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The story of the Dominion Express and its change of name Canadian Pacific Express Company 1926

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Full Text

 STORY OF THE
DOMINION
EXPRESS ffif
CHANGErfNAME
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  "tfzC
STORY OF THE
DOMINION
EXPRESS "H
CHANGErfNAME
COMPILED BY
t. e. McDonnell
VICE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER
Printed in Canada, 1926
 Winnipeg, 1882.
Ohe story of the . . .
DOMINION   EXPRESS
and   its   CHANGE    OF    NAME
THE   Dominion   Express   Company   commenced   Express
transportation service in  1882 over the lines then being
operated in the West by the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Half  a dozen   loyal and enthusiastic employes, one horse  and
second-hand wagon enabled the Company at that time to serve
the Canadian public at seven small agencies.
To-day its goods-transportation and financial services
extend from coast to coast in Canada, to the United States and
to far distant corners of the World.
The Dominion Express Company is essentially Canadian.
It was originated in Canada, owes its success to the good-will
of the Canadian people and to that development of Canadian
economic life to which it has contributed in some measure as
an arm of Canadian Pacific service, and on September 1, 1926,
will assume a distinctively Canadian name, the
CANADIAN PACIFIC EXPRESS COMPANY
 1647 GEORGE V.
CHAPTER
An Act to change the name of the Dominion Express
Company to "Canadian Pacific Express Company "
(Assented to lzth May, igz6)
Whereas the Dominion Express Company has by its ?J~mble-  .
1o/j> c. 113;
petition prayed that its corporate name may be changed 1921, c. 81.
to that of the "Canadian Pacific Express Company,"
and it is expedient to grant the prayer of the said petition.
Therefore His Majesty, by and with the advice and
consent of the Senate and House of Commons, enacts
as follows:—
1. The name of the Dominion Express Company  is  Name
hereby changed to "Canadian Pacific Express Company,"
but such change of name shall not affect any rights or
obligations  of  the  Company  or   render  defective  any
legal proceedings by or against the Company, and any
legal  proceedings  that   might  have  been  continued  or  Existing
commenced against it by its former name may be con-  J-Jj^J
tinued or commenced against it by its new name.
2. This Act shall come into force on the first day of  Commencement
.. ,        ■  .... of Act.
September,   1926.
 In   thus   identifying
tself the Company hopes that the
prestige of the name
of the World's
greatest transportation
system will enable it to
be even more successful
in serving its patrons in
Canada and abroad,
and in making Canadian services and Canadian efficiency better
and more favorably
known throughout the
World.
Although the Dominion Express Company
was incorporated in
1873, it was not until
the Summer of 1882
that it commenced
operating on the Canadian Pacific Railway lines in the West,
from Rat Portage (now Kenora) to Oak Lake, with its head
office at Winnipeg. Prior to that the Express on these lines was
handled by the Canada Pacific Express Company, an organization owned and operated by a group of Winnipeg business men.
While the services of that Company met local requirements
satisfactorily, it was deemed to be in the public interest to have
the more complete service of an Express Company with sufficient
organization and capital to adequately provide for future development.
To those inclined to exaggerate the profits of the early
operations of the Company it is interesting to know that the
President of a  large Express  Company in the  United States
General Offices, Winnipeg, 1882.
T'T
•$a-.'..w
-«-%r^
 HE STORY OF THE DOMINION. EXPRESS
:  :  : AND ITS CHANC
W. S. Stout, President.
turned down an opportunity to place the service of his Company
on the Canadian Pacific, because in his opinion, the Railway
would shortly go under the auctioneer's hammer at a sheriff's
sale.
Having decided on the policy to be followed Mr. Van Home
made a contract with the Dominion Express Company which
then bought the property and good-will of the local company
and acquired its charter. Mr. G. A. Kirkpatrick of Kingston,
Ont., was then President of the Dominion Express Company.
Mr. W. S. Stout, a very young but thoroughly experienced
expressman, was called from the United States in the Summer of
"tin a
 r
THE STORY OF THE DOMINION EXPRESS
AND ITS CHANGE OF NAME :  :  :  :
1882 and engaged to act as Superintendent of the Dominion
Express Company charged with the duty of providing complete
and efficient Express service for the public along the Railway
lines of the Canadian Pacific and to lay plans for its future
development.
The Company which was started by him is fortunate in
still having Mr. Stout as its President.
The growth of the Company from its very humble beginning
to its present world wide activity and its splendid reputation for
efficiency and fair dealing are proof of the adequacy and the
soundness of the plans Mr. Stout formulated and carried out
during the past forty-four years.
!>^a-
11
cx^k.<^^
 THE STORY OF THE DOMINION EXPRE
He and his few assistants had a hard and uphill fight. They
had not only to move traffic but to help create it—to find Canadian and foreign markets for Canadian products. In those
early days the Express Company was a free agent in naming
rates just as merchants still are in fixing prices of their goods.
At that time it was possible to and the Company did make
low rates to encourage the farmer, the fruit grower, and the
fisherman without great regard to the cost or the profit of the
moment, but free from the necessity of extending unprofitable
rates to others not requiring them, and free to withdraw unprofitable rates when they had served their purpose.
During its early years the officers and agents of the Express
Company spent much time and energy finding customers and
markets for butter, eggs, fish, fruit, and other perishable products as an aid in getting settlers on the land and keeping them
there until the usual marketing organizations were established
to serve them. Special cars for ventilating and refrigerating
were designed, built and operated to insure the efficient marketing of perishable products of the farm and fisheries. The now
important fruit industry of British Columbia was to a large
extent made possible by the agents of the Company who persistently canvassed everywhere and secured trial orders until the
business was firmly established and the growers had made their
own marketing arrangements.
The Company early realized that the growth of Canada's
population and industry is linked up with its transportation
facilities and that the success and the credit of each is dependent
upon the other.
By 1884 operations had been extended from Rat Portage
(now Kenora) to Prince Arthur's Landing (now Port Arthur),
..; ^S^-r-<
 THE  STORY  OF  THE  DOMINION   EXPRESS
AND   ITS   CHANGE   OF   NAME   :       :       :       :
Present General Offices, Toronto, 1926.
and a joint traffic route formed with Vickers Express Company
for traffic to and from Toronto, using steamers between Owen
Sound and Prince Arthur's Landing. This arrangement continued until the Eastern and Western lines of the Railway were
joined on the North shore of Lake Superior.
In 1884 the head offices of the Company were moved from
Winnipeg to Toronto. At that time the entire staff at Toronto
totalled ten; made up of three clerks, four drivers, Mr. W. S.
Stout, Superintendent, Mr. W. H. Burr, Auditor, and Mr. Wm.
Walsh, Chief Clerk.
To develop traffic in advance of the laying of Canadian
Pacific rails, the Express Company went ahead by means of
wagon stage routes, some of which served the public for a number
of years. Many shippers will recall the Ayr, Paris and Brantford
route, which was opened in 1892 and continued as a stage route
until  1903, when the opening of electric lines made the stage
 ?ESS
:.      :. AND "ITS   CHANGE   OF   NAME
service no longer necessary. The Gait, Preston, Hespeler,
Berlin and Waterloo stage route served the public until the
opening of the Grand River Railroad in 1905. Two other
important stage routes were the Myrtle, Whitby and Oshawa,
tapping the Canadian Pacific at Myrtle, and the Ivanhoe and
Belleville, tapping the Canadian Pacific at Ivanhoe. These
two routes were operated by stage for nearly 25 years, until the
opening of the Canadian Pacific Railway Lake Shore Line in
1915.
West of Winnipeg the expansion occurred at a similar rate,
the Express Company preceding the Railway in many places,'
Lake and River Steamers taking the place of the stage. Vancouver Island was given Express service in 1886; Skagway got
it in 1901. Year by year important additions were made until
to-day, the Dominion Express Company can give either a direct
service to any given point through its own organization, or can
arrange speedy transportation through its connections and
working agreements with other lines.
That the Dominion Express Company is useful to, and has
gained the confidence of the public, there can be no doubt, else
it would not be entrusted, as it is, with hundreds of millions of
dollars in goods and treasure by the people, by the business
community, by the banks and by the Government.
 THE   STORY  OF  THE   DOMINION   EXPRESS
AND    ITS   CHANGE   OF   NAME    :        :        :        :
The integrity of the staff and its efficiency which enables
the Company to merit that trust and confidence is evidenced
also by its enviable claim record over a period of years. A
record not perfect, because the staff is human, but not yet equalled
by any other Express Company in North America—a record of
only one claim for any reason per 3500 pieces handled during
1925.
In this connection it should be remembered that under the
conditions of the Company's receipt, it assumes liability as to
the value of shipments for both loss and damage up to $50.00
without extra charge on each shipment carried, and also assumes
liability for higher valuations if declared, a nominal extra charge
being made for the excess over $50.00.
It should also be remembered that Express Companies were
the originators of the C.O.D. System under which the invoice
value or other charges against shipments are collected and
remitted to shippers for a nominal fee, and that the Company is
liable for vast sums of money on that account.
During the dark days of the War when about 25% of the
eligible permanent employes were with the colors and the
great strain of war traffic bore heavily on the weakened organization, recruited as best it could be in those days, it was necessary
to assume yet another great task—the movement of billions of
gold and securities across the Atlantic and across the Pacific to
finance purchases, to stabilize exchange, and to keep the war
machine functioning. The task was carried out without delay,
without loss and with the great secrecy which circumstances
made necessary.
The task meant special arrangements on the ocean, special
steel trains on land, specially trained guards in each car so that
at all times two or more guards were on duty in each car.    It
Some successors to the one-horse wagon of 1882.
— 10-
 the story of the dominion express
:  . :     :     :   and its change of name:
Ready to deliver the goods at Liverpool.
meant special electrical and telephone connections from each car
of the train to the "Master Car" as no door could be opened—
no one might enter or leave a car except under the control and
supervision of the "Master Car." These movements often
involved weeks of service for each shipment.
That these tasks were cheerfully undertaken and successfully
performed by selected members of the staff is a lasting tribute to
their loyalty and efficiency.
Of the staff that went with the colors about 10% made the
supreme sacrifice—nearly all of the balance were glad to avail
themselves of the opportunity afforded by the Company of filling
their old positions or better ones.
*.
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Part of Toronto fleet.
-11 —
 the story-of the DO M.IN I on-, ex press
AND ITS CHANGE OF NAME :
Can
Pac
Expi
 the story of the dominion express
:     :     :     :   and  its change of name
UDIAN
3IFIC
AESS
ices ylbroad
;■:•.."    ^f^\:^.'^;:
5. Manila
6. Paris
7. Liverpool   Office   in
Royal Liver Building
fPMBl.c                              iillll
m>mW: :':.5f   :r'%'"*' ;f	
 BOARD OF DIRECTORS
of the
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  EXPRESS COMPANY
Mr. W. S. Stout
Toronto
President
Mr. T. E. McDonnell     -      -    Toronto
Vice-President and General Manager
Mr. E. W. Beatty   -
Montreal
Mr. C. R. Hosmer  -
Montreal
Sir Herbert S. Holt -
Montreal
Sir Vincent Meredith, Bart. -
Montreal
— 14 —
 THE STORY OF THE DOMINION EXPRESS
:  :  :  : AND ITS CHANGE OF NAME
Montreal Building.
FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT
THE Company was slow to engage in the Money Order
business, fearing the great risk involved in spreading
negotiable financial paper throughout such a new and
unsettled territory, but once started in 1895, its convenience to
the public was quickly appreciated and its growth most gratifying.
What the Financial Department will do for you to-day:
There is no form of remittance quite as convenient
for the payment of lodge dues, insurance premiums,
subscriptions to magazines, payment of tax bills and out of
town purchases, because of their cheapness and security coupled
with the fact that with each Money Order is given a "remitter's
stub" which is retained by the remitter as evidence that the
remittance has been made.
Hundreds of commercial and financial institutions throughout
Money
Orders
 THE  STORY OF THE-DOMINION   EXPRE
AND   ITS   CHANGE  OF   NAME   :       :
Canada, who have occasion to
send small remittances to outside
points, have been appointed Branch
Agents for the issue of Money
Orders because of the convenience
of issuing them in their own offices
and because of the convenience to
their customers by whom the
Money Orders may be cashed or
deposited in their bank without
exchange.
Money Orders are issued at more
than 4,600 Agencies in Canada,
United States, Great Britain, Ireland and Continental Europe. The
charges range from 5c for $2.50
to 24c for $100.00. In the event
of a lost, stolen, or forged Money
Order, a refund will be made or new
order issued free of charge.
One of the many conveniences
of Canadian Pacific Express Money
Orders is that they are not drawn
payable at a given point but may
be cashed almost anywhere for full face value, on the identification of the payee, or they may be endorsed to another, either
in the same or another town, and by him endorsed to some one
else if desired. Their use in that way is limited only by the
space on the back of the Money Order.
There is no better way to send money by mail.
Travellers Cheques are Easy to Buy.
Cheques Cheques of the limited series are issued in Canada
imi e £Qr remittances to Great Britain,  Ireland, Europe
and other countries, and are payable without
advice. They are limited in amount to $100.00 or the equivalent
in foreign money, and may be issued either in United States
Dollars payable at the current buying rate for bankers cheques
on New York, or in the currency of the country on which drawn.
 4E   STORY  OF  THE  DOMINION   EXPRESS
Unlike Money Orders they are drawn payable either by our
own representative or by one of our correspondents, thousands
of which we have throughout the World.
Cheques
Unlimited
Series
These cheques may be issued for larger amounts
and are payable on advice only. They are issued
in Canada for payment in Great Britain, Ireland,
Europe and other countries. They are also issued in Great
Britain, Ireland, and other countries in Europe for payment in
Canada and points in the United States.
Foreign
Postal
Remittances
Foreign Postal Remittances were introduced to
take care of thousands of foreigners in the country
who send money to their friends at home and who
do  not  understand  usual   banking  methods.    By  this  system
we give the remitter a receipt for his money and instruct our
correspondents    abroad    to    pay
the    actual    amount    of    money
to the payee, take his receipt and
send   to   us   which   we    in    turn
deliver   to   the    remitter,    which
completes   the   transaction.      We
undertake payments of any amount
—small    or     large—by      Foreign
Postal Remittance to almost  any
place   in    the    World,    regardless
of size.     We also deposit money
to the   credit   of   the   remitter's
account    in    any    bank   that   he
may    designate    and   return    his
pass   book   showing   the   deposit.
This system of remitting is better
understood and much appreciated
by foreigners.
Travellers Cheques are acceptable the World over.
 THE STORY OF THE DOMINION EXPRESS
AND ITS CHANGE OF NAME ■:
Liverpool Docks.
Banco Di        This   form   of   remittance   appeals   especially   to
Napoh Italian immigrants   because they   are   printed   in
Vagha T    , \& ,   . •       i       t    1-
Bank of Naples Italian and issued by our agents in the Italian
Money Orders language, and because Italians know that payment
of Banco di Napoli Vaglia is guaranteed by the Italian Government, which relieves them of any anxiety as to the safety of
their money.
Refrigerator Car.
— 18 —
 THE STORY OF THE DOMINION EXPRESS
:   : AND ITS CHANGE OF NAME
Fruit Car.
Payment of    yye transfer money by Telegraph or Cable through
Money by ,1        .     .     1      .  .        .        7
Telegraph       our   correspondents   to   all   principal   cities   in   the
and Cable       World.    To the   smaller   places   we   telegraph   the
nearest principal point to  forward payment  by mail.    Under
special agreement between the Postmaster General of the British
Government  and  this  Company,   and  the  Minister  for  Posts
and Telegraph of the Irish Free State and this Company, all
Money Order Post Offices in Great Britain and Ireland and the
Irish Free State accept money for transfer by cable through this
Company to any place in Canada, and agents of this Company
accept money for transfer by cable to any Money Order Post
Office in Great Britain and Ireland and the Irish Free State.
Money yye kuv ancj se\\ foreign
xc ange        money in our more important offices.
In the Immigration Buildings at
Quebec and St. John, N.B., and
at the piers at Liverpool and Southampton we maintain Money Exchange offices at which money may
be exchanged and Money Orders
and Cheques cashed. We also
maintain money exchange booths
on Canadian Pacific Steamers arriving at Vancouver, to look after
the requirements of passengers from
the Orient.
 Shipment of Silver Bullion.
Travellers
Cheques
Canadian Pacific Express Self-identifying Travellers
Cheques are essential to travel comfort. They are
issued in denominations of $10, $20, $50, $100 and $200 and may
be cashed as desired in the money of the country in which you
are travelling. In Canada and the United States they are payable for the dollar amount shown on the cheque and in other
countries at the current buying rate for bankers cheques on
New York. State and religious holidays—of which there are
many in European countries—will not inconvenience you as
they are accepted in payment of accounts by Stores, Hotels,
Tourist Agencies, Railway, Steamship and Sleeping Car Companies, and cashed by all Express Companies and thousands
of banks throughout the World.    The only identification required
is the writing of your
signature on the lower
left hand corner of the
cheque which must
agree with the signature
at the upper left hand
corner of the cheque required of you at time of
purchase of the cheques,
If lost or stolen before
you have countersigned
Interior of Horse Car.
• 20-
 THE STORY OF THE DOMINION EXPRE
. AND ITS CHANGE OF NAT
the       cheques
will be refunded.
money
Canadian Pacific Express
Travellers Cheques are a world
wide currency—familiar to all
nationalities and accepted almost
everywhere. They identify you wherever you are and protect
you against loss.    Ask any Canadian Pacific Agent about them.
One of the full trainloads of gold.
— 21 —
 THE STORY OF THE D<
AND ITS CHANGE OF
THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT
THE Foreign Department was established in 1%5, with
three agencies in Liverpool, London, and Glasgow. Like
the other operations of the Company, the Foreign
Department grew steadily.
This Department, with the aid of Canadian Pacific representatives and the fast service of Canadian Pacific and other
Liners on the oceans, has been helpful in extending the operations
and the markets of Canadian and Overseas shippers and importers
as evidenced by its steady growth.
Experienced shippers and importers have learned to know
the advantages of through Express movement due to Express
being loaded just before sailing, unloaded immediately at port
of arrival, and rushed through to destination from ship side on
fast passenger trains.
In addition to ordinary merchandise and valuables, the
Foreign Department has satisfactorily transported dogs, birds,
rabbits, horses and other live stock, sometimes from Europe
across Canada and the Pacific Ocean to the Orient, arranging
for necessary feeding and care throughout the entire journey.
The Foreign Department has assisted in making Canada
favorably known throughout the World.
It is the aim and ambition of the officers and employes of this
world wide service under its new name, as it was during forty-
four years under its old name, to constantly improve and extend
its service to the end that those who use it most may profit best.
CANADIAN PACIFIC EXPRESS COMPANY.
L
"Marquis" in Service at Toronto.
Age 5 years. Age 18 years.
— 22 —
 THE   STORY
Foreign Department Agencies are now maintained in
EUROPE
Amsterdam ; 124 De Ruyterkade
Antwerp  .25 Quai Jordaens
Basle 45 Elisabethenstrasse
Bergen Guldskogaarden
Belfast 41-43 Victoria Street
Birmingham     4 Victoria Square
Bristol 18 St. Augustine's Parade
Brussels 98 Boulevard Adolphe Max.
Bordeaux    .... 36 Quai des Chartrons
Bremen  Schlachte 15-18
Calais 17 Boulevard Gambetta
Chiasso 16 Via Internazionale
Como Via Cinque Giornate, 22
Danzig Heumarkt, 4
Dundee 88 Commercial Street
Florence 26 Piazza St. Maria Novella
Gablonz A/N Bahnhofstrasse 20
Genoa 1 Piazza dei Greci.
Gothenburg Postgaten 32
Grenoble 7 Rue Genissien
Glasgow 25 Bothwell Street
Hamburg 1 Chile-Haus
Havre  2 Rue Pleuvry
Hull Q Scale Lane
La Chaux de Fonds Rue Leopold Robert, 76
Leeds 38 Royal Exchange Bldgs.
Liverpool Royal Liver Bldg.
London 103 Leadenhall St., E.C. 3
London 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W. 1
Lyons 31 Rue de l'Hotel de Ville
Manchester 31 Mosley St.
Marseilles 50 Rue Fauchier
Mulhouse 13 Rue Huguenin
Milan 34 Via Principe Umberto
Oslo Jernbanetorvet 4
Paris 7 Rue Scribe
Prague Hybernska ul. 4
Rome 25/6 Piazza S. Nicola da Tolentino
Rotterdam Coolsingel 91
Roubaix 61 Rue de la Care
Sheffield 43 The Wicker
Southampton C P.R. Bldg., 7 Canute Rd.
St. Etienne 25 Rue de la Bourse
St. Gall Poststrasse 18
Stavanger Bredgaden 13
Strassbourg 16 Rue du 22 Novembre
Trondhjem Fjordgaten 17
Turin  10 Piazza Statute
Vienna Hoher Markt, 12
Warsaw Przejazd nr. 3
Zurich Freigutstrasse 12
THE ORIENT, AUSTRALIA, AND NEW ZEALAND
Auckland New Zealand Express Company
Bombay MacKinnon McKenzie & Company
Calcutta MacKinnon McKenzie & Company
Hong Kong Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe         1 The Bund
Manila Roxas Building
Melbourne. Rudders Limited, 14 Market Street
Nagasaki Holme Ringer 8z Company
Shanghai 4 The Bund
Sydney Rudders Limited, 44 Pitt Street
Tokio 1 Itchome Yuraku-Chd
Yokohama 1 The Bund
-23 —
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