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Canadian Pacific Railway train timetables Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1887

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Full Text

 CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
.A.
TIME-TABLE
WITH  NOTES
WESTBOUND TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAIN
THE GREAT LAKES ROUTE
TORONTO AND   CHICAGO  LINE
MONTREAL:
ItTLAAY'   1887 2ND  EDITION. TO THE WEST.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
TIME-TABLE
WITH NOTES
WESTBOUND TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAIN
THE GREAT LAKES ROUTE
TORONTO   AND  CHICAGO LINE
MONTREAL
vTTJlsriE   1887
7 G"EIsrE3K,^Xj   OFFICERS
HEAD OFFICES:   MONTREAL, CANADA
Sir Geo. Stephen, Bart..President Montreal
W. C. Van Horne Vice-President         "
Charles Drixkwater Secretary         "
T. G. Shaughnessy. ...... Assistant General Manager	
George Olds  General Traffic Manager..	
Lucius Tuttle Passenger Traffic Manager	
Henry Beatty  Man. St'mship Lines & Lake Traffic.. Toronto
I. G. Ogden , Comptroller ... . Montreal
W. Sutherland Taylor. .Treasurer         "
J. H. McTavish Land Commissioner Winnipeg j
C. W. Spencer Act'g Gen. Supt., Eastern Div Montreal
Wm. Whyte Gen. Superintendent, Western Div... Winnipeg
Harry Abbott Gen. Superintendent, Pacific Div... Vancouver
Kobert Kerr Gen. Frt. & Pass. Agt, W. & P. Divs... Winnipeg
D. McNicoll  Gen. Passenger Agent, Eastern Div.. Montreal
G. M. Bosworth. Asst. Frt, Traffic Man., Eastern Div..        "
E. Tiffin Gen. Freight Agent, Ontario Div... .Toronto
G. W. Swett Supt. Dining, Sleeping & Parlor Cars. Montreal
E. S. Anderson General Baggage Agent	
f
Adelaide,...S. Aus.
Boston, Mass. |
Brockville, Ont..
Chicago, 111..
Glasgow,. • Scotland..
Halifax,...:....N.S..
Hong Kong,. China j
Liverpool, Eng..
London, Eng..
London, Ont..
Montreal, .....Que..
New York N.Y.
Ottawa, Ont.
Portland, Ore.
Quebec, Que.
St. John, N.B.
St. John's, ....Nfld.
Fan Francisco,.Cal. <
Seattle, Wash. .Ter.
Shanghai, .. .China.
Sydney....N. S. W.
Tacoma, Wash. Ter«.
Toronto, OnU
Vancouver, — B. C..
Victoria, B.C.
Winnipeg, — Man.
Yokohama, .Japan.
-A.O-ZEROIZES
. Agents Oceanic S-S.Co.
H. J. Colvin, City Pas. Agt. .211 Washington Si
L. S. Dow, Agent B. &L. R. R.218 Washington St.
A. Caswell, Ticket Agent.... 145 Main St.
J. Francis Lee, Com. Agt.... 205 La Salle St.
Russell & Pinkerton, Agents.. 135 Buchanan St.
C. R. Barry, Ticket Agent.. .126 Hollis St.
Adamson, Bell & Co., Agents )
for China J
A. Baker, European T. Agt. .17 James St.
^H ..88 Cannon St.
T. R. Parker, Ticket Agent.. .Richmond St.
C.E.McPherson, City Pass. A.266 St. James St.
E.V. Skinner, Gen. Eastern A.337 Broadway.
.J. E. Parker, City Pass. Agt. .42 Sparks St.
.C. G. McCord,Frt. & Pass. Agt.6 Washington St.
.J. McKenna, City Pass. Agt. .St. Louis Hotel.
.Chubb & Co., Ticket Agent.
.Geo. Shea, Ticket Agent.
' G%SeS f Ci CAo8tS*}10 Market St.
D. B. Jackson, Pass. Agent.. .214 Montgomery St.
.E. W. McGinnes.
. Adamson, Bell & Co.
.Alex. Woods.
E. E. Ellis, Frt. & Pass. Agt.
W.  R. Callaway, District  )   iiOKinc/st W
Passenger Agent. \   ilU King bt* VV*
D. E. Brown, Dist. Frt. & Pass. Agent,
G. A. Carleton. Frt. & Pass. Agent.
G. H. Campbell, City T'k't Agt.471 Main St.
Frazar & Co., Agts. for Japan .
TI^^"V"SIL,XjIlsrC3-   -A-GbZElSTTS
F. H. Small. ...... Gen. Travelling Agent, Pass. Department. .Montreal.
W. P. Rand Passenger Travelling Agent. Chicago.
F. W. Madera         " " "     	
W.D.Hughes         " " " Toronto.
W. G. McLean./..        " " "     	
W. T. DOCKRILL..   . " " "        	
J.W.Ryder         " 7 "     	
J. J. Melamphy. ..        '' (' "     	
. Montreal. Canadian Pacific Railway
TIME TABLE, WITH NOTES
QUEBEC   LIITE
Eastern Division—Quebec to Montreal: 172 Miles
§ Refreshment Station.
EASTERN  DIVISION
Miles
from
.Mont'l
172
Trans-
Contin'l
Train
Leave
3.30
STATIONS—Descriptive  Notes
168
164
158
146
142
.37
4.10
Quebec—Population 75,000. This old city occupies the base
and summit of a lofty crag projecting into.the St. Lawrence. Jacques Cartier, the first European who sailed
into the river (1534), spent a winter at the base of the
cliffs, and French fur companies soon after established
here a headquarters for trading. A few years later the
headland was fortified, and, as the settlement grew, the
fortifications were enlarged until Quebec became the
stronghold of Canada, remaining so until captured by
the English under Wolfe, in 1759. No city in America
is so grandly situated, or offers views from its higher
points so diversified and lovely. In the "upper town,"
on the highlands, the public buildings, churches, best
business blocks, hotels and schools are found, and here
the English and modern part of the town has outgrown
its antecedents. The "lower town," near the water,
abounds in irregular, narrow streets, quaint old houses,
and is  the  commercial  quarter of  the town. The
commerce of Quebec began with the fur trade, and this
remains an important element. Enormous transactions
in lumber go on here annually. The whole lower valley
of the St. Lawrence and the northern lumbering regions
draw their merchandise from this centre.——The suburbs
of Quebec are remarkably interesting in scenery, history,
and opportunities for sport, especially fishing.—:—The
railways leading here, other than the Canadian Pacific,
are the Grand Trunk, the Intercolonial, the Quebec
Central, and the Quebec and Lake St. John. Transatlantic steamers of the Allan, Beaver and Dominion lines
land here in summer, and local steamers depart for the
lower St. Lawrence and Saguenay rivers. Extensive
docks, warehouses, &c, incidental to the terminal facilities of the Canadian Pacific Railway, will be noticed;
passengers from Europe landing immediately at the
railway station, where assistance concerning customs
regulations, exchanging tickets, and forwarding personal
effects, is rendered by the company's agents.
JLake St. John R'y Junction—Junction with Q. & L.-St.-J.
R'y for Lake St. John and the upper Saguenay.
Lorette—Originally a settlement of Christianized Huron
Indians, with celebrated cascade scenery and fishing.
Belair
St. Jean de
Neuville
St. Bazile
Villages of French Canadian farmers
and lumbermen/whose houses are picturesque and customs widely different
from those of their English neighbors.
Miles Trans-
from Contin'l
Mont'l     Train
136
133
129
126
119
114
107
97
94
79
74
70
64
61
56
48
LEAVE
4.24
4.50
5.25
5.30\
5.45/
6.24
6.57
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
Portneuf—Pop. 2,200.
Deschambault
Lachevrotiere
Grondines
Ste. Anne de la
Perade
Batiscan
Champlain
Factories of wood-pulp and paper.
Stations for French agricultural parishes. Many rivers afford power for
mills and factories, devoted principally to paper-making and woodworking. Churches and schools
abound. Fishing and Fall shooting
0good toward the head of the streams.
Piles Junction—Junction for branch line to Grand Piles,
22 m. north, up the St. Maurice. Quantities of lumber
and produce come down this river; which is noted for its
fishing. At Shawanegan, (21 m.) the river falls 150 feet.
§Three Rivers—Population 10,000. At the mouth of the
St. Maurice, and at the head of tidewater in the St.
Lawrence. It was founded in 1618, and played an important part in the early history of Canada. The chief
buildings are the Roman Catholic cathedral, the courthouse, the IJrsuline convent, St. Joseph's college, and
the Episcopal and Wesley an churches. Besides the
daily boats of the Richelieu line, several stelMfcrs ply to
adjacent river villages. The chief industry is the shipment of lumber. The Dominion government has expended $200,000 in improving the navigation on the St.
Maurice, and over $1,000,000 has been invested in mills
and booms above. There are large iron-works and machine-shops here, where stoves and car-wheels are made
in great numbers from the bog-iron ore of the vicinity.
Pointe du Lac
Yamachiche
Louiseville
Maskinonge
St. Berthelemi
St. Cuthbert
Berthier Junction-
French villages. The St. Lawrrence
expands here into Lake St. Peter.
Getting out timber and fuel occupies
people in the winter. St Leon Springs,
near Louiseville, is a popular watering place, and medicinal resort.
Branch line to the port of Berthier.
48
7.15
42
7.24
39
35
27
23
8.03
17
13
8.25
10
839
5
8.50
2
9.00
Arrive
0
9.10
P.M.
Lanoraie—A river landing two miles distant.
Joliette Junction—Branch line to Joliette, 7 m., and to
St. Felix de Valois, 17 m., northward.
La Valtrie Road
L'Assomptjon
L'Epiphanie
St. Henri de
Mascouche
Terrebonne
St. Vincent de Paul
*St. Martin Junction
Sault aux Recollets
Mile-end
Hochelaga
Populous and prosperous French villages, cut up into small farms, and
frequented in summer by sportsmen
and city visitors. Artists would find
sketching subjects plentiful.
Suburbs of Montreal. The l< North
Shore" line, or Quebec Division, curves
around the rear of Mt. Royal, and at
St. Martin's Jc. unites with the "main
line" of the Canadian Pacific, entering the city along the waterfront.
Montreal—Terminus at the Quebec Gate station, Dalhousie
square, whence horse-cars lead to all parts of the city, and
wThere cabs and omnibusses will be found waiting.
X Flag Station.
§ Refreshment Station,
* Passengers for the westbound transcontinental train change cars at this station, t Flag Station.
TI^A.3SrSO'03STTI3SrE35rTA.Xj ROUTE
Eastern Division—Montreal to Port Arthur: 993 miles.
§ Refreshment Station.
EASTERN  DIVISION
Miles
from
Mont'l
Tran s-
Contin'l
Train
Leave i
8.00
P.M.
STATIONS—Descriptive Notes
Montreal—Population (with suburbs) 250,000. The city
stands upon an island formed by mouths of the Ottawa.
It was visited in 1634 by Jacques Cartier, who found the
Indian village of Hochelaga on its site, at the base of
Mount Royal, now tflte city's park. A fortified trading
post was established here a century later, called Ville
Marie, and was the last point yielded by the French in
1763. Settlements accumulated about this post, and a
city rapidly grewT up; about three fourths of the population at present are of French descent. The building of
the canal about the Laehine rapids, just above the city,
and the growth of railways and commerce, caused Montreal to increase, until it became the metropolis of the
Dominion. Here resided the governors of the old fur companies, and the fur trade has always occupied a prominent place in the city's commerce. In summer, great
^m numbers of steamships and sailing vessels ascend to
Montreal, which is one of the best harbors, as well as most
thoroughly furnished warehouse-ports, in the world.
The city is built almost entirely of stone, possesses imposing public buildings, churches and institutions, and
many handsome residences, and is provided with superior
hotels. Its suburbs are quaint and beautiful, and the
neighborhood abounds in objects of interest. Steamships of the Allan, Dominion, Beaver and other lines run
to Europe; and steamers connect Montreal with all the
river and lake towns. The new cantilever bridge of the
Canadian Pacific at Laehine, 10 miles above Montreal,
gives an independent outlet for its trains to Boston, the
White Mountains, Portland and all parts of New England.
Over the Victoria bridge, the trains of the Central Vermont
and Delaware and Hudson Canal Co's railroads connect
Montreal with southern New England and New York.
8.07
8.16
8.32
•<s>   <*>
el
Suburbs. At Hochelaga are shops
and the stock yards of the Can. Pac.
R'v., and extensive mills.
Hochelaga
Mile-end
Sault aux Recollets—Rapids of the Riviere des Prairies,
where a Recollet priest was drowned in 1626.
St. Martin's Junction—Divergence of Quebec Division.
Ste. Rose—French village, frequented in summer by suburban visitors.    Crossing of Isle Jesus river.
Ste. Therese—Branch lines for St. Jerome, St. Lin and St.
Eustache.
M
French   farming   villages
largely to dairying.
devoted
Ste. Augustin
St. Scholastique
St. Hermas
Lachute—Pop. 2,000. Fine waterpower, running a variety
of factories, especially paper-mills and wood-working
industries. Beautiful building-stone quarried here ; and
a dairy-country in the neighborhood. An interesting
sporting region in the Laurentian hills northward-
Miles
from
Mont'l
49
57
59
65
74
79
84
90
94
100
104
109
114
118
120
Trans-
Contin'l
Train
122
124
128
134
143
148
155
158
163
171
174
177
Leave
9.51
p.m.
11.45
12.55
a.m.
1.10
1.28
1.47
2,00
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
St. Phillipe j A dairying and quarrying region;
Grenville | population largely English-speaking.
§ Calumet—Refreshment rooms- The hills near here are
rugged, and afford good shooting and trout-fishing.
Charming views of the rapids of the Ottawa and Calumet
rivers are gained from their summits. Station for Caledonia Springs, eight miles south of L'Orignal, Ont.
Pointe au Chene*
Montebello
Papineau ville
North Nation Mills
Thurso
Rockland
Buckingham
L'Ange Gardien
East Templeton
Gatineau
Hull I
§Ottawa—Pop. 40,000.
Ottawa valley. Farming and dairying between the line and the river.
Phosphate and mica mines at various
points; also iron ore, building stone
and good clays. Excellent shooting
in spring along the rivers, and in the
fall in the hill regions, which are
wooded and rugged. Fishing abundant. The city of Ottawa is seen in
the distance as the great lumberyards of Hull are approached.
Capital of the Dominion, and in
Ontario, through which the railway extendsuntil Manitoba is reached.—Ottawa is picturesquely situated at the
junction of the Rideau river with the Ottawa. Navigation is interrupted here by the falls of the Chaudiere,
whose remarkable cataracts are seen in crossing the
river. This gigantic waterpower is utilized, and some
of the largest lumber manufactories in the Dominion,
are here visible from the bridge; and also the timber-
slides, by which the lumber from the upper river passes
down without damage into the navigable water below.
Close to the city, are the pretty Rideau falls. The city
itself stands upon high ground overlooking the falls
and the lumber-yards.—The principal places of interest
within it are the public buildings, some of which, most
prominently the octagonal and buttressed Library, can
be plainly seen from the railway. These are of magnificent proportions, and ornate architecture. Rideau Hall,
the   residence of  the   governor-general,   is two miles
distant. Ottawa is becoming not only the residence
of many- public men, and attracting a brilliant social
circle, but factories of various kinds are accumulating.
JSkead's
JBrittannia
Bell's Corners
Stittsville
Ashton
Carleton Junction.—Divergence of the Ontario Division to
Toronto, Owen- Sound, St. Thomas, etc. Refreshment
rooms.   Station for Carleton Place, pop. 3,600.
An agricultural and wood-cutting
region, settled by English speaking
communities. Bass, pickerel, and
pike fishing is always good.
Almonte
Sneddon's
JPakenham
JArnprior
Braeside
Sand Point
From Carleton the main line turns
northwrest and afterwards west, and
again seeks the banks of the Ottawa.
This is a region cultivated in isolated
spots, especially for barley and hay ;
but chiefly devoted to timber cutting
and saw-mills, for which the frequent eastern division
t Flag Station.
>Hles I Trans-
from fontinl
Mont'l I   Train
STATIONS—Descriptive Notes.
LEAVE
2.12
a.m.
2.28
2.45
3.00
3.41
4.30
5.24
6.28
7.21
8.19
8.27
8.56
9.10
FIRST
DAY
9.35
9.45
10.03
10.26
10 51
11.14
11.22
11.42
11.55
12.10
Castleford
Russell's
Renfrew
JHaley's
Cobden
Snake River
Graham's
Government Road
Pembroke
JPetewawa
IChalk River
Wylie
Bass Lake
Moor Lake
Mackey
Rockliffe
Bissett
Deux Rivieres
Klock
Mattawa
Eau Claire
Rutherglen
Callander
Nasbonsing
tThorncluTe
rapids of the river give excellent
waterpower. At Almonte are woolen
mills; and at Arnprior large marble
quarries. Opportunities for sport
both with gun and rod are excellent.
The fishing is best in the many small
lakes and in the Ottawa, where mas-
kinonge, pickerel, bass, whitefish and
perch are common. The largest villages are Renfrew (a brisk place, pop.
2,000, at the terminus of the Kingston
& Pembroke R'y), and Pembroke (pop.
4,000) on the historic Allumette lake.
The Ottawa is followed westward as
far as Mattawa, wThere the river diverges as it comes down from northward,
and then the line strikes westward
towards L. Nipissing, north of Georgian bay. The Laurentian hills stand
on the opposite bank of the Ottawa,
and many rapids and romantic
brooks, suggesting good fishing, please
the eye. As Mattawa is approached
the land becomes rough and strewn
with ledges and boulders, which continues for some distance further : the
valleys and borders of the many lakes
are tillable and fertile, but farmers
are few. Mattawa has 1,000 pop. and
is the principal distributing point for
lumbering supplies. Guides for hunting moose, caribou, etc., can be got
here. At Callander the old government lines, which were taken by the
Company, terminated, and here the
construction of the Canadian Pacific
Railway began in 1884.
North Bay.—Railway divisional-point; and terminus of
Northern & Northwestern Ry's from Hamilton, Toronto,
and the Muskoka Lake country. A port (pop. 1,000) on
L. Nipissing, is noted for its fishing (in great variety)
and shooting; good hotels exist upon its borders, and it
is a favorite summer resort. Choice lands and heavy
timber border its shores, and settlement is proceeding.
JBeaueage I Quantities of good land await cul-
JMeadowside tivation, but at present getting logs,
Sturgeon Falls ties and cordwood is the chief indus-
J Verner try.   Meadowside is on a reservation
JVeuve River of the Nipissing Indians, after whose
JMarkstay chief Beaucage was named.    Wahna-
JHillcrest pitae is near an excellent fishing lake
JWahnapitae of the same name; and here the
tRomford | country becomes broken andfrocky.
Sudbury—Small station, whence theJAlgoma branch proceeds westward to Sault Ste. Marie, where it'will connect
§ Refreshment Station.
EASTERN DIVISION
Miles I Trans-
from Contin'l
Mont'l     Trains
STATIONS—Descriptive  Notes
455
461
467
478
489
501
515
532
549
564
581
599
615
629
644
661
675
681
694
710
727
747
763
776
791
797
802
811
830
846
865
880
896
912
928
12.42
12.55
1.10
1.45
2.15
2.45
3.20
4.05
4,45
5.23
6.16
7.01
7.53
A. M.
8.38'
9.23
10-08
10.48
11.08
11.48
12.38
midn't
1.27
2.30
3.15
3.57
4.37
4.51
5.15
5.45
7.01
8.01
9.27
SECOND
DAY
10.26
11.30
12.20
NOON
1.06
P. M.
946
961
979
993
1.52
2.34
3.21
Arrive
4.00
wTith routes through northern Michigan and Wisconsin,
to St. Paul, etc. This branch runs down the valley of
Spanish river, and thence along the coast of Georgian
Bay. It penetrates a district of pine, lead and copper.
Moose, deer, bears and small game reward the hunter.
t Chelmsford | Beautiful views across L. Nipissing
on the left, and of hills and cataracts
on the right.  Admirable engineering.
tLarchwood
JOnaping
Cartier—A railway divisional point.
Straight Lake
tPogamasing
tMetagama
Biscotasing
Ramsey
Woman River
Ridout
Nemagosenda
§Chapleau—Pop. 500.
Westward of Lake Nipissing the line
pursues its way through forested
hills for some distance. Large game
and birds abundant; fishing for trout
and lake-fish excellent. Biscotasing
would be a good outfitting point. The
people trap fur-bearing animals in
great numbers. Minerals abound.
Railway divisional point, and Hud
son's Bay Co.'s post.    A rude fire-swept region.
Pardee i This country was quite uninhabited
Windermere until  the  railway   was built, and
Dalton known only to fur-trappers and hun-
Missanabie ters. The fur trade is still important.
JLochalsh White River is a divisional point, and
Otter all the neighboring statioi s are main-
Grasset ly inhabited by French-Canadians.
J At Heron Bay, L. Superior is first
Amyot seen;   and  Peninsula has  the  first
White River harbor north of Michipicoten.   After
Bremner this the shore of the lake is indented
Trudeau by many bays, penetrating the tre-
Round Lake mendous cliffs through which the rail-
Melgund way makes its way by exceedingly
Heron Bay costly   and  ingenious construction.
Peninsula Many large rivers come down, all fine
Middleton fishing streams. Jackfish is on Jackfish
Jackfish I bay, a well known sporting place.
^Schreiber—Railway headquarters for this part of the line,
which crosses many deep and romantic valleys on lofty
trestles and admirable bridges.   Population chiefly railway employees.   Refreshment rooms.
Rossport | Splendid   scenery,  and   many   ex-
Gravel River amples of difficult engineering, amid
Mazokama rocky hills rich in minerals, overlook-
I ing Nepigon Bay.
Nepigon—-Hudson's Bay post, and station for the sporting
district along Nepigon bay, up Nepigon river and tributaries, and Nepigon lake,—all famous for canoeing-opportunities, charming scenery, and large trout and whitefish.
Wolf River I Inland stations behind Thunder cape,
Pearl River on powerful rivers falling into Black
Mackenzie Sturgeon and Thunder bays.   Trout-
| fishing and deer-shooting.
Port Arthur—See next page. Western Division—Port Arthur to Donald: 1,452 Miles
Trans-
Contin'l
Train
Leave!
15-IO*1
3.10 pm
H
S
cfl
H
m
7
7
s
^d
W
O
<!
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
15. 30
15.56
16.22
16.45
17.31
17.40
17.54
18.20
18.45
19.01
19.25
19.54
20.13
20.38
21.30
22.13
22.37
23.28
23.43
24.33
24.58
1.17
1.33
2.23
3.08
Port Arthur—Pop. 3,500. Formerly known as "Prince
Arthur's Landing; on the shore of Thunder bay, and first
settled about 1867. The town is prettily situated overlooking the bay, which is a fine open harbor, and has in
view the dark cliffs of Thunder cape and Pie island. Since
the opening of the Lake Superior section of the railway,
it has assumed particular importance as the connecting
point between the railway system of the Northwest and
the inland water-route of Canada via the great lakes.
Extensive wharves have lately been erected.together with
enormous docks, huge elevators for grain, and terminal
warehouses and stations. There is much pretty scenery
in the hills back of the town, while the bay and its islands
are adapted to yachting and picnic excursions. A remarkable variety of minerals occurs in the neighborhood, and
some valuable silver mines are being developed. Here
come the steamers of the Canadian Pacific line from
Owen Sound, while most of the other Lake Superior lines
call here, in passing, affording opportunities for voyaging
to ports around the whole circuit of the lake.
Port William—Site of the oldest trading post on L. Superior.
Situated at the mouth of the Kaministiquia river, which
affords a good harbor. Ft. William is used to a large
extent by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company as a
distributing point for the immense quantities of coal,
lumber and heavy supplies passing over the road or
across the lake.
Murillo
Kaministiquia
Finmark
JNordland
Dexter
JLinkooping
Savanne
JUpsala
JCarlstadt
J Bridge River
English River
tMartin
JBonheur
Ignace
JRaleigh
Tache
JWabigoon
Barclay
Eagle River
Vermillion Bay
Gilbert
Parry wood
Hawk Lake
Rossland
In the lower valley of the Kaministiquia the land is good, cultivation
extensive and new settlements increasing. The railway then strikes
westward, through pretty scenery, toward the ridge separating the basin
of L. Superior from Hudson's bay,
along the old fur-trading canoe-and-
stage route to the Northwest. This is
a wild and difficult region, rocky and
uninviting to the farmer, but with
large resources for ties, firewood.and
certain kinds of timber. Minerals
abound and near Savanne are profitable gold mines. The rivers are
rich in romantic scenery, and invite
conoeists, who can find Indian guides
and helpers, and can buy provisions
from traders. Deer and other large
game range the woods, and ducks
throng about the lakes. Ignace is a
railway divisional point and Eagle.
River a good centre for fishing, in a
labyrinth of lakes and rivers.
* The 24-hour system is in use on the Western and Pacific Divisions of the Canadian
Pacific Railway. By this system the A.M. and P.M. are abolished, and the hours from
noon till midnight are counted as from 12 to 24 o'clock.
WESTERN DIVISION
11
§ Refreshment Station.
Miles I Trans-
from Cootin'l
Mont'l     Train
STATIONS—D escriptive   Notes
1290
1294
1306
1313
1321
1327
1332
1342
1362
1368
1378
1387
1402
1408
1415
1234
LEAVE
3.38
3.30 am
3.49
4.22
4.40
5.00
5.16
5.26
5.52
6.40
6.55
7.16
7.37
8.10
8.24
8.40
9.001
9.40/
9.40 am
1430
1438
1445
1452
1458
1463
1472
1479
Rat Portage—A large town at the north end of the Lake
of the Woods, on the strip of land lying between that
lake and a bay of Winnipeg river, w7here the scenery is
enchanting; thousands of islands, quiet bays, falls and
rapids, serve to make up a picture not easily forgotten.
It is the centre of a mining district producing gold and
other ores.   There are very large sawmills here.
Keewatin
^Deception
Kalmar
Ingolf
JCross Lake
tTelford
Rennie
Whitemouth
Shelly
JMonmouth
Beausejour
Selkirk, East
JGonor
Bird's Hill
Rocks and forests as before,—the
" Keewaydin " of the Ojibways; now
the political district of Algoma West.
At Rennie, near Cross Lake, Manitoba
is entered. Whitemouth is an important timber-making station, the connecting streams and lakes of the interior enabling lumbermen to float
hither vast quantities of logs. Piles
of cordwood and ties will also be
noticed along the track.
Prairie stations near the site of one
of Lord Selkirk's early colonies. After
the Red river is crossed, Winnipeg
comes into view.
THIRD
DAY
9.57
10.13
10.29
10.43
10.56
11.08
11.26
11.48
NOON
i Winnipeg—Pop. 25.000. A magic city of a fewgyears' growth,
only a little while back a trading post of the Hudson's Bay
Company, but now a handsomely built city, and the capital
of Manitoba. " This is the focal point of the Canadian
Northwest, a fertile region extending from the Red river
for a thousand miles west and fifteen hundred miles northwest, to the mountains of British Columbia,—a region already producing grain and cattle to an enormous extent,
and having possibilities beyond the grasp of the most sanguine mind. Interest must give place to amazement on
seeing the change that has been wrought in five short
years. The massive grain elevators and flouring mills, the
well-tilled farms and the numberless herds of cattle, would
elsewhere indicate a growth of decades. The many railway lines radiating from Winnipeg, and the twenty miles
of well-filled sidings at that point, give evidence of the
immensity of the traffic of the country beyond." Two
branch lines connect Winnipeg with the United States.
The offices and plant of the Western Division of the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company are situated here,
including stock-yards and extensive repair shops.
JBergen
Rosser
JMeadows
Marquette
Reaburn
Poplar Point
High Bluff
Portage La Prairie-
part of Manitoba,
Northwestern R'y,
Valley of the A ssiniboine.  The swelling prairie is covered with fields of
grain, and farm-houses dot the landscape.    Nor is this prairie flat and
uninteresting; it is diversified with
trees along all the water-courses, and
is ever changing in color and form.
-Pop. 4,000.   Market-town of richest
and intersection of  Manitoba and
Several industries have been successfully started, viz": paper mills, biscuit factory, flour and
oatmeal mills, etc., besides a heavy grain trade. 12
WESTERN DIVISION
t Flag Station.
Miles . Trans-
from Contin'l
Mont'l      Train
I486
1494
1497
1516
1521
1529
1537
1545
1550
1555
LEAVE
12.08
12.24
12.53
13.16
13.30
14.10
14.29
14.45
14.58
15.21
3.10 pm
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
15.40
15.57
16.18
16.35
17.07
17-46
18.19
18.38
19.15
19 46
19.40
gg|
20.00
20.20
20.38
20.58
21.45
22.16
22.40
23.04
23,22
23.45
midn't
Burnside
JBagot
Austin
Sydney
J Melbourne
Carberry
Sewell
JDouglas
Chater
Brandon
A rich wheat district, known as
"Beautiful Plains." Carberry (pop.
400) is the foremost place, (refreshment room) and ships nearly half a
million bushels of grain annually,
drawn from the upper Assiniboine
valley southward, and from Pine,
Squirrel and other valleys northward, draining into White Mud river.
-Pop. 4,000. At the crossing of the Assiniboine
river. It is the market-town for the country north to
Minnedosa, and south to the Turtle mountains. The
huge grain elevators and warehouse accommodation will
be noticed at the station. The towm has abundant
churches, schools, and well-furnished shops and factories
of local supplies.
Stations for a grain and stock-raising
region. Virden is an intelligent village of amazing growth. Moosomin is
the first town in Assiniboia, and the
station for the Fort Ellice and the
Moose M't'n districts. At Whitewood
a new bridge across the Qu'Appelle
river (northward) gives an impetus to
growth. The trade at all these places
is far beyond what their small size
would indicate.
JKemnay
Alexander
Gr is wold
Oak Lake
Virden
Elkhorn
Fleming
Moosomin
Wapella
Whitewood
§Broadview—Pop. 600. Divisional station. Refreshment
rooms. Prettily situated at the head of Weed lake. The
repair shops of the railway give the place a standing,
and it advances rapidly under the patronage of several
flourishing colonies.
Station for the Pleasant Hills district,
northward,and for a widely cultivated
area southward. An Indian reservation close by. The lakes and river-
flats of this region furnish excellent
wild-fowl shooting, and prairie-chickens abound, with some large game.
Indian Head—Headquarters of the celebrated Bell farm
and of the Qu'Appelle Indian Agency. The Fishing
lakes on the Qu'Appelle, 8 miles north, and another
beautiful lake, 6 miles south, offer special attractions.
Qu'Appelle—Pop. 700. Station and supplying point for
Qu'Appelle and towns northward in Qu'Appelle and Saskatchewan valley, reached by stages. Land offices and
governmental immigration buildings here. The streets
are lined wdth poplar trees, adding to the beauty of this
flourishing business point.
JOakshela
Grenfell
Summerberry
Wolseley
McLean
Balgonie
: Pilot Butte
Prairie stations. Good shooting in
the near vicinity, and farms along
the streams northward.
Regina—Pop.800. Capital of Assiniboia, headquarters of the
Indian service, and of the Northwest Mounted Police. The
government buildings and police barracks are two miles
WESTERN  DIVISION
13
§ Refreshment Station.
Miles
from
Mont'l
Trans-
Contin'
Train
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
1796
1813
1821
1837
1855
1866
1875
1894
1912
1919
1927
1933
1951
1969
1977
1988
2008
2019
2038
2051
2061
2074
Regina
24.45
1.30
2.00
2 A.M.
2.40
3.29
4.05
4.25
5.15
5.55
6.12
6.33
7.00
FOUBTH
DAY
7.52
8.42
9.07
9.36
10.35
11.10
12.04
12.40
13.07
13.40
2083
14.05
northward. The Mounted Police form an uniformed
force, about 1,000 strong, stationed throughout the Northwest, at the expense of the Dominion, to keep order among
the Indians, and to prevent the selling of liquor, forbidden
by law in the territories. These officers board the train
at frequent intervals, in order to guard against the importation of contraband liquors. Regina is in the centre
of the largest block of wheat-growing land in the northwest. It has miles of graded streets, a large reservoir,
elevators, warehouses, and a flourishing trade. A railway, projected from here to the populous Upper Saskatchewan valley has already been built 22 miles northward
Pense I to Long lake, upon which a steamer
Pasqua | is running.
Moosejaw—Pop. 600. A divisional station; and an important terminus during the construction of the line. Station
for Wood Mountain and other districts southward, where
soft coal is abundant, and herds of cattle range.
Caron
Parkbeg
JSecretan
Chaplin
JMorse
Rush Lake
JWaldec
JAiken's
Settlements scarce, and the prairie
(Coteau de Missouri) almost in its
original state, yet covered everywhere
with greensward, and diversified with
lakes and clear streams, the resort of
waterfowl, especially at Rush Lake,
with other feathered game in astonishing quantities, and the haunt of
the antelope. Near Chaplin the Old
Wives lakes are skirted.
Swift Current—Divisional point; on Swift Current creek,
which rises in the Cypress hills and empties into the
Saskatchewan. Stage to Battleford (200 m. northward),
Ft. Pitt and North Saskatchewan valley, weekly.
Water-tanks, and stations for stock-
raisers. " The prairie rolls in beautiful
low swelling undulations, touching
the skyline in graceful curves in one
place, and falling gently down to the
horizon in another.5'   .
Goose Lake
Gull Lake
JCypress
tSidewood
Colley
Maple Creek—Post of the Mounted Police, and shipping
station for the extensive cattle and horse ranges in the
Cypress hills, 15 m. southward, and in northern Montana.   Agency of the Blackfeet.
JForres
JWalsh
Irvine
Stopping places opposite Cypress hills.
Formerly noted for buffalo and now
a successful cattle-region.
Dunmore—Starting-point of the Northwest Coal & Navigation Company's railway westward up the Belly river
to Lethbridge and (by stage) to Ft. McLeod. At Lethbridge (109 m.) are extensive mines of soft coal, and a
large colliery village. Fort McLeod is a hill-station of the
Mounted Police, and the centre of very valuable cattle
interests. Bituminous coal is dug near Dunmore, also.
Medicine Hat—Pop. 700. At the crossing of the South
Saskatchewan (steel bridge, 1010 ft. long). Coal and iron
are abundant in the neighborhood; water, inexhaustible ; 14
WESTERN division
X Flag Station.
§ Refreshment Stath
WESTERN  DIVISION
15
Miles
from
Mont'l
2091
2098
2118
2136
2156
2173
2189
2208
2224
2242
2262
2285
2295
2303
23 J 6
Tran s-
Contin'l
Train
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
Medicine
Hat
14.45
15.03
16.05
16.53
17.55
18.36
19.21
20.25
21.08
21.56
22.50
10.50pm
24.02
24-31
1.00
1.30
wood, plentiful in Cypress hills, 36 m. southward, and
climate most healthful. An active business place supplying cattle-ranches and collieries. Divisional point, and
repairing shops of the railway. From this point the
railway trends northwesterly, following the north slope
of Bow river, a tributary of the Saskatchewan.
JStair
Bowell
Langevin
Tilley
Cassils
Lathom
JCrowfoot
Gleichen
Strathmore
Langdon
Cochrane
^Radnor
Morley
Kananaskis
The
Foothills
Ranches for hundreds of miles along
the foothills, north and south.   Here
formerly roamed  the   buffalo,  and
these plains were a bloody borderland
between Blackfeet and Crees. At Langevin, where Alberta is entered, are
wells of natural gas; at Tilley <k Gleichen, successful experimental farms
of the C.P.R; and at Gleichen the
first satisfactory view of the Rockies.
Calgary—Pop. 2,000, altitude 3,388 feet above sea level.
Beautifully situated near the junction of the Bow and
Elbow rivers, within fine viewT of the Rockies, and just
outside the foothills.     Capital of Alberta, post of the
Mounted Police, land  agencies.     Headquarters of the
grazing industries and containing the most wealth and
finest shops, for its size, of any town in Canada.    Some
farming, for hay, oats, flax, etc.; roots and vegetables do
exceedingly well.  Good water-power, little utilized as yet.
The profile of the Rocky Mountains
seen here   is   extremely   irregular.
There is no stately line of rounded
summits set in orderly array along
the horizon, or evenly serrated chain of peaks; but the
sky rests upon a jagged wall, every elevation having
some angular and abrupt form quite unlike its neighbor, and the  whole seeming a long stretch of ruins
rather than a mountain range.   By the time Cochrane
station   is   reached,  the traveller   is well within   the
rounded grassy foothills and river "benches," or terraces.   After leaving Cochrane, and crossing the Bow,
the line ascends a grade to the top of the first terrace,
whence a magnificent outlook is.obtained into the foothills, especially toward the left hand, rising in successive tiers of sculptured heights to the snowy range behind
them.   " By-and-by the wide valleys change into broken
ravines, and lo! through an opening in the mist, made
rosy with early sunlight, we see, far away up in the sky,
its delicate pearly tip clear against the blue, a single
snow-peak of the Rocky Mountains.   .   .   .    Our coarse
natures cannot at first appreciate the exquisite aerial
grace of that solitary peak that seems on its way to
heaven; but, as we look, gauzy mist passes over, and it
has vanished."   An open, lightly timbered region succeeds.   Here is the Stony Indians' reservation; and a
glimpse is caught of Morleyville, their agency village,
and of some of their well-tilled farms.   " On again we
go, now through long stretches of park-like country,
now  near  great mountain-shoulders, half misty, half
defined, with occasional gleams of snowy peaks far away
Miles I  Trans-
from     Contin'l
Mont'l      Train
leave
2324
2329
1.52
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
2.10
I Mount
iCascade
2342     3.03
before us like kisses on the morning sky.   The Kananaskis river flows directly across the pass that leads into
the mountains which here begin to close in around us.
We stopped at the Kananaskis station, and walking [to
the right] across a meadow, behold the wide river a
mass of foam leaping over ledges of rock into the plains
below."   (Lady Macdonald.)
JThe Gap—A rocky gateway, letting the Bow river issue
from the hills, beyond which the track turns northward,
and ascends the long valley between the Palliser and
Front ranges of the Rocky Mountains.   A remarkable
contrast in appearance between these two ranges will be
noticed.   On the right are fantastically broken and castellated heights; on the left, massive snowr-laden promontories, rising thousands of feet, penetrated by enormous alcoves in which haze and shadow of gorgeous
coloring lie engulfed.   Now begins a series of visions
and experiences beside which all seen before dwindles
into insignificance.   Five ranges of prodigious mountains are to be crossed before the Pacific coast is reached,
and grandeur and beauty now crowd upon the attention
without ceasing, as the train speeds through gorge and
over mountain, giving here a vast outlook, and there an
interior glimpse, then exchanging it for a new one with
the suddenness of a kaleidoscope.
Canmore—Altitude (of station) 4,230 ft. Divisional point.
The three lofty peaks on the left, seen as the station is
approached, are the Three Sisters. On a hill behind the
station stands a group of isolated monumental rocks
(conglomerate) curiously weathered out of the softer soil,
and widely renowned. " Here the pass we are travelling
through has narrowed suddenly to four miles, and as
mists float upwrards and away we see great masses of
scarred rock rising on each side—ranges towering one
above the other. Very striking and magnificent grows
the prospect as we penetrate into the mountains at last,
each curve of the line bringing fresh vistas of endless
peaks rolling away before and around us, all tinted rose,
blush-pink and silver, as the sun lights their snowy tips.
Every turn becomes a fresh mystery, for some huge
mountain seems to stand right across our way, barring it
for miles, with a stern face frowning down upon us; and
yet a few minutes later we find the giant has been
encircled and conquered, and soon lies far away in
another direction. Mount Cascade is perhaps one of
the most remarkable of these peaks. Approaching its
perpendicular massive precipice-front, streaked with a
thousand colors wrhich glow in the sunshine, we half
shrink from what seems an inevitable crash. From
this precipice falls a narrow cascade, making a leap of
about 1,800 feet. Surely it will presently burst over us !
But no; a few minutes later Mount Cascade has mysteriously moved away to the right, and its silver waterfall soon gleams in the distance."   (Lady Macdonald.)
Banff—Station for the National Park, and. the Hot Springs
of Banff—a medicinal watering-place and pleasure-resort. 16
western division.
t Flag Station.
Miles    Trans-
from    Contin'l
Mont'l      Train
LEAVE
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
In the
National
Park.
2349
2360
2368
2378
3.27
4.00
5.06
5-25
This park is a tract of many square miles embracing
every variety of scenery, charming and wonderful, which
the government has already made accessible by many
carriage-roads and bridle-paths.   In the rivers and lakes
trout are plentiful and of a size unheard of elsewhere,
and in the hills and forests roam deer, mountain sheep,
and goats.   The general altitude of the valley is about
4,500 feet.   Roads have been built northward to Devil's
lake, an extremely deep sheet of water, walled in by
tremendous cliffs, and overlooked by that remarkable
peak, the Devil's Head, which forms a well-known landmark, since it is visible far out upon the plains.   The
fishing here is unrivalled, and the scenery grand.   In
the Bow river, near Banff station, are some beautiful
falls and rapids, dropping 60 feet in the course of a
few rods.   Cottages and small hotels now exist; but the
railway is building a very large and elegant hotel, with
perfect arrangements for bathing in the spring water,
and for all sorts of recreation
Castle M'n—Alt. 4,470 ft
Silver City—Alt. 4,580 ft
JEldon-Alt. 4,720 ft.
Laggan—Alt. 4,930 ft.
dull China blue,
Bow
River
Valley
" Here the Bow river, which we
have skirted since leaving Calgary, winds through the wide
i green plateau, its waters of a
uuii v^uiiia uiuc. About five miles farther on, Castle
mountain is before us, standing a sheer precipice 5,000
feet high—a giant's 'keep,' with turrets, bastions and
battlements complete, reared against the sky. " As we
rise toward the summit, near Stephen, about thirty-five
miles further on, the railway's grade gets steeper, tall
forests gather round us, and a curious effect is produced
by glimpses of snowy spurs and crests peeping through
the trees, and of which, though apparently near us, we
see no base. This conveyed to me an idea of our elevation."   (Lady Macdonald.) Another writer has this to
say of the scenery :—" The BowT river at this point is a
swift, deep stream of pea-green water. We follow it
through low forest for several miles, and then at Castle
Mountain [station] turn to the west, and begin the ascent
of the main range. Here comes into view, off towards
the north, the first of the great glaciers. It is a broad,
crescent-shaped river of ice, bearing all the characteristics of the Swiss glaciers (so far as I can judge from
pictures of Swiss glaciers), the further end concealed
behind the lofty yellow cliffs that hem it in. You
seem to be almost on a level with it, and at the distance of hardly half-a-dozen miles ; but it is 1,300 feet
above you, and a round dozen miles away, and almost
inaccessible by reason of the Tavines and rocks and
forest which intervene. Down its back flowed in August
a meandering stream of blue water. This fell over the
front in a fine waterfall, and came to us in a creek as
white as milk, which poured into the Bow. The larger
river itself drains from the glacier higher up, and its
stream at this height is pale with that peculiar chalky
tint wThich melting glaciers have. The forest is not noteworthy until the top of the pass (altitude 5,300 feet) is
§ Refreshment Station.
WESTERN  DIVISION
17
Miles     Trans-
from    Contin'l
Mont'l      Train
2384
2387
2395
4.25
5.35
6.20
6.20 am.
LEAVE
:Stephen—Alt. 5,290 ft.
Hector—Alt. 5,190 ft.
gField—Alt. 4,050 ft.
Summit
of the
Rockies
FIFTH
DAY
Source
of the
Kicking
Horse.
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
reached, when the eye looks across miles of magnificent
evergreen trees, filling the great depression through
which the Kicking Horse stream rushes headlong from
cataract to cataract down to the westward, dividing at
the summit from the eastern waters in a marshy spot,
which supplies moisture that perceptibly trickles right
and left to the Atlantic and to the Pacific. A large post
is seen at the left of the track, marking the boundary
line between Alberta and British Columbia."
Summit of the Rocky Mountains.
Stephen is named after the vast
and beautiful mountain, loftiest of
the Rocky Mountains in this latitude, to which the
honorable name of Sir George Stephen, President of the
Canadian Pacific Railway, is attached. This peak is
stated to be 8,240 feet above the track. The castellated
mass this side of it, wThich comes into good view on the
left, as soon as the summit is passed, is Cathedral mountain. A magnificent picture of snowy peaks, one behind
the other, bursts upon the vision across the valley
toward the north and west'; and the difficulties of the
descent begin. "We saw the little stream gradually
diminishing as we ascended towards the lake, and now
on the other side we see another little rill running out
of a swamp and led into an artificial channel. This is
the first stream encountered that goes towards the
Pacific, and it is one of the heads of the Kicking Horse
river. We follow it along, and the little brooklet expands
into a creek, and leads us past the Cathedral mountain,
broad and snow-covered, its towers and pinnacles resembling some great Duomo. We have pierced the range,
and now start downward on the Pacific slope by a steep
gradient. An extra locomotive is fastened behind the
train, and all brakes put on, so that these, with the
reversed engines, retard the descent. Rounding a curve,
the tall form of Mount Stephen, with its two surmounting peaks, comes into full view as the outpost on the
southern side of the pass, its snowy tops tapering off into
a long glacier. The little stream expands into a lake,
where wild ducks disport, but the forest fires have
blackened all the surrounding surfaces. Winding through
the valley is the ' tote road ' of the railway builders, a
necessary preliminary of the work, but now abandoned.
We pass the little station of Hector (named from Dr.
Hector, the hero of the ' kicking horse' incident after
which the pass was christened by Palliser's exploring
expedition, about 1845), which is nestling under the
shadow of Mount Stephen. Our little creek has become
a mountain torrent, and falls into quite a large lake,
from which flows on the right hand the Kicking Horse
river. Here begins the great canyon which this stream,
with impulsive suddenness, soon carves deep into the
mountain side. The river becomes a wild and roaring
torrent, leaping over cataracts and dashing down rapids
far below us, making a vast fissure in the mountain
which the railway has to get dowrn by difficult work 18
WTESTERN  DIVISION
X Flag Station.
Miles Tran s-
from Contin']
Mont'l       Train
2402
2409
2416
At
Field-
7.20
7.42
8.15
Canyon
of the
Kicking
Horse.
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
and skilful engineering The route is cut out of the
great cliffs high up on the sloping side of the canyon,
turning and twisting about in the roughest country
imaginable to put a railway through. Mountain peaks
are seen everywhere with subsidiary valleys between
them, each sending out its rushing stream to feed the
swelling river that roars over the boulders far below.
The views along these are indescribably grand, wdrile
their sides are composed of great and small rocks apparently strewn about by some terrific convulsion. Passing under the edge of the Tunnel mountain the railway
finally gets down to the bottom of this portion of the
canyon, where the river flows with comparative peaceful-
ness into a valley of some breadth. Here, under the
edge of the Tunnel mountain, with the river in front
and an array of other peaks opposite, the Railway
has built a pretty Swiss chalet, as a mountain halting
place for tourists. This is Meld, 2,395 miles west of
Montreal, named from Cyrus W. Field, of New York,
who has always been a great advocate of this
route."
The most striking view along this stretch is where the
line crosses for the second time the Kicking Horse, where
the river rushes underneath the railway through a deep
and narrow gulch. The traveller here sees a valley coming down from the right, out of a marvelous array of
snowT-laden and glacier-studded peaks, the most prominent of which (on the opposite side, ahead) is Mt. Field.
After passing the tunnel this huge peak comes into
plainer view. The hotel at Field (which is the first
station in British Columbia) is an excellent point for
stoppage. It is managed by the Company, and well
provided in every way.
Otter-tail—Alt. 3,670 ft,
^Leanchoil—Alt. 3,570 ft.
Palliser—Alt. 3,250 ft.
After leaving the placid flats of
the Kicking Horse, the line ascends again, crosses the Ottertail
(whence one of the finest views, backward and off towards the right, is given) and descends to the mouth of
the Beaverfoot valley, coming in from the left, where the
road makes a short turn to the right, exposing the noble
Beaverfoot range at the left. " Thus we enter the lower
canyon of the Kicking Horse, the river running suddenly
from a broad valley into a steep-banked fissure, through
w7hich the railway winds. The canyon narrows, and its
sides grow higher, while the river, again a roaring torrent, cuts deeper and deeper into the fissure. The foaming wTaters sweep with raging speed past great precipices
and over rocks and boulders that have fallen directly
into the stream-bed. There is hardly room for the river
and railway to make their way between the enormous
masses of cliff towering far above and almost shutting
out the sunlight. The route is cut out of the rocks, and
the canyon makes such sharp bends that in several cases
to get in a curve that the trains can go around the cliffs
have to be tunnelled and the river bridged. This is
repeatedly done, the torrent being crossed and recrossed
western division
19
§ Refreshment Station.
Miles Trans-
from Contin'l
Mont'l      Train
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
First
view
of the
Selkirks
2428
9.03
2435
2445
9.21
9.50
within brief distances. The old ' tote road ' is scratched
out of the hill-side above, and looks like a most dangerous highway, yet along it all the materials had to be
taken before the railway could be built." Finally the
canyon ends, and the train rushes through a narrow
gateway out   into the valley  of  the Columbia.
Here another surprise awaits. The train, escaped
from the canyon-walls, rushes at full speed along the base
of a ridge, which confronts it on the right, until it swings
around its foot toward the north. Then springs into view
a magnificent sierra, lifted high against the azure sky.
It is the Selkirk range of mountains, lofty, rock-ribbed
and glacial. Their base is hidden behind massive folds
of foot-hills looking almost black beneath a mantle of
spruce, which sweeps far up the sides of even the central
cones, intercepted here and there by jutting crags, cut
from top to bottom in long lanes mowed year after year
by the avalanches, and capped by a chain of summits
from whose turrets winter never retreats. And when
the afternoon sun is dropping slowly towards it, and the
mists of the great valley have risen into light clouds
that fleecily veil the cold peaks, they swim in a radiant
warmth and glory of color that suggests Asgard, the
celestial city of Scandinavian story, whose foundations were laid on the icy pillars of those far northern
mountains where the Vikings worshiped.
Golden—A small village on the bank of the Columbia
river. Much gold mining has been done in the vicinity,
and the place is steadily growing in importance. From
here the steamer Duchess makes weekly trips (Thursday)
to the head-lakes of the Columbia, where there are placer
mines. This trip is a novel one, profitable to both sportsman and lover of scenery. From the head of navigation, roads and trails lead over to Findlay creek and
mining village; and to the agricultural and grazing districts in the Kootenay valley.
JMoberly House—Site of the oldest cabin in the mountains.
Donald—End of Western Division. On the bank of the
Columbia, here crossed by a steel bridge. This was the
headquarters of construction in the mountains. Gold is
found along this part of the Columbia, which rises about
100 miles southward, flows swiftly northward 75 miles,
turns sharply westward around the northern end of the
Selkirks and returns southward along their western base. 20
Pacific Division—Donald to Vancouver; 461 miles.
Miles     Trans-
from     Contin'l
Montr'l     Train
LEAVE
9.50
9.42
9.42 am.
fi
<
O
Q
o
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
Donald—Alt. 2,550 ft.
Beaver
Six Mile Creek
Bear Creek
The Columbia is crossed
and its western bank followed down to the Gate of
the Beaver, into which the
. line turns sharply to the
left toward Roger's pass through Selkirks. Crossing the
Columbia on a fine truss bridge, the railway runs down
its margin close under high wooded bluffs, which here
rise into the foot-hills of the Selkirks. The banks of the
river opposite are also lofty bluffs. Seventeen miles below Donald the Beaver river comes down from the
mountains, finding exit through a narrow opening between high rocks, after the manner of all the streams in
this region. Up through this gateway the railway turns
and follows the gorge of the Beaver for several miles,
by means of admirable engineering and through enchanting scenery. It occupies a bed cut into the mountain
side, higher and higher above the stream, wThich is presently abandoned for the side-gorge at the right, dowm
which Mountain creek leaps and dashes, and is passed
upon a bridge nearly 1200 feet in length. Beyond, Cedar
creek is crossed by a bridge 125 feet in height, and not
far west of it is a bridge spanning a rivulet which
descends in a succession of foaming cascades, whence
one of the most beautiful prospects of the whole journey
is to be had. So impressed wrere the builders with the
charm of this magnificent picture of mountains, that
they named the spot The Surprise. The princidal difficulty in construction along this part of the line was
occasioned by the torrents, many of them in splendid
cascades, which come down the very steep slopes along
wrhich the road creeps. To span these fierce torrents
with bridges or culverts which would not be torn away
required great skill and a liberal expenditure. Several
of the more notable bridges have been mentioned, but
the greatest of all crosses Stony creek—a noisy rill flowing in the bottom of a V-shaped channel, cut deeply into
the soft rock. To so high a level upon the hillside was
the line compelled to attain, that this bridge spans the
ravine 295 feet above the torrent—one of the loftiest
railway bridges in the world. It is about 750 feet long
and cost $250,000. After crossing this bridge the line
follows up the gorge of the insignificant Bear creek, at
whose source is the narrow portal, between Mt. Carroll
on the south and Hermit mountain northward, which
admits to the summit. These mountains are flanked
by enormous precipices, down the side of one of which
(on the right) pitches a waterfall several hundred feet in
height, white and dusty like snow. Mt. Carroll towers
a mile in vertical height above the track, so near, so
bare, sheer and stupendous, that it impresses one with a
sense of the height and majesty of these mountains
in a wray that perhaps no other single view can do. As
this magnificent promontory, whose base is green with
abundant foliage and warmth and whose crest is wreathed in clouds and snow, is gradually left behind, the
splendid peaks of   the massive Hermit mountain (so
pacific station
21
§ Refreshment Rooms.
Miles
from
Mont'l
Trans-
Contin'l
Train
2479
leave
10.07
STATIONS—Descriptive  Notes
Summit of
the
Selkirks
2481   11.42
The
great
glacier
2487
2496
2503
2513
2524
named from its close resemblance in one aspect to a
cowled monk of St. Bernard, followed by his dog) are
disclosed, and the upper course of the noble cataract
seen below can be traced to its source in the mighty
glaciers that surmount The Hermit and his neighbors.
Roger's Pass—Summit of the Selkirks, 4,300 ft. in altitude
at the station.   The pass was named after Maj. Rogers,
by whose adventurous energy and skill it was discovered
in 1883, previous to which no human foot had penetrated
these fastnesses of this great central range.   The pass
lies between two lines of huge snow-clad peaks.   That
on the   right  forms a   prodigious ampitheatre, whose
parapet, eight or nine thousand feet above the valley,
encircles vast spaces of snow and shelters wide fields of
perpetual ice, glaciers beside which those of Switzerland
would be insignificant, and  so   near them that the
shining green fissures penetrating their mass can be distinctly seen.   The changing effects of light and shadow
on this brotherhood of peaks, of which The Hermit is
chief, are beyond statement, and never to be forgotten
by the fortunate man who has seen the sunset or sunrise
tinting their battlements, or has looked up from the
valley about him at   some snow-shower  trailing its
curtain along their crests, with perchance a white peak ,
or two standing serene above the harmless storm.
Glacier House—TwTo miles west of the summit the train
turns to the left and takes one into view of the greatest
of all the Selkirk glaciers, overlooked by  the   stately
monolith named Sir  Donald peak, after  Sir   Donald
Smith of Montreal.    Facing this enormous field of ice
and that crowning summit of the range, whose head is
reared a mile and a quarter in vertical height above the
track, stands the pretty Swiss chalet which forms a meal-
station  for  passing  trains, and  a   most  comfortable
stopping place for tourists who wish to hunt or fish or
explore the surrounding mountains and glaciers.   The
great glacier is hardly a mile away, and its forefoot is
only a few hundred feet above the level of the hotel.   A
good path has been made to it, and its exploration is
entirely practicable, adding sensations of novelty  and
superiority of size to all those   features   that   attract
Alpine climbers in Switzerland.   Many other pleasant
paths and   " improvements"   have been made in the
neighborhood of this  hotel, which offers a  luxurious
headquarters for mountaineering.   Game is very abundant throughout these lofty ranges.     Their summits
are the home of the bighorn sheep and the mountain
goat, the latter almost unknown southward of Canada.
Wapiti and deer frequent the lower glades.   Bears can
always be obtained on the mountain heights.   Birds are
numerous, and fish throng in the icy streams.
12.35
13.14
13.44
14.27
15.08
Boss Peak Sid'g
Illicilliwaet
Albert Canyon
Twin Butte
Revelstoke
Descent of the western slope of the
Selkirks, which begins at" the loops "
just beyond the Glacier House. " Perhaps," writes Lady Macdonald, " no
part of the line is more extraordinary 22
Miles Trans-
from Contin'l
Mont'l    Train
Th«
Loops
Illicil-
liwaet
River
The
Albert
Canyon
The
Gold
Range
pacific division
X Flag Station.
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
as evincing daring engineering skill, than this   pass,
where the road-bed curves in loops over trestle-bridges
of immense height, at the same time rapidly descending.   In six miles of actual travelling the train only
advances two and a half miles, so numerous are the
windings necessary to get through this canyon.    As I sit
looking forward down the pass I can see long trestle-
bridges below, and yet on a line with the one we are
crossing at the moment I   They show above the forest,
sharply distinct, so far below, that for a moment my
heart beats quickly as I feel the brakes tighten, and the
engine bear on with a quiet, steady, slower rush round
and down and over, while I look through the trestle-
beams into the hurrying foam of waters 150 feet below."
The outlet of this glacier is the Illicilliwaet {" swift
current") river, and it is by its gorge that the descent
is made.   The best views are now backward, toward Sir
Donald and adjacent peaks, which many judge to be the
grandest of all seen.     The illicilliwaet is a stream of no
great size, but of course turbulent, whose water is at first
pea-green with glacial mud, but rapidly clarifies.   The
gorge is sometimes of considerable width, filled with
that remarkable forest of gigantic trees for which British Columbia is  famous,  and there are exceedingly
grand outlooks all along, especially backward.   Halfway down   the train skirts the very brink of several
remarkably deep canyons, cut like enormous trenches
through the solid rock, whose sheer walls rise hundreds
of feet on the opposite side, too steeply to let any soil
or vegetation cling, and   buttress   the wooded   crags
beyond which ranks of glacial mountains are heaped
against the sky.   The most striking of these canyons is
the Albert, where a deep fissure opens in the rocks and
the river suddenly drops down a cataract some 200 ft.,
flowing nearly 300 ft. below the railway, a raging mass
of waters compressed into a stream scarcely 20 ft. wide.
" This strange chasm twists about, and from the train
you have momentary glimpses of the foaming waters
far below.   When it stops, the passengers rush out to get
a better view of the abyss.   At another place, nearer the
Columbia, there is a second gorge, broader but much
similar."   After the huge mountain known as the Twin
Butte (which has a notch cut in the peak, dividing it
into two summits) has been passed, there looms up
upon the right the conspicuous   and   beautiful   peak
named Clachnacuddin.     The Illicilliwaet resembles the
other river-passes in guarding its entrance with narrowr,
rocky portals.   Through these, exit is made into the
broad plain of the Columbia west of the Selkirk foothills, and Begbie, with its   glaciers  and   snow-fields,
Cunningham wTith its double summit, and a long line of
other snowy monarchs in the Gold range ahead, suddenly break upon the vision.    "We   make   our   final
crossing to  the north bank of the Illicilliwaet, which
has done such good service in guiding the railway down
out of the mountains, and then it rushes away from us
pacific division
25
§ Refreshment Station.
Miles Trans-
from Contin'l
Mont'l    Train
2524
15.08
3.08 pm.
2533
2541
2553
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
15.47
16.17
16.53
Eagle Pass
Griffin Lake
Craigellachie
Then the ascent of
Summit
of the
Gold
Range
to end its course in the Columbia.   The rows of bordering peaks continue out to the larger river, w^hich flows in
a broad stream southward between the ranges past the
great   Mt.   Begbie.     The railway   crosses   the   level
forest, where the huge cedars have nearly  all been
burnt, and comes to this little town of Revelstoke."
Revelstoke—Alt. 1,600 ft.   Second crossing of the Columbia, which falls 950 feet between Donald and this point
and has here a current of eight miles an hour.   This is
the supplying  point for a  large area  of gold-mining
operations; especially northward toward the great bend
of the river around the northern extremity of the Selkirks.
Half-civilized Kootenay Indians are likely to be seen
here cleverly handling their strangely shaped canoes of
birch-bark.   The river is here navigable for steamers.
The Columbia is crossed upon a
bridge and trestle-continuation, to-
, gether one-third   of  a mile   long,
the Gold range begins by moderate
gradients and through earth-euttinss to  the Summit
lake, at the top of Eagle pass, 1,800 feet above the sea.
" The railway is laid along a succession of lakes and
connecting streams that conduct it through the mountains, and by comparatively easy gradients it gets both
up to and down from the pass.   The region traversed is
a gold-producing section,   and prospectors and placer
miners are numerous, though there are scarcely any
other settlements anywhere in the mountains.    The
Gold range has some snow-capped peaks, but generally
they are much lower than the Rockies or the Selkirks,
and have more rounded tops, being composed of loose
materials, requiring very little difficult rock-cutting in
building the line.   The region is a universal forest in the
valleys and upon the mountain   slopes.    .   .   .   Th§
principal lakes in succession are Summit, Victor, Three
Valley and Griffin.   We go through these forests to the
summit of the pass, which is the dividing ridge between
the waters seeking the Pacific ocean by the Columbia
river and these flowing westward through the Fraser
river.   At the actual summit there is a long and narrow
lake of beautiful clear water surrounded by high mountains.   This is the beginning of the Eagle river, and the
railway route is cut out of the rocky border of the lake.
Its winding shores and overhanging cliffs are very pretty.
Then the line follows the Eagle river down the western
slope, a succession of long narrow lakes and their connecting streams, the railway seeking one shore or the
other as has best presented a feasible line.   While the
scenery is fine, there is nothing like the startling canyons
and terrific engineering seen in the other mountain ranges.    .   .   .   Lake after lake is passed, the finest being
the Three Valley lake, which stretches three arms into
as many gorges.   The lakes and streams are full of fish,
and thousands of trout and salmon can be seen swimming in their clear waters, a great temptation to the
angler.   It is in this attractive region that we pass a 24
PACIFIC DIVISION
t Flag Station.
Miles | Trans-
from Contin'l
Mont'l     Train
2568
2587
2595
2604
2620
2636
Driving
the last
spike.
17.36
18.27
18.49
19.16
20.04
20.46
U6 pm.
The
Shuswap
lakes.
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
little station alongside the Eagle river, 2,553 miles from
Montreal, which has been given the sturdy Scotch name of
Craigellachie. It was here that the " last spike" in the construction of the Can. Pac. Ry. was driven with modest
ceremony by Sir Donald Smith, in November, 1885."
Sicamous I The London Times recently described
Salmon Arm this part of the road most excellent-
JTappen Siding ly :   " The Eagle river leads us down
JNotch Hill to the Great Shuswap lake, so named
Shuswap from the Indian tribe that lived on
Ducks | its banks and who still have a ' re
serve' there. This is a most remarkable body of wTater.
It lies among the mountain ridges, and consequently extends its long narrow arms along the intervening valleys
like a huge octopus in half-a-dozen directions. These
arms are many miles long, and vary from a few hundred
yards to two or three miles in breadth, and their high,
bold shores, fringed by the little narrow beach of sand
and pebbles, with alternating bays and capes, give beautiful views. The railway crosses one of these arms by a
drawbridge at Sicamous narrows, and then goes for a
long distance along the southern shores of the lake, running entirely around the end of the Salmon arm. For
fifty miles the line winds in-and out the bending shores,
while geese and ducks fly over the waters and light and
shadow play upon the opposite banks. This lake with
its bordering slopes gives a fine reminder of Scottish
scenery. The railway in getting around it leads at different, and many, times towards every one of the thirty-two
points of the compass. Leaving the Salmon arm of the
lake rather than go a long and circuitous course around
the mountains to reach the Southwestern arm, the line
bodily strikes through the forest over the top of the intervening ridge. We come out at some 600 feet elevation above this ' arm,' and get a magnificent view across
the lake, its winding shores on both sides of the long
and narrow sheet of water stretching far on either hand,
with high mountain ridges for the opposite background.
The line gradually runs down hill until it reaches the
level of the water, but here it has passed the lake, which
has narrowed into the [south branch of the] Thompson
river. The remainder of the route follows the valley of
this stream, which gives as pretty a sight as one would
care to see of a rich pastoral valley enclosed between
mountain ridges. The Shuswap Indian reserve shows some
signs of settlement and cultivation between the river and
the lake on an extended stretch of lowland bordered by
forests. The Indians of British Columbia are said to
make better labourers than most of those on the plains,
when they will work. They make excellent herdsmen
and shepherds on the ranches in these luxuriant valleys,
and their little settlements are scattered at intervals
along the river wherever they can pick up a livelihood.
"The Thompson riyer broadens into the Little Shuswap
lake, and the route is cut out of the hillside on its southern bank.   Then the valley broadens, and the eye that
§ Refreshment Station.
PACIFIC DIVISION.
25
Miles
from
Mont'l
2653
Trans-
Contin'l
Tram
2661
2667
2678
2684
2698
2713
2725
2731
2747
2753
2763
Thomp-
Valley
21.40
10.49 pm
22.18
22.39
23.17
23.41
24.35
1.35
2.23
2.47
3.50
4.14
4.54
SIXTH
DAY
Kamloops
Lake
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
has been so accustomed to rocks and roughness and the
uninhabited desolation of the mountains is gladdened
by the sight of grass, fenced fields, growing crops, haystacks, and good farmhouses on the level surface, while
herds of cattle, sheep, and horses roam over the valley
and bordering hills in large numbers. This is a ranching country extending far into the mountain valleys
west of the Gold range on both sides of the railway, and
is one of the garden spots of British Columbia. . . .
The people are comparatively old settlers, having come
in from the Pacific coast, and it does one's heart good,
after having passed the rude little cabins and huts of the
plains and mountains, to see their neat and trim cottages, with the evidences of thrift that are all around."
Kamloops—Pop. 1,00 (. Divisional point, and principal
town in the Thompson River valley, begun years ago
around a Hudson's Bay post. The north fork of the
Thompson comes down from the mountains 100 miles
nortrrward ,and here joins the main stem, whence the
the name, which is an Indian word meaning a river-
confluence. It is a beautiful spot. " The broad valley
is intersected by another coming into it at right angles.
The rivers flow over the plain and finally join. There is
both a background and a foreground of bordering hills,
and the town stretches along a single street at the edge
of the river. At either end the Chinese have set up their
special little towns, while the English residents occupy
the centre. The railway track enclosed with planks
runs along the middle of the street, and this is the foot-
walk and promenade. Little steamboats are on the
river, and saw-mills are briskly at work." The principal
industry around Kamloops will always be grazing, since
the hills are covered with most nutritious bunch-grass.
JTranquille
Cherry Creek
Savonas
Penny's
Ashcroft
Spatsum
Spence's Bridge
Drynock
Lytton
JSisco
Keefer's
Below Kamloops the Thompson enters a series of canyons, leading to the
great gorges of the Fraser river, into
which it pours at Lytton. " Startling
as was the ride through the Rockies
and Selkirks, the carving out of the
line upon the steep banks of the deep
and winding canyons of theThompson
and Fraser rivers has also called for
great engineering skill, and gives for
hundreds of miles a succession of
superb scenes and magnificent displays of the art of
successful road-making. . . . It is at the Kamloops
lake, a beautiful sheet of water into which the Thompson river widens just below the town, that the fine
scenery of the canyon begins. This lake is about 20 miles
long and a mile or two wide. The river above it meanders in careless crookedness through a valley that is enclosed by parallel ridges of round-topped, furrowed, and
water-worn hills, the bottom-lands making a good grazing country, with many herds of cattle. The lake spreads
across this valley, the bordering hills, however, changing
to towering rocks, which become higher as the moun- 26
PACIFIC DIVISION
Miles Trans-
from Contin'l
Mont'l     Train
At
Savonas
Gold
Washing.
The
"Thompson
anyon,
\ Lytton
X Flag Station.
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
tain range is entered. They bear no timber, and the
sombre aspect of the cliffs, with the parched brown
vegetation, contrasts sharply with the bright green
wraters. The railway has to be carried on ledges and
through tunnels on the southern bank, the views over
lake being beautiful as the route winds in and out, now
piercing a tunnel and now hung upon a bridge over
some great fissure. A half-dozen rocky ridges stretch
across this lake, and have been broken through by the
waters, so that it presents a series of high promontories and intervening bays. The little village of
Savonas [where the Government's line ended and the
C. P. R. construction eastward began] is at the foot of
the lake, and below this the gorge narrows and the
Thompson river flows out with swift current towards
the sea, plunging with mad pace over the successions of
rapids at the bottom of the canyon. This canyon broadens
and narrows as the mountain chains approach or recede,
and the railway is carried high above the river on the
southern side. Where the bottom lands spread out the
river winds through them, leaving flats or bars. It is on
these and the sandy outflows of the mountain streams
which fall in, that much gold has been found, and both
. here and on the Fraser river can be seen the gold hunters shaking their " cradles" to wash the sand from the
gold dust. In the bottoms and on the hills along this
river, until the gorge runs too far into the mountains, the
grazing is good, and there are evidences of some settlement, with cattle herds and horses feeding on the
' bunch grass,' which looks in its dried condition like so
much hay. Below this part, however, the rocks become
too steep to permit of much habitation. A light bridge
deep down in the canyon, thrown across the Thompson
river where several roads come together out of the
mountains, gives a name to the station of Spence's
Bridge. . . .As the Thompson river canyon gets further into the mountains the gorge becomes deeper and
narrower and the scenery even more grand. The hills
are denuded of trees, but some shrub-timber grows in
sheltered parts of the valleys. The river becomes a wild
torrent. The railway has a difficult route, is laid high
above the water, and crosses a great number of lofty
trestle-bridges over the fissures in the sides of the canyon,
while it has to pierce cliff after cliff through tunnels.
The sides of the gorge in most places are precipitous,
making it impossible to get down to the water's edge.
A wagon road is cut into the precipice along the top,
high above the stream, and here are seen a party of
Indians with their ponies, moving their household goods
on the animals' backs. But it seems perilous navigation to go along such a roadway in such a dangerous
place, entirely unprotected from falling far down into
the abyss below. Then the canyon gradually winds its
wray into the mountains and approaches the highest
peaks, some with snow-rifts on their summits, which
border the canyon of the Fraser river. And finally we
come to Lytton, a town started by a colony of gold-
Refreshment Station.
PACIFIC DIVISION
27
Miles Trans-
from Contin'l
Mont'l      Train
2774
2789
2801
2815
2823
2833
2842
2851
2861
2871
2879
LEAVE
Cliffs
and
gorges
of the
Fraser
The
bridge
at
Sisca
5.38
6.48
7.36
8.43
9.05
9.22
9.57
10.22
10.49
11.16
11.38
Noon
bearing the
coast
STATIONS—Descriptive  Notes
miners at the junction of the two rivers	
"The Fraser river is the chief watercoursex>f British
Columbia, rising in the northern portion of the Rockies,
and flowing for about 500 miles before it begins to break
through the mountains on its way to the strait of Georgia. It passes Lytton as a full stream with rapid, turbid
current, which, when the Thompson river is added, becomes much larger and at times a foaming torrent. It
flows through a deep and rocky gorge, but with the
slopes and bottoms better timbered than the Thompson
River valley. The scenery is, if anything, on a grander
scale, and the huge rocks that have fallen into the water
have been worn by the action of the elements into forms
like towers, castles, and rows of bridge-piers, with the
swift current eddying around them. The cliffs that
encompass the river rise for thousands of feet, and in
many places stand up like solid walls, or jut out, and
almost bar the passage. A pair of such protruding promontories is used by the railway to cross the river on a
fine iron bridge [the cantilever bridge near Sisco~\, but
it has to tunnel one of the cliffs to secure a safe route on
the opposite bank. The great number of mountain torrents coming in, and the rocky buttresses that intervene,
make the railway for miles a succession of tunnels and
trestle-bridges, most costly to construct, and compel
endless bends to get a practicable route at all. These
obstructions narrow the channel so that the river runs at
race-horse speed. Clouds encompass the higher peaks
and float along in the canyon while the water boils below.
There are intervals, however, when the valley broadens
sufficiently to permit a nook wrhere an acre or two of comparatively level land gives a chance for brief cultivation."
North Bend—Divisional point; refreshment rooms.   Here
is a large tourists' hotel, managed by the company.
Spuzzum I  Yale is the head of steamer naviga-
§Yale tion,  and   an   outfitting   point   for
Hope miners and ranchmen  northward.
Ruby Creek It has about 1,200 population, and
Agassiz I occupies a level flat under fine cliffs.
Harrison •. Hope is a similar, but smaller town.
J"Nicomen Both wrere founded 25 years ago; and
Mission the waggon-road seen here and below
Wharnock was built by the government of Bri-
Hammond I tish Columbia, at vast expense, as an
avenue to the Cariboo gold diggings toward the head of
the Fraser, where there are now many flourishing settlements. (t The Fraser River canyon below Yale becomes
more of a valley, and its course changes from south to
west. There is better cultivation and settlement, but
the mountains still overhang us, and the route to the
coast is encompassed by them and laid through an
almost unbroken forest. On leaving the dry and arid
region of the mountains for the more genial climate of
the coast, there is brighter foliage and more luxuriance.
The ridges separate and the river broadens, flowing
with gentler current now that it has plenty of room. 28
PACIFIC DIVISION
X Flag Station.
lilies
from
Mont'l
2887
2891
2906
2990
Trail s-
Contin'
Train
11.50
12.10
ARRIVE
12.50
1.30pm
21.00
9.00pm
STATIONS-Descriptive   Notes
Then it seeks different channels, and flows into the
Georgian strait, with two outlets, its delta embracing a
vast surface of rich agricultural land capable of high cultivation. Its shores are moderately settled, but could
easily support a much larger population."
New Westminster Junction—Divergence of branch to
Newt Westminster, an old and important seaport in the
populous and fertile Fraser delta; distance, 8 miles.
Port Moody—At the head of Burrard inlet, in the midst
of forests of gigantic trees. This was the provisional
terminus of the road, and has an excellent harbor, but
there are dangerous narrows between it and the open
strait, which made the lowTer harbor of the inlet, at
Vancouver, the present terminus, far superior as a
commercial port.
Vancouver—Pop. 5,000. Vancouver, the western terminus of the Canadian Pacific, stands upon the beautiful
slope bordering English harbor, near the entrance of
Burrard inlet. The town has been built with great
rapidity, but the wooden houses first thrown up to
afford shelter, are fast giving place to substantial buildings of stone and brick; extensive wharves line the
shores, where only two or three years ago the primitive
forest swept to the water's edge; while a crowd of shipping and boats, moved by steam and sails, by the sturdy
arms of fishermen, lumbermen and settlers, or under
disciplined strokes of a man-o'-war's crew ; together with
dozens of Indian canoes of all shapes and sizes, some
paddled by men and others by squaws, with a cargo of
furs, fish, vegetables and children, or simply steered
with a carved paddle wThile the breeze fills their sails of
bark-matting, combine to make a scene of lively animation off shore. The shores of Burrard inlet elsewhere
has several settlements and timber-mills ; and one pretty
town with white-painted houses and a neat church is an
Indian mission-station, of some 300 people. Vancouver
is a calling-port for most of the coast-wise steamers, and
port of departure for steamers to Japan and China. On
the arrival of the train a steamer departs for Victoria,
on Vaucouver island,—a ferriage of eight hours through
the beautiful archipelagos of the gulf of Georgia and
Puget sound.
Victoria—Pop.12,000. Capital of British Columbia, situated
at the southern extremity of Vancouver island. It has
a lovely site, and its mild climate is healthful. English
people and manners predominate, in contrast with
" Western" abruptness, Chinese picturesqueness and
Indian squalor. At Esquimault harbor (2 m.), an Imperial naval station, a fleet rendezvous. This station,
Beacon Hill park, overlooking the straits of Fuca and
the Olympic mts., and many fine drives make the place
one of the most interesting in Canada. Victoria does
a large business in naval supplies, general merchandise,
fish, coal and timber. A railway extends thence to
the coal and farming districts near Nanaimo on the
western coast of the island.
transpacific steamships
29
Steamships on the Pacific Ocean
Steamships of the Canadian Pacific line, depart from Vancouver every
three weeks for Japan and China, according to the appended table.
These are fast steamers heretofore in the service of the Cunard line.
Their route is shorter by 800 miles than the steamers from San
Francisco. The trip will require only 12 to 15 days to Yokohama, and
17 to 20 days to Hong Kong. At Yokohama, connection is made for
all other ports in Japan, eastern China and Corea; and at Hong Kong
for Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland, Levuka, Batavia, Calcutta and the
East Indies, and Australasia generally. In addition to the Japan line
an extensive coast-service has been provided, at Victoria, where daily
connection is made by prompt steamboats and railroads for all the seaports, towns and farming districts in Washington Terr, and Oregon,
U.S.A. Once a week or oftener, steamers depart from Vancouver or
Victoria to San Francisco, where connection is made for the Sandwich
Islands and Australia, southern California, Mexico and South America.
Once a fortnight, a steamer leaves Vancouver for Alaska, traversing a
region of magnificent scenery. The course is wholly within narrow and
intricate, but deep and safe, channels, affording a constant succession of
magnificent scenery.
Intended Sailings of Trans-Pacific Steamships
EASTWARD SAILING
WESTWARD  SAILING
"Name of
Steamships
Leave
Vancouver
Monday
Arrive
Yokohama
Saturday
Arrive
HongKong
Monday
Name of
Steamships
Leave
HongKong
Tuesday
Leave
Yokohama
Sunday
Arrive
Vancouve
Monday
Abyssinia..
Parthia. ...
P't Augusta
Batavia. . .
Abyssinia. •
Parthia...*
Batavia. . .
Abyssinia..
20 June
11 July
5 Aug.
17   "
30   "
23 Sept.
17 Oct.
10 Nov
9 July
30   "
24 Aug.
5 Sept
18   "
12 Oct.
5 Nov.
29    "
18 July
8 Aug
3 Sept.
14    "
27    "
21 Oct.
14 Nov.
8 Dec.
Batavia. . .
Abyssinia.
Parthia. • .
Batavia. . .
Abyssinia..
12 July
26    "
19 Aug.
12 Sept.
6 Oct.
22 July
7 Aug.
31 Aug.
24 Sept.
18 Oct.
8 Aug.
23   "
16 Sept.
10 Oct.
3 Nov.
And sailing about once a month thereafter. OZtsTT^IRXO ^zlstid LAKES route
By Rail from Montreal to Toronto and Owen Sound; and by
Can. Pac. Steamship Line from Owen Sound to Port Arthur
Toronto
Express.
LEAVE
8 P.M.
11.45
12.45
A.M.
1.10
A. M.
1.32
2.14
3.40
4.13
4.35
4.55
5 31
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
Montreal—Quebec Gate Station.
Ottawa I For account of intermediate stations,
Carleton Junction | see pages 3 and 4.
Smith's Falls Jc.—Divergence from main line, of the
Brockville branch, Canadian Pacific Railway.
Pike Falls—Waterpower-point in the Rideau river.
Perth—Pop. 4,000. A stirring farming centre of Scotch
and Irish people mainly. Considerable milling is
done. In the neighborhood, quarries of fine white
free-stone and phosphates are worked.
Bathurst—Farming station, near Christie's lake.
Maberly I With   Kingston and   PembrokeRy.,
Sharbot L. June. | for Kingston, on L. Ontario, 46 m.
southward. Sharbot Lake, about 8 miles in length, is
here crossed by the railway at the narrows. Excellent
fishing, fair hotel accommodation.
Mountain Grove
Arden
Kaladar
Sheffield
Tweed
Ivanhoe
Central Ont. Jc.
Blairton
Havelock
JNorwood
Indian River
Thinly settled Laurentian hills, rivers
and lakes, inviting to the tourist and
sportsman. Timber, fine building
stone, iron and other minerals abound,
and water-power is available everywhere. Tweed is on the Moira, an
important lumbering stream. At
Ivanhoe, charcoal is made. At Central
Ontario Junction, the Cent. Ont. Ry.
is crossed, and at Blairton the Cobourg
and Marmora Ry-; these roads open
iron-mining districts northward. Trenton and Picton are reached by the
Central Ontario Ry. At Norwood, a
flourishing village, a fine farming
country is entered.
Peterboro—Pop. 8,000. Here the Otonabee river, in the
space of 9 miles, rushes down an incline of 147 ft.,
furnishing waterpower to many mills. " From this point
as a centre, a whole realm of wild beauty opens out^ to
the lover of nature, quiet lakes innumerable, flashing
waterfalls, sparkling streams abounding in fish and game.
This is the place where the Rice-lake canoe was invented,
and in it the whole territory can be traversed with few
portages. Through this region, down the Trent, came in
early times the ubiquitous Champlain from L. Huron,
leading the Huron raid into Iroquois-land,"
Re reshment Station.
ONTARIO  AND  LAKES ROUTE
31
Miles
from
Mont'l
^Toronto
'Express
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
307
316
319
328
337
346
354
362
371
375
378
381
381
378
380
384
386
389
392
393
394
397
6.50
7.04
7.35
7.55
8.10
A.M.
8.17
ARRIVE
8.27
St'mship
Express
LEAVE
10.45
A.M.
>h  g
if
0Q   g
< 8
< e
Is
H   |
Cavan ville
Manvers
Pontypool
Burketon
Myrtle
% Claremont
Green River
Agincourt
North Toronto
I Toronto Junction
11.25
Stations for the quieter landscape and
fruitful fields of central Ontario, a
richly cultivated grain and fruit producing region.     At Myrtle, L. Scugog
is reached, and the Whitby and Pt.
Perry Ry., is crossed.    Glimpses of
Lake Ontario are caught southward.
Scotch is the predominating nationality in this section.
Convergence of Canadian Pacific lines
from Ottawa and from St. Thomas, with Toronto Grey &
Bruce branch to Owen Sound.    Refreshments.
Parkdale—Suburb of Toronto.   Here the Canadian Pacific,
Grand Trunk, and Northern & Northwestern railways
enter the city, crossing upon the bridge, at Queen St.,
the great east and west artery of Toronto and suburbs.
Toronto—Union Station.
Toronto—Pop. (with suburbs) 110,000. This point was one
of the earliest French fortifications against the Indians,
and afterwards a trading post and naval station of importance to' the English. It is the capital of Ontario,
its people are almost wholly English-speaking, and it is
mainly devoted to manufacturing and mercantile pursuits.
Many railways centre here, and its lake commerce is
considerable. A line of boats makes two trips a day to
Niagara Falls, and other lines daily trips down the St.
Lawrence. In addition to forming the central point for
the various Ontario lines of the Canadian Pacific, Toronto
is reached by the Grand Trunk Ry., and is connected by
the Northern and Northwestern Railway with the agricultural and lake regions of northern Ontario,reaching the
Canadian Pacific Railway Main Line at North Bay, on
Lake Nipissing. The city is laid out in streets crossing
at right angles; is excellently built; and possesses many
interesting features to the tourist. It considers itself the
most enterprising community in eastern Canada, but is
not wholly given over to commercial ambition. The
University of Toronto, and several lesser educational
institutions have a wide reputation; the city is well supplied with churches; and possesses several large and
_ valuable libraries and collections of pictures. Its parks
and suburbs are beautiful, and opportunities for pleasure-
taking in the harbor and surrounding hills are many.
Lambton Stations on the main line, Canadian
^Islington Pacific Ry., to Detroit.    An agricul-
X Dixie tural and fruit raising region, occu-
Cooksville pying the pretty valley of the Hum-
X Springfield ber river.
Streetsville—A busy town, supplying most of   the milk
used in Toronto.
Streetsville Junction—The steamship express here leaves
the main line and passes to the Orangeville branch.
Meadowvale i Stations in the valley of the River
JChurchville I Credit, one of the richest in Ontario. ONTARIO AND LAKES ROUTE
X Flag Station.
from I st'mshiP
LEAVE
11.49
12.45
NOON
1.10
1.18
g
53
3.07
ARRIVE
3.30
P.M.
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
Brampton—Pop. 3,500.   A brisk town, where the Grand
Trunk Ry. is intersected.
Edmonton
Campbell's Cros'ng
X Cheltenham
Farming and dairying neighborhoods
among romantic hills along the Credit
river.   Woollen mills.
Inglewood—Intersection with N. & N. W. Ry.
Forks of Credit—Picturesque resort for picnic excursions
from Toronto, and elsewhere; and famous for its wild
berries. The red-stone of these hills is much used in
Toronto and other towns. Dufferin lake, near by, is a
favorite resort for summer camping, picnics and fishing.
Cataract—Branch line to Elora, 27 m., west.
Alton—A pleasant village among the hills.
Melville Junction—Rejoin main-line, Toronto, Grey &
Bruce section. This is more direct from Toronto, but is
avoided by northivard-bound trains on account of its
heavy grades.
I Orange ville—Pop. 4,000. A farming centre as shown by
the elevators at the station.    Refreshment station.
Orangeville Junction—Branch line to Teeswater, in the
fruitful peninsular region near Lake Huron.
Laurel I A well-cultivated plateau, furnishing
Crombies lime    and   building   stone.      The
Shelburne lakes of this  region, especially at
Melamcthon Homing's Mills, 4 in. from Shelburne,
Corbetton ' are noted for extraordinary trout.
Dundalk—The road has here ascended to the top of the
Ontario plateau, about 1,300 ft. above the level of L.
Ontario, the soil is suitable for grains, root-crops, and
grazing.
Flesherton—A brisk agricultural village. The town of
Flesherton is 2 m. east, and Priceville 4 m. wTest. A little
east of Flesherton are the Eugenia falls, and many most
picturesque brooks and cataracts, abounding in trout
and bass.   Shooting good.
Markdale
Berkeley
Holland Centre
Arnott
Chatsworth
Rockford
St. Vincent Road
A rolling, timbered and well-watered
region. Fine farming in the valleys.
Lumber, cord-wood and tanbark,
are exported largely. Scotch and Irish
people predominate throughout this
neighborhood, which has long been
settled. The region is limestoney.
Owen Sound—Pop. 6,000. Port on Georgian bay for Canadian Pacific steamships. Entered by a long detour
eastward, along the edge of the bay, wrhere steep grades
bring the line down to the wharves. This town has
grown rapidly since the building of the railway ; and is
the shipping point for a vast area of farming country.
The huge elevators and lumber-piles will be observed.
The town is situated at the mouth of the Sydenham
River at the head of the Sound, and is surrounded by
an amphitheatre of limestone cliffs. The region is well-
wooded, and in summer is visited by large numbers of
§ Refreshment Station.
ONTARIO AND LAKES ROUTE
33
Miles
from
Montr']
Ste'mship
Express
LEAVE
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes
tourists. Within a radius of 2 or 3 miles are many pretty
waterfalls, among them Ingles Falls, and Indian Falls.
Building stone and brick-clays abundant. Manufactures,
especially of furniture and wooden-ware, are increasing.
Shooting and fishing in great variety is easily accessible.
In addition to the steamships of the Canadian Pacific
line for Port Arthur, steamers depart regularly for Col-
lingwood, and all ports on Georgian bay, Manitoulin
island, and in the Indian peninsula separating Georgian
bay from Lake Huron. Many irregular steamers and
sailing vessels call at frequent intervals, taking passengers
and freight to and from all the lake ports.
I 34
THE CANADIAN  PACIFIC STEAMSHIP  LIKE
Canadian Pacific  Steamships.
The steel steamships Alberta and Athabasca, of this line, perform
a bi-weekly service between Owen Sound and Port Arthur, departing
from Owen Sound on Wednesdays and Saturdays, after arrival of the
steamship express from Toronto.
These vessels are new and elegant Clyde-built steamships surpassing
in speed, safety and comfort, all other steamers on the great lakes.
They each have a gross measurement of nearly 1,800 tons, are 270 feet in
length, and complete in every detail. Their furnishing is equal in
luxury to that of the ocean steamers, and their table compares favorably
with that of the leading hotels of our large cities. They are lighted
throughout by electricity, furnished with steam steering-gear, and provided with every appliance for safety.
Miles
from
Mont'J
Can. Pac.
Steamships
499
770
Leave
4.00
P. M.
1020
12.00
NOON
Arrive
8.00
A.M.
PORTS—Descriptive   Notes
Owen Sound—The course of the departing steamer is laid
down Georgian bay, with the wooded shores of Indian
peninsula on the left, and many pretty islands in view.
During thenight the steamer passes out into L Huron,
and by morning approaches Detour Channel, where land
is close at hand on either side. After passing through
several small and exceedingly picturesque lakes we
reach St. Mary's river, which drains the overflow
of lake Superior into L. Huron. Up this narrow,
forest-bordered and charming water-defile, the steamer
pursues a devious wray for several hours until debarred
by the rapids of St. Mary, where it makes its only stop
between Owen Sound and Port Arthur.
Sault Ste. Marie—There is a village on the Canadian side
as wrell as on the Michigan side, at which latter all
vessels must stop to pass through the canal by which
the falls, or " Sault Ste. Marie," are avoided. The canal
was built in 1853-5, and has two locks of 350 ft. each...
Since then a new lock has been made, 515 ft. in length,
and 80 ft. in width, admitting vessels of 16 ft. draught,
. and overcoming a rise of 18 ft. The width of the canal
varies from 108 to 270 ft,-—-A garrison of U.S. troops,
has enabled a large and busy village to grow up on the
Michigan side. The fishing here is excellent, and a
favorite sport is running the rapids in boats guided by
Indians. Here will soon be built the bridge connecting
the Algoma branch of the Can. Pac. Ry., with United
States railways running westward to St. Paul. After
an hour's halt, the steamer enters L. Superior, and
heads northwest, past Whitefish point (on the left)
straight across the lake to Isle Royale and Thunder
cape, protecting Thunder bay and the harbor of
Port Arthur—Described on p. 12.
(FRIDAY   Or  MONDAY)
CHICAGO   LIJSflE.
Toronto to Chicago: 518 Miles.
35
Miles from
Chicago.
Western
Montreal.
Express
Express,
LEAVE.
LEAVE.
/     °
8.00
8.00
P.M.
P.M.
7\
y
381
1.05
8.10
A.M.
$
i 379
1.15
8.20
<
1376
1.25
8.35
3
(378
J1.30
8.39
&
\392
1.56
9.03
393
2.06
9.13
525
/404
2.27
9.34
fl
1429
3.25
10.25
<
439
3.50
10.44
<\
459
4.31
11.28
468
4.49
11.47
\ 473
5.02
£11.57
/492
J5.35\
14.45/
f12.35 \
I  1.15/
/
Central
P.M.
Time from
St. Thomas
to Chicago
587
7.30
4.12
603
8.10
4.55
<
1
604
f 8.461
19.15/
J 5.20 \
\  8.00/
1622
9.55
8.40
<
1634
10.00
8.58
a
s,
y641
10.38
9.12
\680
12.03
10.52
Q
midn't
525
700
12.42
11.27
<
1712
1.04
11.47
1725
1.35
12.12
midn't
748
2.35
1.20
797
4.18
3.03
833
5.40
4.32
888
7.55
6.50
ARRIVE.
ARRIVE.
\890
8.05
7.00
\
A.M.
A.M.
STATIONS—Descriptive   Notes.
Montreal—Quebec Gate Station ; see
pp. 5,6.
Toronto—Union Station; see p. 31.
Parkdale—See p. 31.
I Toronto Junction—Connection with
morning trains to and from Montreal.
Lamb ton—See p 31.
Streetsville—See p. 31.
Streetsville Jc—See p. 31.
Milton Only the larger towns are
Galt given. TheWestern Ex-
Ayr press   stops  at   many
^Woodstock     intermediate   stations.
Ingersoll This is a well-populated
Putnam and highly productive
region, supporting some of the most
flourishing communities in Canada.
St. Thomas—Town of about 10,000
inhabitants, doing much manufacturing. Railways to Port Stanley,
Lake Erie. June, of Can. Pac. with
Canada Southern line of Mich. Cent.
R.R., which the train now follows.
Essex Center I Cars are here run on
Windsor |     to    large    transfer
steamer   and the train is ferried
across the Detroit River to Detroit.
^Detroit—Pop.  150,000.     Largest city
in Michigan.
Wayne Jc—Various roads southward.
Ypsilanti—Pop. 5,500. Many factories,
and a great school.
Ann Arbor—Pop 8,500. Seat of the
State University.
Jackson—Pop. 20,000. Large factories
and site of State prison.
Albion—In the midst of farming lands.
Marshall—Pop. 4,000. Flour mills and
granaries.
Battle Creek—Pop. 10,000.   A manufacturing town.
^Kalamazoo—Pop. 15,000.   A beautiful
and wealthy town.
Niles—Pop. 5,000. Surrounded by rich
farms and orchards.
Michigan City—Lumber-port on Lake
michigan, in Illinois.
Twenty-second Street—Suburbs of
Chicago.
Chicago—111. Cent. R. R. station at the
foot of Lake street.
* The new Branch Line for London here leaves the Main Line.  RTJIST   OlST   THEIR
Express Trains
 BETWEEN	
THE CELEBRATED
"CARILLON," "LONE" and "CALUMET,"
3 of the Grandest Drawing-room Cars in America,
AND  CHARGE
oix-jltz"—FIFTY   CENTS—oi/rxrsr
FOR A CHAIR BETWEEN* THE TWO CITIES.
SEATS   CAN BE   SECURED  AT TICKET  OFFICES
IN   MONTREAL =
WINDSOR HOTEL, 266 ST. JAMES STREET, QUEBEC GATE STATION
 ^^^^ OTTAWA 	
Corner Sparks and Elgin Sts. (opp. Russell House),
And at Union Station.
WEDNESDAY,   APRIL 23,   1884. CfQ
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OF THE
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
(EASTERN  DIVISION)
•   AND   ITS   CONNECTIONS.
CANADIAN  PACIFIC RAILWAY.
In Connection with Lines from Montreal.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
COZLTZDEZfcTSIEID   TIME-TABLE,
In Connection with Utica & Black River R.R,.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
C02sT33E3iTSE!ID   TXME-I'.A.BME],
In Connection with Grand Trunk Railway.
STATIONS.
Local      Fast      Local
Exp.      Exp.       Exp.
STATION'S.
Day      Night
Exp.      Exp.
STATIONS.
Day
Exp.
Night
Exp.
Tve. Ottawa C.P.Ry.
Arr. Montreal        "
Lve. Montreal No. Shore Ry,
Arr. Terrebonne  "
'   Berthierville... "
'   Louise Ville  "
'   Three Rivers .. "
[>   Quebec  "
Lve. Pt. Levi Intercol. Ry
A ir. Riviere du Loup..       "
'   Riraouski        "
'    Campbelltown        "
'   Moncton        "
'    St. John	
'   Halifax        "
Lve. Montreal.. .R. & 0. N. C. Strs
Arr. Sorel  "
'   Three Rivers "
'   Quebec  "
Lve. Montreal S. E. Ry.
Arr. W. Farnham       "
'   Newport, Vt      "
'    St. Johnsbury, Vt., Pass. R.R.
'   Portland, Me P. & O. Ry
<   Concord,   N.H., M. & B. A.L.
'   Manchester, " "
'   Nashua,        " "
'   Lowell, Mass.,   "
*■   Lawrence, "       "
'   Boston, "       "
'   Fall River, "       "
'   New Bedford,     "       "
'   Worcester, "       "
'   Providence, R.I., "
Lve. Montreal, "
Arr. Holyoke,   Mass.,        "
1    Springfield,   " "
'   Hartford, Conn., "
'   New Haven, " "
1   NewYor-k.N.Y., »
,15am
40pm
,00<J
,55"
,30 "
,52"
,40"
,50"
4.45pm
8.15 "
10.00
11.05
.50pm
10.58 "
10.00
11.05
 C.P.Ry.
1.36am
2.35
6.30
30pm
,00"
,00am
,00"
10pm
,45"
55"
32am
1.36am
2.35"
6.30 "
7.30"
12.05pm
3.00"
7.50"
3.40am
7.00"
12.10pm
35am
,25"
00"
35"
,25"
,30"
40pm
45"
, 25am
,30"
10pm
45am
,00"
,15"
,30"
45 "
9.00am
10.30 "
12.51pm
2.45 "
10.00 "
6.45"
7.19 "
7.49 "
8.17"
9.00am
10.30 "
12.51pm
2.45 "
10.00"
6.45 "
7.19"
7.49 "
8.17"
9.12pm
9.12'
Transfer	
 U. &B.R.
..N.Y.C. &H.R.
Lve. Ottawa •
Arr. Brockville .;.
Free Omnibus and Ferry
Lve. Morristown, N.Y...
Arr. Theresa, "      .
"   Carthage, "    ..
"   Watertown,    "    ..
"   Lowville, "    ..
"   Boonville,        "    ..
"   Utica, **    ..
Lve. Utica, "    ..
Arr. Little Falls,     "
"   Amsterdam,    "
"    Schenectady,   "
"   Albany, "
"   Troy,
"   New York,      "
"   Pittsfield,     Mass.,   Boston & Albany
"   Springfield,      "
"    Palmer, "
"    Worcester,      "
"   Boston, "
Lve. Utica, N.Y.,
Arr. Bingham ton,   "
"   Scran ton, Pa.,
Lve. Utica, N.Y.,
Arr. Rome, "
"    Syracuse,        "
"   Rochester,      "
"   Buffalo, "
"    St. Thomas, Ont.,
"   Detroit, Mich.,
"   Toledo, Ohio,
"   Chicago, 111.,
Lve. Buffalo, N.Y.,
Arr. Ashtabula, Ohio,
"   Cleveland,      "
"   Toledo,
"  Chicago, in.-,
,45am
35pm
10.30pm
1.35am
D., L. & W.
N.Y. C. & H. R.
Mich. Central
L. S. & M. S,
50pm
00"
,54"
,00"
,35"
,50"
,20"
,45 "
,29 "
,52"
,25am
00"
,30"
,45"
,32"
,15"
,06"
25"
,50"
,55"
00pm
,25 "
,20am
2.50am
5.10"
7.25 "
11.35 "
3.15pm
5.45 "
6.10am
8.00"
11.14"
1.02pm
5.02 "
5.41am
9.03am
10.20 "
11.20 "
12.25pm
12.05"
1.23"
2.50 "
3.12"
3.45 "
4.50"
5.15"
5.50"
8.30"
10.00"
10.39 "
12.40am
3.38
5.00
6.25
5.30pm
9.45 "
1.20am
5.45pm
6.08 "
7.15 "
9.45 "
12.15am
4.10"
8.25 "
11.00"
8.00pm
12.45am
4.18
6.07
10.17
7.31pm
Ky
Lve. Ottawa C.P.Ry,
Arr. Brockville	
Lve. Brockville Gr.
Arr. G-ananoque	
"   Kingston	
"   Napanee	
"   Deseronto Junction	
"   Belleville	
"   Trenton	
"   Brighton	
"   Colborne	
"    Grafton	
"   Cobourg	
"   Port Hope	
"   Bowmanville	
"    Oshawa	
"   Whitby	
"   Toronto	
Lve. Toronto	
Arr. Georgetown	
"   Acton	
"    Gfuelph	
"   Berlin	
"   Stratford	
"    St. Marys	
"   London	
"    Sarnia, (Pt. Edward)	
"   Port Huron, (Ft. Gratiot)....
"   Ridgeway	
"   Detroit Junction	
"   Detroit...	
"   Chicago via C. & Gr
Lve. Brockville Gr.
Arr. Toronto	
Lve. Toronto	
"   Hamilton	
"    St. Catharines	
"   Niagara Falls , .
"    Suspension Bridge	
"   Buffalo Via N.Y.C;
10.45am
1.35pm
2.05
3.05
3.55
4.55
5.05
5.40
6.15
6.35
6.50
7.05
7.20
7.55
8.45
9.10
9.17
10.30
11.00
12.20am
12.40
1.12
1.50
3.00
3.25
10.30
6.40
7.00
8.00
9.35
9.40
7.45pm
2.05 "
10.30
11.00
12.15am
3.25
3.50
4.00
5.35
10.30pm
1.35am
1.55
3.00
3.35
4.40
4.50
5.30
6.05
6.25
6.40
6.50
7.10
7.38
8.17
8.35
8.43
10.00
12.15pm
1.25"
1.40 "
2 10"
2.45"
3.45"
4.20"
5.15"
6.40 "
7.00"
7.57"
9.20"
9.25"
8.10an
1.55"
10.00 "
1.00pm
2.25 "
6.41
7.05
7.15
8.40
Time to Montreal from all Stations on Canadian Pacific R'y given on
inside pages.
Refer to inside pages for Time-Table from Local Stations
to Brockville.
Time to Brockville from all Local Stations given on
inside pages. CANADIAN PACIFIC   RAILWAY.
EASTERN    DIVISION.
TIME-TABLE.
GOING   WEST.
Montreal and Ottawa to Smith's Fails,
Irish Creek, and Brockville.
STATIONS.
Montreal Lve
Hochelaga	
Mile End	
Sault aux Recollets(
St. Martin	
St. Martin Jct..
Ste. Rose	
Ste. Therese....
St. Augustin ...
Ste. Scholastiqu
St. Hermas	
Lachute	
St. .Philippe	
Grenville	
Calumet.... j ££
Pointe au Chene...
Montebello...	
Papineauville .
North Nation Mills
Thurso	
Rockland	
Buckingham ....
L'Ange Gardien.
East Templeton.
Gatineau	
Hull	
Ottawa.... |^l
Skead's	
Britannia ....
Bell's Corners
Stittsville	
Ashton	
Arr
Lve
Beckwith .....	
Franktown	
Welsh's	
Smith's Falls...
Story's	
Irish Creek.   .. .
Wolford	
Bell's	
Jelly's	
Bellamy's	
Clark's	
Fairfield	
Brockville...A r
Carleton Jct. <
.£ S
Morning
10.45am
10.50
10.56
11.04
11.15
11.34
11.47
12.08pm
12.22
12.42
12.56"
1.16
L35*
Express
and
Mixed.
10.25
10.35
12.10pm
12.15
§3.45
3.52
4.01
4.11
4.28
4.53
5.10
§6.00
6.17
6.33
6.52
7.15
7.25
7.35
7.52
8 00
8.05
8.17
8.27
8.37
9.00
Night
Express.
5.40pm
5.47
6.26
6.41
6.51
7.06
7.20
7.30
7.46
7.50
8.00
8 10
8.30
8.40
8.50
9.03
9.09
9.21
9.28
9.39
9.47
9.54
10.00
10.30|
10.50
11.03
11.35
11.50
12.10am
li'. 30*"
i2*.5o"*
1.14
L35*
GOING   EAST.
Brockville, Irish Creek and Smith's Falls to
Ottawa and Montreal,
STATIONS.
Brockville ..Lve
Fairfield	
Clark's	
Bellamy's	
Jelly's	
Bell's	
Wolford	
Irish Creek	
Story's	
Smith's Falls	
Welsh's	
Franktown	
Beckwith	
Carleton Jct. j ^
Ashton	
Stittsville	
Bell's Corners..
Britannia	
Skead's	
Ottawa.... j£^
Hull	
Gatineau	
East Templeton..
L'Ange Gardien...
Buckingham	
Rockland	
Thurso	
North Nation Mills]
Papineauville	
Montebello	
Pointe au Chene...
C"lumet j^
Grenville..	
St. Philippe	
Lachute	
St. Hermas .......
Ste. Scholastique..
St. Augustin	
Ste. Therese	
Ste. Rose	
St. Martin Jct	
St. Martin	
Sault aux Recollets
Mile End	
Hochelaga.    ...
Montreal Arr
5
H.IOam
7
10
4.30
12
14
16
21
4.55
25
28
5.15
31
37
5.30
41
Morning
Express.
5.50
6.00
7.00
8.15
8.20
8.28
8.37
9.09
9.16
9.29
9.40
9.55
10.14
10.25
10.35
10.39
10.56
11.07
11.20
11.30
11.40
11.56
;8.00am
8.17
8.22
8.44
8.50
8.55
9.03
9.28
9.40
10.00
10.10
10.30
10.45
11.00
12.10pm
12.26
1.01
1.20
1.30
1.41
1.50
$4.45
12.11pm
12.17
12.34
12.40
Mixed
and
6.21
6.31
6.55
7.06
.15
Night
Express.
4.10pm
4.45
5! 00*
5.30
5.43
5.53
6.05
6.19
6.35
6.50
6 55
7.02
7.10
7.21
7.30
7.40
7.48
8.00
8.10
8.30
9.00
9.04
9.21
9.31
9.45
9.55
10.05
10.20
10.25
10.34
10.39
10.48
10.53
10.58
Refreshments at Montreal, Calumet, Ottawa, and Carleton Junction. % Express. § Mixed.
t Ottawa to Brockville Daily, Sunday included. * Brockville to Ottawa Daily, Sunday included.
Q3F Trains run by Seventy-fifth Meridian or Eastern Standard Time.
ST. LAWRENCE AND OTTAWA RAILWAY. - W. CASSILS,  Receiver.
GOING SOUTH. — Ottawa to Prescott.
STATIONS.
Ottawa Lve
Chaudiere function	
Gloucester	
Manotick	
Osgoode 	
Kemptville	
Oxford	
Spencerville	
Prescott Arr
st
S o
7.00am
7.25
7.40
7.55
8.30
9.10
9.35
10.05
10.40
Express.
1.45pm
2.03
2.13
2.22
2.40
3.07
3.19
3.45
4.20
GOING NORTH. — Prescott to Ottawa.
STATIONS.
Prescott Lve
Spencerville	
Oxford	
Kemptville	
Osgoode 	
Manotick.	
Gloucester	
Chaudiere Junction	
Ottawa.... Arr
6.00am
6.45
7.15
7.40
8.30
8.55
9.10
9.35
10.00
Express.
5.00pm
5 30
5.50
6.05
6.30
6.49
7.00
7.12
7,30
TIME-TABLE —GOING WE8T — Montreal to Ottawa, Pembroke/and Sudbury.
STATIONS.
MONTREAL ••
Hochelaga	
Mile End	
Sault aux Recollets ..
St. Martin	
St. Martin Junction .
Ste. Rose	
Ste. Therese   	
St. Augustin .... —
Ste. Scholastique —
St. Hermas	
Lachute	
St. Philippe	
Grenville... s....... .
Calumet	
Pointe au Chene....
Montebello	
Papineauville	
North Nation Mills.
Thurso .#»	
Rockland	
Buckingham	
L'Ange Gardien	
East Templeton....
Gatineau 	
Hull	
OTTAWA
Skead's	
Britannia	
Bell's Corners .
Stittsville	
Ashton	
Carleton Junction .
Almonte	
Snedden's	
Pakenham	
Arnprior	
Braeside	
Sand Point.....'....
Castleford	
Russell's	
Renfrew 	
Haley's	
Cobden..	
Snake River	
Graham's	
Gov't Road	
PEMBROKE.
Pettewawa	
Chalk River	
Weston.,	
Bass Lake.	
Moorlake	
Mackey	
Rockliffe	
Bissett	
Deux Rivieres	
Klock	
Mattawa —
Renton	
Rutherglen..
Callander ...
Nosbonsing..
Thorncliff...
North Bay..,
Meadowside....
Sturgeon Falls .
Verner	
Veuve River....
Veuve	
Mark Stay	
Stinson	
Wahnapitae —
Romford	
SUDBURY
(Arr
Lve
( Arr
Lve
( Arr
Lve
\ Arr
I Lve
j Arr
> Lve
j Arr
I Lve
j Arr
> Lve
Morning
Express.
7.00am
7.08
7.17
7.28
7.31
7.3fe
7.44
7.50
8.06
8.17
8.28
8.43
8.52
9.09
9.13
9.23
9.35
9.55
10.05
10.15
10.27
10.34
10.48
10.55
11.07
11.17
11.25
11.30
Through
Express.
10.25
10.35
12.10pm
12.15
12.25
12.45
1.00
1.25
1.35
1.51
2.12
2.30
2.43
3.13
3.31
3.53
4.38
5.00
5.20
Local
Express.
Evening
Express.
5.40pm
5.47
6.11
6.26
6.41
6.51
7.06
7.20
7.30
7,46
7.50
8.00
8.10
8.30
8.40
8.50
9.03
9.09
9.21
9.28
9.39
9.47
9.54
10.00
3.45pm
3.52
4.01
4.11
4.28
4.53
5.10
5.45
6.00
6.10
6.27
6.53
7.03
7.13
7.31
7.46
7.58
8.24
8.47
9.05
9.16
9.27
9.45
10.20
10.50
.00pm
.17
.31
.51
.21
.36
.16
.16
.51
10.41.
11.21
12.06am
12.21
12.36
1.06
1.31
2.00
2.40
3.00
3.44
4.34
5.24
5.39
6.14
6.55
It.15
7.45
8.20
St.
Eust'che.
Mixed.
Refreshments at Montreal, Calumet, Ottawa, Carleton Jc, Mattawa.    Trains do not stop at Stations where no time is given. TIME-TABLE —GOING EAST —Sudbury, Pembroke and Ottawa to Montreal.
STATIONS.
§ GO
Local
Express.
Morning
Express.
Afterno'n
Express.
Through
Express.
Mixed.
Mixed.
St.
Jerome.
Mixed.
St.
Eust'che
Mixed.
SUDBURY Lve
10.00pm
10.35
11.05
11.25
12.06am
12.36
12.56
1.46
2.36
3.09
3.38
4.25
6.00
6.25
6.55
7.10
7 25
8 05
8.40
8.50
9.21
10.01
10.51
11.26
11.51
12.16pm
12.40
12.53
1.Q8
Romford	
6
12
16
24
31
34
45
56
63
69
80
87
95
99
102
115
125
135
145
157
167
171
179
186
192
198
208
219
225
228
232
238
245
253
256
260
266
269
271
280
285
289
295
300
309
315
319
322
324
326
330
335
341
345
351
354
361
366
370
380
385
387
396
401
407
412
417
425
427
432
433
436
440
443
444
Wahnapitae *.	
Stinson	
Mark Stay	
Veuve 	
Veuve River	
Verner	
Sturgeon Falls.	
U<>rihBay jl>e
Thorncliff   	
Nosbonsing   	
Callander  	
\
Mattawa j ^
Deux Rivieres	
Bissett	
Moorlake	
Bass Lake	
Weston	
Chalk River j ^rr
Pettewawa	
1.50pm
2.10
7.00am
7.30
PEMBROKE JlvI
Gov't Road	
2.32
8.05
8.23
8.33
8.43
9.08
9.30
9.55
10.02
10.15
10.35
10.42
10.53
11.17
11.33
11.43
11.58
12.10pm
12.26
1.01
1.20
1.30
1.41
1.50
3.16
3.31
3.49
Haley's	
t
Russell's	
Castleford	
Sand Point	
4.16
Braeside	
4.28
4.43
Snedden's	
5.01
5.15
5.25
5.35
5.50
6.01
Carleton Junction j £^£
Ashton f	
OTTAWA \iH
Hull	
4.45pm
6.17
6.50
6.55
7.02
7.10
7.21
7.30
7.40
7.48
v8.00
8.10
8.30
8.49
8.15am
8.20
8.28
8.37
8.49
8.58
9.09
9.16
9.29
9.40
9.55
10.14
10.25
10.35
10.39
10.56
11.07
11.20
11.30
11.40
11.56
Rockland     	
Thurso	
North Nation Mills	
5.59
Pnlnmpt                                       ) -^"rr
6.21
6.31
oaiumet  j Lve
9.66
9.04
9.21
9.31
9.45
9.55
10.05
10.20
10.25
10.34
St Philippe	
"6.hh"
7.06
Ste. Therese	
7.51am
7.56
8.06
8.08
8.13
8.23
8.29
8.35
12.11pm
7.52
St. Martin	
12.17
10.39
10.48
10.53
10.58
Mile End	
12.34
12.40
MONTREAL Arr
8.15
| Refreshments at Montreal, Calumet, Ottawa, Carleton Jc, Mattawa.    Trains do not stop at Stations where no time is given.
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  RAILWAY.
EASTERN    DIVISION.
TIME-TABLE.
GOING WEST. - Montreal to St. Jerome.
STATIONS.
Montreal Lve|
Hochelaga	
Mile End	
Sault aux Recollets	
St. Martin	
St. Martin Junction ....
Ste. Rose 	
Ste. Therese    j £™|
St. Lin Junction..	
St. Janvier .'	
St. Jerome Arr
Evening
Mixed.
5.00pm
5.07
5.17
5.30
5.34
5.40
5.53
6 00
6.10
6.18
6.35
6.55
GOING WEST. - Montreal to St. Lin.
STATIONS.
Montreal Lve
Hochelaga	
Mile End	
Sault aux Recollets	
St. Martin	
St. Martin Junction	
Ste. Rose	
Ste. Therese j f^
St. Lin Junction	
Mascouche	
Ste. Anne	
Les Plaines	
St. tin Arr|
Evening
% 1
Mixed.
5.00pm
i
5.07
4
5.17
8
5.30
11
5.34
12
5.40
17
5.53
19
6.00
6.20
21
6.25
24
6.35
27
6.45
30
6.50 '
34
7.10
GOING WEST. — Montreal to St. Eustache.
STATIONS.
Montreal Lve
Hochelaga	
Mile End	
Sault aux Recollets	
St. Martin	
St. Martin Junction	
Ste. Rose	
Ste. Therese ......... j f7
St. Eustache Arr
S S
Evening
Mixed.
5.00pm
5.07
5.17
5.30
5.34
5.40
5.53
6.00
6.10
6.35
GOING WEST.—Ottawa to Ay I mer.
STATIONS.
Ottawa Lve
Hull.	
Belmont	
Duchesne Mills	
Aylmer Arr J
GOING NORTH
9.00*
9.09
9.15
No. 51
1.15,1
1.24
1.30
1.45
1.55
No. 53
5.10,1
5.20
5.30
5.38
5.45
9.40^
9.56
10.03
10.15
10.25
Smith's Falls to Perth.
STATIONS.
Smith's F'ls Lv
Pike Falls ...
Perth Arr
No.40|
Exp,
|No.42;
Mix'd
§5-30£
5.47
6.05
10.10*
10.30
10.50
No. 44
Mix'd
12.55fi|
1.15
1.35
No. 46
Exp
No. 48
Mix'd
5.15fi
5.35
5.55
12t40£
1.00
1.20
GOING EAST. —St. Jerome to Montreal.
STATIONS.
St. Jerome .Lve|
St. Janvier	
St. Lin Junction......
Ste. Therese..... j ^|
Ste. Rose	
St. Martin Junction	
St. Martin 	
Sault aux Recollets	
Mile End j
Hochelaga	
Montreal Arr
Jj i
Morning
£n   *5
Mixed.
7.00am
6
7.18
12
7.35
7.45
14
7.51
16
7.56
21
8.06
22
8.08    .
25
8.13
29
8.23
32
8.29
33
8.35
GOING EAST. —St. Lin to Montreal
STATIONS.
St. T.in • -Lve
Les Plaines	
Ste. Anne	
Mascouche	
St. Lin Junction	
Ste. Therese \l7e\
Ste. Rose	
St. Martin Junction —
St. Martin	
Sault aux Recollets ...
Mile End	
Hochelaga	
Montreal Arr|
g   a
* 3
Morning
S   03
Mixed.
6.40am
4
6.52
7
7.04
10
7.15
13
7.25
15
7.32
7.51
17
7.56
22
8.06
23
8.08
26
8.13
30
8.23
33
8.29
|    34
8.35
GOING EAST. —St. Eustache to Montreal.
STATIONS.
St. Eustache Lve
Ste Therese..... Itvll
Ste. Rose	
St. Martin Junction	
St. Martin	
Sault aux Recollets	
Mile End.....	
Hochelaga	
Montreal Arrl
Morning
Mixed.
7.20am
7.45
7.51
7.56
8.06
8.08
8.13
8.23
8.29
8.35
GOING EAST.—Aylmer to Ottawa.
STATIONS.
Aylmer Lve
Duchesne Mills	
Belmont	
Hull	
Ottawa Arr
No. 50
7.50*
7.55
8.01
8.21
8.27
No. 52
10.45^
10.55
11.10
11.33
11.40
No. 54
3.40£
3.46
3.52
4.05
4.15
No.5U
8.00£
8.06
8.12
8.25
8.30
GOING SOUTH. — Perth to Smith's Falls.
STATIONS.
Perth Lv|
Pike Falls,...
Smith's F'ls Ai
No. 31
Exp.
No. 41
Mix'd
'4.15^
4.30
4.50
9.00^
9.18
9.40
No. 43|
Mix'd
U.50ft
12.10,5
12.30
No. 451
Exp.
4.05G
4.25
4.45
No. 47
Mix'd
6.20£
6.40
7.00
t Sunday, not Monday.
§ Daily, Sundays included.
W Trains run by Seventy-fifth Meridian or Eastern Standard Time.

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