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Canadian Pacific Navigation Company Limited Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1935

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 "f   ORIGINAL.
9
.
y
<s\p<SUm^s S. Jd.} ~?YC^f ST-fr Vbfpt
CClunttoe miller,
cPivom pvinA and &uppPj 7m fPff. j&>, J^\ (fo,} J5d,
 4    .
Canadian Pacific Navigation Company, Limited.
Duplicate.
JVo     Victoria, B. C.JJk/fA.MiSST}
Delivered  by   _E«3c3LS'£H*   Marvin,
to be shipped on board the p. P. N. Co's (Limited) steamer
.. UHfFV3p2.	
whereof. .1.) .^AffrAfy.. lfffF\Af9Am/mas.ter, or on board
any other steamer of the Company, or on board of any steamer the Company may employ, the following property, in apparent good order, except as noted (value, weight, contents
and condition being unknown to said master),   marked   as
indicate^below,to. be.delivered a.t.7J. TAffffffYAfFfP....
to... .11.. S3.. .Try" or assigns, subject to the
conditions printed on the back of this receipt.
MARkId: y/ ,(!• , C.O
 _M	
No. Pkgs.
ARTICLES.
PfysYU
Weight.      Feet.
AGENT.
 Canadian   Pacific    Navigation    Company,    Limited.
CONDITIONS :
The within goods are shipped and received subject to the following
conditions :—
[f the consignee is not on hand to receive the goods, package by package, as discharged, then the master may deliver them to the wharfinger or
other party or person believed by said master to be responsible, and who
will take charge of said goods and pay the freight on the same or deposit
them on the bank of the river, cr other usual place for delivering goods.
The responsibility of said master shall cease immediately on the delivery
of the said goods from the ship's tackles.
The steamer on which the within goods are carried, shall_ hava
leave to tow and assist vessels; to sail with or without pilots; to tranship
to any other steamer or steamers; to lighter from steamer to steamer or
from steamer to shore; to deliver to other steamers, companys, persons, or
forwarding agents, any of the within goods destined for ports or places at
which the vessel on which they are carried does not call. The master and
owners shall not be held responsible for any damage or loss resulting from
fire at sea, in the river or in port; accident to or from machinery, boilers
or steam, or any other accident or dangers of the seas, rivers, roadsteads,
harbors, or of sail or steam navigation of what nature or kind soever.
It is expressly understood that the master and owners shall not.be liable or accountable for weight, leakage, breakage, shrinkage, rust^ loss or
damage arising from insecurity of package, or damage to cargo by vermin,
burning or explosion of articles or freight, or otherwise, or loss or damage on
account of inaccuraciesor omissions in marks or descriptions, effects of climate or from unavoidable detention or delay, nor for loss of specie, bullion, bank notes, government notes, bonds or consols, jewelry, or any property of special value, unless shipped under proper title or name and extra
freight paid thereon.
Live stock, trees, shrubbery, and all kinds of perishable property at
owner's risk. Oils and all other liquids at owner's risk of leakage, unless caused by improper stowage.
It is hereby understood that wool in bales, dry hides, butter and egg
boxes, and all other packages, must be, each and every package, marked
with the full address of the consignee; and if not so marked it is agreed
that the delivery of the full number of packages as within mentioned, without regard to quality, shall be deemed a correct delivery, and in full satisfaction of this receipt.
It is agreed that in settlement of any claim for loss or damage to any of
the within mentioned goods, said claim shall be restricted to the cash
value of such goods at the port of shipment at the date of shipment.
It is agreed that the person or party delivering any goods to the said
steamer for shipment is authorized to sign the shipping receipt
for the shipper..
On delivery of the goods within enumerated, as provided herein, this
receipt shall stand canceled, whether surrendered or not.
It is expressly agreed that all claim against the said steamer
or her owners for damage to or loss of any of the within merchandise must
be presented to the master or owners thereof within six months from date
hereof; and that after six months from date hereof, no action, suit or proceeding in any court of justice shall be brought against the said steamer
or the owners thereof for any damage to or loss of said merchandise ; and the lapse of said six months shall be deemed a conclusive bar and
release of all right to recover against the said steamer or the
owners thereof for any such damage or loss.
Shipper,
T. N. Hibben&co., Stationers, Victoria.
 Canadian Pacific Navigation Company, Limited,
Original.
Jfo       Victoria, B. Cpp?y2*.ty.A88 <^
._^f-A^6<.f ty<^^-   V~"ht^^y-fr^~
Delivered by   ^3cLsg.-_*   3MEa,X» vii_)
to be shippecU-ctTBoard the£*-B. Ek-~Co'3> (Limited) steamer
whereof....Fy2-^z~^-n-<y*y. is master, or on board
any other steamer of theCompany, or on board of any steamer the Company may employ, the following property, in apparent good order, except as noted (value, weight, contents
and condition being unknown to said master),   marked   as
indicated!.elow,to be delivered AtFAAey^yt^cy^^r. ,v&?a-
to.. .F.-... YY/....3fyy?y.<?iy:<?S.o-£ assigns, subject to the
conditions printed on the back of this receipt.
MARKED :    yy^ ^^ >  y^y^^r^y ~
AGENT.
 Canadian   'Pacific    Navigation    Company    Limited.
CONDITIONS :
The within goods are shipped and received subject to the following
conditions:
If the consignee is not on hand to receive the goods, package by package, as discharged, then the master may deliver them to the wharfinger or
other party or person believed by said master to be responsible, and who
will take charge of said goods and pay the freight on the same, or deposit
them on the bank of the river, or other usual place for delivering goods.
The responsibility of said master shall cease immediately on the delivery
of the said goods from the ship's tackles.
The steamer on which the within goods are carried shall have
leave to tow and assist vessels; to sail with or without pilots; to tranship
to any other steamer or steamers; to lighter from steamer to steamer, or
from steamer to shore; to deliver to other steamers, companys, persons, or
forwarding agents any of the within goods, destined for ports or places at
which the vessel on which they are carried does not call. The master and
owners shall not be held responsible for any damage or loss resulting from
fire at sea, in the river, or in port; accident to or from machinery, boilers
or steam, or any other accident or dangers of the seas, rivers, roadsteads,
harbors, or of sail or steam navigation of what nature or kind soever.
It is expressly understood that the master and owners shall not be liable or accountable for weight, leakage, breakage, shrinkage, rust, loss or
damage arising from insecurity of package, or damage to cargo by vermin,
burning or explosion of articles or freight, or otherwise, or loss or damage
on account of inaccuracy or omissions in marks or descriptions, effects of
climate, or from unavoidable detention or delay, nor for loss of specie,
bullion, bank notes, government notes, bonds or consols, jewelry, or any
property of special value, unless shipped under proper title or name and
extra freight paid thereon.
Live stock, trees, shrubbery, and all kinds of perishable property at
owner's risk. Oils and all other liquids at owner's risk of leakage, unless
caused by improper stowage.
It is hereby understood that wool in bales, dry hides, butter and egg
boxes, and all other packages, must be, each and every package, marked
with the full address of the consignee ; and if not so marked it is agreed
that the delivery of: the full numberjof packages as within mentioned, without regard to quality, snail be deemed a correct delivery, and in full satisfaction of this receipt.
It is agreed that in settlement of any claim for loss of or damage to any
of the within mentioned goods, said claim shall be restricted to the cash value
of such goods at the port of shipment at the date of shipment.
It is agreed that the person or party delivering any goods to the said
steamer for shipment is authorized to sign the shipping receipt
for the shipper.
On delivery of the good's within enumerated, as provided herein, this
receipt shall stand canceled, whether surrendered or not.
It is expressly agreed that all claim against the said steamer
or her owners for damage to or loss of any of the within merchandise must
be presented to the master or owners thereof within six months from date
hereof ; and that after six months from date hereof, no action, suit or proceeding in any court of justice shall be brought against the said steamer
or the owners thereof for any damage to or loss of said merchandise ; and the lapse of said six months shall be deemed a conclusive bar and
release of all right to recover against the said steamer or the
owners thereof for any such damage or loss.
Shipper.
T. N. HibbJ-N & Co., Stationers, "Victoria.
 UMATILLA DUE SUNDAY
Vessel  Will  Bring1   Here    475    Tons  of
Cargo ?rom San Prancisco—Will
Take 200 Away.
The Pacific Coast steamer Umatilla is
expected here on Sunday some time from i
San Francisco via ports.    So far the local agents have not been advised of the
Bxact hour of her expected arrival.
I   For   here   she   has   some   475   tons   of
general  cargo,   and  when   she  leaves   on
the return journey the same evening she j
yill   have   about   two   hundred   tons     of |
mcouver  cargo   for  the  South.
 norial Methodist Church performed the
peremony, the single ring service being
ised. The bride was gowned in blue
nessaline with lace trimmings and was
inattended. The parlor was simply but
lastefully decorated with ferns and
yhite asters. Mr. and Mrs. Cowan took
he 9 o'clock boat for a trip up .the
foast, and will return to reside in Cedar
Cottage. Mrs. Cowan has but recently
trrived from the East. Mr. Cowan is
if the firm Campbell & Cowan, contractus and builders,   Cedar Cottage.
Dr. Dal by has left for a trip to Eng-
and.
Mr.   and   Mrs.   Tho mas JMc Mil lan^ are
 June.26.96,
&ng x _• - Anie r i e a' '" {*. L. o
189
637
TRIP
It ^tifttte. IJiltlt ItiStlittti IffittlSMi't (ttffllllt)
sTEflmnn ^. p. I^ITHET
For Freight and Chars;es from    VICTORIA    TO            Cannery.Canoe.Pass .
MABK8.
NO.   PA0KAO153.
DESCKIPTION.
WEIGHT.
FEET.
_>OL_A_S.
CENTS.
fled Correct,	
18.
Pigs.Lead.
Advanced Charges,    -
Wharfage,       -      -      -      -
Total      --■!-.-
40.
$      r,
50.
P.
o	
.
Uate,_
Received Payment for the Company.
j8g	
 Vancouver, b. C.
190
M*
To COAST STEAMSHIP CO., Ltd.
OWNERS
TRIP.
STEAMERS    "CELTIC"
"CLANSMAN'
AND    "FINGAL"
Steamer "FINGAL"
For Freight and Charges from l.A.Ff/tStSffSfS... to	
o
I
.*_
.
MARKS
NO.  PACKAGES
DESCRIPTION
n
WEIGHT
RATE
DOLLARS
CENTS
/A
f
'
■
•
K
Advanced Charges
Wharfage
Total
Date.
RECEIVED PAYMENT
190  	
 THE SUNDAY PROVINCE, VANCOUVER,   BRITISH COLUMBIA.
B»C* History Interlocks With
Of Coast Steamers
Left—SS. Charmer, the oldest
vessel  in  B. C. Coast  Steamship fleet*
t^early a Hundred Years
Have Passed Since Beavers-
Supplanted Sailing Ships
By H. W. SCHOFIELD.
ri the welter of tradition that is
being1 continually built up around
the ships and shipping of the
seven seas, little stress has been laid
on the proud record of early navigation days in the Pacific Northwest,
and the growth of maritime facilities that have kept pace with and
aided the development of the British
Columbia coast.
Few people realize today, for instance, that it is now nearly 100
years since the original Beaver, a
paddle-wheel vessel from England,
inaugurated the era of steam qn the
North Pacific coast and sounded the
death knell of the sailing ships in
I    these waters.
This first steamer was owned by
I   the Hudson's Bay Company.    Built
I   in England in 1835, during the reign
\ of  William  IV.,  her  departure  for
Canada was one of the sensations of
.the times, and history records that
imore than 130,000 persons saw the
jship leave the Thames for her adventurous voyage around the Horn
to a new land.   She arrived in Brit-
*sh Columbia waters on March 19,
1836, ninety-three years'ago.
They built staunch ships in those
Jays, too. The Beaver was still plying a service between Vancouver
Island and the mainland fifty years
later, and might have achieved a
much riper old age had not fate intervened. She was piled up on the
rocks off, Prospect Point, at the en-
la-ance to Vancouver harbor, in 1886,
the year of the great fire.
_OLD RUSH SPEEDS
JP NAVIGATION.
For many years the Beaver was
practically alone in her glory on
this coast, for very little steam navigation development took place until
the early 'fifties, when, in 1852. the
Hudson's Bay Company built a companion ship, the Otter, of 220 tons
register. Although not nearly so
old as her venerable consort, the
Otter passed out of existence at
almost the same time, being dis-
, mantled and put into service as a
coal barge in 1888.
Discovery of gold in the Cariboo
tn 1858 gave a great impetus to
steam navigation on the coast, and
that year found a vessel called the
Surprise operating up the Fraser
River to Yale,, while in the following
year the first steam vessel to be constructed   in  British   Columbia,   the
Governor Douglas, also entered the
river service.
The Surprise did yeoman work in
the early gold rush days. Records
show that the little side-wheeler
made thirty trips between Victoria
and Hope, on the Fraser River, in
1858, carrying between 500 and 600
passengers,, most of them hot on the
scent of gold, on each trip. In the
same year an alien invader, the
Wilson G. Hunt, arrived from San
Francisco to share in this rapidly-
developing shipping business in-what
was then the Far North. The Hunt
was operated between Victoria and
Queensborough, now New Westminster.
OLYMPIA-VICTORIA
RETURN—50 CENTS.
While the Hunt was the first
American vessel to take up a regular
run in this latitude, the gold rush
had already brought a considerable
influx from the States. The year
1858 saw a steady stream of newcomers, all of them grist to the mills
for the coastal and river steamers
already operating. It must be remembered that this was before the
days of the railway, and land transportation was rough and extremely
difficult.
To illustrate the extent of this
early northward trek, it might be
pointed out that 455 passengers arrived from California in April, 1858;
May saw the arrival of 1262 newcomers, mostly gold-seekers, while in
June of the same year the arrivals
were swelled to 7149 persons,
brought by twenty-four vessels, and
to 6278 in July. They were still
coming in August, then considered
very late for northern navigation.
Most of these people were landed
at Victoria and Bellingham Bay.
The year 1867 marked the transfer
of the territory of Alaska from Russia to the United States for the
purchase price of $7,200,000. For
many years previous to this transfer,
the Hudson's Bay Company had been
trading in Southeastern' Alaska
under a lease from Russia at an
annual rental of $10,000.
By 1875 steam navigation had become common on the coast, so much
so, in fact, that fierce competition
had arisen between rival lines. Regular services were being performed
between Olympia, Wash., and Victoria, B. C, by the Oregon Steam
Navigation Company, with the Starr
Brothers operating several steamers
in competition. They were happy
days for the traveller by water, for
in June, 1875, this steamboat battle
had hammered down the one-way
fare from Olympia to Victoria to
the startlingly low figure of 25 cents.
It probably brought no protests from
the public that no further reduction
for a round-trip ticket was offered,
the return rate being 50 cents. This
state of affairs ended some time
later when Captain Starr sold out to
his rivals.
In 1879 the Oregon Steam Navigation Company ended a prosperous
career of operation on the Columbia
River and Puget .Sound, being succeeded by the Oregon Railway &
Navigation Co., with a capitalization
of $6,000,000. The new company
acquired a fleet of twenty-seven
steamers and continued to operate
between Puget Sound ports and Victoria for many years.
Meanwhile, in 1877, we find another battle of transportation inter- B. O. Mills to construct the Yale-
ests on the coast. In that year the Kamloops link of the line. Onder-
Hudson's Bay Company was oper- donk gave Captain Irving a contract
ating a regular service between Vic- sfor transport of passengers and
toria and New Westminster, and freight from Victoria to Yale. Here
Captain John Irving of Victoria a William More returned to the fray,
service from Westminster to Yale, Having been displaced on the Fraser
connecting with that of the former by living's agreement with the Hud-
company. At that time, William son's Bay Company, he had con-
Moore, with the assistance of Yale structed the steamer Western Slope
and other up country merchants, put to operate a through service from
the Glenora on the river route in Victoria, obviating the transfer of
opposition to Irving. This resulted passengers and freight previously
in an effort on Captain living's part necessary.
to make arrangements with the Hud- Out, of this new competition grew
son's Bay Company, whereby they the new consolidation of the inter-
would issue bills of lading through ests«of Irving and the Hudson's Bay
from Victoria to up river points. Company, known as the Canadian
"^apt   TrnTxr» wive Pacific Navigation  Company, incor-
CAPT. JOHN" WINS porated  in Victoria in  1883  with  a
HIS BATTLE. capital of $500,000.    The  incorpor-
Failing in his effort to secure ?toFs <>. th.e. £e™ ^Pf1^. were
such a settlement, Irving declared ^fh^^£^T^K
war. Purchasing the stern-wheeler William Charles and AlexAnd.r
Wilson G. Hunt in San Francisco, he Munroe. Irving was manager'and
placed her on the run from Victoria Charles, Rithet, Munroe and Rober.
to New Westminster, in competition Dunsmuir directors'
with the Hudson's Bay ships. A FINE FLEET
Irving operated this service for OF STEAMERS.
two years, but won his fight in 1879 „., ~ ,. ,_ ..«_ ,_.' - .
and, securing the through bills of ihQ Canadian Pacific Navigation
lading that he had originally asked, Company launched out with a fin.
he dropped the Victoria service, line of steamers, including the R P
From then until 1882 he received Rithet Princess I ni_i«» WiiK_.™
two-third of the through rates from f ' "™cess Louise, William
Victoria to Yale. Irving,   Western   Slope,   Enterprise,
In the meantime the construction Reliance, Otter, Maude and Gertrude.
of the Canadian Pacific Railway was the fleet being increased soon after
under way, and a contract was let by addition of the Yosemite, pur-
to Andrew Onderdonk, Sim Reid and chased in San Francisco.   The com-
Left—SS.    Yosemite,    considered a palatial and fast vessel
in the early days.
Capt. J.  W.  Troup, retired manager of the B. C. Coast Steamship
Service.
pany's operations in after years included regular services between Victoria and New Westminster, New
Westminster and Steveston, Victoria
and Vancouver, New Westminster
and Chilliwack, and linking Victoria
and Vancouver with the west coast
of Vancouver Island  and  Northern
British   Columbia   ports   to   Southeastern Alaska.
The Yosemite was considered the
handsomest as' well as the fastest
steamer which had yet appeared in
these waters. She was originally
built for the Sacramento River trade
in the early 'sixties, but with a decline in business there was laid up
for a number of years prior to her
purchase by Irving. The William
Irving was a steam paddle vessel of
738 tons, built on Burrard Inlet in
1880, The R. P. Rithet was constructed in Victoria.
WAS THE PREMIER
BEFORE THE CHARMER.
New competition loomed in 1884,
a year after the Canadian Pacific
Navigation Company commenced
business, in the People's Navigation
Company, incorporated in Victoria
that year with a capital of $100,000.
This company bought the old steamer
Amelia, built in San Francisco in
1863, and commenced operations be-
Capt. John Irving, whose career is a colorful part of the history of
coast steamships.
other loss to the Canadian Pacifia
Navigation Company in the Sar-
■23t: donix, a steam screw vessel which
was wrecked while en route from
Port Simpson to Skidegat.
It is interesting to note that in
1891 Captain J. W. Troup, who later
became manager of the British Columbia Coast Steamship Service, retiring last year, built the new
steamer Victorian while he was
superintendent of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Co. This vessel
made one excursion on the Columbia
River and was then sent to Puget
Sound and placed on the Victoria
route. Several years previously, Ln
1888, wjiile port captain for the same
company, Captain Troup had superintended the building of the T. J.Potter, the fastest side-wheeler tit-Ik
on the northwest coast, '
SWAN SONG OF
FRASER RIVER BOATS.
It was not until the year 1900,
thirteen years after the completion
of the Canadian Pacific Railway's
transcontinental rail line,, that the
Canadian Pacific entered the coastwise trade by purchasing the stock
of the Canadian Pacific Navigation
Company, and thus acquiring a fleet
of fourteen ships of 10,000 gross
tons and premier place in the British  Columbia  coastwise  trade.
Only one ship of the original Canadian Pacific Navigation Company
is now in the British Columbia Coast
Steamships Service, this the
Charmer. The balance have been replaced in the course of time by large
modern steamers, until today the
fleet consists of twenty-three ships
of all sizes with a gross tonnage of
more than 57,900.
With the coming of rail and elee-
tric lines steamer service on the
Fraser River has long since been
abandoned.
tween Victoria and Nanaimo, in
competition with the R. P. Rithet.
Passage fares at once dropped to
25 cents for the round trip and
stayed at that until 1885, when the
Canadian Pacific Navigation accepted
a split of 25 per cent, of the gross
receipts and dropped out of the Nanaimo run.
In 1982 the company bought the
steamer Premier, built by the Union
Iron Works in San Francisco in 1887.
This vessel, later to become famous
as the Charmer, is now the oldest
vessel in the British Columbia Coast
Steamships fleet, and is as staunch
as in the early days when she first
saw the British Columbia coast.
In 1888 the steamer Islander, built
in Glasgow at a cost of over $200,-
000, a splendid twin-screw steel ship,
240 feet long, arrived in Vancouver
and took over the Vancouver-Victoria
route. Later she made several trips
to Alaska and continued in service
until 1901, when she was wrecked
off Douglas Island, near Juneau. The
year 1890 had previously brought an-
 MAGAZINE  SECTION
THE VANCOUVER   SUNDAY PROVINCE
MAGAZINE   SECTION
rail
Heed Ye!  The Freshman
Speaks
Sir,—I feel that out of fairness to all parties
concerned I must take exception to your editorial in The Sunday Province of October 20,
entitled "Derelicts of U. B. C." Also, being a
member of this year's freshman class, I am in
a position to offer some first-hand information
on the matters treated with in your article.
It is well known that a percentage of first
year students fail in the Christmas examinations and are requested not to return after the
holidays. This year I may be one of those unfortunate ones, but if I am, I can never say that
it was due to lack of warning that the calamity
befell. In the opening exercises of the session
the warning was sounded in no uncertain tone,
and since then every professor that I have received instruction under has endeavored to bring
home to the mind of every student the realization that "college means business," and that to
be safe at Christmas means to "get busy" early.
The danger to the well-intentioned student
of entering into too many activities, either literary or athletic, has been well emphasized.
With regard to this matter, it might be permissible for me to point out that the constitution of the Alma Mater Society curtails a first
year student's activities to a very marked degree, particularly until the Christmas examinations are safely passed.
Surely when people come to the University
they should be beyond the stage where they
need to be coaxed and "babied" like young children. In other words, they should be men and
women enough to work on the course they have
chosen, and if they expect to obtain, without
hard work, satisfactory results in examinations
at any university worthy of the name, then, unless prodigies, they are not sufficiently developed mentally to attend one. Connected with
this idea, I must add that I am afraid that most
students starting their course with the idea that
\they will only need to study an hour, or an hour
■and a half, a day, outside of lectures, will have
an early disillusionment.
There is a good spirit exhibited by the
faculty of our University towards the students,
And there is manifest a desire not only to save
u! very one of these from disaster in the examinations but to assist him or her to a high
standard of culture. A FRESHMAN.
Prince Rupert Logical Outlet
For Peace?
Sir,—In The Sunday Province of October 27
I am glad to see a letter from the president of
the Smithers Chamber of Commerce supporting
Prince Rupert as the Pacific outlet for the
Peace River country. To which I sax, "More
grease to their elbows." Because by all that is
fair, logical and geographical, Prince Rupert is
entitled to that distinction.
If we desire to build the province as a whole
and not Vancouver city alone; if we want to
develop our people-owned Canadian National
Railway; if we want closer business relations ,
with the Orient—Prince Rupert is 700 miles
closer to the Far East than Vancouver is—if
we want to encourage settlement in the valleys
of the Bulkley and the Skeena, where wonderful production only waits the efforts of man;
if we want to give to' the long-patien. but always optimistic men who invested and stayed,
with never-lagging faith in the future of Prince
Rupert, then by all that is decent and abov^
board, that city should be the Peace River country's Pacific base.
Vancouver _ity, I am afraid, is inclined to
"hog the deal."    Surely the long haul bv rail
ic;    r^nt    r.r.-r.ciHofon    in    otitt   tit-pit   linnn. i_._.i.    to.   ±V,a
More Grief for Poor
Mary Gold
Sir,—I certainly was surprised to see the
view of T. Kobayashi in the case of Mary Gold.
Of course, everyone has their own opinion on
such things, even in comics and fiction. But in
this case it didn't have to end like it did, for
there was an alternative. If the widow, Henrietta Zander, gets Tom Carr into her fishing
net, we can say goodbye to our reputation and
money also.   But don't let it happen.
DESPERATE.
Silent But Conscientious
Worker
Sir,—Being a subscriber to The Daily Province for a number of years, I would be more
than pleased if you could find space in your
columns for a few words of appreciation for
the kind and considerate attention given by the
secretary of the Disabled Veterans' Association,
Mr. Webb, in helping me to get my husband the
necessary attention in hospital,
I feel sure great credit is due this silent but
conscientious worker who is a tireless worker
amongst the disabled veterans at the Shaugh-
nessy Military Hospital. I am certain my statement can be endorsed by many other wives and
dependents, and I personally wish to thank Mr.
Webb for his kindness in my husband's case.
LILY CLARKE.
Selecting the Site For the
Market
Sir,—Please permit me to use a portion of
your space in a worthy cause—the selection of
a suitable market site.
The committee in charge of the selection has
made mention of several sites, but in the opinion
of a great number of people have overlooked
the most suitable one in the city.
Opposite the C. N. R. station on Main street
is a tract of vacant city property with ample
space for a large market. It is centrally
located, available from practically all car lines,
and there is plenty of parking space for automobiles. It is close to water where fishing
boats and other craft could land.
The C. N. R. side of Main street is beautifully kept; the other side is an eyesore. Why
not improve it and build a market in the most
convenient site in the city?
A RATEPAYER.
When Point Atkinson Was in
Wilderness
Sir,—I was greatly interested in a recent
article in The Sunday Province, "Our Real Pio-
-neers in 1882," in Which I noticed many names
that were familiar to us even before that time—
Walter Erwin, for instance, at Point Atkinson
lighthouse. In September, 1880, he succeeded
ui. at the Point, where we had been for three
years and three months. It was a desolate
place then. Our oldest boy was born there in
September, 1879, in the home of Mrs. H. A.
Ridley, near Mrs. Cordiner's, the school teacher.
These houses'" were not far from Hastings Mill.
I knew Mrs. George Black, Mrs. Soule, the
pastor, Rev. C. Bryant, and his family. Rev.
Thomas Derrick was there before Mr. Bryant.
While living at Point Atkinson, I went out
once a year . for supplies, generally by the
steamer Etta White, Captain Smith. We had
few visitors, and it was lonely. I did not see a
white woman for nine months out of each year,
but we made many good friends among the Indians who came to see us.
MRS. E. S. WELLWOOD.
<S5 Letters In Brief J@>
Unhealthy?
Sir,—Your article in the editorial column,
The Great City," was fine. I wondered if the
suites in the numerous apartments now being
erected, with their two by four kitchenettes,
breakfast nooks, disappearing beds, and so on,
could be called healthy. I WONDER.
Pay for Pets
_ Sir,—It is a great relief to know that something is at last being done about the numerous
dogs of Vancouver. I have never visited a city
where so many of these neglected creatures,
male and female, roam the streets. A few
months ago, at my request, the S. P. C. A. put
a dog out of her misery and their investigation
of this case resulted—as it so frequently does—
in not getting anyone to admit ownership of the
animal. Anyone really interested in owning a
pet should be only too glad to pay the small fee
required for a license. If they are not interested to this extent, let them do without pets.
A LOVER OF ANIMALS.
Wants Honor Rolls
Sir,—I hope you will publish this letter in
response to the enquiry of "Father of Four
Native Sons." I would like the young person
who wrote in answer to same, October 27, to
stop and think a moment. Maybe one day the
younger generation may have a little one who
will cherish an honor roll; also deserve one. In
my time a small book was given for praise. My
girl has ranked first i. .1 six different occasions.
"Younger Generation" would be just as pleased
as my child to bring home an honor roll. Have
a heart.   Give praise where it is due.
A PROUD MOTHER-
Remember Those Who Have
No Medals
Sir,—This week's news announced the departure to London of that gallant little band
to attend the Prince of Wales' banquet to V. C.
winners. Never was such a gathering known in
history before. As a rule, the winner is nearly
always mortally wounded.
Permit me to say a few words in memory of
the living, as well as the comrades that never
came back. There is many a man today whose
brave deeds do not appear on the records of the
war office, through the officer in charge not
placing the recommendation forward in .improper way, but his deeds and name will li. f
forever among his old comrades.
Another point that is overlooked is instances
where all officers become casualties and the
N. C. O. takes charge; he has. no power to
recommend anybody.
For the thousands of mothers and fathers
whose sons never came back let me leave a
word. Who knows but what your boy was one
of these heroes, though his name does not appear on the record at the war office? But his
name and deed will live in our memory forever.
ONE OF THE OLD 4TH BRIGADE.
No. 54306.
Paint 'em Yellow
Sir,—If there is a truckmen's association in
the city, let me suggest that they get after the
city fathers to establish loading zones in the
busy downtown section of the city by painting
$he curb yellow, as in other large cities; otherwise the new mounted policemen will reap a
harvest in fines for the city from owners of
trucks who are compelled to park double on
account of all available space being taken by
private cars. All honor to the mounted police
who are rightfully doing their duty by keeping
tlie streets clear of traffic.     O. A. HORTON.
Is Private Ownership Morally
Wrong?
Sir,—Many of those who advocate single
tax do not seem to appreciate the fact that
Henry George, the founder of the movement,
believed private ownership of land to be morally
wrong and wished to make it also unprofitable
by the institution of single tax, thus causing all
land to revert to the government—the public.
Whether private ownership of land is right
or wrong may be a matter of opinion, but few
would approve of a law that would amount to
confiscation of the property of all land owners
without even partial compensation.     R. B. W.
Traffic Tieups
j Sir,—Observation leads me to believe that
the tanker Imperial of the Imperial Oil Company is the biggest regular offender against
traffic on Granville bridge during rush hours.
This craft blew her imperial way into False
Creek on the evening of October 21 at 5:55 and
inconvenienced many of that company's patrons,
disrupting traffic for about an hour. An hour
later, on the evening mentioned, would surely
have found sufficient tide and shown consideration for these citizens who either patronize or
tolerate the oil corporation and are instrumental
in creating the revenue to operate this craft.
4430 Osier street. E. PUGSLEY.
Original Copy of Royal
Family Tree
An interesting picture, which unfortunately
would not reproduce, of the genealogical tree of
the royal family from the time of David of
Scotland to George III. was brought to The
Province office recently by Mr. W. J. Scougal
of 4325 West Fifteenth. The picture, the original of which is forty-two by thirty inches, is
an interesting reproduction of this famous royal
tree. The original was certified by the then
Earl of Buchan at Edinburgh on March 16, 1792.
Only five copies of the original are extant, one
of which is in possession of the royal family.
The possessor of one of the original copies is
a widow of a connection of the MacDuff family
shown on the tree. She is at present in Vancouver.
From Our Letters
LORD'S DAY ALLIANCE.
F. Sirrah stirred up a nest of protests when
I he wrote his letter against the Lord's Day Al-
iliance. Many letters have been received obj^ct-
S ing to Mr. Sirrah's views on this subject. Lack
of space prevents us printing all these letters.
CURB MARKETS.
Mr. George Popham writes to The Province
objecting strongly to the market at the corner
of Main and Hastings. He says that the aroma
arising from this market is a disgrace to Vancouver.
JZ^fL^JsJJp^L
More About the Celtic
Alliance
Sir,—A few months ago you were good
enough to publish a letter from me on my ideas
of founding a Celtic alliance. Since then, men
of Celtic descent—Cornish, Irish, Scottish and
Welsh—have written to me from Alberta, New
York City, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Melbourne
(Australia), and Alexandria (Egypt), expressing approval.   In fact, they write with one voice.
My aim is to cement the friendship between
men of Celtic descent, not in hostility to others,
but in love with one another. I hope to get
this movement started, if I have to finance it
myself.
The importance of a Celtic alliance, particularly in Canada and the United States, can not
be estimated. It might easily prove of tremen- (
dous importance. I call a man a Celt whose
forebears were born and bred in Brittany, Cornwall, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, or the Isle of
Man, for generations.
W. STANLEY SHAW.
Permanent Curbs Should
Be Established
Sir,—I have always admired the persistent
attitude of The Province in editorials from time
to time advocating a general and generous civic
policy with regard to boulevards and the upkeep
of same.
It is very evident that such persistent effort
is necessary. Before such a policy can be successfully carried out, however, and by successfully I mean without discrimination, it would
be necessary first of all to establish permanent
curbs on all residential streets. The universal
use of automobiles. almost makes it a necessity
and not a luxury, as it is treated at present.
What we are confronted with now is residential districts a few years old, all complete
in every detail, while the older residential sections have spasmodic blocks, much of this done
on the initial principle. Others, due to the encroachment of .that which the curb is intended
to prevent, look anything but progressive. Since
it is a necessity, is beneficial to all, economical,,
and eventually will have to be paid for by the
same class, why not complete all streets in residential districts on the initiative?
ANDREW HUNTER.
O '7 9jCX
^^__a_________aj_t s-y I i y\-t"
Is Combine Taking Place
Of Labor?
Sir,—In one of your recent editorials I noticed
that you disagreed with Mr. Buchanan's view on
the $10 harvester excursion.
I most heartily agree with his statement
when he says the combine is taking the place
of labor in the prairie provinces, whether or not
that labor is brought in or is from the cities and
towns of the West.   -
The combine does cut_the cost of threshing
Shortsightedness of the
Wheat Pool
Sir,—Just for fear that someone has no.
noticed it, I would like to draw to the attention
of the people of Vancouver that we have a
prophet in our midst. I refer to Mr. Swallow,
, who, on October 4 and again on October 25, has
written letters regarding the short-sightedness
and lack of business ability on the part of the
Wheat pool in not throwing their^ wheat on the
market at present prices.
The chief thorn in Mr. Swallow's flesh seems
to be the Wheat Pool, but he apparently forgets that the Wheat PoqJ has only between 60
and 65 per cent, of the wheat, and so the grain
dealers, with whom he claims to have been intimately associated for a great number of years,
must be equally short-sighted and lacking in
business ability, as they too are holding their
wheat and refusing to sell at present prices.
Also the grain dealers of the United States are
unbusinesslike, as they are holding for higher
prices.
Likewise the heads of our banking institutions must be lacking in business ability, as they
are endorsing the action of the grain dealers
and Pool by extending them credit to carry the
wheat.
As far as the railways are concerned, they
have not made any serious complaint, as they
have already carried a larger percentage of the
crop than they ever did before at this date.
True they have not hauled as many cars as they
did a year ago, but they have not half as many
to haul, and they realize that eventually this
wheat will have to be hauled and this will provide work for their men and increased earnings
at some future date.
Mr. Swallow complains of tying up capita!,
but the Pool has already paid the farmers $1
per bushel on a basis of No. 1 Northern, and
the farmers have no doubt paid their bills and
a great amount of this money is back in the
bank again.
I hold no brief for the Wheat Pool or any
grain company, but I can not see but what it
is purely a business proposition.
The British miller wants to buy wheat as
cheaply as possible, which is only good business,
while the grain dealers, the Wheat Pool, bankers and farmers of the North American continent want to get as high a price as possible,
which is only good business on their part. They
also realize that if the farmers do not get a
higher price than what has been offered, they
will be unable to put in another crop, and
neither the Wheat Pool, grain dealers, bankers,
railway, farmers or Mr. Swallow will have anything to do next year.
The highest possible figures will not give an
average of more than ten bushels per acre, and
present prices are below cost of production.
The British millers are at present buying
cheap Argentine wheat and when this is exhausted they will no doubt be willing to pay a
fair price for the small amount we will have
to export, and they will have purchased all their
requirements at a fair average price.
It is indeed a brave man who will prophesy
the price of wheat, but we are glad and hope
that the opinion of the grain dealer, the bankers^
the Wheat Pool and the farmers is in this in-s
stance correct and that for once critics arti
wrong. A SASKATCHEWAN FARMER.
Mr. Gollomb Has at Least
One Supporter
Sir,—After reading Mr. Wm. Lee's letter ins
a recent issue of your paper, under the heading
of "Well, Fifty Below Is too Cold for Us," X
can  not help  bu^feel Jn^ympathy with   Mr,
 THE   DAILY  PROVINCE.. V
CS REVIEW
Aristocracy of Austr
THESE    champion    Hereford
drooping horns and 'wide-se
bers of Australia's cattle aristoci
[IILWI.
11
New Tariff I
As Boon to
U. S. Sect
WASHINGTON, Nov. 23.—(
new   Canadian-United   .
Agriculture Wallace said
to United States farmers.
"I have a statement I wa
 DA ST.    NOVEMBER    2 3.    1935
.sselto
rs as Barge
Pioneer
CAPT. JOHN IRVING
CAPTAIN JOHN TO
Pioneer of Gold Rush Days
Still Hale, Hearty-
Here In 1859.
British Columbia's grand old sea-
dog, Captain John Irving, will celebrate his eighty-third birthday on
Sunday. Known wherever steamboat and mining men gather, from
Seattle to Nome, "Captain John" is
one of this province's most notable
pioneers.
Back in 1859 he came to Victoria
with his father, Captain William
Irving, who built the first steamboat in British Columbia. Before
he was 20 John had command
of the steamer Onward, and by
the time he ■was 31 he controlled the Canadian Pacific Navigation Co., which had a practical
monopoly of B. C. coastwise steam-
boating.
Those were the halcyon days of
frequent gold rushes—days when
dozens of stern-wheelers were
churning up the Fraser; days
when the C.P.R. construction
brought great wealth and high
hopes and an inroad of population.
Captain Irving was in the thick
of the fight, and his steamboats
carried many tons of railroad supplies up the Fraser and Thompson
rivers.
Then came the Klondike rush,
and Captain John took advantage
of the times to organize the John
Irving Navigation Co., operating
steamers on Yukon waters.
In 1901 he sold his steamboat interests to the Canadian Pacific
Railway, which has since built up
the services with the modern "Princess" liners. The last of Captain
John's old steamers was the
Charmer, which went to the scrappers this year.
Although Captain Irving has outlived all his steamers, he is proud
to say that his "timbers are as
staunch as ever they were." For
many years he has confined his interests to mining, and has just returned to his home in Vancouver
after visiting mining properties in
 l-i~l-      V.«     ia     in+oro«tfl_      fl.     Vp1deZ.
 VAILY  PROVINCE.   VANCOUVER.   BRITISH
I
Captain John Irving
3><S><$><S><$><$><^<$>^^
Celebrates   82nd  Birthday
82 Today
—Ste.fens Colmer Photo.
CAPTAIN JOHN IRVING.
Veteran   Coast   Mariner
Has Had Adventurous
. /       . Career.
i/\sfex
7
Operated Transportation
Service Here Many
Years Ago.
SIXTY-TWO years ago he stood
on the heaving deck of a sturdy
steamer, a youth of twenty
fired with the ambition brought to
him by his first command. Capt.
John Irving of the Onward, if you
please, veteran of four years service in the steamboat business and
master of as sound a vessel as was
furrowing the face of the Fraser.
Today, as he looks forward to a
real sailorly celebration of his
eighty-second birthday, his memories can ply back to adventures far
beyond those allotted to the average
man. Captain John has lived a life
long and full, a life nearly perfect
inasmuch as it has been of service
to his country and of credit to himself.
Captain John is a true son of the
sea. The son and grandson of a
mariner, lie was born at sea off the
Oregon coast on the ship Robert D.
Garter, owned by his father. He came
 ff    COLUMBIA".   SATURDAY,   NOVEMBER   24
Figures in Galapagos Mystery
 in that city __
BEGAN AT SIXT_
At the age of sixtee.
his father in the .teatt.uv.
and displayed such aptltui
work that, as has been obs^
took command of the "Onward'-..
age of twenty. He continued in ....
sociatlon with Ixis father until  the
latter's death in 1872, when he assumed   the   entire  responsibility  of
the business.
Competition at this time was of the
hottest kind, but Captain John was
quite equal to the emergency, and
soon emerged with his line stronger
than ever. Under his management
numerous steamers were added to the
fleet, the "Lillooet," "Hope," "Glen-
mora," and "Royal City" toeing
familiar names to old-timers. In 1881
he built the "Elizabeth Irving," the
finest steamer on the Fraser, at a
cost of $50,000, only to see her totally
destroyed on her second voyage near
Hope.
 ^fS
BOVE is one of the "residences" or
■<*■ of the Galapagos group, off Equi
tary exiles hid themselves fim the '
their home is Mrs, Margaret Wittmer
Prank Wittmer, a recluse, her blind t
here)  and a 2-year-old child.
Other residents were an Austria!
press of Galapagos" and who atten.
and fear on the former convict islan.
whom she deserted in favor of the o
with a tiny colony of nudists. When
disappeared, the other, named Loren_
been found on a deserted island 16'
it, is now supposed to be that of a
the blonde "empress" and who, aft
Charles Island, got some baby cloth(
and, in attempting to return to his 1
Lorenz, died of starvation.
 _n io.. captain Irving perfected
the organization, with five hundred
thousand dollars capital, of the Canadian Pacific Navigation Company, of
which he became active head. The
company, which was a consolidation
of the Irving pioneer line and the
Hudson's Bay Line, took over the
steamers "R. P. Rithet," "Princess
Louise," "William Irving," "Western
Slope," "Enterprise," "Reliance,"
"Otter," "Maude," "Gertrude," "Yosemite," and later the "Premier,"
"Islander," "Sardonyx," "Danube,"
"Amur."
PURCHASED BY C. P. R.
This line was purchased by the
C. P. R., and became the nucleus of
the present B. C. coast service fleet.
A second line which Captain Irving
had commenced in 1890, the Columbia
and Kootenay Steam Navigation Co.,
which added enormously to the development possibilities of that district,
was also absorbed by the C. P. R.
Captain Irving probably did more
than any other in solving the problem
of transportation to the Yukon. He
and his ships of the John Irving
Navigation Company became well
known in northern B. C. waters, and
the venture highly profitable. The
line was _*it~r nalilii.l. H^r White Pass
Railway Co)
NAMED IN
In 190&Jae escorted the excursion
of tjj^HaJrican Institute of Mining
EngM »"to the Yukon Territory, and
it was on this occasion that R. W.
Raymond penned his poem "The Song
of the Mining Engineers." In it appeared this verse:
"And there was Admiral Kafer, a
sailor of the sea,
And shiver my tarry topllghts but
a heart of oak had he!
And there was another heart of oak
for his to  lean  upon,
The heart I mean that could be
seen in the face of Captain John."
Of late the tides of fortune have
run into many uncharted courses for
Captain John. Yet they have not
changed him from the genial, generous
man he has always been. Tonight,
in a home in Point Grey, he will
celebrate with a half-dozen of his
most intimate friends. Friends from
the Columbia to the Yukon will joir
with them in congratulating «•
grand old man of the Pacific Coast
Fruit fivov-«-c c—i-'
re   highly   proi
iters^ty^Pe
09__fl AA
.Tpoem;
 ooay i iicu
Prisoner of Ed
New   Galapagos  Revelations   Introduces   New
Figure Into Mystery.
Master of Clipper Craft
Tells Story As Another
Ship Leaves for Islands.
By  WALTER B.   CLAUSEN
ABOARD the Tuna Clipper
Northwestern, at Los Angeles
Harbor, Nov. 24.—(AP)—A
solution of the death mystery at the
Equator of two men was offered today by Captain Fred Ostrem, skipper of this ship;, just in from the
Galapagos Islands.
From Associated Press radio descriptions of the two bodies, sent
by the skipper, who found-them last
Saturday on bleak, waterless Mar-
chena Island, at the Equator,
Captain Ostrem identified the victims as Arthur Estampa, 34, Norwegian, of Indefatigable Island, in the
archipelago, a completely new figure
in the mystery, and Alfred Rudolph
Lorenz, 40, of Paris, deserted companion of the Baroness Eloise Bons-
quet de Wagner of Charles Island.
VINCENT ASTOR KNEW HIM.
He accounted for their presence on
the bleak volcanic beach of Marchena
as a shipwreck of Estampa's schooner,
the Falcon, on a reef jutting out from
the southeast tip of the tragedy isle.
Estampa,  he  said,  was  known  by
Vincent Astor and a member of the
Roosevelt family, and the engine of
his  old  pilot schooner,   the  Falcon,
■as sent to the  island  several years
o   by  a  member  of  the  Roosevelt
 1897
''•-"•    V-**^
TRIP-
l!t QsiiUs-i. Iri§IIi§ It wttiitii. ©tiiitiofi (Ikiiittii)
sTEAmnn $. p. Rithet,
For Freight and Charges from VICTORIA      TO
MAKKS NO.  PAOKAOES.
a
-6
S.
J
DESOBIPTION.
'
Advanced Charges,
Wharfage
Total, -
WEIGHT. FEET. DOLLARS. CENTS
Received Payment for the Company,
Date,.
.189
 Form 76.
*
P
190
TRIP
To Canadian Pacific Navigation Company's (^Limited.)
• (SPiFffyfS        ' L**~
Steamer
4f
For Freight and Charges from :   \ TO
/A
/■yf>

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