The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

Glad to have you aboard! Canadian Pacific Air Lines 1949

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0357575.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0357575.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0357575-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0357575-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0357575-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0357575-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0357575-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0357575-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0357575-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0357575.ris

Full Text

 ■fcW
cJ(HHcAi£f
mAIRmLINES
ACROSS THE PACIFIC  "Glad to have you aboard".  The traditional light-hearted greeting
of generations of seamen sounds the keynote of your Pacific flight.
Flying is a light-hearted affair.   That's why this little booklet is
treated in a light-hearted way.   The light-heartedness starts with
the crew.   They are light-hearted because they know that everything
about this flight across the Pacific by Canadian Pacific Empress of the
Air has been planned in advance and checked.   Then, they double-
checked.   So, all there is for any of us to do now is sit back, or
lean back, or stretch out and enjoy it.
That "stretch out" doesn't apply to the crew. They — all six of
them — will be too busy. In case this is your first flight and you
wonder why there is one crew-member for every six passengers
let's go up front and see what goes on.
First — there's the Captain.   He may not look it, but he's a greybeard
as far as flying's concerned — more than 10,000 hours!   He's the
boss.   Your boss, too, in flight.   Then there's the First Officer.   He's
got "flying whiskers" too, is a qualified captain, with thousands of
hours in varied types over land and sea.   He made a personal check
of the entire aircraft while you were weighing in.   Next, comes the
Navigating Officer.   He's surrounded by gadgets, Loran, Automatic
Direction Finding apparatus, compasses, charts, dividers — even
has a demountable platform to stand on when he uses the Periscopic
Sextant to "shoot the stars".   Often he's a pilot, too.   Number four
is the Radio Officer.   He's in constant touch with ground stations —
ahead and astern — responsible for the automatic radio-controlled
instruments and is an expert on "George". "George"?   He's a pilot, too.   But since he gets no wages we don't
count him in the crew.   George is the automatic pilot — an
extremely clever piece of mechanism that can fly the aircraft when
altitude and course have been reached.   All this is old stuff to veteran
air-travellers.
"That's only four — you said six!"   Right!   But there's not much
need to outline the duties of the two stewardesses.   You met them
when you came aboard.   They'll be with you all the way; preparing
your meals, serving snacks at "elevens" and tea-time, cheerfully
answering your questions, responding to the call-button at your
seat, looking to your comfort and always at your service.   They'll
help with the baby, too.   But, sorry, no time for baby-sitting.
w«
btlW
m
s\ffiS
<;v
S<e*
y/v
4°'
**>*lito**«
s^'SV^^v;
AV^XbeW
a^-
<of
^\.T>°rd;e^
o^c
***>^,
to
O-V^
fcotf\
co^
»*•"*
s\^s*
^e yO«r
com
fort
ft*
b< °0os**P °.^< ^ge c0,.\ **»•   «-« toXO
^"TY-OV^'
W-W^"
;tV\^
^o'
,o n**'
»•'•
com
fort
o^.*:v*
-°t*^°
v/e
ye
3\e\
\oo-
be
d,
^.wr.*.*"
v*av=r»-rs5--r5*»
rttov)^0     «>rV\Ce
be
<sy&»T
OO*
X\c* r°°m
your nlf,«"b /.o
y s"»P/e
afthe
the
'ooit,,, ' °r Perh     n9*r o«      ewQrdJ   b°dy
^       ' *Oo* / //*r© *^       ifiou/.     , s^ur c^    ,s'~, Oi
see
ett(
er
ertk
you,
°5S/
on
0/7/77,
^/7/i
9
/A7g
Xot/r
c°"6€
OQrd
V//
sufc
e*"'h
'0/7> Jn   fr°m "C„
f/9nQnf.
Kali
■S3**
tte
0roye
£$&*
S5
*/■/>,
^o<
'*>*/;
>^0(/
^e
CCfnje
ror
»on,Q
">9
^o^^r*
■   SuWy„
'On    1  ' o
e, n' she'//
*o/f
futt.
*ith
">€
ond
ink
Ughf 1
.e^C^ os th^j thQr°^h
e"e/>
* c<>o*/e
Um
^ot,
;«/■/
ers.
°s th,
We
youfe^tinuoi
^*3£*%*.
pr<*s J! 5*>em _wee» fr^:~or <*
yoar
re^e
^0/7V
^ C ,C°" W^* ><»s of-^
eMpr*   "°» onw ..°f fe,
W'H vvA:~ 'eel hu»
teo
belt.
^ere
*o/i
Woys 66/fis ?
you,
that ZQm-   On ,?° °P on tbCheot wither 66 lh
ondsi,
cO/7-y
Wn*>r*~£.'"*.in
s'9hts,
ee//
'"9,
**#
'* 4*se
o/*„.. yester
Of
Mere?
•a£»*»
th,
s'er to
ton
ro\y
^o^0/7**
>ock
^oy-°ldodogei
d°te„?.   Tt>e inn"?*0* ar.. ..„™ ..                 -,rs
**?■-ii-OS,?»^S*C*S-' "
'Wo
cross t^
QostW{
th,
e the i^1 ^orld^ You
y^nolbVerythinq:'T
e niinu*- •     fo o L     '•'He.   /*,
srda
6o„r^ eo,;: ;* *»£™ ^ ^o* 6,
*/)ere £  '"of
Xoc/
OccVer^
»e.
XeSf(
errf,
ore/
°y.
/n
3ceSs
one/
find
lnto «**£-
'self
srr,Qck "needle in a hay stack n
You could navigate this Empress yourself.   That's a fact!   The rest of us
would just  as soon you let the crew do it, but — no kidding — there
are so many special radio sets up front for the Captain and Navigator
that they could find the traditional needle in a haystack.   It wouldn't
be true to say these instruments can do anything but talk — because
some of them do talk!
The "V.H.F." (very high frequency radio) for instance is the Captain's
personal, static-free communication with the ground.   For use within
a 100 mile radius of any port, it can be used for a "ground-
controlled-approach" in poor visibility.   "I.L.S.", (instrument landing
system) has dials on the Captain's and First Officers' panels that
guide the aircraft down a safe glide path in the thickest weather.
Two needles, one vertical, one horizontal, cross at right angles and
everything's O.K.   If the angle changes the skipper corrects and your
Empress glides down an invisible incline at exactly the right angle
to land without even a bump.
"A.D.F.", — we've got as many initials as Washington haven't we?
This one's the automatic direction finder.   Did you notice two black,
tear-shapes on the under side of the hull?   They are the automatic
directional loops, and will find any radio station or weather ship
we tune in.   A dial upstairs gives the bearing, the Navigator consults
his tables, pinpoints the map — and there you are!
"Loran" is practically human.   It has a viewer like a television set.
Automatic "blips" from two stations show our exact position.   That's
"long range navigation", and we're never out of range.
There's still another way.   Just call the nearest radar station and ask
for a position.   Simple, isn't it?
And, of course there's an ordinary voice radio set that can maintain
touch with the ground, astern or ahead, every minute we're air-borne.
That navigation stuff sounds too simple?   Perhaps it does.   So let's
look in on the flight planning that goes on before we start.   Long
before the take-off Captain and First Officer familiarize themselves
with the weather ahead by consulting the information gathered by
Despatchers.   Despatch maintains a perpetual inventory of weather
data — brought up to date every hour.   Based upon his studies the
Captain prepares a flight plan, discusses it with the Despatcher, and, when both agree, it is adopted and a copy filed with goven
air transport departments.
This happens at every port of call.   So your flight across
is planned five times.   Five consultations, five double che<
But it isn't rigid!   Latest weather and ground conditions i
is supplied to your Empress in a steady stream and ]
may change his plan to increase your comfort, to tal*
of favourable winds, to conserve fuel.   Of course he
enough to take you to an alternate airport, and a re;
several hours more than the flight will use — but,
is a penny earned."
Radio ranges, similar to thos<
routes of the world but infinite
and alternate air port in the
welcome "on track" hum of
Captain and First Officer s
Network the organized over-land
Fe powerful, lead to every main
pittt.   Long before you land the
nnge station in the  ear-phones  of
a welcome.  V4KCOUVCR.
SAN PRflKCISCO
pH l§
ME
FROM
TO
ELAPSED
TIME
Join a select circle
You'll get a very fancy certificate, signed
by the Captain as Deputy for Neptune,
proclaiming to all and sundry that you have
joined the select circle of travellers who
have crossed the equator. Treasure this, in
the air you get it without fuss and you can
laugh at your friends who were lathered
and shaved and thrown into the pool when
they "crossed the line" on a sea-going
Empress. The Flight Bulletin will tell you the
minute you "crossed"— jot it down in the
log for remembrance.
how's your memory?
Are you the methodical type or do you
have to keep notes of what you want to
remember? Whichever you are—and historyl
resounds with the names of both kinds—
this skeleton map and log, with the aid of a
pencil, can be a handy record of your
trans-pacific voyage in a Canadian Pacific
Empress of the Air. ditching, what's that?
Columnist Earl Wilson calls them "gay
deceivers", but we'll stick to the Air Force
slang, that has now been dictionary
blessed —"Mae West".   It's one of the
many things on board that we're sure
you'll never need, but "if you haven't got
it when you need it, you'll never need
it again."   Take a look in the light
baggage shelf above your seat, so
you'll know where it is.   What is a "Mae
West"?   Sorry, a self-inflating life-jacket.
%o«j>«*
Ditching, in our language, isn't an excavating job so you won't
need a pick and shovel.   In fact you won't need anything except
your Mae West, we've got everything else stowed handily for quick
release.   Ditching, since international regulations insist that we tell
you, is the airborne word for "abandon ship".   And it's a simple
operation that very seldom becomes necessary.   The crew has been
thoroughly drilled and will tell you what to do in the event of this
very unlikely emergency.   Before we give you the details, let's
look at all sides of it.
Your Empress is in touch with several ground stations all the time.
Dials in "the office" show pilot and navigator their exact position
every minute of the flight.   If an emergency should develop the
nearest landing field and Search and Rescue Station will know about
it before you do.   They'll be on the way to your probable landing
place even before the Captain finally decides to "go downstairs".
Three of the four engines can get you to port — it has been
done with only two, but if the Captain's experience calls for a water
landing here's what will happen.
First, a preliminary warning, "Standby to Ditch," will tell you of the
possibility.   This is your cue to make yourself comfortable — loosen
your collar, remove pens, pencils and anything sharp (including
high-heeled shoes) you wouldn't want to puncture your Mae West
or your raft, would you?   Next, also from the Captain, comes, "Brace for ditching".   Fasten your seat belt, press your feet down
on the floor and hold hands with yourself behind your neck to lessen
the jar.   There will be two jolts, one a little lighter than the other,
and you're down.   Loosen your seat belt, and sit still until the next
instruction.   There will be no heroics, no "women and children first",
the three fully-equipped rafts have room for more people than your
"Empress" carries — and there are seven exits from the cabin.
Don't inflate your Mae West until instructed, then pull the lever —
whoops!   "a perfect thirty-six".
Each raft is fully equipped with food and water, spray curtains,
oars, even an automatic radio (Gibson Girl, we call her) that sends
a continuous position signal.   Careful organization has reduced the
possibility of "ditching" to a minimum — equally careful organization
assures that its improbable actuality turns emergency into adventure. yhrt
no
firef"**1
Oorft UOOK FORijKhe *A°,A"r0R
/
,eH
co'
«9'
<o< *°*e* *«
c\eO°-.,wed or"
*oes~
o *°c
voc
con^
co\d O%or Pe
sa^.*^
V^o°V,e *oV
*e *°««e
too-
ftn
*f I"""
o'tfe
y6o«
we ^
w-ond^\o\v
* D   .~ Xo *eXX T vwete *" _c ano ^ ..   vQ\> °* KrtrA tf
*c\ * . ^en
Voo c°n   have *°  le>ete
^ .^ea^o b_e b^aea.^,^
So^V-
.or®
5wr/ » she's an empress
Want to boast a little about your "Empress"
when you get home?   Okay — here's the basic dope.   She's
an Empress because in the Canadian Pacific tradition the
finest vessels in the Pacific sea-borne service have been
"Empresses" since 1891.   Your Empress proudly continues the
tradition.   She has a wingspread of 11716 feet, measures
93 feet, 7Vi inches from nose to tail and stands 27Vi feet
high.   A "Canadair Four", specially designed for long overseas
flights at above-the-weather heights, her four British-made
Rolls-Royce Merlin engines develop power equal to two of the
giant "Selkirk" locomotives that pull Canadian Pacific trains
over the steep grades of the Canadian Rockies.
-tf
\>&
moY
be
an
or
tis*
ctWe v
as
the
r*       ^.*>BUBBUftV
rt'
-of
Popf„ en»e'
iS etf eCV ^9
de  • foonV .Jft. cn ^ 0
•tisr-1
>* ->ode;.4;? Try
^V-oroO'^^he
che*
9'
0o<
.dV^oo^d^
fof9
she
jov»r
o^>P(
cWecs
yO^'
hos
so
"Oops, dearie!   was that an air pocket?"
Well, no, we don't call them that
any more. "Turbulent air" sounds much
more dignified.   Sometimes, while
we are "grabbing altitude" or "coming
downstairs" we meet a little turbulence.
If we do the skipper will flash the
"fasten seat-belt" sign, and you'll be
more comfortable.   Warm air rises, cold
air descends, and when the terrain and
atmospheric conditions combine to cause
up- or down-drafts your Empress of the
Air notices it.   Over water these air
currents are seldom met — lucky, ain't we? "oh, goody - customs"
Amongst the joys of air travel Customs and Immigration regulations
stand high on the list.   They bother surface travellers too — but
not as often.   We'll do our best to simplify anything we can, and
the Stewardesses will be glad to help with forms.   Officials of the
various countries are helpful too, and so long as your passport is in
order and properly visaed. Immigration inspection is largely a
formality.   It is hard to generalize on Customs — "one man's meat
is another man's poison".   Every piece of baggage is subject to
inspection and in most countries duty has to be paid on alcoholic
spirits, cigars, cigarettes and tobacco, perfumes, clothing, jewellery,
furs — in quantities greater than normal travel needs.   Live plants,
and some seeds, are subject to quarantine inspection.
Don't worry about your baggage, it's safely tucked away in a
belly compartment and will appear by magic, at each overnight
stop.   The light baggage rack will take care of brief cases, purses
and that sort of thing. cfl"1
«rd
fan?
fun-
to"*
the"
joO
^ove;;;^roo9
ore
*°dfc\>\e
lens e»ig v<j0 re
d *h°*S voor . „
\tYc
Oor
*v,e tfu'~ rt\0^e *"   yo^ "j    And
oreaS.'lrt»\0ns * ,, f0r9el   -.col °r
(o\or*.     ,toC*
ins
poP^r*
sToc
, re °*ner3
beT°r    ^c ono
rtaPeS      M'ne    r\ces»
i rdn°r    w of    . \- prl<-    i*
rc^fs>Sr>°^
^Pb.9<oond'<.^Y
car
Brve
*po*
isse'
:0rs
ore
a<J
^i:0^^;o0
de
sbo'
y/n
^^och"10'   loo'
O*
so.;>*
u«S ^°
yV 0,r-, fl'.9'
order
the
st'm
be'
.fore ^ere   ,.„Wi . •.„ os
j be1"  *\\\-
„be» ,wo«> \„v»«o
\oo^°do».  <e<V    ,<,os
tne* °Lfo <ve VO^r0nn^e ^ Ln^
*he *° ^i. O     _<>n
i«ose , c o<^    u t°1
on°'
NO T/PWG
PLEASE
tri
te
V,P°n7*one     |S\°S
d*feV,f\c*er
ce d°" , yoo " pofi^.j <or '" „d V>
^<>?^«^efhi   orso"
^'-oHS^
iV»or
H^JrH^s>
^:.^:o><>
P end'U ^°'
\on°'
><ond'  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0357575/manifest

Comment

Related Items