1231 Washington Blvd.
W. L. Mitchell Canadian Pacific Building
H. Lyall Martin 108 South May St.
W. C. Tully 30  Wyndham  St.
A. C. MacDonald 413 Barrington St.
A. Craig 4 King Street West
Theo H. Davies & Co.
V. W. Mulvihill
R. G. Norris 201-2 Waldheim Bldg.
Edgar Anderson
J. H. Welch 180 Wellington St.
H. J. McCallum 417  Richmond  St.
A. D. Macdonald 513 West Sixth St.
Wm. C. Giese 1014 Warner Theatre Bldg.
H. M. Tait 611 2nd Ave. South
/P. E. Gingras Windsor  Station
^ F. C. Lydon 201 St. James St. W.
R. G. West Canadian Pacific Station
J. G. Watson Baker and Ward Sts.
J. E. Roach  Madison Ave. at 44th St.
R. Y. Daniaud 87 Main Street West
J. A. McGill 83  Sparks St.
T. G. M. Jamieson 343   George   St.
E. A. Kenney Fifth Floor, 1500 Walnut St. Bldg.
W. N. McKendry Koppers Bldg.,  444, 7th Ave.
W. H. Deacon 626 S.W. Broadway
W. L. Coates
F. Fortier Palais Station
J. C. Pike Canadian Pacific Station
C. E. Cameron 40 King St.
G. P. Carbrey 418 Locust St.
H. J. McCauley 4th and St. Peter Sts.
S. E. Corbin 152  Geary St.
W. Fridfinnson 115 Second Ave.
L. V. Johnston 529  Queen Street
E. L. Sheehan 1320 Fourth Ave.
J. A. Metivier 91 Wellington St. North
L. H. Johnston
E. S. McPherson .Old National Bank Bldg.
H. C. James Canadian Pacific Bldg.
J. A. Tourville 1262 Notre Dame St.
F. H. Daly 434 Hastings Street West
R. J. Burland 1102 Government   St.
C. E. Phelps ,... .726, 14th Street N.W.
W. C. Elmer. 196 Ouellette Ave.
E. A. McGuinness Main and Portage
EUROPE
R. E. Swain 24 Donegall Place
G. W. Murrell 4 Victoria Square
T. W. Thorne 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Thomas Cook & Son 118 Grafton St.
C. L. Crowe 25  Bothwell   St.
H. Taylor Pier  Head
(G. A. Hobbs. Trafalgar Square,   W.C.2
^R. J. Harden 103 Leadenhall St., E.C. 3
R. L. Hughes 43 Cross Street
E. S, Spackman Richmond House, Bassett Ave.
ASIA
Hong Kong  E. Hospes Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe, Japan  S. H. Garrod 7 Harima-machl
Manila, P.I  D. C. Miller Marsman Bldg.,  Port Area
Shanghai, China  A. M. Parker The Bund and Peking Road
Tokyo, Japan  W. R. Buckberrough. E-7 No. 2 Sanchome, Marunouchi
Yokohama, Japan  B. G. Ryan 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, FIJI
Adelaide, Aus , Macdonald,   Hamilton & Co.
Auckland, N.Z A. W. Essex, Traffic Agt., C.P.R., 32-34 Quay   St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald,   Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedm. N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Fremantle, Aus Macdonald,    Hamilton & Co.
Hobart, Tas  Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic H. F. Boyer, Freight and Pass'r. Agent, C.P.R., 59 William St
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Perth, W. A Macdonald,    Hamilton  & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W N. R. McMorran, Traffic Agent, C.P.R., 247 George St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z G. A. Glennie, Fr. and Pass'r. Agent, C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express
Travellers Cheques.
Printed in Canada, Feb. 1941
 New Thrills!   New Adventures!   Cruise
North to Alaska this year on a
CANADIAN PACIFIC "PRINCESS" LINER
6299      POOLE BOOS-  'NC ,  CI
VICTORIA—Capital City of
British Columbia. Parliament
Buildings, Provincial Museum.
Empress Hotel. Observatory at
Esquimalt.
VANCOUVER—Canada's great
port on the Pacific near the
mouth of the Fraser River.
Lumbering, fishing, canning,
mining, manufacturing and trading centre. Immense shipping
to Honolulu, the Orient, Australia and New Zealand. Stanley
Park.   Hotel Vancouver.
NANAIMO—An old Hudson's
Bay Company's fort. Coal mines.
COMOX—Gateway to the beautiful Comox Valley, Comox is an
attractive resort. Lovely Comox
Bay is noted for its fine salmon
fishing.
ALERT BAY—Indian village
on Cormorant Island separated
from Vancouver Island by Johnstone Strait. Notable for its street
and cemetery bedecked with
totem poles, Indian school and
picturesque fishing  community.
OCEAN FALLS — near the
mouth of Dean Channel—reached by Alexander Mackenzie on
his overland passage across
Canada in 1793. The site of an
important paper manufacturing
plant.
BUTEDALE — on Princess
Royal Island: salmon canning
and fish oil production plant.
PRINCE RUPERT—port near
the mouth of the Skeena River
with population of about 6,350.
An important fishing centre with
large cold storage plants. Here
also is a large floating dry dock.
Close by on Digby Island is the
Canadian Government wireless
station, and a little farther north
is Port Simpson, celebrated in
the annals of the Hudson's Bay
Company. Prince Rupert has
interesting fur stores.
PORT SIMPSON—Site of the
original Fort Simpson built by
the Hudson's Bay Company in
1834.
KETCHIKAN—The southernmost town in Alaska, well
equipped with canneries and
cold storage plants. Centre of
platinum, gold, silver and lead
mines. Curio stores and totem
poles. Salmon jump the waterfall on Ketchikan Creek in the
late summer months.
BEHM CANAL (special
cruises only)—with Eddystone
Rock, a pinnacle 250 feet, rising
sheer from the sea.
RUDYERD BAY—with the picturesque "Punch Bowl." '
WRANGELL—near the mouth
of the Stikine River, which is
navigable 180 miles to Telegraph
Creek, outfitting point for the
Cassiar big game hunting fields.
Totem poles and curio stores.
Named after Baron Wrangell,
Russian Governor of Alaska, in
1830. At the north of Wrangell
Narrows is Petersburg, formerly
a Russian settlement.
TAKU GLACIER—at the head
of Taku Inlet, dropping sheer
into the sea—100 feet thick, a
mile wide and ninety miles long.
JUNEAU—Capital of Alaska
with population of over 4,000.
Fascinating Museum and experimental salmon hatchery. Fur
and curio stores. Close to Mendenhall Glacier and Gold Creek
basin. Gold crushing plants.
SITKA (special cruises only)
—on Baranof Island—Former
capital of Alaska under Russian
regime. Russian St. Michael's
Cathedral founded 1848. Sheldon Jackson Indian Industrial
School. National Park.
LYNN CANAL — Spectacular
fjord 80 miles long, 1 to 5 miles
broad. Ice wall of Davidson
Glacier on the west.
SKAGWAY—At the head of
Lynn Canal. Southern terminal
of White Pass and Yukon Route.
Rich in memories of Gold Rush
days and the Trail of '98—
Beautiful flower gardens. Fishing. Trips to West Taku Arm and
Lake Bennett—Miles Canyon
and Whitehorse Rapids. Or on
to   Dawson   and   the   Klondike.
*fr Location of Canadian Pacific Hotels
Corrected to November, 19-tO
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enjoy ocean cruise luxuries on the
sheltered Inside Passage
||| The Canadian Pacific maintains a year-round steamship service
to Alaska, and during the summer months assigns to this route three
of its smart Princess liners ... all of them are large, modern vessels of the
most comfortable, sea-going type. They are oil-burners, and equipped
with wireless telegraphy.
The staterooms are comfortable, cozy, well-ventilated, and designed to
accommodate only two passengers per stateroom.    On each ship there
All liners have large community rooms, dining saloons, observation rooms,
lounges, smoking rooms, and spacious dance floors. They are well proportioned and charmingly furnished. Delicious food, tastefully prepared,
with menus remarkable for their variety, contribute to the distinction of
Canadian Pacific's Alaska Service. In addition to breakfast, luncheon
and dinner, light refreshments are served in the dining saloon at night.
 "PRINCESS CRUISES"
TO
ALASKA
SUMMER 1951
VANCOUVER TO SKAGWAY
AND RETURN BY THE SMOOTH INSIDE PASSAGE
OCEAN FALLS - PRINCE RUPERT - KETCHIKAN - PETERSBURG - JUNEAU
IN DIRECT CONNECTION WITH "PRINCESS" STEAMSHIPS SERVICE FROM
SEATTLE — VICTORIA
The Canadian Pacific "Princess** route to Alaska is by the famous 'Inside Passage", a sea voyage
in smooth water sheltered by mountainous islands that protect the scenic coasts of British Columbia
and Alaska. Daylight is many hours long in the summer, long enough for your cruise through the
wooded, narrow channels and fiords to become an unforgettable memory. And, an average summer
temperature of 65°.
U. S. Transportation tax applies on all tickets sold in U. S.
2,000-MILE, 8V2-DAY "PRINCESS" CRUISES
$162.50 U. S. Funds
$150. Canadian Funds        — AS LOW AS —
(June 1st - August 31st, inclusive)
FROM VANCOUVER or VICTORIA FROM SEATTLE (including berth and
(including  berth and meals from  Van- # meals from Vancouver to Skagway and
couver to Skagway and return.) return.)
Steamer .
Lv. Vancouver
Ar. Skagway
Lv. Skagway
Ar. Vancouver
Steamer
Lv. Vancouver
Ar. Skagway
Lv. Skagway
Ar. Vancouver
Princess Louise
Sat     May 26
Wed May 30
Thur   May 31
Mon June   4
Princess Norah
Sat     July 14
Wed July 18
Thur  July 19
Mon July 23
I Princess Norah
Sat     June   2
Wed June   6
Thur  June   7
Mon June 11
Princess Louise
Wed July 111
Sun    July 22
Mon July 2;
Fri     July 27
Princess Louise
Wed June   6
Sun    June 10
Mon June 11
Fri     June 15
Princess Norah
Wed July 25
Sun    July 29
Mon July 30
Fri     Aug   3
Princess Norah
Princess Louise
Wed June 13
Sat     June 16
Sun    June 17
Wed June 20
Mon June 18
Thur  June 21
Fri     June 22
Mon June 25
Princess Louise
Princess Norah
Princess Louise
Sat     July 28
Sat     Aug   4
Wed Aug   8
Wed Aug   1
Wed Aug   8
Sun    Aug 12
Thur   Aug   2
Thur   Aug   9
Mon Aug 13
Mon Aug   6
Mon Aug 13
Fri      Aug 17
Princess Norah
Sat     June 23
Wed June 27
Thur  June 28
Mon July    2
Princess Norah
Wed Aug 15
Sun    Aug 19
Mon Aug 20
Fri      Aug 2'
Princess Louise
Wed June 27
Sun    July    1
Mon July    2
Fri     July    6
Princess Louise
Sat     Aug 18
Wed Aug 22
Thur  Aug 2;
Mon Aug 2"
Princess Norah
Wed July    4
Sun    July    8
Mon July    9
Fri     July 13
Princess Norah
Sat     Aug 25
Wed Aug 29
Thur   Aug 30
Mon Sept    ;
Princess Louise
Sat     July    7
Wed July 11
Thur  July 12
Mon July 16
Princess Louise
Wed Aug 29
Sun    Sept    2
Mon Sept    3
Fri     Sept    7
SPECIMEN ITINERARY—
NORTHBOUND
Leave  Vancouver  8 p.m.
*Arrive Ocean Falls    p.m.
Arrive Prince Rupert a.m.
Arrive Ketchikan        p.m.
Arrive Petersburg       a.m.
Wed.
Thur.
Fri.
Fri.
Sat.
Sat.
Sun.
Mon.
Mon.
Tues.
Arrive Juneau             p.m.      Sat.
Arrive Skagway        a.m.      Sun.
* Princess Norah dots not call at Ocean Falls
Tues.
Wed.
NOTE: Time in Alaska is one hour later than Pacific Time
Meals only are included between Seattle and Vancouver.
Stopovers not exceeding 15
days in Vancouver or Victoria,
either north or southbound,
will be arranged for Seattle
passengers, and not exceeding
15 days in Vancouver for
Victoria passengers.
Cruise fares do not include
berth and meals on board ship
while in Skagway.
SPECIMEN ITINERARY-
-SOUTHBOUND
Leave Skagway     7 p.m.
Mon.
Thur.
Arrive Juneau             a.m.
Tues.
Fri.
Arrive Wrangell         p.m.
Tues.
Fri.
Arrive Ketchikan        a.m.
Wed.
Sat.
Arrive Prince Rupert  p.m.
Wed.
Sat.
* Arrive Ocean Falls    a.m.
Thur.
Sun.
Arrive Vancouver 9 a.m.
Fri.
Mon.
* Princess Norah dots not call at Octan Falls
 "PRINCESS" COMFORT INCLUDES
Hot and cold running water in every stateroom.
Reading light over each berth.
Porthole in every stateroom.
Steamer rugs, for rent from News Agent.
Field-glasses, limited in number,
for rent from News Agent.
BAGGAGE
Each adult ticket includes free carriage of 1 50 lbs.
of baggage, and each half ticket, 75 lbs. Baggage
in excess of these weights is carried between Seattle,
Victoria, Vancouver and Skagway at a charge of
$6.15 per 100 lbs.
Staterooms can accommodate steamer trunks not
more than 14 inches high, but you will find it more
convenient to have trunks properly cared for in the
ship's baggage room. Unless bonded, they are
readily accessible during the voyage.
At Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver, passengers'
baggage can be stored free for not more than 30
days, after which regular charges are made.
BONDED BAGGAGE
Baggage that you are sure will not be needed during the voyage may be checked between Seattle
and Skagway in bond and customs examination
avoided. But, if you plan to use it on the voyage,
check to Victoria or Vancouver. Canadian customs
examination will be carried out before you board
your Alaska-bound "Princess". Northbound, U.S.
customs inspection is made at Ketchikan where
baggage checked from Vancouver or Victoria to
Skagway may be examined, or bonded, as you
wish.
Whitehorse and Dawson City
If you have through tickets from Puget Sound or
British Columbia points to Whitehorse or Dawson
City via the White Pass and Yukon Route, your
baggage can be checked to and examined at
destination without inspection at Skagway.
Also free of inspection is corded and sealed baggage from British Columbia points passing through
Alaska in bond.
Southbound
Canadian Customs inspection of southbound baggage is made at Prince Rupert; U.S., at Seattle. If
you are travelling east by Canadian Pacific Railway to a U.S. point you may have your U.S.
Customs inspection at Vancouver and check to
destination in bond.
IMMIGRATION ARRANGEMENTS
For passengers entering Alaska from Canada, U.S.
Immigration Inspection is held at Ketchikan. Bona
fide tourists do not find it strict. To simplify and
speed the work of the inspectors your "Princess"
Purser makes up the Manifest required from information as to age, residence, business, etc., obtained
from you.
The Purser will give you a card to present to the
Immigration inspector when he boards your "Princess" at Ketchikan. As soon as the inspector checks
with the Manifest you may go ashore. A similar
inspection is carried out by Canadian Immigration
officials at Prince Rupert on the southbound voyage.
Both inspections are simple formalities for tourists.
Passengers from the United States who carry "identification slips" supplied by selling agents find the
formalities even simpler.
FARES FROM PRINCE RUPERT
Fares from Prince Rupert to Skagway are the same
as from Vancouver to Skagway and return to Prince
Rupert or Vancouver—or, vice versa.
BERTH AND MEALS AT SKAGWA Y EXTRA
Your round trip fare to Skagway includes, of course,
berth and meals enroute, breakfast on arrival, and
dinner on departure day. It does not include meals
and berth while your "Princess" is in port at Skagway. But if you are making the round trip in the
same "Princess" liner you may arrange to stay on
board at Skagway. Your berth will cost $2.00 for
a standard lower, $1.50, upper, in an ordinary
room. Meals are at the regular tariff rates.
Approximate Cost:
Lunch, day of arrival  $1.75
Dinner, day of arrival  2.00
Berth, ordinary room  2.00
Breakfast, day of departure  1.25
Luncheon, day of departure  1.75
$8.75
ALASKA AND THE YUKON
Old and new combine "down north" to makeyour
visit to Alaska and the Yukon a memorable one.
The White Pass and Yukon Route, by rail from
Skagway to Whitehorse, by river steamer from
Whitehorse to Dawson and the many side trips
available open up the country that inspired the
songs of Robert W. Service, that witnessed the gold
rush of '98.
Add to this the Alaska Highway, an engineering
marvel of today—a bus route where once was only
mountain and muskeg—and the swift, clean lanes
of the upper air where Canadian Pacific Airlines
lengthen your stay by shortening your travel time in
Alaska and the Yukon and you have the modern
answer to the old question of where to go this year.
The track of the White Pass and Yukon Railroad
literally follows "The Trail of '98" from Skagway
LIMITS
Round   trip   tickets   to   Skagway   are   limited   to
October 31, 1951.
FREE STORAGE
Embarkation at Vancouver
You may join your Canadian Pacific "Princess" at
Vancouver any time after 5.30 p.m. P.S.T. An
appetizing cold plate Buffet will be served aboard
your Alaska "Princess" liner shortly after sailing
from Vancouver for passengers who have not dined
before embarkation.
along mountainsides, across spidery trestles, spans
historic "Dead Horse Gulch" to Bennett. Twelve
miles farther on is White Pass. This station is the
boundary point where Union Jack and Stars and
Stripes fly side by side—where you may get your
first sight of Stetson-hatted, scarlet-coated Royal
Canadian Mounted Police.
The wide plain that leads to Whitehorse gives you
mountain views, sight of the upper Yukon River and
your first crossing of the Alaska Highway. Down
the Yukon River to Dawson City sturdy sternwheelers that burn four-foot logs really show you
this northland. Five Finger Rapids, where you see
what fast-water piloting really is, and the great
dredges and flumes that today dig out gold dust
in quantities the old-timers never dreamed of are
highlights of a voyage in almost perpetual daylight.
C.P.A. airliner
over Vancouver;
Wrangell
Narrows;
k*Princess Norah"
in Lynn Canal.
"PRINCESS"ENTERTAINMENT INCLUDES
Excellent dance floor on every ship.
Social Hostess, to organize your pleasure.
Motion Pictures—Informal talks on the ports
of call.
Introduction Dinners.
Shuffle-board — Table   Tennis — Quoits —
Horse-racing.
WHITE PASS AND YUKON ROUTE
The White Pass and Yukon Route operates daily train services shown below between SKAGWAY and WHITEHORSE in both
directions during the tourist season, and steamships on the Yukon River to Dawson City. Service is also provided for an interesting trip
from CARCROSS to WEST TAKU ARM by steamship through Nares and Tagish Lakes.
RESERVATIONS and detailed information may be obtained from White Pass and Yukon Route agents at the following addresses,
407 Douglas Building, Seattle, Wash.; and 640 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
SPECIAL SUMMER EXCURSION FARES
TRAIL OF '98 TOUR—from Skagway to Bennett and return, daily. Time required, one day, including all
expenses    $ 11.25
SKAGWAY TO WHITEHORSE, one way, including parlor car accommodations. Time required, one day.
Service daily        15.25
SKAGWAY-WHITEHORSE TOUR—a   round  trip   from  Skagway,   including   all   transportation   expense.
(Meals and lodging at Whitehorse extra.) Time required, two days. Service daily          30.00
SKAGWAY-WEST TAKU ARM TOUR—a round trip from Skagway, including all expenses. Time required,
two days, while ocean steamship in port        40.00
SKAGWAY-WEST TAKU ARM-WHITEHORSE TOUR—a round trip from Skagway, including all transportation expense. (Meals and lodging at Whitehorse extra.) Time required, three to five days        52.50
SKAGWAY-WEST TAKU ARM-WHITEHORSE, one way. Includes all expenses. Time required, two days.       39.00
SKAGWAY-DAWSON CITY-WEST TAKU ARM TOUR—A round trip from Skagway, including parlor
car Skagway to Whitehorse and return, round trip on Yukon River Whitehorse to Dawson City and return,
including berth aboard steamer in port at Dawson City and Whitehorse, also side trip via lake steamer
to beautiful West Taku Arm and return. (No meals served in port.) Minimum time required, twelve days.    144.00
TAKE YOUR CAR
There is room aboard your Canadian Pacific "Princess"
for your car, which will be carried between Vancouver
and Whitehorse for an inclusive steamship and rail rate
of $121.00. This rate applies in either direction, so
you can drive the Alaska Highway one way and enjoy
the restful, scenic inside passage sea voyage the other.
Ask your Agent for details.
CRUISE HIGHLIGHTS
Introduction Dinner
On the evening of the first day out from Vancouver
a special introduction dinner menu is served and the
occasion is a gala one, at which with the aid of the
social hostess and your own goodwill, everyone
becomes acquainted at the very start of the voyage.
Up-To-Date Information
J0HN At HAGLE
DOMAIN ST
COMFORTABLE CLOTHES
Your choice of clothes for your Alaska cruise
depends largely upon your own tastes and habits.
For climatic comfort our best suggestion is that you
plan as you would for spring at home—except, of
course, that residents of southern United States and
similar climates should include warmer clothing in
their luggage.
Stout shoes for the hikers, and fishing tackle for
those who want to try their skill in northern lakes
and streams, especially in the Yukon territory, are
a good bet.
N
ews
Divine Service
DEPOSIT
So that you may know what to look for and thoroughly enjoy the magnificent scenic aspects of your
cruise, there will be two interesting talks given by
the Purser. These are informal and take place at
about 9.30 a.m. the day after you leave Vancouver and about 2.30 p.m. the day after leaving
Prince Rupert.
News bulletins are made available to passengers
daily usually at the breakfast table—to keep you
up to date on the latest news highlights,- and you
will find the ship's bulletin "Alaska Princess" very
useful.
Divine services are held on board every Sunday
when clergymen are available.
A deposit of $20.00 one way, $40.00 round trip
is required when your reservation is made, the balance to be paid when the ticket is issued, but not
less than sixty days before sailing in the case of
separate north and southbound sailings, or forty-five
days for a round trip on one voyage.
FLY ONE WAY
If time limits your holiday in Alaska and the Yukon you
can lengthen your stay ashore by using Canadian Pacific
"Princess" in one direction and a fast twin-engined
Canadian Pacific airliner in the other —
Steamship, Vancouver — Skagway, (minimum) $75.00
Rail, Skagway — Whitehorse, - 575.25
Air, Whitehorse — Vancouver, $79.00
 SPECIAL
CRUISES TO
ALASKA
RY LUXURIOUS, SPEEDY
"PRINCESS KATHLEEN"
From $180. Canadian Funds
From Vancouver
Ports of Call
June
June
June
July
July
August
August
August
Lv. SEATTLE*
Lv. VICTORIA*
Lv. VANCOUVER
8.00 p.m.
Sat.
9
Wed.
20
Sat,
30
Wed. 11
Sat.     21
Wed.
1
Sat.
11
Wed. 22
Ar. Prince Rupert
Lv. Prince Rupert
Cruise Behm Canal to
Punch Bowl 4.30 p.m.
Ar. Ketchikan
Lv. Ketchikan
about    8.30 a.m.
10.30 a.m.
about    7.30 p.m.
10.00 p.m.
Mon.
11
Fri.
22
July
Men.
2
Fri.      13
Mon. 23
Fri.
3
Mon.
13
Fri.      24
Ar. Juneau
Lv. Juneau
about    3.00 p.m.
11.30 p.m.
Tue.
12
Sat.
23
Tue.
3
Sat.     14
Tue.    24
Sat.
4
Tue.
14
Sat.     25
Ar. SKAGWAY
about    9.00 a.m.
Wed.
13
Sun.
24
Wed.
4
Sun.    15
Wed. 25
Sun.
5
Wed.
15
Sun.    26
Lv. SKAGWAY
Ar. Glacier Bay
Lv. Glacier Bay
11.59 p.m.
about 11.00 a.m.
about      12 noon
Thur.
Fri.
14
15
Mon.
Tue.
25
26
Thur.
Fri.
5
6
Mon. 16
Tue.    17
Thur.   26
Fri.      27
Mon.
Tue.
6
7
Thur.
Fri.
16
17
Mon. 27
Tue.    28
Ar. Wrangell
Lv. Wrangell
Ar. Ketchikan
Lv. Ketchikan
about    8.00 a.m.
12 noon
about    7.30 p.m.
11.30 p.m.
Sat.
16
Wed.
27
Sat.
7
Wed. 18
Sat.     28
Wed.
8
Sat.
18
Wed. 29
Ar. Prince Rupert
Lv. Prince Rupert
(Cruise Grenville Channel,
Gardner Canal, Goat Hbr.)
about    8.00 a.m.
11.00 a.m.
Sun.
17
Thur.
28
Sun.
8
Thur.   19
Sun.    29
Thur.
9
Sun.
19
Thur.   30
Ar. Ocean Falls
Lv. Ocean Falls
Ar. VANCOUVER
Ar. VICTORIA!
Ar. SEATTLEf
about    8.00 a.m.
11.00 a.m.
9.00 a.m.
Mon.
18
Fri.
29
Mon.
9
Fri.      20
Mon.  30
Fri.
10
Mon.
20
Fri.    31
Tue.
19
Sat.
30
Tue,
10
Sat.     21
Tue.    31
Sat.
11
Tue.
21
Sept.
Sat.       1
"Princess
Kathleen"
entering
Vancouver
Harbour.
* Northbound passengers from Seattle or Victoria leave on local Steamships connecting with Princess Kathleen from Vancouver.
t Southbound Princess Kathleen is due at Vancouver in morning, connecting with local steamships for Victoria and Seattle.
The times and dates of arrival and departure from various ports will be followed as closely as possible, but are subject to tidal and weather conditions and to change without notice.
Highlights of the special cruises by Princess Kathleen
are additional trips into Glacier Bay west of
Skagway, the Behm Canal between Wrangell and
Ketchikan and the passage of Grenville Channel,
Gardner Canal and a visit to Goat Harbour between Prince Rupert and Ocean Falls. North and
southbound Princess Kathleen travels via Snow Pass
and Cape Decision.
Princess Kathleen, ideally designed for Alaska
cruising, is noted for extra large public rooms,
plentiful deck space and an observation lounge
from which every scenic gem can be viewed in
comfort without regard to the weather.
5140
 SPECIMEN ITINERARY, SKAGWAY-WHITEHORSE TOUR
(June - September)
Leave Vancouver by Canadian Pacific "Princess", Wednesday or Saturday, 8.00 p.m.
Arrive Skagway, Sunday or Wednesday, 9.00 a.m. Pacific Time.
Leave Skagway, Sunday or Wednesday, 10.00 a.m. Yukon Time.
Arrive Whitehorse, Sunday or Wednesday, 4.40 p.m. Yukon Time.
Leave Whitehorse, Monday or Thursday, 900 am, Yukon Time.
Arrive Skagway, Monday or Thursday, 3.05 p.m. Yukon Time.
Leave Skagway, Monday or Thursday, 7.00 p.m. Pacific Time.
Arrive Vancouver by Canadian Pacific "Princess", Friday or Monday, 9.00 a.m. Pac. Std. Time.
SKAGWAY-DAWSON CITY-WEST TAKU ARM TOUR USING S. S. PRINCESS LOUISE
Trip                Trip                Trip Trip Trip
No. 1            No. 2           No. 3 No. 4 No. 5
Leave Seattle or Vancouver. .        June    6        June 16        June 27 July     7 July  18
Arrive Skagway \..        June 10        June 20        July     1 July  11 July  22
Leave Skagway.. .         June 10        June 20        July     1 July  11 July  22
Arrive West Taku Arm     June 10        June 20        July     1 July  11 July  22
Leave West Taku Arm         June 10        June 20        July     1 July  11 July  22
Aboard Lake Steamer TUTSHI
Arrive Whitehorse         June 11         June 21         July     2 July  12 July  23
Leave Whitehorse         June 11         June 21         July     2 July  12 July  23
Arrive Dawson City         June 13        June 23        July    4 July  14 July  25
Berth aboard Steamer included. No meals served in port.
Leave Dawson City         June 14        June 24        July     5 July  15 July  26
Arrive Whitehorse (before noon)   June 20          July   1         July  11 July  22 Aug.   1
Berth aboard Steamer included. No meals served in port.
Leave Whitehall*          June 21         July    2        July  12 July  23 Aug.   2
Ai;sve Skagway           June 21         July     2        July  12 July  23 Aug.   2
Leave Slcagway                   June 21         July     2        July  12 July  23 Aug.   2
Arrive Vancouver or Sea'^le. .        June 25        July     6        July  16 July  27 Aug.   6
*Rooms must be vacated by 8:00 A.M.
Trip
No. 6
July 28
Aug. 1
Aug. 1
Aug. 1
Aug.   1
Aug. 2
Aug. 2
Aug.   4
Aug. 5
Aug. 12
Aug.13
Aug. 13
Aug.13
Aug. 17
Trip
No. 7
Aug. 8
Aug. 12
Aug. 12
Aug. 12
Aug. 12
Aug.13
Aug.13
Aug. 15
Aug. 16
Aug. 22
Aug. 23
Aug. 23
Aug. 23
Aug. 27
Trip
No. 8
Aug. 18
Aug. 22
Aug. 22
Aug. 22
Aug. 22
Aug. 23
Aug. 23
Aug. 25
Aug. 26
Sept.    2
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
SPECIMEN ITINERARY, SKAGWAY-WEST TAKU ARM TOUR
Leave Vancouver by Canadian Pacific "Princess", Saturday or Wednesday, 8.00 p.m. Pac. Std
Arrive Skagway, Wednesday or Sunday, 9.00 a.m. Pacific Time.
Leave Skagway, Wednesday or Sunday, 8.30 a.m. Yukon Time.
Arrive West Taku Arm, Wednesday or Sunday, 7.00 p.m. Yukon Time.
Leave West Taku Arm, Wednesday or Sunday, 9.00 p.m. Yukon Time.
Arrive Skagway, Thursday or Monday, 3.05 p.m. Yukon Time.
Leave Skagway, Thursday or Monday, 7.00 p.m. Pacific Time.
Arrive Vancouver by Canadian Pacific "Princess", Monday or Friday, 9.00 a.m. Pac. Std. Time
ime.
 1931
CANADIAN PACIFIC
B.C. COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
SEATTLE -VICTORIA -VANCOUVER
SKAGWAY, ALASKA
Circular 620
■Hr*
X,X7
ASSURANCES
IILLETS DE VO
fMMEUBLES
306 Edii
Winnipeg
^
 S.S. PRINCESS ALICE
0
->
m
S.S. PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
if
 ALASKA SERVICE
Victoria and Vancouver, B.C., to Prince Rupert, B. C,
Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau and Skagway, Alaska
Summer Schedule, 1931
S.S.  "PRINCESS CHARLOTTE,"  "PRINCESS LOUISE," and "PRINCESS ALICE"
3
Sailing Number    S^
PORTS OF CALL
1
Princess
Louise
2
Princess
Charlotte
3
Princess
Louise
4
Princess
Alice
5
Princess
Charlotte
6
Princess
Louise
7
Princess
Alice
8
Princess
Charlotte
9
Princess
Louise
10
Princess
Alice
11
Princess
Charlotte
Lv. Victoria  12 mid't.
June
5
June
12
June
16
June
19
June
23
June
26
June
30
July
3
July
7
July
10
July
14
Lv. Seattle © 	
6
13
17
20
24
27
July 1
4
8
11
15
Lv. Vancouver 9  p.m. 6 13
"    Alert  Bay  a.m. 7 14
"    Prince  Rupert  a.m. 8 15
"    Ketchikan    p.m. 8 15
"    Wrangell    a.m. 9 16
"    Taku  Glacier ©p.m. 9 16
"    Juneau  p.m. 9 16
Ar. Skagway    a.m. 10 17
Lv. Skagway ©7 p.m. 11 18
"    Juneau    a.m. 12 19
"    Wrangell p.m. 12 19
"    Ketchikan    a.m. 13 20
"    Prince Rupert  p.m. 13 20
"    Alert Bay  p.m. 14 21
Ar. Vancouver  © a.m. 15 22
17
20
24
27
1
4
8
11
15
18
21
25
28
2
5
9
12
16
19
22
26
29
3
6
10
13
17
19
22
26
29
3
6
10
13
17
20
23
27
30
4
7
11
14
18
20
23
27
30
4
7
11
14
18
20
23
27
30
4
7
11
14
18
21
24
28
July 1
5
8
12
15
19
22
25
29
2
6
9
13
16
20
23
26
30
3
7
10
14
17
21
23
26
30
3
7
10
14
17
21
24
27
July 1
4
8
11
15
18
22
24
27
1
4
8
11
15
18
22
25
28
2
5
9
12
16
19
23
26
29
3
6
10
13
17
20
24
Ar. Seattle     8.30 p.m.
15
22
26
29
3
6            10
13
17
20
24
Ar. Victoria    p.m.
15
22
26
29
3
6            10
13
17
20
24
Sailing Number    D#
PORTS OF CALL
12
Princess
Louise
13
Princess
Alice
14
Princess
Charlotte
15
Princess
Louise
16
Princes
Alice
17
s    Princess
Charlotte
18    ©19
Princess   Princess
Louise       Alice
20
Princess
Charlotte
21
Princess
Louise
22
Princess
Charlotte
23
Princess
Louise
Lv. Victoria  12 mid't.
July
17
July
21
July
24
July
28
July
31
August
4
August      August
7          10
August
14
August
18
August
25
August
28
Lv. Seattle © 	
18
22
25
29 Aug. 1
5
8          11
15
19
26
29
Lv. Vancouver 9  p.m. 18
"    Alert  Bay   a.m. 19
"    Prince Rupert  a.m. 20
"    Ketchikan    p.m. 20
"    Wrangell   a.m. 21
"    Taku  Glacier ©p.m. 21
"    Juneau p.m. 21
Ar. Skagway    a.m. 22
Lv. Skagway ©7 p.m. 23
"    Juneau    a.m. 24
"    Wrangell   p.m. 24
"    Ketchikan    a.m. 25
"    Prince Rupert  p.m. 25
"    Alert Bay   p.m. 26
Ar. Vancouver  ©a.m. 27
22          25
29
1
5
8
11
15
19
26
29
23          26
30
2
6
9
16
20
27
30
24          27
31
3
7
10
id
17
21
28
31
24          27
31
3
7
10
a>
17
21
28
31
25          28
Aug. 1
4
8
11
zn
18
22
29
Sept. 1
25          28
1
4
8
11
TJ
18
22
29
25          28
1
4
8
11
o
18
22
29
1
26          29
2
5
9
12
hL
19
23
30
2
27          30
3
6
10
13
Q
20
24
31
3
28          31
4
7
11
14
21
25
Sept. 1
4
28          31
4
7
11
14
o
21
25
1
4
29 Aug. 1
5
8
12
15
?T
22
26
2
5
29             1
5
8
12
15
i-S
22
26
2
5
30            2
6
9
13
16
23
27
3
6
31             3
7
10
14
17
24
28
4
7
Ar. Seattle   	
 8.30   p.m.
27
31
3
7
10
14
17
24
28
4
7
Ar. Victoria   ...
 p.m.
27
31
3
7
10
14
17
24
28
4
7
Steamers   are  due  to arrive  in  Skagway  about  8.00  a.m.  on  advertised  date,  and  remain  until  7.00  p.m.
following day.
® Alaska time, one hour slower than Pacific standard time.
© Northbound passengers from Seattle may leave on local steamer on day of sailing from Vancouver or on
local night steamer the previous evening.
® Southbound Alaska steamers are due at Vancouver about 7.00 a.m., and leave for Victoria at 9.00 a.m.
@ For full particulars of special cruise trip Princess Alice, kindly refer to special Cruise Circular.
© Call will be made at Taku Glacier northbound on dates shown, subject to weather conditions.
The times and dates of arrival and departure are subject to tidal and weather conditions.
 (1) Fares
The fare from SEATTLE, VICTORIA or VANCOUVER to
SKAGWAY and RETURN is
$90.00
AND UPWARDS
According to accommodation occupied.
Fare includes meals and berth in stateroom en route, but not on board steamer while in
port at Skagway.
(See paragraph 16 "Extra Charge for Berth and Meals at Skagway")
ONE WAY AND ROUND TRIP FARES
Effective June 1   to September 10,  1931, Inclusive.
The following fares will be charged for accommodation specified on S.S. "Princess Charlotte," "Princess Louise" and "Princess Alice" between Victoria, Vancouver or Seattle
and Skagway. Passengers from Seattle will be furnished with similar accommodation
and meals on local steamers to Victoria or Vancouver.
Fares for special cruise trip, "Princess Alice," August 1 1th, will be found in special cruise
circular.
Round trip fares will be the sum of the fares for the accommodations occupied north
and southbound.
0
c
(2)   S.S. PRINCESS LOUISE
Gross  Tonnage      -    -    4,200
Berthing Capacity     -       254
ONE   WAY   FARES
North or Southbound
For
1
in
Room
For
in
Room
For
2
in
Room
For
in
Room
For
3
in
Room 1[
Berth
Rate
AWNING  (LOWER DECK)
(a)   Rooms   Al-Bl,   Cl-Dl — Separate   tub   bath
and toilet, also one three-quarter bed 4 feet
wide with each room (see paragraph 6)	
$140.00
130  00
$140.00
130  00
$140.00
130  00
$162.50
152  50
$185.00
(b)  Room   133—Large   room  with  twin  beds   (3
feet wide) ; shower bath and toilet 	
(c)  Rooms 100 to 117 inclusive—Large rooms containing sofa berth in addition to double lower
and single upper berths; electric heaters	
110.00
87.50
110.00
132.50
155.00
55.00
(d)  Rooms  120, 121,  122, 123, 128, 129, 130, 136,
137, 138, 139, outside rooms amidships 	
100.00
77.50
100.00
122.50
50.00
(e) Rooms  142,  143, 144,  145—Large rooms containing sofa berth in addition to double lower
and single upper berths; electric heaters	
(f) Rooms 148, 149, 150, 151 	
110.00
90.00
87.50
67.50
110.00
90.00
132.50
112.50
155.00
55.00
45.00
(g) Rooms  118,  119,  124,  125,  126,  127,  132,  134,
135, 140, 141, 146, 147, 152, 153—Bibby rooms,
with porthole at end of alcove	
90.00
67.50
90.00
112.50
135.00
45.00
(h)   Rooms 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159	
90.00
67.50
90.00
112.50
	
45.00
PROMENADE  DECK
(i)   Rooms 200 to 231, 234 to 241 inclusive	
100  00
77.50
100.00
122.50
50.00
BOAT DECK
(j)   Rooms   300   to  307   inclusive,   312   to  326   in
elusive—Rooms with deck entrance	
105.00
82.50
105.00
127.50
52.50
(k) Rooms   E-3  and  F-3—Separate  shower bath
and toilet, also one single bed 3 feet 6 inches
wide with each room  (see paragraph 6)	
115.00
137.50
o
IIIMPORTANT:—See paragraph 12, page 6, before booking.   Three persons can not be accommodated
in rooms where no rate is shown.
 (3)  S.S. PRINCESS CHARLOTTE
Gross  Tonnage
Berthing  Capacity
3,924
232
ONE  WAY   FARES
North or Southbound
For 1
in Room
For \y2
in Room
For 2
in Room
For iy2       For 3
in Room  in Room*]
Berth
Rate
(e)
(f)
LOWER DECK
(a) Rooms 104-106 and 105-107—Connecting rooms with bath
and toilet between. Each room has one three-quarter bed
3 feet 9  inches wide,  and  electric heaters.    (See  para.   6.)
One  room with bath  and  toilet	
One room without bath or toilet	
(b) Rooms 100, 101, 102, 103, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 115—
Large rooms with sofa berths, in addition to double lower
and single upper  	
(c) Rooms 114, 117—One single bed 3 feet wide, shower bath
and toilet   (accommodating one passenger only) :.
(d) Rooms 116, 119—Twin beds 3 feet wide, shower bath and
toilet   	
(Memo:—Rooms 114-116, 117-119 can be sold en suite.)
Rooms    118,    121—Double    lower,    single    upper    and    sofa
berth    :	
Rooms    120,    123—Double   lower,   single   upper   and   sofa
berth	
(g) Rooms 122, 125—Double lower and single upper. Bibby rooms.
(h)  Rooms 124, 127—Twin beds 3 feet wide 	
(i)  Rooms 134, 137, 142, 145, 150, 153, 158, double lower, single
upper, shower bath and toilet	
(j)  Room   159,   large   room   with   twin   beds   3   feet   wide,   sofa
berth,  shower   and   toilet	
(k)   Rooms 132, 135, 138, 140, 141, 143, 146, 148, 149, 151, 154, 156,
157, 162, bibby rooms with porthole at end of alcove	
(1)    Rooms 161, 163, 168, 170, 172	
(m)  Rooms 165, 167, 169, 171, 173, 174, 175, 176, 178, 180, 182, 184
(n)  Room 164, twin beds 3 feet wide, shower bath and toilet
UPPER DECK
(o)   Rooms 16-18, 17-19, 20-22, 21-23, connecting rooms with double
lower and single upper berths.
Rooms 18, 19, 22, 23, with deck entrance only	
Rooms 16, 17, 20, 21, with saloon entrance only	
(p)   Rooms 1 to 12 inclusive, 14, 15, 24 to 53 inclusive.   Rooms
with double lower and single upper berths and settee   (seat
only)  :	
$125.00
110.00
110.00
115.00
130.00
100.00
100.00
90.00
125.00
115.00
187.50
90.00
90.00
90 00
130.00
110.00
105.00
105.00
U25.00
110.00
87.50
$125.00
110.00
110.00
130.00
77.50
77.50
67.50
125.00
92.50
187.50
67.50
67.50
67.50
130.00
130.00
100.00
100.00
90.00
125.00
115.00
187.50
90.00
90.00
90 00
130.00
87.50 110.00
82.50 105 00
132.50
122.50
122.50
112.50
137.50
210.00
112.50
112.50
112.50
132.50
127.50
155.00
145.00
145.00
232.50
82.50 105.00 127.50
55.00
50.00
50.00
45.00
57.50
45.00
45.00
45.00
55.00
52.53
52.50
11 IMPORTANT:—See  paragraph   12,  page   6,  before   booking.    Three  persons   can  not   be  accommodated  in  rooms
where no rate is shown.
(4) S.S. PRINCESS ALICE
Gross  Tonnage      -    -    -    3,100
Berthing Capacity     -    -       206
LOWER DECK
(a) Rooms 143, 144, 149, 150, twin beds, 3 feet wide. Shower
bath and toilet 	
(b) Rooms 151-153, 152-154. Separate shower bath and toilet,
also one three-quarter bed 4 feet wide with each room. (See
para.  6.)    Electric  heater   	
(c) Rooms 121, 122, 129, 130, 137, 138, double lower, single upper:
shower bath  and  toilet	
(d) Rooms 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 110, 115, 116, 117,
118—Large rooms with sofa berth in addition to double lower
and  single  upper   berths	
(e) Rooms 109-111, 112-114—Each room contains double lower
and single upper berth and settee (seat). Folding doors
between rooms so that they may be used en suite	
(f) Rooms 119, 120, 125, 126, 127, 128, 133, 134, 135, 136, 141
142—Bibby rooms with porthole at end of alcove	
(g) Rooms  155 to  158 inclusive	
(h)   Rooms   159  to   172  inclusive	
UPPER  DECK
(i) Rooms 11-15, 12-14, 16-18, 17-19, 20-22, 21-23, 24-26, 25-27,
28-30,   29-31 — Connecting   rooms,   double   lower   and   single
upper berth 	
Rooms 14, 15 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 25, 30, 31—Rooms with deck
entrance  only  	
Rooms 11, 12, 16, 17, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28, 29—With saloon
entrance  only	
(j)  Rooms 1 to 10 inclusive, 32 to 43 inclusive	
ONE  WAY  FARES
North or Southbound
For 1
in Room
$130.00
125.00
115.00
110.00
100.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
105.00
100.00
100.00
For iy2       For 2       For 2^       For 3
in Room    in Room    in Room   in Room^[
S130.00
125.00
92.50
87.50
77.50
67.50
67.50
67.50
82.50
77.50
77.50
$130.00
125.00
115.00
110.00
100.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
105.00
100.00
100.00
137.50
132.50
122.50
112.50
112.50
112.50
127.50
122.50
122.50
155.00
Berth
Rate
57.50
55.00
50.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
52.50
50.00
50.00
Above rates do not apply to special cruise trip, Princess Alice, August 11.   For particulars, see Special Cruise Circular.
If IMPORTANT:—See  paragraph  12,  page  6,  before  booking.   Three  persons  can  not  be  accommodated  in  rooms
where no rate is shown.
Round trip fares will be the sum of the fares for the   accommodations   occupied   north   and   southbound.
5
 (5)      Fares from Fares quoted on pages 4 and 5, as applying from Vancouver, Vic-
Prince Rupert       tor*a or Seattle to Skagway, will also apply for passengers embarking
at Prince Rupert and proceeding from there to Skagway, returning to
Prince Rupert or Vancouver, or vice versa, between June 1 and September 10, 1931.
(6) Width of Beds in Special attention is called to the fact that beds in de luxe staterooms
de Luxe Rooms are °f varying widths. Princess Louise: Rooms Al, Bl, CI, DI
are 4 feet wide; rooms E3, F3, 3 feet 6 inches wide. Princess
Charlotte: Rooms 104, 105, 106, 107, 3 feet 9 inches wide. Princess Alice: Rooms
151-153, 152-154, 4 feet wide. When selling 3-foot 9 inches or 4-foot beds for
occupancy by two persons, please be particular to explain to passengers that they are not
full size double beds. Rooms E3 and F3 on Princess Louise, and rooms 1 1 4 and 1 1 7
on Princess Charlotte should not be sold for more than one passenger each.
(')      En Suite Accom- By an arrangement of alleyway doors it is possible to use Al-129
modation, as adjoining rooms, if desired.     This also applies to rooms CI-128
Princess Louise   and D1-1 30.
(8) Berth Lights, Hot All rooms on Princess Louise, Princess Charlotte and Princess Alice
and Cold Water have berth lights in each berth and hot and cold running water.
(9) Children Children  5  years of age and under   12  years will be charged half
minimum fare, plus full premium (if any), except that no allowance
will be made for children in de luxe rooms when same are occupied by two passengers only.
See pages 4 and 5. Children 2 years of age and under 5 years between Seattle, Victoria
or Vancouver and Skagway will be charged $7.50 one way or $15.00 round trip. This
will include a separate seat at the dining table, but if separate berth is required, charge the
same as for children between 5 and 12 years of age. No charge will be made for
children under 2 years of age accompanied by parent or guardian.
3
(10) Charges for When two adjoining rooms with bath between are sold to the same
Room with Bath   Party» premium charge for room with bath need not be collected for
both rooms.
(11) Reselling Space    When space assigned to a particular party is later released and resold
immediately, it is important that General Passenger Agent, Vancouver,
be given full particulars of the transfer by mail or wire in order that records may be
corrected. If this is not done, General Passenger Agent has no means of telling whether
or not a duplicate sale has occurred and may require to wire to make sure. THIS IS
IMPORTANT.
(12)
(13)
(14)
Number to be With the exceptions of rooms E3 and F3 on the Princess Louise;
Berthed in One 1 1 4 and 1 1 7 on the Princess Charlotte, which are single rooms only,
Room and room 159 on the Princess Charlotte, which is a three-berth room,
all other rooms are designed to accommodate two passengers and are
not large enough to comfortably accommodate more than two adults, with the possible exception of rooms covered by paragraphs (c) and (e) Princess Louise, (b), (e) and (f)
Princess Charlotte, and (d) Princess Alice. These latter rooms contain a sofa berth
and can accommodate three passengers, but should not be sold to more than two unless
at passengers' express desire and after the matter has been explained.
When two-berth rooms are occupied by three passengers, the third passenger will be
charged one minimum fare in addition to rate shown for two persons. See room rates,
pages 4 and 5.
Voyage Numbers   Agents will note,  by referring to Page  3,  that voyages have been
numbered consecutively, 1 to 23.   When telegraphing for space, voyage
numbers may be used in place of the steamer's name and sailing date, i.e.:
"Offer minimum room voyage one north two south Jones and wife."
If this system is followed, telegraph charges will be reduced to a minimum. Please
be particular to state price of accommodation desired.
Exclusive Owing  to  the  limited  amount of space available  during the tourist
Use of Rooms season it is necessary to charge the two-in-room rate for exclusive use
of two-berth rooms by one passenger. See rates on pages 4 and 5.
When Passenger pays for exclusive use, ticket should be endorsed and signed by the
issuing agent. Exceptions: Room E3 and F3 on Princess Louise, and 1 14 and 1 1 7 on
Princess Charlotte are single rooms only.
o
 :
(15) General Be particular to state in letter or telegram whether space is required
one Way only or round trip, price of accommodation desired, and when
single berths are desired, whether for lady or gentleman.
If round-trip space is offered and passenger only wishes one-way space, release the
round-trip space to General Passenger Agent, Vancouver, and apply for space as required.
Avoid selling lower berths to ladies travelling alone when uppers are available.
(16) Extra Charge The passage fare to Skagway and return includes berth and meals
for Berth en route, but not while steamer is in port at Skagway. Breakfast
and Meals at w^' however, be served on the morning of arrival and dinner on the
n, evening of departure without extra charge.
Passengers making the round trip on the same steamer may
remain on board while steamer is in port at Skagway if they so desire, upon payment of
regular tariff rates for berths and meals—see B. C. C. S. Tariff 21-2, and supplements.
Night berth rates shown therein will apply for entire time steamer is in port.
Meal Rates:    Breakfast,  75c; Lunch, $1.00; Dinner, $1.50.
Tickets should be endorsed, "Berth and Meals extra at Skagway." This extra
charge will be collected by Purser at Skagway, and should not be collected by agents
selling tickets.
Passengers who have travelled northbound on another steamer or sailing may board
steamer at Skagway after 5.00 p.m.  (Alaska time).
^ (17)      Local Service—    FROM SEATTLE NORTHBOUND—Berth and meals are pro-
Seattle vided without charge between Seattle and Vancouver as follows:—
Victoria, (a)   To passengers using local steamers from Seattle not earlier than
Vancouver 48   hours   previous   to   sailing  of   Alaska   steamer   from   Vancouver.
Passengers using 11.30 p.m. steamer from Seattle day previous to
sailing from Vancouver may, if they desire, and the Alaska steamer is in port, go on board
at once and occupy their staterooms and will be served their lunch and dinner without extra
charge. Passengers should not be encouraged to do this, however, as steamer has to load
freight during the day and may have to shift her berth at Vancouver.
(b) To passengers using 9.00 a.m. steamer from Seattle on date Alaska steamer sails
from Vancouver. Lunch will be served on local steamer en route, and dinner on Alaska
steamer on arrival at Vancouver, without extra charge.
FROM VICTORIA NORTHBOUND—Alaska steamers are scheduled to sail from
Victoria at 11.45 p.m. Passengers may board steamer after 9.00 p.m. on advertised sailing date. Dinner will not be provided on Alaska steamer at Victoria. It is not
always possible, however, to sail Alaska steamer from Victoria and in such cases Alaska
passengers are furnished with passage, berth and breakfast on local steamer leaving
Victoria midnight and may board Alaska steamer at Vancouver, they also have the
option of leaving Victoria on regular afternoon steamer on day of sailing of Alaska
steamer from Vancouver and will be furnished with stateroom on local steamer, and
dinner on Alaska steamer at Vancouver.
FROM VANCOUVER OR VICTORIA SOUTHBOUND—Alaska steamers are
due to arrive Vancouver southbound about 7.00 a.m. on advertised date and usually leave
at 9.00 a.m. for Victoria.   Breakfast will be served to Alaska passengers before debark-
/— ation.     Passengers holding Alaska  tickets  reading to Victoria  or  Seattle  may  remain
on board Alaska steamer until arrival at Victoria about 1.30 p.m., and passengers for
Seattle may connect with local steamer from Victoria the same afternoon, or if desired,
may stop over at Victoria for forty-eight hours.
Passengers holding Alaska tickets reading to Seattle if they do not desire to proceed direct
to Victoria may transfer to local steamers leaving Vancouver at 10.30 a.m. or 11.00 p.m.
for Seattle on day of arrival from Alaska, or up to second day following, or if desired, may
travel on midnight steamer Vancouver to Victoria on day of arrival and leave Victoria
the following afternoon for Seattle. Meals and berth are furnished without extra charge
on local steamers between Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle to passengers holding tickets
from Alaska points.
(18) Deposit A deposit of 25  per cent,  of the steamship  fare is required when
reservation is made, and balance to be paid and tickets issued not less
than sixty days prior to sailing when space is reserved on separate sailings north and
southbound, and forty-five days when space is reserved round trip on one sailing.
(19) Music All steamers have excellent dance floors,  are equipped with Ortho-
phonics and carry musical entertainers.
 (20)
(21)
(22)
Clothing
Passengers should provide themselves with a warm top coat.
(23)
(24)
(25)
(26)
(27)
H
Steamer Rugs       A travelling rug is very desirable, although not absolutely necessary.
and Glasses Passengers generally derive much comfort from a steamer rug.     A
limited number of steamer rugs and also field glasses will be carried by
News Agent, and will be rented to passengers at a nominal charge.
Steamer Chairs The Company supplies, free of charge, a sufficient number of comfortable camp chairs with backs. We wish it to be understood that
the regulation ocean liner deck chairs are not supplied. There is not sufficient room
for them on the "Princess Alice," and although there is a certain amount of room on the
"Princess Charlotte" and "Princess Louise," the use of long deck chairs on these trips
is not considered desirable. Agents are particularly requested to have this clearly understood, and avoid making application for such chairs or encouraging people to bring such
chairs with them. The alley-ways and deck space on the "Princess Alice" are too limited,
and they might become an encumbrance and an annoyance to other passengers even on
the other steamers.
Barbers and Barbers and lady hairdressers are carried on all steamers.
Hairdressers and service is provided.
Valet Service
Meals
A valet
The  meals provided  on  Alaska  steamers  are  breakfast,   lunch  and
dinner,  and in  addition  light  refreshments  are served in  the  dining
saloon at night without extra charge.
Tickets to Skagway and return will be given the usual summer excursion limit of October 31.    A stopover of not more than thirty days
will be granted at Prince Rupert, if desired, upon application being
made to purser prior to arrival.    For stopovers at Vancouver and Victoria (see sect. 1 7).
Limits and
Stopovers
Ticketing
Instructions
Foreign Line
Agents
(a) When ticketing passengers for the Alaska tour via Seattle, draw
exchange order on Seattle, and in the case of round trip passengers,
draw separate exchange order on Skagway covering southbound journey,
and if the passenger is not returning to Seattle southbound, order should
call for ticket from Skagway to Vancouver or Victoria only. Be sure
to endorse reservations on the back of the exchange order.
(b) In the case of passengers routed via Seattle who hold through rail tickets reading to
Vancouver and who intend leaving Seattle not earlier than night steamer on day prior to
sailing of Alaska steamer from Vancouver, exchange orders for Alaska trip should be
drawn on Seattle in order that passengers may be furnished with tickets including meals
and berth from Seattle to Vancouver.
(c) If passenger is embarking direct at Victoria or Vancouver, exchange order should be
drawn on these points, where it will be exchanged for steamship passage ticket.
(d) It is absolutely necessary that exchange orders be used in any event, as special form
of local passage ticket must be furnished passenger from Seattle and a special form of
steamship passage ticket must be furnished from Victoria or Vancouver.
(e) When ticketing passengers through to points on the White Pass & Yukon Route,
Agents should draw exchange order on Agent, Vancouver, for tickets beyond Skagway.
Value should be shown on order in all cases.
Can.  Pac. (f)   Ticketing instructions for Canadian Pacific Agents are contained
Agents in circular issued by P. T. M.
Immigration Passengers  entering Alaska   from  Canada  are  required  to  pass  the
Requirements customary United States Immigration inspection at Ketchikan, the
port of entry. This inspection is not strict so far as bona fide
tourists are concerned. Passengers will be asked by purser for certain information
regarding age, place of residence, business, etc., for use in making up the manifest
required by the Immigration Department, and will be given a card by him. This
inspection is greatly facilitated for passengers from the United States if they are
furnished with the "identification slips" which have been supplied our General Agencies
in the United States. It is important that these slips be stamped to show place of issue,
as otherwise they are of no value, also signed by passenger, and they should be pinned to
exchange order, and passenger told to surrender to purser upon boarding steamer at Vancouver.     The card received from purser is presented by holder to immigration inspec-
c
D
O
 tor, who boards steamer on arrival at Ketchikan, and as soon as particulars shown by
purser on manifest are checked by the inspector, the passenger is permitted to go ashore.
There is a similar inspection by the Canadian Immigration Department on arrival of steamer
southbound at Prince Rupert. These inspections are largely formal so far as tourists are
concerned.
(28)      Baggage
o
(a) The usual free allowance of one hundred and fifty (150) pounds
of baggage will be granted on whole tickets, and seventy-five (75)
pounds on half tickets, with customary additional charge on any excess weight. Steamer
trunks, if not more than 1 4 inches in height, may be placed in staterooms on all steamers,
but practice should be discouraged, as staterooms are not sufficiently large to permit of
trunks being opened with any convenience, and they are available in baggage room en
voyage,  unless bonded.
(b) FREE STORAGE AT SEATTLE, VICTORIA OR VANCOUVER —
Passengers holding through tickets and making Alaska side trip from Seattle, Victoria
or Vancouver will be granted free storage of baggage at the Company's wharves at the
points mentioned for not more than 30 days. After expiration of 30-day limit regular
storage charges will accrue.
(c) BONDED BAGGAGE—Baggage may be checked through from Seattle to Skagway, and if not required en route may be forwarded under bond to avoid necessity of
customs inspection. If baggage is required en route it should be checked to Victoria or
Vancouver only and presented for Canadian Customs inspection before boarding steamer
for Alaska. U. S. Customs inspection will also be necessary at Ketchikan, the first
port of entry into Alaska. Baggage checked from Vancouver or Victoria to Skagway
will be inspected by U. S. Customs officers at Ketchikan, or may be bonded if desired.
(d) SOUTHBOUND—Canadian Customs baggage inspection will be made at Prince
Rupert and U. S. Customs inspection at Vancouver (if passenger is travelling east via
Canadian Pacific Railway) or at Seattle.
(e) Baggage can be checked through from Puget Sound and British Columbia ports to
Atlin or Dawson, via the White Pass & Yukon Route, without undergoing inspection by
Customs officers at Skagway, provided passengers hold through tickets, and after it is
once checked at starting point passengers are not annoyed by Customs inspection or
rechecking until arrival at destination, where all baggage from United States points is
subject to inspection. Baggage originating at British Columbia points can be corded and
sealed and sent through Alaska in bond without inspection. Baggage originating at
United States ports destined to points in Alaska on the lower Yukon River below Dawson
can go through to destination in bond without inspection.
(29)      Stikine River        The   Cassiar   District   of   British   Columbia,   the   big   game   hunting
Service to country, is reached from Wrangell via the Stikine River to Telegraph
Tele&rabh Creek Creek. Service will be performed during the summer of 1931 by the
Barrington Transportation Co., which company will operate three large
gasoline launches, the "Hazel B 2," "Hazel B 3" and the "Hazel B 4," on the Stikine
River. These boats have accommodation for from fifteen to fifty passengers and fifty tons
of freight, and they will make connection with C.P.R. steamers at Wrangell northbound.
Big game hunters will be given a rate of $75.00 for the round trip from Wrangell to
Telegraph Creek, which will include transportation for all baggage and trophies. During the months of June, July and August, tourists are given a round trip rate of $50.00,
but through tickets must not be sold. Comfortable accommodation for passengers is
provided and the trip usually takes from three and a half to four days. The service
starts with the opening of navigation (about May 5), continuing until the close of navigation early in October. Telegraph Creek is the outfitting point for the big game country.
The Cassiar District may also be reached via Skagway and the White Pass & Yukon
Route to Atlin, where sportsmen may outfit for a hunting trip. Mr. A. O. Seymour, General Tourist Agent, Montreal, will furnish information that may be required by sportsmen.
I
 **=&&.
 I
oo)    WHITE PASS AND YUKON ROUTE
The White Pass and Yukon Route operates daily trains between SKAGWAY and WHITEHORSE
in both directions during the tourist season, and steamers on the Yukon River to Dawson and Mayo. Service
is also provided for an interesting trip from CARCROSS to ATLIN by steamer through Nares and Tagish
lakes and across Atlin Lake.
RAIL SERVICE BETWEEN SKAGWAY AND WHITEHORSE
NORTHBOUND
Dist. from
Skagway
Alt. Above
Sea Level
STATIONS
SOUTHBOUND
Mon., Tues.,
Thurs., Sat.
Sun., Wed.,
Fri.
Sun., Wed..
Fri.
Mon., Thurs.,
Sat.
Mon., Tues.,
Thurs., Sat.
Sun., Wed.,
Fri.
*8.30 a.m.
11.30 a.m.
12.01 p.m.
1.40 p.m.
3.50 p.m.
*t8.30 a.m.
10.40 a.m.
12.45 p.m.
2.45 p.m.
*10.00 a.m.
1.00 p.m.
1.30 p.m.
3.05 p.m.
5.05 p.m.
0.0
40.6
67.5
110.7
0
2,158
2,164
2,079
Lv.     Skagway     Ar.
Ar.}..4Ben„ett ■ { Lv;
Lv  Carcross   Lv.
Ar.  ...   Whitehorse  ...  Lv.
3.00 p.m.
12.26 p.m.
12.01 p.m.
10.45 a.m.
8.45 a.m.
4.30 p.m.
1.40 p.m.
1.15 p.m.
11.50 a.m.
9.30 a.m.
4.30 p.m.
1.45 p.m.
1.30 p.m.
12.10 p.m.
9.30 a.m.
* Alaska Time—One hour behind Pacific Time. J Meal Station.
tWest Taku  Arm  Special leaves  from  Skagway  Wharf—Other trains leave from Skagway Depot.
RIVER AND LAKE STEAMER SERVICE
TO DAWSON
Navigation on the Yukon River between Whitehorse and Dawson opens from May 20 to June 1,
and closes, depending upon weather conditions, about the middle of October. At the opening of navigation the steamers do not operate on a definite schedule for the first week or so. The regular service
commences with the sailing of the "Casca" from Whitehorse, June 10, and every Wednesday thereafter
at 7.00 p.m. The steamer "Whitehorse" commences her regular service sailing from Whitehorse at 7.00
p.m., June 15, and every Monday thereafter. This service continues until the middle of August, after
which there will be irregular sailings about twice a week for the balance of season.
The round trip, Whitehorse to Dawson and return, occupies 6y2 days, bringing the passenger back
to Whitehorse on a Wednesday or Monday morning.
The WEDNESDAY arrival at Whitehorse leaves the passenger the option of remaining in Whitehorse that day and going to Skagway Thursday to connect with the Canadian Pacific Railway steamer
southbound; or, leaving Whitehorse Wednesday morning connecting at Carcross with steamer "Tutshi"
for West Taku Arm, which will bring the passenger into Skagway Thursday afternoon in time for Canadian Pacific steamer sailing Thursday evening; or, leaving Whitehorse Thursday morning connecting at
Carcross with steamer "Tutshi" for Atlin for a stay at that point, connecting with the following Monday
(or later) sailing southbound from Skagway.
The MONDAY arrival at Whitehorse leaves the passenger the option of proceeding direct to
Skagway to connect with Canadian Pacific Railway steamer sailing that evening; or, proceeding direct
to Carcross, connecting with steamer "Tutshi" sailing for Atlin Monday afternoon, returning from Atlin
to Skagway to connect with Canadian Pacific Railway steamer sailing Thursday evening, or a later sailing if desired.
TO ATLIN
At Carcross connection is made for Lake Atlin on the steamer "Tutshi," which sails for Atlin Monday and Thursday afternoon shortly after arrival of train from Skagway. At Atlin the White Pass
and Yukon Route operates the Atlin Inn, where good accommodations and meals are available for the
passenger. Returning from Atlin, the "Tutshi" arrives in Carcross Wednesday and Sunday morning in
time for train either for Skagway or Whitehorse, having left Atlin at 7.30 p.m. previous evening.
SPECIAL SUMMER EXCURSION FARES
The following low round-trip excursion fares will be in effect during the summer season:
Skagway to Lake Bennett and return   (1-day limit) $     7.50
Skagway to Whitehorse and return  (2-day limit)         22.00
Skagway to Whitehorse and return   (30-day limit)         32.00
Skagway to Atlin and return  (30-day limit)   (Including side trip Carcross to Whitehorse      50.00
Skagway to Dawson and return   (30-day limit)   (Side trip Carcross to Atlin $25.00)    115.00
SPECIAL EXCURSION TO WEST TAKU ARM   (During June, July and August)
Leaving Skagway Wednesday morning, returning to Skagway Thursday afternoon, and leaving Skagway Sunday morning, returning to Skagway Monday afternoon.
Skagway to north end of Taku Glacier and return, including meals at Bennett
and meals and berth on lake steamer, but not including parlor car fare    $35.00
This is a special excursion, 68 miles by rail over the White Pass Summit, along the shores of Lake
Bennett to Carcross, where connection is made with a comfortable stern-wheel steamer for a twenty-hour
trip on the West Taku Arm to the north end of Taku Glacier, 82 miles and return, a total distance of 300
miles through magnificent mountain and lake scenery.
The foregoing information covering the White Pass and Yukon Route is subject to change at any time.
Due notice will he given when possible.
12
o
'"N
o
 DAWSON-WEST TAKU ARM OR DAWSON ROUND TRIP, SEASON 1931
FROM VANCOUVER
Steamer
Date
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.       Lv.
A.M.
West Taku
Arm
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.  A.M.
White Horse
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.
Dawson
Ar.       Lv.
A.M.
White Horse
Ar.       Lv.
A.M.
West Taku
Arm
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.  A.M.
Skagway
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE  VANCOUVER
Date
A.M.
Steamer
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Louise	
Chanotte,
Louise	
Alice	
Charlotte.
Louise	
Alice	
Cnarlotte.
Louise	
Alice	
Charlotte.
Louise	
Alice	
Charlotte.
Louise	
Alice	
Charlotte.
Louise	
June
June-
June
June
June
June
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
10
17
21
24
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22
26
29
9
12
10
17
21
24
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22
26
29
2
5
9
12
21
22
28
29
5
6
12
13
19
20
26
27
2
3
9
10
10
17
22
24
29
1
6
8
13
15
20
22
27
29
3
5
10
12
10
17
22
24
29
1
6
8
13
15
20
22
27
29
3
5
10
12
12
19
24
26
1
3
8
10
15
17
22
24
29
31
5
7
12
14
13
20
11
16
18
23
25
30
1
6
8
13
15
17
24
29
1
6
8
13
15
20
22
27
29
3
5
10
12
17
19
17
24
29
1
13
15
20
22
27
29
3
5
10
12
17
19
17
24
IS
1
2
8
9
15
16
22
23
29
30
5
6
12
13
19     20
2
6
9
13
16
30
3
6
10
13
17
20
18
25
29     29
13
16
20      20
23      23
27      27
3
6
10
13
17
20
June
June
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
3 0   |  Aug
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
22
29
3
6
10
13
17
20
24
27
31
3
7
10
14
17
23
24
Pr. Charlotte
Pr. Alice
Pr. Charlotte
Pr. Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr. Charlotte
Pr. Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr. Charlotte
Pr. Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr. Charlotte
Pr. Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr. Charlotte
Pr. Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr. Charlotte
DAWSON-ATLIN ROUND TRIP, SEASON 1931
FROM VANCOUVER
Steamer
Louise	
Charlotte.
Louise	
Alice	
Charlotte
Louise	
Alice	
Charlotte
Louise	
Alice...	
Charlotte.
Louise	
Alice	
Charlotte.
Louise	
Alice	
Charlotte.
Louise	
Date
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.       Lv.
A.M.
Atlin
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.
White Horse
Ar.       Lv.
P. M.
Dawson
Ar.       Lv.
A.M.
White Horse
Ar.       Lv.
A.M.
Atlin
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE   VANCOUVER
Date
A.M.
Steamer
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
Pr.
June 6
June 13
June 17
June 20
June 24
June 27
July
July
July
July   11
July
July 18
July 22
July 25
July 29
Aug. 1
Aug. 5
Aug. 8
10
17
21
24
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22
26
29
2
5
9
12
10
18
21
24
28
12
16
19
22
26
30
2
5
9
12
18  20
16  1£
10
21
21
24
28
5
5
8
12
19
19
22
26
2
2
5
9
12
10
22
22
24
29
6
6
8
13
20
20
22
27
3
3
5
10
12
12
24
24
26
1
8
8
10
15
22
22
24
29
5
5
7
12
14
13
25
25
27
2
9
9
11
16
23
23
25
30
6
6
8
13
15
17
29
29
1
6
13
13
15
20
27
27
29
3
10
10
12
17
19
18
29
29
2
6
13
13
16
20
27
27
30 |
3 I
io !
10
13
17
20
29
30
2
4
6
7
13
14
16
18
20
21
27
28
30
1
3
4
10 11
13 15
17 18
2 0 2 2 )
21
29
1
5
8
13
15
19
22
27
29
2
5
10
12
16
19
23
22
29
2
6
9
13
16
20
2 3
27
30
3
6
10
13
17
20
24
June
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
26
3
6
10
13
17
20
24
27
31
3
7
10
14
17
23
24
28
Pr. Louise
Pr.  Charlotte
Pr.  Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr.  Charlotte
Pr.  Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr.  Charlotte
Pr.  Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr.  Charlotte
Pr. Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr.  Charlotte
Pr.  Louise
Pr. Alice
Pr.  Charlotte
Pr.  Louise
ATLIN ROUND TRIP, SEASON 1931
FROM VANCOUVER
Skagway
Ar.       Lv.
A.M.
White Horse
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.  A.M.
Atlin
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.
Skagway
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.
ARRIVE   VANCOUVER
Steamer
Date
P.M.
Date
A.M.
Steamer
Princess
Louise
June
June
June
June
June
June
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
6
13
17
2 0
24
27
1
4
8
11
15
18
22
25
29
1
5
8
15
19
26
10
17
21
24
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22 ,
26
29
2
5
9
12
19
23
30
10
17
21
24
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22
26
29
2
5
9
12
19
23
30
10
17
21
24
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22
26
. 29
2
5
9
12
19
23
30
11
18
22
25
29
2
6
9
13
16
20
23
27
30
3
6
10
13
20
24
31
11
18
22
25
29
2
6
9
13
16
20
23
27
30
3
6
10
13
20
2 4
31
16
20
23
27
30
4
7
11
14
18
21
2 5
28
1
4
8
11
15
22
29
1
17
21
24
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22
26
29
o
5
9
12
16
2 3
30
o
18
22
25
29
o
6
9
13
16
20
23
27
30
3
6
10
13
17
24
31
3
June 22
June 2 6
June 2 9
July     3
July     6
July   10
July   13
July   17
July   20
July   24
July   2 7
July   31
Aug.     3
Aug.     7
Aug.   10
Aug.   14
Aug.   17
Aug.   2 3
Aug.   2 8
Sept.    4
Sept.    7
Princess  Charlotte
Princess
Charlotte --.-.	
Princess Louise
Princess
Louise
Princess Alice
Princess
Princess
Princess
Alice.   	
Charlotte.. 	
Louise 	
Princess  Charlotte
Princess Louise
Princess Alice
Princess
Princess
Alice.	
Charlotte	
Princess  Charlotte
Princess Louise
Princess
Louise  	
Princess Alice
Princess
Alice	
Princess  Charlotte
Princess
Charlotte 	
Princess Louise
Princess
Princess
Louise	
Alice
Princess Alice
Princess  Charlotte
Princess Louise
Princess Alice
Princess  Charlotte
Princess Louise
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Charlotte  	
Louise	
Alice.	
Charlotte 	
Princess
Louise	
Princess Alice
Princess
Charlotte	
Princess Louise
Princess
Louise	
Princess  Charlotte
Princess
Charlotte  	
Princess Louise
WEST TAKU ARM, SEASON 1931
FROM VANCOUVER
Steamer
Louise... 	
Charlotte..-	
Louise	
Alice	
Charlotte	
Louise...	
Alice —	
Charlotte	
Louise	
Alice.	
Charlotte	
Louise	
Alice 	
Charlotte..	
Louise	
Alice 	
Charlotte..	
Louise 	
Charlotte	
Louise..—	
Charlotte 	
Louise	
Date
P.M.
Skagway
Ar. Lv.
A.M.     A.M.
W. Taku Arm
Ar.       Lv.
P.M.     A.M.
Skagway
Ar. Lv.
P.M.     P.M.
ARRIVE   VANCOUVER
Date
A.M.
Steamer
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
June 6
June 13
June 17
June 20
June 24
June 27
July 1
July 4
July 8
July 11
July 15
July 18
July 22
July 2 5
July 29
Aug. 1
Aug. 5
Aug. 8
Aug. 15
Aug. 19
Aug. 26
Aug. 29
10
17
21
2 4
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22
26
29
2
5
9
12
19
23
30
2
10
17
21
24
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22
26
29
2
5
9
12
19
23
30
10
17
21
24
28
1
5
8
12
15
19
22
26
29
2
5
9
12
19
2 3
30
2
11
18
22
2 5
29
2
6
9
13
16
20
23
27
30
3
6
10
13
20
24
31
3
11
18
22
25
29
2
6
9
13
16
20
23
27'
30
3
6
10
13
20
24
31
3
11
18
22
25
29
2
6
9
13
16
20
23
27
30
3
6
10
13
20
24
31
3
June 15
June 22
June 2 6
June 2 9
July
July 6
July 10
July 13
July 17
July 20
July 24
July 27
July 31
Aug.
Aug. 7
Aug. 10
Aug. 14
Aug. 17
Aug. 2 4
\Ug. 28
Sept. 4
Sept.   7
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Princess
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Alice
Charlotte
Louise
Alice
Charlotte
Louise
Alice
Charlotte
Louise
Alice
Charlotte
Louise
Alice
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
Charlotte
Louise
13
 CANADIAN  PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY
B. C. COAST S. S. SERVICE
So S/PRINCESS * LOUISE "
BOAT-BECK.
DECK-3
PROMENADE-DECK.
PECK- Z.
l/PPEfc-BERTHS-DESIGNATED       A
Lower- berths        •. "b"
SOFA-BERTHS- WHERE F1TTEP
PESI<SNAT£C>- BY       "C"
A^ING-BECK.
o    o
PECK- 1 .
.:;    o
 DE LUXE SUITE
S.S. PRINCESS LOUISE
LOWER  DECK  STATEROOM
15
 CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY
B. C. COAST S. S. SERVICE
WTV/A  Swot* /onto, S. ^-^/r
Lower Deck
o    o
J
J
 INTERIOR
DINING SALOON
TWIN BEDROOM WITH SHOWER BATH
ORDINARY TWO-BERTH ROOM
17
 CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY
B. C. COAST S. S. SERVICE
Cabin   Plan
.P/p/z/osss Al/ce
Z^vy^vy JDsc/t
j
n
 o
DANCE   HALL—PRINCESS   ALICE
CORNER   OF  OBSERVATION   ROOM—PRINCESS   ALICE
::::  ■.    ;;:.   .:■■■.   .■
DINING SALOON, PRINCESS ALICE
19
 2
S.S. PRINCESS LOUISE
For  Reservations  on Alaska  Steamers apply  to nearest Canadian  Pacific Agent, or to—
PASSENGER AGENTS IN THE  UNITED STATES
K.  A.  COOK General Agent  Suite 1017 Henley Building Atlanta,  Ga.
L.  R.  HART General Agent  405 Boylston  St Boston,  Mass.
W.   P.   WASS General Agent 160 Pearl   St Buffalo, N.Y.
T.  J.  WALL General Agent  71   E.   Jackson  Blvrd Chicago,  111.
M. E. MALONE General Agent  201 Dixie Terminal Bldg Cincinnati, 0.
G.   H.   GRIFFIN General Agent  .....1010   Chester   Ave Cleveland,  O.
A.  Y.  CHANCELLOR Travelling Passenger  Agent 906 Kirby Building Dallas, Texas
G.   G.  McKAY General Agent  1231   Washington  Blvrd Detroit,   Mich.
P. G. JEFFERSON Travelling Passenger Agent Merchants'   Bank   Bldg Indianapolis, Ind.
R.  G. NORRIS City Passenger Agent 723   Walnut  St Kansas City, Mo.
W. McILROY  General Agent  621   So.  Grand Ave Los Angeles, Cal.
M. K. McDADE Travelling  Passenger  Agent Porter  Building Memphis, Tenn.
F.   T.   SANSOM City Passenger Agent 68  East Wisconsin Ave Milwaukee, Wis.
H.   M.   TAIT General Agent  611   2nd  Ave.  So. Minneapolis,   Minn.
F. R. PERRY General Agent  Madison Ave.  at  44th St New York,  N.Y.
H.  J. CLARK Travelling Passenger  Agent 803 W. O. W. Building Omaha, Neb.
JOHN  C.  PATTESON    General Agent  1500  Locust St Philadelphia, Pa.
W. A. SHACKELFORD General Agent  338 Sixth Ave Pittsburgh, Pa.
W.   H.   DEACON General Agent  148a  Broadway   Portland,  Ore.
G. P.  CARBREY General Agent  412   Locust   St St. Louis, Mo.
W.  H.  LENNON General Agent, Soo Line Robert and Fourth Sts St. Paul, Minn.
F.   L.   NASON General Agent  675  Market St San Francisco, Cal.
E.   L.   SHEEHAN General Agent  1320  4th  Ave Seattle,  Wash.
E.  L.  CARDLE Traffic Manager, S. I. Railway Old National Bank Bldg Spokane,  Wash.
D.   C.   O'KEEFE City Passenger Agent 1113   Pacific   Ave   Tacoma,  Wash.
C.   E.   PHELPS General Agent
14th and New York Ave. N. W Washington,   D.C.
G.  S. BEER	
P. E. GINGRAS...
F. C. LYDON
PASSENGER AGENTS  IN CANADA
..District  Passenger  Agent 40 King St. Saint John, N.B.
...District  Passenger  Agent Dom. Sq. Bdg., 201 S. James St. W.Montreal,  Que.
..General Agent  Dom. Sq. Bdg., 201 S. James St. W.Montreal, Que.
C.  A.  LANGEVIN General Agent  Palais Station  Quebec, Que.
J.   A.   McGILL General Agent  83  Sparks  St Ottawa, Ont.
S. E. CORBIN General Agent  C. P. Bldg., King and Yonge Sts Toronto,  Ont.
G.  B.  BURPEE District   Passenger   Agent Union Station, Room 367 Toronto, Ont.
WM.   FULTON    Assistant Genl.  Passenger Agent C. P. Bldg., King and Yonge Sts. Toronto, Ont.
C. H.  WHITE District  Passenger  Agent 87 Main St. W North Bay, Ont.
C.   B.  ANDREWS District  Passenger  Agent Main   and_ Portage Winnipeg,  Man.
J.  W.  DAWSON..
...District  Passenger  Agent C.  P. R.  Station Regina,  Sask.
G.  D.   BROPHY District  Passenger  Agent C.  P. R.  Station Calgary, Alta.
F.  H. DALY    District  Passenger  Agent 434 Hastings St. W Vancouver,  B.C.
L.   D.   CHETHAM District  Passenger  Agent 1102   Government   St Victoria,  B.C.
J.  S.  CARTER District  Passenger Agent Baker   and   Ward   Sts Nelson,  B.C.
o
20
1590
 ALASKA
i<cIhe Land of ihe Midnight Sun"
AND THE
Canadian
Rockies
BY
CANADIAN PACIFIC
 LIST OF SAILINGS
Season, 1930
Northbound
Leave
Leave
Arrive
Steamship
Victoria
Vancouver
Skagway
12:00 mid'nt 9:00 p.m.
a.m.
Princess Louise
June   6
June   7
June 11
Princess Alice
June 13
June 14
June 18
Princess  Charlotte
June 17
June 18
June 22
Princess Louise
June 20
June 21
June 25
Princess Alice
June 24
June 25
June 29
Princess   Charlotte
June 27
June 28
July   2
Princess Louise
July    1
July   2
July   6
Princess Alice
July    4
July   5
July   9
Princess Charlotte
July   8
July   9
July 13
Princess Louise
July 11
July 12
July 16
Princess Alice
July 15
July 16
July 20
Princess   Charlotte
July 18
July 19
July 23
Princess Louise
July 22
July 23
July 27
Princess Alice    .'
July 25
July 26
July 30
Princess   Charlotte
July 29
July 30
Aug.   3
Princess Louise
Aug.   1
Aug.   2
Aug.   6
Princess Alice
Aug.   5
Aug.   6
Aug. 10
Princess Charlotte
Aug.   8
Aug.   9
Aug. 13
Princess Louise
Aug. 12
Aug. 13
Aug. 17
Princess Alice
Aug. 15
Aug. 16
Aug. 20
Princess Charlotte
Aug. 19
Aug. 20
Aug. 24
Princess Louise
Aug. 22
Aug. 23
Aug. 27
Princess Charlotte
Aug. 29
Aug. 30
Sept.   3
Southbound
Leave
Arrive
Arrive
Steamship
Skagway
Vancouver
Victoria
:7:00 p.m.
7:00 a.m.
p.m.
Princess Louise
June 12
June 16
June 16
Princess Alice
June 19
June 23
June 23
Princess  Charlotte
June 23
June 27
June 27
Princess Louise
June 26
June 30
June 30
Princess Alice
June 30
July   4
July    4
Princess Charlotte
July    3
July    7
July    7
Princess Louise
July   7
July 11
July 11
Princess Alice
July 10
July 14
July 14
Princess   Charlotte
July 14
July 18
July 18
Princess Louise
July 17
July 21
July 21
Princess Alice
July 21
July 25
July 25
Princess Charlotte
July 24
July 28
July 28
Princess Louise
July 28
Aug.   1
Aug.   1
Princess Alice
July 31
Aug.   4
Aug.   4
Princess Charlotte
Aug.   4
Aug.   8
Aug.   8
Princess Louise
Aug.   7
Aug. 11
Aug. 11
Princess Alice
Aug. 11
Aug. 15
Aug. 15
Princess Charlotte
Aug. 14
Aug. 18
Aug. 18
Princess Louise
Aug. 18
Aug. 22
Aug. 22
Princess Alice
Aug. 21
Aug. 25
Aug. 25
Princess Charlotte
Aug. 25
Aug. 29
Aug. 29
Princess Louise
Aug. 28
Sept.   1
Sept.   1
Princess Charlotte
Sept.  4
Sept.  8
Sept.  8
*Alaska time one
hour slower than Pacific time.
Southbound Alaska steamers
connect at Vancouver
with local steamers leaving in the morning or eve
ning for Seattle.
Steamers call at Taku Glacier northbound on trips
leaving Victoria June 6th to
August 29th
inclusive.
The time and dates of arrival and departure at in
termediate ports and terminals are subject to tidal
and weather conditions and to change without notice.
 IMPORTANT INFORMATION
The Fares from
SEATTLE, VICTORIA or VANCOUVER
to SKAGWAY and RETURN are
$90.00 to $110.00
According   to   Location,   DeLuxe   Accommodations with Bath at Higher Rates
Fare includes meals and berth enroute, but not on
board steamer while in port at Skagway.
(See paragraph "Extra charges for berth and
meals at Skagway.")
Berth and meals are provided without additional
[ charge if passenger leaves Seattle not earlier than
evening steamer of day preceding sailing of Alaska
steamer from Vancouver. Passengers may also leave
Seattle on morning steamer on day of sailing of Alaska steamer, which arrives in Vancouver in the evening, and will be provided with free state room for
day trip via Victoria, and lunch and dinner without
extra charge.
Passengers using night steamer leaving Seattle
on day prior to sailing of Alaska steamer and arriving in Vancouver the following morning may, if they
desire, and the Alaska steamer is in port, go on
board at once and occupy their staterooms, and will
be served lunch and dinner without extra charge.
However, it is more desirable that passengers board
steamer in late afternoon, as it is frequently necessary to shift from one wharf to another during the
day.
FROM VICTORIA Alaska Steamers are scheduled
to sail from Victoria at 12:00
midnight. Passengers may board steamer at Victoria, after 9:00 p.m., on advertised sailing day or, if
preferred, may remain over in Victoria and use local
steamer leaving Victoria in the afternoon. Free
stateroom and dinner on local steamer will be provided without extra charge, if passengers will notify
our Victoria city office of their desire to use local
steamer.
Dinner will not be provided on Alaska steamship
at Victoria.
PORTS OF Alert Bay, Prince Rupert, Ketchikan,
CALL Wrangel, Juneau (Capital of Alaska),
and Skagway. Steamers call at Taku
Glacier northbound on trips leaving Vancouver June
to August, inclusive.
THE Service will be performed by three
STEAMSHIPS of the finest of the Company's well-
known "Princess" steamships, the
"Princess Louise," 4,200 tons, length 330 feet; "Princess Alice," 3,099 tons, length 289 feet, and the
"Princess Charlotte," 3,924 tons, length 330 feet. All
steamers are oil burners and are equipped with
every modern device for the safety and comfort of
passengers, and are the most popular steamers
operating in the Alaskan Service. Each steamer
carries  an   orchestra  and   has   a   dance   floor.
EXTRA CHARGES FOR A   number   of   de
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS    luxe rooms on the
"Princess Charlotte," "Princess Louise," and "Princess Alice" carry
additional charges over and above the fares already
quoted. The charges are based on location and
special appointments. Full information on request.
CHILDREN: Children five (5) years of age and
under twelve (12) will be charged
half minimum fare, plus full premium (if any).
Children two (2) years of age and under five (5),
$7.50 each way unless separate berth is required
when half fare will be charged. No charge will be
made for children under two (2) years of age when
accompanied by parents or guardian.
LIMITS AND Tickets to Skagway and return will
STOPOVERS: bear usual Summer Excursion limit
of October 31st. Stopover not exceeding 30 days allowed at Prince Rupert upon application to Purser.
MEALS:    Meals provided on Alaskan steamers are
breakfast, lunch and dinner; in addition
light refreshments are served in the Dining Saloon
at night without extra charge.
MEALS AND The passage fare to Skagway and re-
BERTH AT turn includes meals and berth en-
SKAGWAY route, but not while steamer is in
port at Skagway, except that breakfast is served the morning of arrival and dinner the
 evening of departure. Passengers desiring to remain
aboard steamer while in port at Skagway may do so
upon payment of $3.50 up, -for room.Breakfast, 75c;
Lunch, $1.00. Dinner, $1.50.
BAGGvAGE:    Usual; free allowance of one hundred -
and fifty (150) pounds of baggage wall
be allowed on whole tickets, and seventy-five (75)
pounds on half tickets, with customary additional
charge on any excess weight. Steamer trunks, if not
more than 14 inches in height,, may be placed in
stateroom, but it is more, desirable that they be
placed iii baggage room, where access to them may
be had at any time, unless bonded.
Free Storage of Baggage,, not exceeding 3J0 days, at
.., Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver, is granted passengers holding through tickets and making the Alaska
side trip from any of these cities. This baggage is
stored at the company's wharves at the points
named. ,      X-yXiv: ■  '■''■
DEPOSIT:    A, deposit of 25 per cent of the steamship fare is required when reservation
is made,' balance to foe paid and tickets issued not
less than forty-five days prior to sailing.
WHAT TO Passengers should provide themselves
WEAR with a warm top-coat. Do not b;urderi
yourself with heavy clothing.
STEAMER RUGS   A traveling rug is desirable, but
AND GLASSES:      not    absolutely    necessary,    al-
; ft though it will add to the comfort
Of the trip. A limited number Of steamer rugg and
field glasses will be carried by the news agent and
may be rented by passengers for a nominal charge
each way. '    ... "■ ,:.'. /        .,X '; ■ -,/" / .
BARBER, Barbers and , lady hairdressers are
VAL ET:   '     carried on all steamers. Valet service
7 ;■ is also provided.
THE INTERIOR L From Skagway it Is only a short
OF ALASKA trip by railway to the summit of
White   Pass   and XBehnet^   The
railway extends to Carcross and White Horse, connecting with Yukon River steamers for Dawson.
, The Lake Atlin trip is made by steamer from Car-
cross. The steamers Of the White Pass and Yukon
Rente were built especially for service on these
northern waters. They are electrically lighted, contain two berth rooms, and afford passengers every
comfort.   X ■       ■■-. . X X. V '-s •;
The Dawson-Lake Atlin trip consumes about three
weeks' time from Seattle,^Victoria or Vancouver.
SIDEvTRIP
TO  THlE
CANADIAN
ROCKIES:
The trip through the Canadian
Rockies is wonderful beyond description, the railway being built
directly through three of Canada's
National Parks and through the
very heart of these world-renowned mountains, and
when combined with the journey to Alaska has well
been termed "The Trip of a Lifetime." Daylight trips
are suggested, in one direction at least. '
HOTELS:     Our  mountain   resort  hotels  at  Banff,
Lake Louise, Emerald Lake, and Sicamous enjoy a world-wide  reputation,  and are the
mecca of tourists from all over the, globe.
TRAIN Five   fine   trains   (including   two   fast
SERV ICE: limited ones, XThe Trans-Canada Limited'.' and "The Mountaineer"), hauled
by oil-burning engines, are operated daily each way,
during the Summer, through the mountains between Vancouver and Banff. All trains carry dining
cars, standard sleepers and Buffet-Observation cars.
An open observation car for sight-seeing is also -attached to each train, during the daytime, through
the Rockies.  ' X v\,      . XX;;X:X'   . • .
1LLUSTRATED      Descriptive booklets,  containing
LITERATJJftE:       complete    information,5  will, be
cheerfully furnished for the asking, either in person, by mail, or telephone.
v The present year gives every indication of being an
Alaska year.  Requests for  literature arid advance r
steamer reservations far outnumber those of other
years.   Book   your   accommodations   asv early   as
possible. ..-.X ■   X ."X; -
X   "Alaska,"  a name to conjure  with.1  The iland of \
Glaciers and   of  Mountains;  the" land  of gold  and
mystery.     v-,.\-"' X: XX'' L      ■:'',
From yancouver, B. C, to Skagway,, Alaska,^-is a
thousand-mile trip ' via the "Inside Passage," a
journey rivaling that through the fiords of Norway.
The Summer Vacation season to Alaska includes
May to September and during that period the CANADIAN PACIFIC operates adequate service.
Avoid regrets. Make the trip to Alaska this year.
F urther information cheerfully furnished.     '
Make Yoiir RcscryationsjEarly
 BRITISH COLUMBIA*PUGET50UND AND
f filldSHd
A      DAILY      RADIO      NEWSPAPER      PUBLISHED
ON BOARD        B.C.        COAST        STEAMSHIPS
D-l— SOUTH
*   *   *
AT   SEA
Alaska Purchase Price
Over Seven Million
• Alaska was first visited by the
Russians in 1741, and Russian traders and trappers soon thereafter entered the country to obtain fur. In
1784 they established the first settlement on Kodiak Island, and in
1804 founded Sitka, which became
the seat of government the following
year.
During the 83 years that Russia
occupied Alaska she obtained $45,-
000,000 worth of furs, but made little
effort to develop the country. The
500 colonists were provided even
with food from Siberia. Russian rule
ended in 1867 when the United
States purchased Alaska for $7,200,-
000.
Following the Bering Sea Controversy, in 1896, a dispute arose between Alaska and Canada concerning ownership of territory adjoining
British Columbia, and was settled by
arbitration in 1903. President Roosevelt, wishing to conserve Alaska's
natural resources, established restrictions on exploitation. As this
program worked out the country did
not progress industrially; legislation
was passed in 1914, however, which
improved conditions. The completion of the Alaska [Railroad in 1923
was of great importance in the development  of  the territory.
JUNEAU    IS   BUSTLING   MODERN
CITY  OF   ENTERPRISE
# While Juneau came into being at
its present site in the early 1880's,
when it was named after the French-
Canadian who first discovered placer
gold there, placer mining operations
in the area actually go back as far
as  1869.
In 1881 the famous Treadwell
mine, seen on the left as one enters
Juneau, began operations. During
the 60 years of its life, over 65 million dollars of -gold were recovered,
dividends declared during that period   of   time   were   in   excess   of   25
Totem  poles  at Wrangell,  Alaska.
The Alaska Juneau mine,—which
may be seen on the right as you
enter the Juneau harbor, is a very-
remarkable enterprise. A breakwater,
built out into the Channel, has been
built from the waste rock of the
mine. It contains approximately 15
million tons of rock. The mill has
a capacity of approximately 12 thousand tons per day. This is the largest gold mining operation in the
world, the gold recovered in the
milling operations averaging approximately 85c per ton. The cost of
milling this ore is approximately 22c
per ton. In normal times the Alaska
Juneau Gold Mining Company employs something over 1,000 men per
day, the payroll amounts to upward
of   a   million   dollars  a   year.
The commercial fishing fleet of
halibut and salmon is another industry  of the  Juneau  area.
million   dollars.     Many   of the   first
locators    in    the    famous Klondike
stampede   were   originally residents
of  Juneau.
 ALASKA PRINCESS
Published by
BOLLYBURN        -        British   Columbia
Seattle:  408  Chamber Commerce   Bldg.
KETCHIKAN
1
HUNTS NEWS
and NOVELTIES
H27  Front St., Opposite Gilmore Hotel
1^
Ml your needs in Books, Liter- ^
ture, Tobaccos and Notions. ^
laska   Views   and   Literature.   ^>
NOME
Genuine . . .
NATIVE ARTCRAFT
Created by Eskimos of Diomede,
King and St. Lawrence Islands
—Wales,   Shishmaref   and   Nome.
Carved Ivory Curios, Native-
Styled  Moccasins   and    Mukluks.
All  types   of   Sport   Fur   Jackets
and   Parkas
Send    for    Illustrated    Catalogue
A. POLET
NOME, ALASKA
PRINCE RUPERT
Vance9s Home Arts
FRESH   CUT   FLOWERS
CORSAGES   A   SPECIALTY
Capitol Theatre Bu Idsng
TOURISTS
Be   sure   to   pay   our   Souvenir   Depart
ment   a   visit   during   your   stay.
McRae Brothers Ltd
3rd   Avenue      -      Prince   Rupert
Leave   Your   Personal   Laundry,
Cleaning and Pressing
when   Northbound   at
HAWKINSON'S LAUNDRY LTD.
Sixth Ave.,   at   Fulton   Street
Ready for you Southbound
CONSULT   YOUR   ROOM   STEWARD
KETCHIKAN
KETCHIKAN
MODEL CAFE
318   Mission   Street
KETCHIKAN - ALASKA
CHOICE STEAKS
at all times
ALASKA   SHELL   FISH   AND
OTHER   SEA  FOODS
IN   SEASON
"Snappy   Service   and   the   Best
of   Everything"
Pruell's Gift Shop
Visitors    always    welcome.
ALASKA    CARVED   IVORY — NUGGET  AND  IVORY  JEWELRY —INDIAN    CURIOS   —   BASKETS    AND
TOTEMS.
Mail   Orders   a   Specialty
KETCHIKAN       -       ALASKA
(The    Sportsman's   Paradise)
WHITEHORSE
INGERSOLL HOTEL
One   Block   from   Steamer   Dock
"KETCHIKAN'S    BEST    HOTEL"
George  Brinck, Manager
KETCHIKAN ALASKA
ELLIOTT'S
YUKON IVORY
SHOPS
Manufacturers  of  Mastodon   and
Walrus   Ivory   Novelties.    Silver
Spoons—Pictures,   etc.
WHITEHORSE
BILLINGSLEY'S
CURIO  STORE
EXCEPTIONAL ALASKAN CURIOS
Old   Ivory   and   Native   Nugget   Jewelry
VISITORS   WELCOME,
BOX   357—KETCHIKAN, Alaska
WHITEHORSE
WHITEHORSE SIGHTSEEING TOUR
Get Tickets from Agent or Desk of The WHITEHORSE INN
WHITEHORSE,  YUKON.
A   SCENIC   AND   HISTORICAL   DRIVE
MILES  CANYON —   DAWSON   TRAIL  —  WHITEHORSE   RAPIDS
AIRPORT   —   '98   TRAMWAY   —   ALASKA   HIGHWAY
*
Charter Trips Arranged for Highway Drives
WRANGELL
BEAR TOTEM STORE
ALASKA'S REAL CURIO STORE
Mrs.   Walter   C   Waters       -   WRANGELL,   ALASKA
Most   Complete   Collection   of
!NDtAN     CURIOS     iN    THE     NORTH
NUGGET   AND   IVORY   JEWELRY
Indian   Mad*    Moccasin?
—      Basket*
Totems     —     Ivory     —     Beads
TWO
-& ALASKA PRINCESS <£-
NORTHBOUND
 FINE    COLLECTION
• At the Bear Totem Store in
Wrangell, there is a fine collection
of native baskets, engraved ivory,
and miniature totem poles, the latter
carved and painted by the boys of
the Wrangell Native Institute, government boarding school. Walter C.
Waters, the former proprietor, who
died recently, had a large fund of
knowledge about totems; the meaning and history of each is printed
on a slip of paper and attached to
the back of the copies for sale in
his store, and on the sidewalk in
front of it stand several original
ones which he brought from the
west coast of Prince of Wales Island
and restored by re-enforcing them
with concrete and repainting them.
Each is worth a careful study. The
Bear Totem Store is now operated
by   Mrs.   Waters.
NATIVE    MARRIAGE    BENCH
• At the iNugget Shop in Juneau,
Alaska, they have a curious old
bench with Totems and other witchcraft designs. This bench has a
legend that any unmarried person
who sits upon it will meet his or
her fate within one year. We hope
our superstitious passengers will
take due warning and beware of this
bench!
Mr.  Laurence's  "Mt.   McKinley,"   "The Vanishing   Race."   and  "Off to  the   Potlach,"   are
a feature of the .Lounge of the Baranof Hotel
at   Juneau,   and   visitors   are   invited   to   view,
them.
♦ SKAGWAY ""♦
Kill MSB'S
Gift Shop
SKAGWAY
Estab.    1897
ALASKA   BLACK   DIAMONDS
IVORIES
NORTHERN   SILHOUETTE
HOLDERS   and   TOTEM   CANDLES
JUNEAU
YOU EXPECT . . .
and find the most Complete Lines Jj
and Latest Styles at Juneau's Finest ■;
Ladies'   Store.
YVONNE'S
WOMEN'S   APPAREL
BARANOF   HOTEL  BUILDING
"It's   the   Nicest   Store   In   Town"
*-&••••*••<
>••••♦»••
SKAGWAY
Dedman's  Photo  Shop
ALASKA   PICTURES
All Sizes — Album    size    Snaps  — Post
Cards — Large   Scenic  Pictures.
Excellent   reproductions  of   Sydney Laur-
anee's    Famous    Paintings  —  Expertly
tinted.
ALASKA   SOUVENIRS
Skagway Laundry
Your Laundry done during
stay In Skagway. Leave with
# your room steward on arrival. Delivered to Boat. Reasonable  rates.
THE
Pullen House
Famous  for  its  Home   Cooking.
Alaska's   Most  Famous
Tourist   Hotel
Museum   contains   over
4,000   Alaskan   Curios.
HARRIET   S.   PULLEN,   Proprietor.
j366 • • •
Richter's
at SKAGWAY for
IVORY   BRACELETS   —   LAVA-
LIERS   —   CARVING    SETS   —
ALASKA   TABLECLOTHS
APRONS   —    HEAD    SCARVES
AND    GIFTS   OF   ALL    KINDS.
*
Riehter*s
SKAGWAY'S    FINEST    CURIO    STORE
m
9 /t ■#*$
fGCOCI*jfrAIL B*m
THE   BEST   in
Liquors - Wines - Beers
One   of   Alaska's   Best
*. J.EMMA NUEL MoaaaeA.
snackxbar!
xx,   vP^V        i       ^2.$^..f$grm
"^Vy"       One of        sm*
r /    ALASKA'S   BEST \ :w*&
'You  will   be  Delighted  with   x
Wt    the Warm, Cheerful  Atmos- —-^j
ff      phere,    plus    the    Delicious \,.;^
Food    and    Rrefreshments
Prepared    and    Served   Just
L.J. EMMANUEL*
AiASlACET^
Groceries   -   Liquors
*fciJITS£» VEGETABLES
Purveyors to Particular People
You   will   find  the   LARGEST   variety   of   Whiskey
— Wines — Beer   in   ALASKA   from   4   years   old
to  200  years  old.
JUNEAU, Alaska
PA YN TAKE IT(GEO*™mPs)
I
NORTHBOUND
S> ALASKA PRINCESS <£-
THREE
 "THE HOST OF ALASKA"
Q See Artist Zeigler's inspiring
Alaskan murals in the Gold Room
and in the Bubble Room of the
Baranof Hotel. Also Sydney Laurence's famous paintings in the
Lounge.
+
JACK FLETCHER, Manager.
MEET     YOUR
WHILE IN JUNEAU VISIT
Ijarana,
% THERE IS EVERY FACILITY to make your stay at THE
RARANOF HOTEL thoroughly enjoyable'—all under one roof and
at   the   price   you   want   to   pay.
% NEW, MODERN AND FIREPROOF throughout — all outside
rooms, all with private tub and shower bath. . . . Single
from   $4.00;   Double   $5.00.
9 FOOD—Excellent tasty menus served in our Coffee Shop and
Dining Rooms.
0 THE GOLD ROOM—Famous for the Alaskan murals of Artist
Eustace    Zeigler.
0 THE BUBBLE ROOM—As pleasant a nite-club as there is west
of  42nd   Street.    Dancing  while   ship   is   in   port.
m COCKTAIL LOUNGE—The finest in Alaska. Canadian funds
are  accepted  at  par in  the  Cocktail   Lounge  and   Bubble  Room.
£ GIFT    SHOP
SHOP.
LIBRARY  —  BEAUTY     PARLOR
SMOKE
BANQUET  ROOMS — CONCERTS — 24-HOUR  ROOM   SERVICE
FRIENDS     AT     THE     BARANOF
JUNEAU
DON'T   MISS   SEEING
THE    NUGGET
SHOP,JUNEAU
ANTIQUES - CURIOS
NUGGET   JEWELRY        -        PICTURES
KETCHIKAN
FOR
INFORMATION
ABOUT
ALASKA
READ
The Alaska   Sportsman
(Sold on this Ship)
—or—
DROP   IN   AT  OUR  SHOP AND
MUSEUM
IN   KETCHIKAN
Get  a   Free   Recreation   Map
of  Southeastern   Alaska
We    have    Original    Souvenirs,
Books,   Stationery,   Etc.
THE
Alaska  Sportsman
423   MISSION   STREET
JUNEAU
JUNEAU
ORDWAYS--
Scenic Views of All Alaska
PHOTOGRAPHIC   POSTCARDS
2 for 5c
Leave   films   northbound for   developing.
20th   Century   Building,   Front   Street,
JUNEAU, ALASKA.
Peerless Bakery
Henry   Meier,   Proprietor
Quality—First—Last   and   All   the  time in
BREAD    AND    PASTRY
We   are   Featuring   GERMAKO   Bread
JUNEAU
ALASKA
Alaska's Largest Liquor Store
The most complete stock of Whiskey, Liqueurs,
Wine and Beer in the Territory, at the
Lowest Prices.
GEORGE  BROTHERS
LIQUOR STORE
JUNEAU, ALASKA;
Front and  Ferry Way - Phone  92-95
LARGE  SELECTION OF  MINIATURES
FOUR
-§> ALASKA PRINCESS &
NORTHBOUND
 [7
X
1.1
X
X
77
«
noc
BRITISH COLUMBIA* PUGET SOUND AND
I   illflSltQ
A  DAILY  RADIO  NEWSPAPER  PUBLISHED
ON   BOARD   B .   C.   COAST   STEAMSHIPS
D - 2—N 0 R T H
AT SEA
Unique Exhibits
To be Seen in Juneau
• Juneau is set in superb natural
surroundings with Mt. Juneau rising
perpendicularly to 3,500 feet behind
the   town.
This section of Alaska was first
explored by the navigator, Capt.
Vancouver, in 1794. Juneau was
named after the French-Canadian
who first discovered placer gold
there in the early '80's. One of the
gates through which rushers streamed into the north, the town has survived the slump in gold production
and has built a civilization of its
own, based upon Arctic tradition. In
the Arctic Brotherhood hall is a
unique museum showing valuable
curios; a lamp carved in stone; old
Chinese talisman coins; queer trinkets; skeletons of early settlers; and
age-old carved ivory and Indian relics.
Among interesting short trips in
the vicinity are Mendenhall Glacier
and Auk Lake; the site of Joe Juneau's first strike in Gold Creek
Basin; and Thane and Douglas,
where in other days were the largest
low-grade gold-crushing plants in the
world.
IN   KETCHIKAN
• While your Princess ship is in
port, the following sightseeing trip
to points of interest may be made:
Leave the dock by way of Newton
to the Alaska Pacific Salmon Companies' Cannery where a trip through
the cannery is available when in
operation; then return by way of
Water Street, viewing Tongass Narrows and the surrounding country,
to Chief Johnson's Totem in Indian
Town, the native village of Saxman
and Chief Kasake's Totem, and the
Government Indian school where the
Indians can be seen making baskets,
totems and other Indian curios. Then
Ketchikan Park where there are
more totems of interest, to Ketchikan Falls where in season the salmon may be seen jumping the falls
and through the Ketchikan Cold Storage where large quantities of halibut
and salmon are  to  be seen in storage.
'Neath a mountain of ice a Canadian
Pacific Princess ship sails serenely along
under the wall of vast Taku Glacier,
one of the scenic thrills of the famous
Inside   Passage   to  Alaska.
ALONG THE TRAIL OF '98 TODAY
BY   WHITE   PASS  &   YUKON   ROUTE
• Continuing our account from yesterday's ALASKA PRINCESS of
trips offered to vacationists in Alaska and the Yukon, the following are
also available from Skagway over
Alaska's pioneer railway, the White
Pass   &  Yukon  Route
• Skagway-Dawson   and  Return
This   trip   may   be   made   between
the arrival of one ship in Skagway,
and the departure of another ship
of the same line some ten or eleven
days   later.
If we are to follow the trail of the
gold-seekers to its logical conclusion,
we must transfer to the river
steamer at Whitehorse, and set forth
on this fascinating voyage down the
Yukon to Dawson, in the Klondike.
By this time we have made friends
who will contribute to the enjoyment   of   the   trip;   there   are   ship-
(Continued on page  7)fc
 ALASKA PRINCESS
Published by
HOLLYBURN        -        British   Columbia
Seattle:   408   Chamber  Commerce   Bldg.
1
i
KETCHIKAN
HUNT'S NEWS
and NOVELTIES
827  Front St., Opposite Gilmore Hotel
All your needs in Books, Literature, Tobaccos and Notions.
Alaska   Views   and   Literature.
I
NOME
Genuine * . .
NATIVE ARTCRAFT
Created by Eskimos of Diomede,
King and St. Lawrence Islands
—Wales,   Shishmaref   and   Nome.
Carved Ivory Curios, Native-
Styled  Moccasins   and   Mukluks.
All  types   of   Sport   Fur   Jackets
and   Parkas
Send    for    Illustrated    Catalogue
A. POLET
NOME, ALASKA
PRINCE RUPERT
Vance's Home Arts
FRESH   CUT   FLOWERS
CORSAGES   A   SPECIALTY
Capitol Theatre Building
TOURISTS
Be   sure   to   pay   our   Souvenir   Depart
ment   a   visit   during   your   stay.
McRae Brothers Ltd
3rd  Avenue      -      Prince   Rupert
Leave   Your   Personal   Laundry,
Cleaning and  Pressing
when   Northbound   at
HAWKINSON'S LAUNDRY LTD.
Sixth Ave.,   at  Fulton   Street
Ready for you Southbound
CONSULT YOUR ROOM STEWARD
KETCHIKAN
KETCHIKAN
MODEL CAFE
318   Mission   Street
KETCHIKAN - ALASKA
CHOICE STEAKS
at all times
ALASKA   SHELL   FISH   AND
OTHER   SEA  FOODS
IN   SEASON
"Snappy   Service   and   the   Best
of  Everything"
Pruell's Gift Shop
Visitors    always    welcome.
ALASKA    CARVED    IVORY — NUGGET   AND  IVORY   JEWELRY — INDIAN    CURIOS   —   BASKETS    AND
TOTEMS.
Mail   Orders   a   Specialty
KETCHIKAN        -       ALASKA
(The    Sportsman's    Paradise)
WHITEHORSE
INGERSOLL HOTEL
One   Block   from   Steamer   Dock
"KETCHIKAN'S    BEST    HOTEL"
George  Brinck, Manager
KETCHIKAN - ALASKA
ELLIOTT'S
YUKON IVORY
SHOPS
Manufacturers  of  Mastodon  and
Walrus   Ivory   Novelties.    Silver
Spoons—Pictures,   etc.
WHITEHORSE
BILIJNGSLEY'S
CURIO STOKE
EXCEPTIONAL ALASKAN CURIOS
Old   Ivory   and   Native   Nugget   Jewelry
VISITORS   WELCOME
BOX   357—KETCHIKAN, Alaska
WHITEHORSE
WHITEHORSE SIGHTSEEING TOUR
Get Tickets from Agent or Desk of The WHITEHORSE INN
WHITEHORSE,  YUKON.
A  SCENIC  AND   HISTORICAL   DRIVE
MILES  CANYON —  DAWSON   TRAIL  —  WHITEHORSE   RAPIDS
AIRPORT  —  '98   TRAMWAY  —  ALASKA   HIGHWAY
Charter Trips Arranged for Highway Drives
WRANGELL
BEAR TOTEM STORE
ALASKA'S REAL CURIO STORE
Mrs.   Walter   C.   Waters
WRANGELL,   ALASKA
Most   Complete   Collection   of
INDIAN     CURIOS     IN    THE     NORTH
NUGGET  AND   IVORY  JEWELRY
Indian   Made   Moccasins     —     Baskets
Totems      —     Ivory
Beads      —      Curios.
TWO
-$> ALASKA PRINCESS <£-
NORTHBOUND
 NORTHBOUND
THREE
 n
u
I D
p
b
i
Land of the Midnight Sun.    Photo shows a series of exposures as the  sun  set and
just touched  the   rim  of  the   Earth  before  again   rising.
Thousands of tourists each year are
thrilled at this sight, the midnight sun
across the placid waters of the Inside
Passage  on Summer  Cruises  to  Alaska.
—Photo by Ordway-Neff, Juneau.
The   faithful   dogteam,   homeward-bound   on   beautiful   Lake Atlin,   B. C,   at  sunset.
Placid  inland seas and distant mountain ranges as seen from the deck of
your Princess steamer.
Copyright-Ordway.
Named after the French-Canadian who first discovered placer gold there in the 80's,
Juneau, Alaska, is set in superb natural surroundings, with Mt. Juneau rising perpendicularly   to   3,500   feet   behind   the  town.     Above    photo   shows   the   lights   of
Juneau   at   night.
Illflf
:rt:    ^M
A view from the White Pass & Yukon route line at the top of the White Pass,
famous in 1898 when goldseekers with dogs, on foot and in every conceivable
kind  of  conveyance,   pitted  their  strength  against  the  towering pass  in  the  depths
of a  grim  northern winter.
Ringed round by massive hills the body
of water known as the "Punch Bowl"
is one of the scenic treats of the Inside Passage to Alaska. Here is
shown the Princess Alice of the Canadian Pacific fleet, passing through the
mighty natural bowl on her way from
Vancouver,   B. C,   to   Skagway.
Above is an actual photograph—the
negative of which is in a shop in Skagway, Alaska—taken in the exciting
Gold Rush Days of '97 of the stream
of gold seekers moving up in a thin
line over the arduous Chilkoot Pass.
The trail over the White Pass was discovered later and used by the
stampeders.
Princess tourists pause to stare enthralled  at Taku Glacier.  Scenes  such as this,   in
the Glacial  Age, accompanied the birth of the   Inside  Passage as glaciers cut away
the  softer rocks of the  Coast mountains.
Dedman Photograph, Skagway.
Monument to Frank H.  Reid at Skagway, Alaska,  who  killed  Soapy Smith.     At  the
right is Soapy Smith's grave.
FOUR
NORTHBOUND
NORTHBOUND
FIVE
 *n
-x X
iliui
ROYAL YORK
TORONTO, ONT.
THE CHATEAU FRONTENAC.
QUEBEC CITYjJUEBEC
■■■,     ■-;"     '■ ■ :       •
■KPKTS i;-?E.
at these famous hotels
Now more than ever you need the restful comfort and courteous service
of Canadian Pacific Hotels . Located at strategic points across the
Dominion, providing the finest hotel accommodation in the most modern
manner, assuring you the rest and relaxation you need when you travel
orr your wartime missions. Comfortable guest rooms, delicious meals,
moderate rates. And the gracious hospitality for which every
Canadian Pacific hotel is famous.
ROYAL YORK
Toronto, Ont.
CHATEAU  FRONTENAC
Quebec City, Que.
McADAM  HOTEL
McAdam,  N. B.
"THE ALGONQUIN
St. Andrews-by-the-Sea,  N. B.
CORNWALLIS INN
Kentville,   N.S.
* DIGBY  PINES
Digby,   N. S.
"LAKESIDE   INN
Yarmouth,   N. S.
THE LORD NELSON
Halifax,   N. S.   (Operated  by
the   Lord   Nelson  Hotel  Co.)
"BANFF  SPRINGS  HOTEL
Banff, Alta.
"Usually  open during summer months.
"CHATEAU  LAKE LOUISE
Lake   Louise,  Alta.
"EMERALD LAKE CHALET
Near Field,  B. C.
"RUSTIC  LODGES
In the Canadian Rockies
HOTEL  PALLISER
Calgary,  Alta.
HOTEL SASKATCHEWAN
Regina,   Sask.
ROYAL ALEXANDRA
Winnipeg, Man.
EMPRESS   HOTEL
Victoria,   B. C.
HOTEL VANCOUVER
Vancouver,  B. C.   (Operated by
the  Vancouver Hotel  Co.  Ltd.,
on    behalf    of    the    Canadian
Pacific  and Canadian National
Railways).
For   rates,   reservations   and   full   information   communicate
with hotel managers or your nearest Canadian Pacific agent.
ALWAYS CARRY CANADIAN PACIFIC EXPRESS TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
HOTELS
SIX
NORTHBOUND
tz
 ®  (Continued   from   Page   1)
board diversions—cards, social games
and dances . . . always something to
do or to see. Delightful contacts
can be made with the whole-souled
people who make their homes in this
frontier land, and fortunate indeed
is that traveler who may, perchance,
prevail upon one of the pioneers to
speak intimately of early day experiences. The steamer meanwhile proceeds swiftly downstream, through
rapids and around bends it goes . . .
past wooded hills and into ever-
lengthening days. "We shall experience something of the thrill of the
stampeder as we draw nearer and
nearer to the golden treasure house
of the Klondike. At Dawson, there
are no more brawling saloons aim
feverish activity—instead, we find a
serene little city, peopled by a fine,
open-handed citizenry. Here may be
seen what has become a veritable
shrine,—the Robert W. (Service cabin,
where the poet wrote many of his
stirring verses. Mining activity has
by no means ceased; great dredges
are working the gravels of the Klondike River and its tributaries, and
will doubtless continue to do so for
many years. There is a vital charm
to this place ... an intangible lure
that grips and holds. It saturates
the very air as we watch the sunset
blend into the sunrise when the old
day   greets   the   new.
♦ SKAGWAY ♦
KIRMSE'S
Gift
SKAGWAY
Estab.    1897
ALASKA   BLACK   DIAMONDS
IVORIES
NORTHERN   SILHOUETTE
HOLDERS   and   TOTEM   CANDLES
JUNEAU
YOU EXPECT . . .
and find the most Complete Lines I
and Latest Styles at Juneau's Finest I
Ladies'   Store.
YVONNE'S
WOMEN'S   APPAREL
BARANOF   HOTEL BUILDING
"It's   the   Nicest  Store   In  Town"
'••••♦♦
SKAGWAY
Dedman's  Photo  Shop
ALASKA   PICTURES
All Sizes — Album    size    Snaps  — Post
Cards — Large  Scenic  Pictures.
Excellent   reproductions  of   Sydney Laur-
ance's    Famous    Paintings — Expertly
tinted.
ALASKA   SOUVENIRS
»j^ee • • •
Riehter's
at SKAGWAY for
IVORY   BRACELETS   —   LAVA-
LIERS   —   CARVING    SETS   —
ALASKA   TABLECLOTHS
APRONS   —    HEAD   SCARVES
AND    GIFTS   OF   ALL    KINDS.
*
Riehter's
SKAGWAY'S    FINEST    CURIO    STORE
Kkagway Laundry
Your Laundry done during
stay In Skagway. Leave with
# your room steward on arrival. Delivered to Boat. Reasonable  rates.
4.. J.EMMANUEL AtanaaeA.
SNACKBAR
'A
THE
Pullen House
Famous  for  its  Home  Cooking.
Alaska's  Most  Famous
Tourist   Hotel
Museum   contains   over
4,000   Alaskan   Curios.
HARRIET   S.   PULLEN,   Proprietor.
X/y" One   of W(0
/    ALASKA'S   BEST \  -Sg™
You  will   be  Delighted  with
Wt    the Warm, Cheerful Atmos-
ff      phere,    plus    the    Delicious \..x^|
Food    and    Rrefreshments
Prepared   and   Served   Just
L.J. EMMANUEL
Groceries        Liquors
•-KUiTSt VEGETABLES
Purveyors to Particular People
Yo
u   will
find  the
LARGEST
variety
of
Whiskey
—
Wines
—
Beer
in   ALASKA   from
4
years
old
to
200  years
old.
JUNEAU, Alaska
PAY'N TAKE IT(GEO*£ZMPs)
NORTHBOUND
& ALASKA PRINCESS <£-
SEVEN
 "THE HOST OF ALASKA"
0 See Artist Zeigler's inspiring
Alaskan murals in the Gold Room
and in the Bubble Room of the
Baranof Hotel. Also Sydney Laurence's famous paintings in the
Lounge.
*
JACK FLETCHER, Manager.
MEET     YOUR     FRLENDS
WHILE IN JUNEAU VISIT
namna,
0 THERE IS EVERY FACILITY to make your stay at THE
RARANOF HOTEL, thoroughly enjoyable—all under one roof and
at   the   price   you   want   to   pay.
9 NEW, MODERN AND FIREPROOF throughout — all outside
rooms,   all   with  private   tub   and   shower   bath.     .     . Single
from   $4.00;   Double   $5.00.
9 FOOD—Excellent tasty menus served in our Coffee Shop and
Dining Rooms.
0 THE GOLD ROOM—Famous for the Alaskan murals of Artist
Eustace    Zeigler.
£ THE BUBBLE ROOM—As pleasant a nite-club as there is west
of  42nd  Street.    Dancing  while  ship   is   in  port.
£ COCKTAIL LOUNGE—The finest in Alaska. Canadian funds
are  accepted  at  par in  the  Cocktail  Lounge  and   Bubble Room.
0 GIFT    SHOP  —  LIBRARY
SHOP.
BEAUTY    PARLOR  —  SMOKE
0 BANQUET  ROOMS — CONCERTS — 24-HOUR  ROOM  SERVICE
AT     THE     BARANOF
♦                          JUNEAU                       ♦
+                         JUNEAU                      ♦        ♦                         JUNEAU                      ♦
DONT   MISS   SEEING
THE    NUGGET
SHOP, JUNEAU
ANTIQUES - CURIOS
NUGGET   JEWELRY        -        PICTURES
►
ORDWAYS--
Scenic Views of All Alaska
PHOTOGRAPHIC   POSTCARDS
2 for 5c
Leave   films   northbound for  developing.
20th   Century   Building,   Front   Street,
JUNEAU, ALASKA.
Peerless Bakery
Henry   Meier,   Proprietor
Quality—First—Last  and  All  th© time in
BREAD    AND    PASTRY
We  are  Featuring  GERMAKO   Bread
JUNEAU                      -                       ALASKA
♦                     KETCHIKAN                     «
FOR
INFORMATION
ABOUT
ALASKA
READ
The Alaska   Sportsman
(Sold on this Ship)
—or—
DROP  IN   AT  OUR  SHOP AND
MUSEUM
IN   KETCHIKAN
Alaska's Largest Liquor Store
The most complete stock of Whiskey, Liqueurs,
Wine and Beer in the Territory, at the
Lowest Prices.
GEORGE  BROTHERS
LIQUOR STORE
JUNEAU, ALASKA
Front and Ferry Way               -               Phone 92-95
LARGE SELECTION OF MINIATURES
Get a   Free   Recreation   Map
of  Southeastern   Alaska
We    have    Original    Souvenirs,
Books,   Stationery,   Etc.
THE
Alaska  Sportsman
423   MISSION   STREET
EIGHT
g> ALASKA PRINCESS <g
NORTHBOUND

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