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The Chung Collection

Canadian Pacific breakfast and dinner menus from 1936 Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Dining Car Service 1936

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Painting  by MARIUS  HUBERT-ROBERT
LAKE LOUISE
fram ike Ckaieau CANADIAN PACIFIC PI1H1H1G CAR SERVICE
Dinner Suggestions
Price opposite each Item includes the Full Course Meal
Celery
Jellied Consomme
Ripe or Green Olives
Thick Ox Tail
Grilled Lake Trout, or Whitefish,   1.00
Curried Eggs with Rice,  1.00
Fricassee of Chicken, 1.25
"Red Brand" Roast Ribs of Beef, 1.25
Canadian Pacific Sirloin Steak, 1.50
New Boiled Potatoes
Garden Peas
Lettuce and Tomato Salad
Strawberry Shortcake
Apple Pie
Cheese with Crackers
Ice Cream with Cake
Tea
Bread
Coffee
or
Rolls
ti
Buttermilk
It will be a great aid to the service and will avoid any possibility of mistakes, if passengers will kindly ask for
meal order Blanks, and upon them will write their orders, because Stewards and Waiters are not allowed to serve
any food without a meal check.
W. A. Cooper, Manager, Sleeping, Dining, Parlor, Restaurant and News Service, Montreal,
3—4.   Tor. 11-36
C/IMAPIA1 PACIFIC PIIMIUG CAR SER1
Queen Olives, 20      Celery, 20
Jellied Consomme
A la Carte
RELISHES
Tomato Juice, 20      Chow Chow, 15
Grapefruit Cocktail, 30
SOUP Tureen 30, Cup 20
Mixed Pickles, 15
Curried Eggs, 60
FISH
Grilled Lake Trout, Maitre D'Hotel, 70
ENTREES
ROAST
"Red Brand" Roast Beef, 85
Thick Ox Tail
Fricassee Chicken, 85
CHOPS, STEAKS, ETC.—FROM THE GRILL
"Red Brand" Sirloin Steak, 1.50 "Red Brand" Small Steak, 1.00
Bacon (3 strips) 35 (5 strips) 5 5 Country Sausages, 55 Bacon and Eggs, 65
Ham (y2 cut) with 1 Egg 5 5, with 2 Eggs, 65    Broiled or Fried Hami}/2 cut) 45, (full cut), 65
Lamb Chops (One) 35 (Two) 65
Individual Pot of Baked Beans, (Hot or Cold) 35, with Tea Biscuits, 50
EGGS, OMELETS, ETC.
Boiled (One) 20 (Two) 35 Fried (One) 20 (Two) 35
Poached on Toast (One) 20 (Two) 40
Tomato or Cheese, 50 Savory, Spanish or Ham, 60
Scrambled, 35
Omelets:—Plain, 45
VEGETABLES
Mashed or Boiled Potatoes, 20
French Fried or Hashed Browned Potatoes, 2 5
New Green Peas, 20
New Potatoes, 20
New Asparagus, Drawn Butter, 3 5
Imported Sardines, 60
Corn Muffins, 15
Toast, 15
Canadian Cheddar
COLD DISHES
Canadian Sardines, Fancy Pack, 35
COLD MEATS
Ham, 75 Ox Tongue, 75 Beef, 75 Chicken, 80
(with potato salad 15 cents extra)
SALADS—WITH FRENCH OR MAYONNAISE DRESSING
Chicken, 65 Lettuce and Tomato, 35 Combination, 40 Head Lettuce, 35
New Asparagus, 35 Sliced Tomatoes, 35 Sliced Cucumbers, 35
DESSERTS
Apple Pie, 20 Grapefruit (half), 25 Strawberry Shortcake, 2 5
Vanilla Ice Cream with Cake, 2 5 English Plum Pudding, Hard Sauce, 30
Assorted Fresh Fruit, 35
MARMALADES, JAMS OR JELLIES 15
(in individual jars)
Quince Jelly Bramble berry Jelly Crabapple Jelly Raspberry Jam
Strawberry Jam Orange or Grapefruit Marmalade Preserved Strawberries, 2 5
Sliced Pineapple, 30 Preserved Figs 30, with Cream, 40
Individual Canadian Comb or Strained Honey, 2 5
BREAD AND BUTTER SERVICE PER PERSON
Rolls, 15 White, Hovis, Brown and Raisin Bread, 15
Hot Biscuits, 15 Milk Toast, 30
Cream Toast, 40
CHEESE WITH CRACKERS 30
Canadian Cream Gruyere
Roquefort
TEA, COFFEE, ETC.
Coffee, Pot, 2 5, served with Hot Milk or Cream Demi Tasse Coffee, 15 Tea, Pot, 2 5
Kaffee Hag Coffee, 2 5 Instant Postum, 2 5 Ovaltine, 20 Cocoa, Pot, 2 5
Malted Milk, 20 Fleischmann's Yeast, per cake, 10
Individual Sealed Bottle Milk, 15 Individual Bottle Fresh Buttermilk, 15
PASSENGERS WILL KINDLY REFRAIN FROM SMOKING IN THIS ROOM
s mmwmmm^m^mm^wMW&mmmmmwmmwm^wm^m ® wmwmwm%mwm%m%mffi£mmw%^ ss AS OTHERS SEE US!
I HIS Canadian Pacific patron expresses the views of thousands of other passengers who have travelled on comfortable Canadian Pacific trains through the heart
of the Canadian Rockies, with their crowning jewels of Banff, Lake Louise and
Emerald Lake, unsurpassed as vacation resorts.
(Reprint from "Vancouver Daily Province," October 24, 1934)
n li
By GWEN CASH.
" There isn't a train I wouldn't take,
No matter where it's going."
THEY are Edna St. Vincent Millay's
words, but they certainly express a
sentiment     with     which     I     fully
concur.
Quite apart from getting there, I like
to feel the throb of the wheels as I lie in
my berth reading the grimmest detective yarn procurable. I like the high,
lonely shriek of the engine as it passes
into a tunnel. I like coming across
someone who knew my cousin's aunt,
once removed, in Rhodesia, or some
equally remote relative in an equally
remote spot, or talking with a Rotarian
from Kansas City, and powdering my
nose in the company of a lady on her
way through from China dreaming of
Bow Bells. It's fun sitting in the observation car observing people as well as
scenery. Fun and enlightening. Even
swaying and staggering through the
cars towards the effluvia of food is a
minor adventure. All sorts of travellers,
with every kind of attitude to travel,
line the route. Some sprawl in complete relaxation or boredom, reading or
playing cards. Others sit primly erect,
as if they would leap from the
train, fully caparisoned, on the slightest
provocation.
• UT, more than anything, I like getting on the train in Vancouver late
at night, as I did recently en route for
Lake Louise. The station was dimly lit.
The '" portahs' " teeth flashed in dusky
faces. Their eyes gleamed in barely discernible sockets. Inside, the Pullman
berths were already made up. Everything was beautifully neat, unlittered as
yet with the debris of travel. A sense of
adventure vibrated in the air. " All
aboard " echoed and re-echoed musically
and mysteriously down the length of the
train. Much more musically, a thousand
times more mysteriously, than ever it
did in daylight.   We're off!
Now, Lake Louise had hitherto been
my Carcasonne. Almost a dozen times
have I passed through its station since
I first came to British Columbia. Once,
three years ago, I stopped off at Banff,
and then, when fate forbade me adventuring further, resigned myself to what
I then felt was the inevitable. I was
never, it seemed, to see Lake Louise. I
even   told   myself   it   was   better   so.    I
should   probably   be   disappointed   anyway.
* *        * *
A LOT I knew about it. That's the
hopeful part about life. A lot we
ever knew about it. Isn't there always
a chance, slim as it may seem sometimes, of something interesting or exciting or vital round the corner?
As for being disappointed! Great
peaks swept upwards towards a sky of
ethereal beauty, translucent blue by day,
silver starred at night. The lake was
green. Green as jade. Green as creme de
menthe. Green as fairy emeralds. Iceland
poppies, a host of gay and golden butterflies danced upon its rim. Between
mountain wings shone the forbidding,
enigmatic splendor of a glacier. The air
made you feel you could tackle most
things successfully. Disappointing! How
silly.
" There isn't a train I wouldn't take,
no matter where it's going." The wheels
clicked over to their rhythmic monotone
as they bore us towards the Pacific. A
lady from IVIunroe, Ohio—at least, I
think it was Ohio—told me about her
husband, who was a doctor, and in his
youth, a missionary to the Indians, Texas
way. He had fought in the late European war. I told her my son spent the
summer herding sheep up the North
Thompson River. A girl from Los Angeles explained how the N.R.A. codes
worked in the department store where
she was employed. And a gentleman
from New York said he decided he and
his wife might just as well spend some
of their substance travelling as watch
their investments disappear. An attitude in which a good many of his compatriots concurred—or something. For
number three was running in two sections, with Americans representative of
most of the various states aboard. A
young English bride-to-be was on her
way to join her fiance in Hongkong*; an
old man, his daughter in Victoria.
At Albert Canyon, the mellow sunshine of late afternoon touched the surrounding peaks to glory and a grateful
breeze rose from the torrent dashing its
way along the narrow gorge below.
"All aboard! " Heterogeneous numbers
scrambled to sanctuary.
The fat gentleman from Montreal, on
his way to sell ready-to-wear to the
trade in Vancouver and Victoria, removed an over-sized cigar from his lips
and began to tell a story about an Irishman and a Scotsman and a Jew. But
through the windows lovely picture slid
into lovely picture, and dusk softly absorbed  the summer  day.
Yes. " There isn't a train I wouldn't
take, no matter where it's going."
Canadian  Pacific
WORLD'S GREATEST TRAVEL SYSTEM MALAHAT DRIVE
l/ancauver Jj±lah.d   . CAMAPIAIU PACIFIC DIIUIW-C CAR SERVICE ' \T:
Breakfast Suggestions
FRUITS
Orange Juice
Pineapple Juice
Tomato Juice
Fresh Strawberries
Sliced Orange
Prunes
Grapefruit (Half)
65 Cents
^sxsnsmsm @
Rolls
Tea
Choice of Fruit or Cereal
Boiled, Fried or Scrambled Eggs
Grilled Ham or Bacon
Toast Muffins
Coffee Milk
85 Cents
Choice of Fruit and Cereal
Grilled Lake Trout Sausage and Wheatcakes
Bacon or Ham with Egg
Marmalade or Jam
Rolls Toast Hot Biscuits
Tea Coffee Milk
Rolls
Tea
$1.00
Choice of Fruit and Cereal
Grilled or Fried Fish
Bacon or Ham and Eggs
Lamb Chop
Spanish Omelet
Hashed Brown Potatoes
Marmalade or Jam
Toast
Coffee
Muffins
Milk
,, >/; CAlllAPMUll PACIFICPimiMG CAR
A la Carte
FRUITS, ETC.
Orange Juice, 2 5 Pineapple Juice, 20 Tomato Juice, 20
Grapefruit (half), 2 5 Stewed Prunes 20, with Cream, 30
Sliced Banana with Cream, 2 5 Grape Juice, 20 Sliced Orange, 20
Assorted Fresh Fruit, 35 Fresh Strawberries with Cream, 25
CEREALS WITH MILK 20, WITH CREAM 30
It will be a great aid to the service and will avoid any possibility of mistakes, if passengers will kindly ask for
meal order Blanks, and upon them will write their orders, because Stewards and Waiters are not allowed to serve
any food without a meal check.
W. A. Cooper, Manager, Sleeping, Dining, Parlor, Restaurant and News Service, Montreal.
3—4.   Tor. 11-36
FISH
Grilled Lake Trout, 70
Fried Fresh Fillets of Fish, 70
CHOPS, STEAKS, ETC.—FROM THE GRILL
"Red Brand" Sirloin Steak,1.50 "Red Brand" Small Sirloin Steak, 1.00
Ham i}/2 cut) with 1 Egg 5 5, with 2 Eggs, 65 Sugar Cured Ham Steak, 75
Bacon (3 strips) 35, (5 strips) 5 5 Bacon and Eggs, 65
Lamb Chops (One) 35, (Two) 65 Broiled or Fried Ham i}/2 cut) 45, (full cut) 65
Griddle Cakes with Canadian Maple Syrup, 3 5
EGGS, OMELETS, ETC.
Boiled (One) 20, (Two) 35 Poached on Toast (One) 20, (Two) 40
Scrambled, 3 5 Fried (One) 20, (Two) 35
Omelets:—Plain, 45 Tomato or Cheese, 50 Je*ly> Ham or Spanish, 60
French Fried, Hashed Browned or Saute Potatoes, 2 5
Quince Jelly
Strawberry Jam
MARMALADES, JAMS OR JELLIES  15
(in individual jars)
Crabapple Jelly Brambleberry Jelly
Raspberry Jam Orange or Grapefruit Marmalade
Preserved Strawberries, 25
Individual Canadian Comb or Strained Honey, 2 5 Sliced Pineapple, 30
Preserved Figs 30, with Cream, 40
BREAD AND BUTTER SERVICE PER PERSON
French Toast, Currant Jelly, 45
Toast, 15 Milk Toast, 30
White, Hovis, Brown and Raisin Bread, 15
White and Graham Rolls, 15 Corn Muffins, 15
Cream Toast, 40
Raisin Bran Muffins, 15
Hot Biscuits, 15
TEA, COFFEE, ETC.
Coffee Pot 25 (served with Hot Milk or Cream)
Kaffee Hag, Coffee, Pot 2 5 Tea, Pot 2 5 Ovaltine, 20 Malted Milk, 20
Cocoa, Pot 2 5 Instant Postum, 2 5
Individual Bottle Fresh Buttermilk, 15 Individual Sealed Bottle Milk, 15
Fleischmann's Yeast, per cake, 10
PASSENGERS WILL KINDLY REFRAIN FROM SMOKING IN THIS ROOM
mm^mmmmm^mwmwmm&mmmmwmmmm^mmmmm m mwmmwm^mwm&mmmm^mmm^mwmmmmmmm^m g FIFTY YEARS  OF VANCOUVER'S
PROGRESS
The Saga of a Great City
VANCOUVER'S three hundred thousand citizens have set aside the Summer
of 1936—July 1st to September 7th,
inclusive—to observe their Golden
Jubilee. In a two-month season of
gaiety, mirth and music they will also
have time for serious reflection on the
really remarkable growth.of the city of
which they are so proud, and to honor
the pioneers whose faith and courage
laid the early foundations of her greatness.
It was on April 6th, 1886, that the late
Mayor M. A. McLean and Vancouver's
first city council saw passed through the
British Columbia legislature the bill incorporating the original town of Granville, as it had been known, into the city
of Vancouver. Then a collection of raw
frame buildings and dwellings centred
around the famous old Hastings sawmill
which gave its name to one of the city's
leading thoroughfares. The young community had little time to enjoy her newly-
won civic status, for on Whitsunday,
June 13, 1886, there occurred the
disastrous fire which reduced the settlement to blackened ruins.
Undismayed, however, and with pioneer
courage undiminished, the early settlers,
aided by cash donations from Winnipeg,
Toronto, Montreal and other older
members of the Canadian civic sisterhood,
set out forthwith to raise from the ashes
of its devastation a new and greater city.
How well these early settlers builded,
and how well oncoming generations
achieved fulfilment of pioneer dreams and
aspirations, is evident from a mere glance
at Vancouver's important position in
Canadian and world commerce. Her
year-round, landlocked and spacious
harbor, ringed round by timbered
mountains and guarded by the scenic
Lion's Gate, shelters the shipping of the
seven seas; her hinterland produces
untold wealth in timber, minerals and
fish products, and on her balmy shores
rest world travellers between voyages to
and from Australia, New Zealand,
Hawaii and the Far East.
Canadian
WORLD'S   GREATEST
ByTRAVERS COLEMAN.
Brief is Vancouver's history, but romantic
and colorful as are the sagas of few cities.
Her fifty years of steady and sometimes
spectacular progress saw the transition
from ox-cart to aeroplane, from paddle-
wheel steamer to speedy, graceful white
Empress liners of the Canadian Pacific
fleet, which make the run from Lion's Gate
to Yokohama breakwater in ten days—the
transition from wooden shacks to skyscrapers   and   handsome,   landscaped villas.
Selected by the shrewd Sir William Van
Horne as the final western terminus of the
Canadian Pacific Railway, Vancouver was
a city in name and aspirations, if but a
village in size, when that historic "first
through train" from Montreal to the
Pacific reached Port Moody, twelve miles
to the east of her, on July 4, 1886.
When the Canadian Pacific rails were
extended to Coal Harbor, near Vancouver's lovely Stanley Park, Vancouver
welcomed the arrival of the first transcontinental train to her own immediate
shores on May 23, 1887.
From that point, bound inextricably to the
fortunes of Canada's first transcontinental
railway, Vancouver has marched through
the years courageously.
Now, however, the great city by the
Lion's Gate is preparing to throw a few
backward glances, just by way of catching up with the dramatic kaleidoscope of
her past, and she is Finding the prospect
alluring. Plans for her 1936 Golden
Jubilee will include, on July 3, a
pageant at Port Moody to re-enact the
stirring scenes surrounding the arrival of
the first Canadian Pacific train from Montreal, which ushered in a new era for the
tiny Pacific settlement. Throughout the
summer the city will be en fete in celebration, amid gaiety, lights and music, of
epochal and significant events in Vancouver's story.
The world is being invited to Vancouver's generous borders, and her hospitable citizens are mustering to extend
memorable  greetings  and  fellowship.
Pacific
TRAVEL   SYSTEM This is a souvenir of trip
on the
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Hie Route of Scenic Grandeur
and
Unsurpassed Service
9 3 L 

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