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Lunch menu from 31 Oct. 1948 from the Eastward Tour from the 19th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Chamber… Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Oct 31, 1948

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  £$&%
eetmg
ber ol  Lommerce
and 28, 1948
LU1
TOMATO JUICE
BOILED   Y
COLD   SALMON,
SA
CURRIED
BAKED  SUGAR  CUF
POTATOES:  BOILEI
CARROT FINGERS
PUMPKIN  PIE
ICE  C
CANADIAN C
BREAD
(WHITE   OR   BROWN)
TEA
OCTOBER  31ST,   1948
COCC
THE   SPIRAL   TUNNELS
PRIOR to 1908 Hector and Field stations
were separated by such extreme grades
that four consolidation locomotives were
required to haul a trainload of freight over
this section. For about three miles a grade of
4.5 per cent prevailed — ten times the
maximum gradient normally permitted on
heavy prairie work.
By the construction of these Spiral Tunnels
this grade was reduced to 2.2 per cent. From
the east, the track enters Tunnel No. 1, 3,206
feet in length, turns under Cathedral Mountain
at an angle of about 250 degrees on a 573
foot radius, passes under itself and emerges
at the opposite portal 54 feet lower. Tunnel
No. 2, under Mount Ogden, has a similar
radius through an angle of 232 degrees; it is
2,890 feet long and the grade produces a
difference in elevation of about 45 feet
between portals. Thus the railway traverses
the valley by three lines at different elevations'
and crosses and re-crosses the Kicking Horse
River by four bridges. Two engines can now
haul a bigger load up the valley than the
four previously used.
The two tunnels are a perfect maze,
for the railway doubles upon itself twice and
forms a rough figure "8" in shape. If the
train is run in two sections, passengers are
able to see the other section making its way up
"the big grade" at a higher or lower level.
CONNAUGHT   TUNNEL
THROUGH Mount Macdonald in the Selkirk
Mountains only a short train run from
Craigellachie, scene of the historic "driving of
the last spike" ceremony on November 7,
1885, is the Connaught Tunnel, the longest
double-track railway tunnel on the American
Continent. Five miles long from portal to
portal the tunnel cross-section is 23 ft. by 29
ft. and is concrete lined throughout.
The tunnel is a part of a diversion which
shortened the main line 4.3 miles, reduced the
summit elevation 552 ft., eliminated 4.5 miles
of snow sheds and the equivalent of seven
complete circles of curvature. The highest rail
elevation in the tunnel is 3,390 ft. above sea
level over one mile below the summit of Mount
Macdonald which reaches to a height of 9,860
ft. Powerful fans located at the west portal
assist in ventilation. Trains are operated
through the tunnel on the left hand track to
provide engineers with the maximum view
ahead.
Printed in Canada, 1946 THE
CANADIAN  PACIFIC
X HE agreement between the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company and the
Government of the Dominion of Canada,
entered into in 1880, to build a railway
across the prairies and through the Rocky
Mountains to the Pacific Coast, called for
completion in ten years' time.
Actually, the railway was completed,
and through trains run, in half this time:
the last spike was driven at Craigellachie
on November 7, 1885, and the first train,
inaugurating trans-Canada transportation
service, left Montreal on June 28, 1886,
for the Pacific Coast. Later, it was
natural that increasing trade should see
many millions spent in grade reductions
and in the erection of permanent structures.
Amongst other things, this involved the
construction of a most interesting system
of tunnels and of one of the longest tunnels
on the continent — the Spiral Tunnels
at Field and the Connaught Tunnel at
Glacier, respectively, both of which are
illustrated on the reverse side of this menu.
(Jill
at.
•astward lour
Lrom
19tk Annual Aleeting
Ike Canadian Lhamber ol  Lommerce
v.
ancouver
., B.C.
OctoLer 26, 27 and 28, 1948
LUNCHEON
TOMATO JUICE
PUREE OF PEAS
BOILED   HALIBUT,   EGG   SAUCE
COLD   SALMON,   CUCUMBER,   MAYONNAISE
SAVORY   OMELET
CURRIED CHICKEN WITH  RICE
BAKED  SUGAR  CURED   HAM,  CUMBERLAND  SAUCE
POTATOES:  BOILED, MASHED OR COTTAGE FRIED
CARROT FINGERS
BUTTERED CABBAGE
PUMPKIN  PIE APPLE TAPIOCA PUDDING
ICE  CREAM  WITH   CAKE
CANADIAN CHEESE WITH CRACKERS
BREAD
(WHITE   OR   BROWN)
TEA
OCTOBER  31ST,   1948
HOT BISCUITS
COCOA
COFFEE
ROLLS
(HOT   OR   COLD;
MILK
$1.75
THE
CANADIAN   ROCKIES
X HE Rocky Mountains, the Selkirk
Mountains, and the other related
ranges have — within reach of railway
transportation — over six hundred and
fifty mountain peaks 6,000 feet above sea
level, or higher. One hundred and forty-
four are 10,000 feet or higher. There are
many passes, six, seven, eight or nine
thousand feet in height.
i
Canada has reserved in its mountain
national parks over 9,800 square miles —
an area nearly five times as big as one of
its own provinces (Prince Edward Island).
Six of these are on, or reached from, the
Canadian Pacific, namely Banff, Yoho,
Kootenay, Glacier, Mt. Revelstoke7Waterton.
At Banff, Lake Louise and Emerald
Lake (near Field), are delightful Canadian
Pacific mountain hotels — supplemented
by rustic lodges at Lake Wapta, the Yoho
Valley, Lake O'Hara and Moraine Lake. 

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