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Canadian Pacific lunch menu from 1926 Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Dining Car Service Jul 19, 1926

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 £ /*£ -j£&jeJ»~ ' 7. a^ A. !", ■. Yv"v T'a'xC : ':?'! C
%•
VOYAGE   DE   L'UNIVERSITE   DE   MONTREAL
A   TRAVERS   LE   CANADA
 9	
LUNCH
Potage Jardiniere
Kadis Tomates Tranchees
Poisson Blanc Grille, Maitre d'Hotel
Jeune Poulet Roti a la Canadienne
Navets Piles Pommes de Terre Bouillies
Viandes Froides Assorties, Salade de Pommes de Terre
Salade Combinaison , v '
Creme Fouettee a la Gelee
Fromage Avec Biscuits
The Cafe Lait
The a la Glace
Juillet 19, 1926
BOISSON
PRODUITS   DU   CALEDONIA   SPRINGS
DEMI
BOUTEILLE
ADANAC   DRY   GINGER    ALE	
.15
.25
MAGI   CALEDONIA   SALINE   WATER   SPRINGS       -        -        -
.15
.25
EAU   DE  TABLE   MOUSSEUSE   ADANAC   ------
.15
.25
ADANAC   SODA   WATER         --	
.15
.20
DUNCAN   EAU    MOUSSEUSE   APERITISE         -        -        -
.25
IND.
JUS   DE   RAISIN    CONCORDE     -        -        -     '   -        - .15
LOGANBERRY    JUICE    -        -        -        -        -        -        - .15
JUS   DE   RAISIN    HIGHBALL       -----
LOGANBERRY    HIGHBALL -        -        -        -        -
LIMONADE     NATURE     -',■'." -
LIMONADE   AU   SODA   -------
ADANAC   DRY   GINGER   ALE       -        -        -        -        -
CANADA   DRY   GINGER   ALE       -----
DREWRY'S   DRY   GINGER   ALE   -        -
COCA  COLA       ---------
HIRES'   ROOT   BEER       -------
ORANGE   CRUSH     -        -        -        -        -        -
LIME    CRUSH    ---------
LEMON    CRUSH - ■■      -        -
EAU    DE   TABLE
MAGI   CELEBIC   EAU   MOUSSEUSE   -       ' -      ■-
EAU   MOUSSEUSE   DE  TABLE   ADANAC
EAU    APOLLINARIS -        -        -        -        -        -        -
EAU   DE   LITHIA   WHITE   ROCK -        -        -        -
EAU    DE   VICHY	
EAU    DE   SELTZER,   ETC.
EAU   DE   SODA   ADANAC	
BROMO    SELTZER    -        -        -
EAU    MOUSSEUSE   APERITISE   DUNCAN
CIGARES    DE   HAVANA   CHOISIS
CIGARETTES   DE    EYGPTE
CIGARETTES   DE   VIRGINIE
CIGARETTES    TURQUES      -        -
JUILLET,    1926
CIGARES   ET   CIGARETTES
2 pour .25
par paquet
PAR PAQUET
PAR PAQUET
DEMI  BOUTEILLE
.30
.30
.15
.30
.15
.25
.15
.25
.15
.25
.15
.15
.15
.15
.15
DEMI
BOUTEILLE
.15
.25
.15
.25
.20
.30
.20
.30
.20
.25
IND.
DEMI
BOUTEILLE
.15
.20
.15
.15
.20
.35
.25
.25
.35
.25
.30
.45 BLACKFOOT TRAVOIS AND CAYUSE.
By Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance.
Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance, the author, is a full-blooded Indian, a chief of the blood tribe of Alberta. He is a graduate of
Carlisle, where he gained a reputation in university sports. The chief was appointed to West Point in 1915, but relinquished this appointment in 1916 to go overseas with the Canadian forces. Entering the field as a private, he served with distinction, was twice wounded and
returned at the end of the war with the rank of captain. He is at present writing a history of the Indians of the Canadian plains, British
Columbia and the North Country.
/^\N the opposite side of this menu two Blackfoot squaws are seen with their horses hitched to the travois—the
^^ Indian's wagon. Previous to the coming of the white man into Alberta, the Indians carried all of their
worldly possessions on this crude, yet handy, contrivance, which consists of two crossed-poles dragging behind
the horse and bearing between them a skin hammock. Besides the tepee covering, bedding and other living
necessities, one or two children are also placed on this hammock and transported from camp to camp. The baby
is carried in its little moss-bag on the mounted mother's back, and another child usually sits behind her.
Before the horse was introduced on the northwestern plains, which was just over one hundred years ago,
the Blackfeet and other Plains Tribes hitched the travois to their dogs, massive animals bearing a strong strain
of  the  timber  wolf.
The Blackfeet were the first Indians of the plains to obtain the horse, having stolen a small herd from the
Kootenays of the Southeastern British Columbia, in early part of the last century. The Kootenays had acquired
the nucleus of their herd from the Cayuse tribe, of Oregon, which caused the Indian pony to become universally
known  as the  "cayuse."
When the horse first came among the Blackfeet, they did not know its use. They had never seen an animal,
outside of the dog, which could be domesticated, or which could outrun the buffalo; nor one that was invulnerable
to the attacks of large beasts of prey, such as the mountain lion and the buffalo-grizzly. The horse was so powerful, capable and noble in bearing, they regarded it as a sacred or supernatural being, and they ascribed its origin
either to the lakes or to the sun. When, later, they learned from tribes to the south that the horse could be ridden
and used as a pack animal, they immediately associated it with the dog, which had been their only burden bearer.
As a result, all western tribes still refer to the horse as a "dog." The Southern Sioux call the horse, shunka-
waken, meaning, uholy-dog"; the Northern Sioux, shunka-tonka—big-dog; the Crees, mist-atim—big-dog; and
the   Blackfeet,   ponoka-mita—elk-dog.
The coming of the horse, with its great speed'and endurance and its fearlessness, unleashed the fighting instinct
of the Plains Indian and made of him a ferocious raider. He soon became the most expert horseman in the world.
In battle he would often taunt the enemy by galloping up and down in front of their position, with nothing but the
sole of his moccasin showing above the animal's back. Riding at a terrific pace, he would sometimes dive under his
horse's neck and come up on the opposite side, repeating this performance again and again in the midst of a shower
of  enemy  arrows.
When going into battle a Blackfoot warrior would tie up his horse's tail, append a feather to its fetlocks,
and a scalp to its chin, and paint his "Medecine"—usually some animal—on its withers and thighs. If the horse
had been wounded in a previous battle, the wound would be painted where it occurred. The print of a hand
on the horse's shoulder, in red paint, meant that it had run down an enemy in battle.
Grazing in the background of this photograph may be seen a part of the Blackfoot herd of 4,000 horses,
which range on their large reserve, bordering upon the south side of the Canadian Pacific Railway tracks from
Bassano to Namaka, Alberta—a distance of forty-six miles.

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