The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

Notes by the way--through the Canadian Rockies Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1939

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0356802.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0356802.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0356802-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0356802-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0356802-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0356802-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0356802-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0356802-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0356802-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0356802.ris

Full Text

 NOTES  BY THE WAY-THROUGH
c
hi'I D
0^>   ^
N OTES
BY    THE    WAY
D
□ D
H
CO
<
O
O
O
HH
o
<
PL.
H.
O
H
CO
W
o
o
P5
55
P
<
55
<
O
W
0
ID
O
s
_: s
.,;„,-■
Twin Falls, in the Yoho Valley
1 I—
EQUIPMENT
ALL YEAR
(Except During Summer Service)
Observation, Parlor and Dining Car, Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis, (acj
Standard Drawing Room Compartment Sleeper, St. Paul, Minneapolis and
Vancouver,  (ac)
Tourist Sleeper, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Vancouver.
Lounge Car — Dining Car — Coaches.
(ac) Regularly assigned cars AIR-CONDITIONED
Example
DAILY
FOR
SUMMER SERVICE
PLEASE SEE PAGE 3
Ry.
DAILY
Example
Sat.
Sue.
P. M.
3.00
Lv....
Ar ...
DAILY
 Chicago (CT)	
 Madison	
....Ar
 Lv
C. &
N". W.
P. M.
6.30
3.05
Sat.
Sat.
Sat.
Sal.
1.15
LV....
Ar....
 Milwaukee	
 Madi son	
.....Ar
 Lv
!<
7.00
5.00
Sat.
Sat.
Sat.
Lv....
 Madison	
 Ar
Soo
C P K
Str.
3.05
10.50
8.45
7.15
6.45
6.35
3.15
12.40
9.19
8.17
1.66
3.38
2.35
1.15
7.55
6.45
8.10
7.10
5.35
1.35
3.25
2.05
8.50
7.15
6.35
1.55
1.15
*9.00
Sat.
Sat.
8.02
9.30
9.15
10.15
10.25
1.35
4.05
6.50
8.25
11.37
1.15
2.20
1.15
7.00
7.10
8.05
8.45
11.25
12.36
1.15
1.00
6.20
8.45
* 10.30
3.10
1.30
9 00
Sat
Sat.
Sat.
Sat.
Sat.
Sun.
Ar....
Lv...
Ar....
Lv ...
Ar....
 ....St. Paul.....	
 Minneapolis	
 Lv
....Ar
 Lv
 Ar
Sat.
Sat.
Sat.
Sat.
Sat.
Sun.
Sat.
Sun.
 Valley City	
Fri.
Sun.
Fri.
Sun.
 Minot	
Fri.
Fri.
Sun.
Sun.
Sun.
Ar....
Lv....
Ar	
 Portal, N. D. (CT)	
....North Portal, Sask. (MT)	
 Lv
 Ar
Lv
Fri.
Fri.
Fri.
Sun.
Mon.
Lv....
Ar....
 Moose Jaw	
 Ar
....Lv
Fri.
Thu.
Mon.
Lv....
Ar
  Calgary	
 Banff	
...   Ar
 Lv
. Lv
Thu.
Thu.
Ar	
Thu.
Mon.
Mon.
Ar....
Lv....
Ar
 Field (E'ld Lk)..(MT)	
 Field (E'ldLk)..(PT)	
 Lv
....Ar
....Lv
 Lv
....Ar
 Lv
 Ar
. Lv
Thu.
Thu.
Thu.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues
Ar....
Lv....
Ar....
Lv....
Ar
 Vancouver	
C.P. S. S. Line
 "Vancouver	
 Victoria	
 Victoria	
 Seattle	
Wed
Wed.
Wed.
Wed.
Wed.
CT—Central Time; MT—Mountain Time; PT—Pacific Time.
All train schedules shown in this publication are subject to change without notice.
* Daily. Light face type A. M. and black face type P. M. time. 1939
SUMMER SERVICE
CHICAGO
TO THE
NORTH PACIFIC COAST
THROUGH THE
CANADIAN ROCKIES
Via ST. PAUL and MINNEAPOLIS
FROM CHICAGO
FROM VANCOUVER
THE
MOUNTAINEER
JUNE 30 TO
AUGUST 24|
SOO-
DOMINION
JUNE 16 to 29
and
AUGUST25to
SEPT. 23
* f
SOO
DOMINION
JUNE13to30
and
AUGUST29to
SEPT. 20
THE
MOUNTAINEER
JULY 1 TO
AUGUST 28
P. M.
'   Ex
P. M.
P. M.
Ex
P. 31.
Daily
ample
Daily
C. &N. W.
Dally
ample
Daily
12.35
Mon.
12.35
Lv..
 Chicago   (C.T.
).Ar
1.55
Wed.
1.55
3 15
"
3.15
Ar..
Lv..
 Madison.	
..Lv
..Ar
2.00
1    "
2 00
 Milwaukee	
▲ 1.15
"
▲ 1.15
7.00
"
7.00
"
Ar..
 Madison	
..Lv
5.00
1     "
5.00
3.15
7.15
9.15
»
3.15
7.15
9.15
Lv..
Lv..
Ar..
 Madison	
.Ar
.Ar
.Lv
2.00
10.10
8.15
::
2 00
 Eau Claire	
10.10
 St. Paul	
8.15
Soo Line
9.16
«»
9.15
Lv..
 St. Paul	
.Ar
7.15
"
7.00
10.25
"
10.25
Lv..
... Minneapolis....
.Ar
6.35
"
6.20
1.25
Tue.
1.35
Ar..
 Glenwood	
.Lv
3.15
"
3.10
3 38
4.05
6 50
Ar..
 Hankinson	
.Lv
.Lv
12.40
9 19
12.25
6.22
7.57
Ar
.Valley City	
9 11
<»
8.25
Ar..
 Carrington	
..Lv
8.17
8.17
11 00
"
11.37
2.20
Ar..
 Minot	
.Lv
. Lv
1.55
2.35
ii
5 00
1.15
Ar..
 Portal    (C.T.).
3.00
Can. Pac.
12.50
"
1.15
Lv..
....No. Portal   (M.T.)
.Ar
1.15
"
1.30
5.30
<«
7.00
Ar..
....Moose Jaw	
.Lv
7.55
"
8.45
6.00
«
7.10
Lv..
... .Moose Jaw	
.Ar
6.45
•*
8.15
6.30
Wed.
8.05
Ar..
 Calgary	
.Lv
8.10
Mon.
9.35
7.00
"
8.45
Lv..
 Calgary	
.Ar
7.10
'•
9.05
9 15
11.25
11.35
Ar..
 Itaull	
.Lv
.Ar
5.35
5.25
"
* 6.55
* 1.25
9.35
Lv..
 Banff.	
10.50
"
12.35
Ar..
...Lake Louise	
.Lv
1.35
"
3.35
12.25
"
1.15
Ar...
 Field   (M.T.).
.Lv
3.25
'"
2.20
11.40
"
1.00
Lv...
 Field   (P.T.)..
Ar
2.05
"
1.00
1.07
M
2.26
Ar...
 Golden	
.Lv
12.25
"
11.19
5.05
»«
6.20
Ar...
 Revelstoke	
.Lv
8.50
"
7.45
7.45
Thu.
8.45
Ar...
.'Vancouver (P.T.).
.Lv
7.15
Sun.
6.15
A. M.
A. M.
C. P. S. S. Line
P. M.
P. M.
■ 10.30
Thu.
• 10.30
Lv...
... .Vancouver	
.Ar J
• 6.35
Sun.
■ 5.55
2.10
"
3.10
1.30
Ar...
 Victoria	
.Lv
.Ar
1.55
1.15
"
1.15
5.00
Lv...
 Victoria	
12.50
9.00
Thu.
9.00
Ar...
 Seattle	
.Lv
9.00
Sun.
9.00
P.M.
P. M.
A. M.
A. M.
• Until June 24th. ■ After June 24th.
▲ C. & N. W. the "400" provides a 15 miuute connection in St. Paul with the
SOO-DOMINION and the MOUNTAINEER.
if Two and one half hours at Banff for sight-seeing drive.
CT—Central Time.      MT—Mountain Time.      PT—Pacific Time.
EQUIPMENT
Regularly Assigned Cars
AIR-CONDITIONED
SOLARIUM LOUNGE CARS
DRAWING ROOM COMP. SLEEPERS
BEDROOM SLEEPERS
TOURIST SLEEPERS
DINING CARS
COACHES THE
SooDominion
CHICAGO and VANCOUVER
VIA
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS,
BANFF and LAKE LOUISE
THROUGH   THE
Canadian Rockies
'HpHE route is Chicago & North Western, Soo Line and Canadian Pacific, and
■*■ serves the Canadian Rockies, including Banff, Lake Louise, Emerald Lake, The
Yoho Valley .... then on to Vancouver. It provides through travel for those who
wish to enjoy the glories of the Canadian Rockies as a feature of their summer
vacation.
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
C &N.W.
Ry.
Lv.3.00
Lv.4.15
Central
Time
8.02
Ar.
C.&N.W.
Ry.
9.30
P.M.
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
CHICAGO to ST. PAUL and MINNEAPOLIS
0}Chicago Chicago,   second   city   in   size   and
Harvard importance   in   the   United   States,
Beloit is   beautiful   as   seen   leaving   the
Janesville Chicago & North Western Railway
Madison station. An hour's ride through the
0 Milwaukee growing northwestern suburbs to
Crystal Lake in the heart of the
Fox River region and then past
Harvard before entering Wisconsin. Beloit, Wisconsin, an industrial city and college town, is on
the Rock River. For miles north of the city lie
the highest river bluffs in Rock County. Janesville, industrial like Beloit, is a gem on the Rock
River. After leaving the city the route runs along
the river bank.
Baraboo
Elroy
Merrillan
Eau Claire
Hudson
Madison, state capitol of Wisconsin, is a "Four-Lake" city. The
University of Wisconsin, on one of
America's most picturesque campuses flanked by Lake Mendota,
is located here. The city's setting,
on an isthmus, is fitting for the capitol of a state
filled with lakes as is Wisconsin. Baraboo and
Devil's Lake are almost synonymous. The lake,
one of the scenic high-spots of the state, is on the
right before going into the city. It is widely
known as a "gem city."
Elroy and Merrillan are passed and in early
evening we reach Eau Claire, beautifully located
at the confluence of the Eau Claire and Chippewa
Rivers. The route from Eau Claire to Chippewa
Falls is one of the most picturesque in Wisconsin, broad river combining with sloping uplands
to present fascinating scenery.
Entering restful Hudson the train passes the
Willow River on the right with Lake St. Croix
lying on the left. Leaving Hudson, the wide
St. Croix River is crossed and the train travels in
the valley of the river into St. Paul.
(The  description  of  the  route given  above  applies to the service via Madison. Westbound the
train runs via Milwaukee.)
St. Paul
• C. & N. W. No. 401, the "400" leaving Chicago 3:00
P. M., Milwaukee 4:15 P. M., due SL Paul 9:30
P. M., provides a 15-minute connection with the Soo-
Dominion leaving St.  Paul 9:45 P. M.
4 Continued on Page 6
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
C.&N.W.
Ar. 6.30
5.00
4.22
3.58
Lv.3.05
Ar.7.00
Central
Time
2.15
1.30
11.50
10.48
9.19
8.45
C.&N.W
Ry.
Lv.
A.M. South of Banff is
Mount Assiniboine,
the Matterhom of
the New World. a
an
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
Lv.
9.45
10.25
Ar.
11.35
12.07
1.35
2.47
3.27
4.05
5.30
6.50
8.25
f 9.05
A.M.
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
SOO LINE
ST. PAUL-MINNEAPOLIS TO PORTAL
St. Paul St. Paul and Minneapolis, the Twin
Minneapolis Cities of the Northwest, form the
most important financial and
manufacturing center between Chicago and Milwaukee, on the east, and the Pacific Coast on the
west. Politically two municipal corporations, they
are in substance one large community.
St. Paul contains, among other state institutions, the State Capitol, State Historical Library,
and State Fair Grounds. Its parks are many and
varied. You are sure to find interest in the historic Indian Mounds Park—the burial ground of
Indian braves who fought for this territory. Como
Park is a charming spot for the lover of flowers,
and Lake Phalen for the followers of sports.
Minneapolis is built upon approved modern
lines. Its downtown streets are broad and light,
and lined with towering office and business build-
ings.^ Just beyond the center of the city wide
curving highways radiate in all directions and
connect with a chain of lakes:—Nokomis, Harriet, Calhoun, Lake-of-the-Isles, and Minnehaha
Falls made famous by Longfellow's "Hiawatha"
—forming a boulevard system which is the most
unique in the country. The great University of
Minnesota and the world-famous flour mills are
worth an extended visit.
There are 26 golf courses in the Twin Cities,
several are open to the public.
Buffalo The  country  along the  Soo   Line
Maple Lake running west from Minneapolis to
Annandale the International Boundary Line
South Haven between North Dakota and Canada
Kimball may for convenience be split into
Paynesville three divisions. The first, running
Glenwood slightly northwest to Elbow Lake,
passes through the lake country.
Here the settlement is commratively old, and the
people are prosperous, xpfcte is one of the rich
dairy sections of the state. Every little immunity has its creamery, or milk station*
Almost every station on the Soo Line running
west from Minneapolis has its lake resorts. Often
there are a number of lakes of considerable area
within a radius of five miles from the town. Some
of the finest lake cottages in the Northwest are
on this line. Buffalo, Maple Lake, Annandale and
Glenwood are particularly famous, Glenwood
being the location of a state fish hatchery, although South Haven, Kimball, Paynesville and
other towns are having increased attention and a
corresponding appreciation from summer visitors.
At all of these lake resorts the fishing is excellent.
Elbow Lake The second division into which the
Fairmount country along the Soo Line natur-
Hankinson ally divides itself may be called the
Enderlin great wheat belt of the Northwest
Valley City running from Elbow Lake in
Carrington Western Minnesota to Harvey, in
Fessenden the north central part of North
Dakota, passing through the Big
Bend country of Richland county, through Han-
kinson, Enderlin, Valley City, Carrington, and
Fessenden en route.
F—Stops on signal.
6
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M. D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
a
The Soo-
Dominion
A.M.
9.45
11.37
1.15
|Ar.2.20
Soo Line
P.M.
Lv.
1.45
2.40
3.07
3.21
3.36
,f3.49
| Mountain
Time
7.00
Lv.
7.40
\
9.23
Ar. .
10.15
Lv.
10.30
11.24
12.27
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
Harvey The third natural division of the coun-
Minot try along the Soo Line from Minneap-
Kenmare olis west is aptly called "Flaxland."
Portal Flax is a crop particularly adapted to
the soil of the Dakota prairie.
C. P. RY.
North Portal    Here we  leave the  metals  of the
Estevan Soo Line and continue our journey
Macoun on  those  of the  Canadian  Pacific
Midale Railway.  We  enter an interesting
Halbrite territory   of   large   coal   deposits,
Ralph with   many   operating   mines   and
very extensive clay areas supplying
material to numerous brick plants. The country
is somewhat rough, and is drained by the Souris
river. North of Estevan, we enter a very fertile
area, flanked on the west by the Dirt Hills and
on the east by a continuation of the Regina
plains. It has always been a good crop territory,
settled many years ago with farmers mostly from
the United States.
Moose Jaw (Altitude, 1779 feet.) Moose Jaw is
the center of a rich wheat-growing
district and an important division point. Its unusual name is a contraction of an Indian word
meaning "The - creek - where - the - white - man -
mended-the-cart-with-a-moose-jaw-bone" — an illuminating sidelight on an episode of pioneering
days. The city is situated in a fine agricultural
country extending from the elbow of the Saskatchewan on the north to the Dirt Hills on the
south.
Caron Leaving   Moose  Jaw   on   the   west-
Parkbeg ward journey, and still climbing, we
Chaplin pass   through   a   somewhat   varied
Morse country.   Old   buffalo   trails   can   be
Herbert plainly seen,  scarred and pitted on
Rush Lake the prairie by their "wallows." Practically the only reminder of the
huge herds of buffalo that roamed the prairies fifty
years ago are at Banff and Ayainwright, in government enclosures. Caron supplies Moose Jaw
with part of its water supply. Morse and Herbert
are growing towns with large tributary, agricultural districts to serve. Rush Lake is a hunter's
paradise; there are literally millions of ducks in
its great lake and marshes during the breeding
and shooting seasons. Presently we wind around
an unusually large roll in the prairie formation,
and reach Swift'Current.   ,
Swift Current (Altitude 2,432 feet.) Is situated
on a pretty stream. The city is an
important one, with large distributing area for
merchandise. A government meteorological station is located here.
Gull Lake Westward we travel through what
Tompkins was at one time a purely ranching
Piapot country but which is today rapidly
Cross settling   with    first-class   farmers.
Maple Creek     Many   of   the   small   towns   have
Kincorth sprung into  active  existence with-
Walsh in   the   last   few   years.   South   are
Dunmore the Cypress  Hills, a country valu
able because of the extensive clay
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
7.10
4.55
3.38
Lv. 2.351
Soo Line |
P.M.
Ar.
1.15
12.15
11.44
11.29
11.16
11.03
Mountain |
Time
Lv.
7.55
Ar.
6.45
Lv.
4.35
Ar.
4.20
3.28
2.20
P.M.
Continued on Page 9
A.M. Lake Louise, a Gem
of  Deep   and  Exquisite Color.
Rightly Called the
World's Most
Beautiful Picture. D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
A.M.
Ar.
2.-20
Lv.
2.40
4.21
5.15
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
deposits which it contains.
Medicine Hat (Altitude, 2,181 feet.) Is the city
that Rudyard Kipling once called
"that town that was born lucky with all hell for
its basement." His allusion was to the famous
natural gas wells. The gas is used by the many
factories of Medicine Hat for power and by the
inhabitants for lighting, heating, and producing
electric light.
Redcliff Crossing the South Saskatchewan
Bowell River, and climbing up the slope
Suffield to Redcliff, we can obtain a very
fine backward view of the river
and the city. Natural gas plays a very important
part in the industrial life of Redcliff also, glass,
steel and other manufactures being established
here.
Alderson The railway crosses a fine stock rais-_
Tilley ing country, where some of the largest
Brooks herds of cattle in Canada are to be
Bassano seen. The Bow River, occasionally
appears to the south. The prairie is
here seen to advantage, and before August it is a
billowy ocean of grass. Cattle ranches are spread
over it, and farms appear at intervals. The entire
country is underlaid with two or more beds of
good coal and natural gas is frequently found
in boring deep wells. From Tilley on a very clear
day the higher peaks of the Rocky Mountains,
nearly two hundred miles distant, can be seen.
Crowfoot At Crowfoot the Rocky Mountains are
Cluny again in view. Near this point, south of
Gleichen the railway, is a large reservation occupied by the Blackfoot Indians, some of
whom are frequently seen about the station.
Beyond Gleichen the Rockies come into full
view—a magnificent line of snowy peaks extending far along the southern and western horizon.
Calgary Alt. 3438 Calgary has municipally owned
water works, electric light and
power system and street railway and asphalt paving plants. Natural gas is piped from Bow Island
at very cheap prices. The city has some beautiful
k parks and golf courses.
\The city is well supplied with clay and building
| deposits, and is close to immense developed coal
areas, large developed water powers, and large
gas and oil deposits. A 2,500,000-bushel Dominion
Government terminal elevator is located here.
Amongst the important industries of the city are
meat packing, flour milling and oil refining.
Immediately to the east of Calgary, and extending close to the railway, and on both sides, for
about 140 miles, is a large irrigated land project
developed by the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Drawing its water supplies from the Bow River,
this block consists of over 3,000,000 acres.
Alberta, still a country of considerable stock-
raising interests, was until recent years one of the
principal ranching sections of Canada; and in the
"Stampede" held every summer at Calgary—a
famous frontier day celebration that draws com-
A.M. 9
6.00
Ar.
7.55
Lv.
8.35
The Soo-
Dominion
A.M.
Lv.
12.40
Ar.
12.20
10.53
10.05
9.28
Lv.
8.00
Ar.
7.30
P.M. I
D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
A.M.
10.26
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
petitors from all parts of the continent—the
glories of the Old West are revived annually in a
week's carnival of cowboy sports and contests.
Tributary to Calgary is a most prosperous agricultural, beef-raising and ranching district^ in area
some thousands of square miles, and by virtue of
the nutritious and abundant grasses growing
throughout this territory, cattle raised are of excellent quality. Grain and vegetables produced in
this district are also very fine.
CALGARY TO FIELD
Westward from Calgary we enter the most
wonderful region of Canada —• the Canadian
Rockies, which interpose their giant bulk between
the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia.
Nature has thrown up this system on so vast a
scale that their greatness cannot be grasped except by some comparison. The transcontinental
trains take twenty-two hours to pass from
Cochrane, at the entrance to the Rockies, to Mission, where one finally leaves them. The simplest
parallel is that of the Swiss Alps. To traverse
these by train takes only five hours. When, therefore, the late Edward Whymper, one of the most
famous mountaineers that ever lived, described
the Canadian Rockies as fifty Switzerlands
thrown into one, this certainly was no exaggeration.
The Rockies were first seen
several miles east of Calgary, but the finest distant
view was that obtained
from the roof garden of the
Palliser Hotel. Now we
leave the city and the hotel
behind. Between Winnipeg and Calgary the line
has already climbed over 2600 feet; from Calgary
to Banff it must climb another 1100 feet in eighty
miles. Following the course of the Bow River,
the great stretches of level prairie cease, and the
rolling grassy foot-hills succeed, rising tier upon
tier to the base of the great ranges to which they
are the outposts.
Kananaskis Alt. 4130     The  mountains   stand  up
Exshaw "  4261      before us, an impenetrable
Gap "   4248      wall; to cross them seems
almost impossible, but
over the Kananaskis river, a little above its junction with the Bow, is an iron bridge. Crossing
this, we hear the roar of the Bow's mighty cataract called Kananaskis Falls.
A bend in the road brings us between two
almost vertical walls of dizzy height, streaked
and capped with snow and ice, and we enter the
mountains by means of this Gap. On our right
is the Fairholme Range, opposite it is the Goat
Range. The prominent peak is Grotto Mountain
(8870 feet), and those on our left are Pigeon
Mountain, Wind Mountain, and the Three Sisters.
Contrast the ranges ahead. Those on the right are
fantastically broken and castellated; the ones
opposite are massive snow-laden promontories,
rising thousands of feet.
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
Robertson
Glenbow    Alt.
3688
9.20
Cochrane     "
3750
f9.39
Radnor         "
3896
9.56
Morley          "
4078
10.14
Seebe            "
4182
AM.
10
P.M. D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
A.M.
10.56
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
Canmore Alt. 4295 Here on the left is obtained
a striking profile of the
"Three Sisters," companion peaks that form one
of the first notable sights of the journey. The
highest peak is 9734 feet. The curious groups of
pillars on the right, some of them ten times as
tall as a man, are made of hard enough material
to withstand the weatherings that have played
havoc with the surrounding bank. They are
called "hoo-doos." Ahead the great bulk of Cascade Mountain blocks the view. The pass narrows
suddenly. On the left, the sharp peak is Rundle,
so called in honor of an early missionary to the
Indians. Here we leave the Bow for a time and
strike up the valley of the Cascade River directly
in the face of Cascade Mountain.
BANFF and VICINITY
AM.
Banff Park, 2,585 square miles,
was established in 1885 — the
year the Canadian Pacific Railway was completed.
Banff is the administrative headquarters. The railway enters from the east, 10 miles east of Banff,
and cuts across the Park for 53 miles in a northwesterly direction to its western boundary near
Stephen in Yoho Park, which adjoins on the west
Within Banff Park are located Banff Springs and
Chateau Lake Louise resort hotels, Moraine Lake
Lodge, Lake Agnes and Plain of Six Glaciers
Teahouses and Abbott Pass Alpine Hut. Mt. Assiniboine Lodge (in Mt. Assiniboine Park) is 34
miles by trail south of Banff.
Its   principal   mountain   ranges   are   the   Vermilion,   Kananaskis,   Bourgeau,   Bow,   and   Saw-
11
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
f 5.48
Lv.
5.35
Ar
5.25
P.M. gD NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
AM.
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
back ranges; its principal river is the Bow, which
has for chief tributaries the Kananaskis, Spray,
Cascade and Pipestone rivers. The Panther and
Red Deer rivers flow through the northeastern
portion of the Park, which includes part of the
Bow River Forest reserves. Of the many beautiful lakes within the Park, the principal are Louise,
Minnewanka, Hector, Spray, Kananaskis and Bow
Lakes.
Within easy walking distance of the village is
Sulphur Mountain, a long wooded ridge rising to
an elevation of 8030 feet, which has an observatory on its summit and the Canadian Alpine
Club's permanent club-house on the slope. The
club holds a camp every year somewhere in the
Canadian Rockies. In the various mountain
ranges that make up the Canadian Rockies—the
Rockies proper, the Selkirks, and the Gold, Coast,
Cascade, and Purcell Ranges—there are, according to government measurements, no less than
672 mountain peaks over 6,000 feet in height
above sea level.
Cascade Mountain (9,826 feet) faces the village
like a glowering giant. The sharp pointed edge
of Mount Rundle (9665 feet) makes a most
striking feature. Mount Edith (8370 feet) and
Stony Squaw (6160 feet) are close at hand. Crossing the Bow River bridge from the village, we
follow a road to where the Banff Springs Hotel
stands on a height between the foaming falls of
the Bow and the mouth of the rapid Spray river.
This hotel, operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway, has been constructed on a magnificent scale.
From its veranda beautiful panoramas are to be
viewed. Just below the terrace is one of Banff's
three distinctive sulphur swimming pools, supplied with sulphur water piped from Sulphur
Mountain and averaging 90 degrees Fahrenheit
and possessing great curative value. The pool is
a beautiful one, affording excellent swimming;
and a semi-circular cold water pool adjoins it on
the crest of the hill. The other two pools are at
Upper Hot Springs on the wooded slopes of Sulphur Mountain, reached by car or on foot, and at
the cave and Basin, about a mile west of the bridge.
In an enclosed park about \y2 miles to the
other side of the village are a number of specimens of native animals, such as buffalo, elk,
moose, mountain sheep and mountain goat. The
buffalo herd, with a somewhat larger one in another park to the north, comprise the sole remains of the million buffalo which roamed the
prairie fifty years ago. Long launch trips up the
river, tennis, driving, motoring, swimming, horseback riding, fishing, beautiful walks and mountain
climbing are some of the diversions open to visitors. A golf course is situated on the banks of the
Bow River at the base of Mount Rundle. There
are wonderful fossil beds on the south and east
sides of Lake Minnewanka, from which many
very fine specimens have been collected. An an-
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
A.M.
12
Continued on Page 14
P.M. Chateau Lake Louise
1 he time to view this always lovely lake is at sunrise, when rosy
light creeps down the snow terraces of Mount Victoria and the
breeze has not yet rippled the enamel of blue and green in which
the surrounding peaks are mirrored. Wide windows frame unbelievably beautiful views from the dining room, the lounges and the
private rooms that front on the lake. The borders between the
Chateau and the water are carpeted with golden poppies and along
the trails are wild flowers to catch the eye and the heart with their
charm. The lake is too cold to bathe in, so a large pool of warmed
water has been built for the swimmer.
13 I
8*
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
aM.
f 11.54
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
nual Indian "Pow-wow" of sports, races, etc., is
held during the month of July.
Of great interest to automobile enthusiasts is
the new automobile road that has been constructed by the Dominion Government, the
British Columbia Government, and the Canadian
Pacific Railway from Banff to the Columbia Valley. Its course is southeast from Castle Mountain, which we shall shortly pass, through- Vermilion Pass, over the Rockies and then through
some subsidiary ranges until it reaches beautiful
Lake Windermere. Twenty miles south of Banff
in another direction is Mount Assiniboine (11,860
feet), the "Matterhorn of the New World."
The Route from Banff to Lake Louise
Castle Mountain  Alt. 4633     Leaving    Banff,    the
railway   rejoins    the
Bow and follows it up through a forested valley.
We skirt the Vermilion Lakes and obtain an excellent view of Mount Bourgeau on the left. Far
to the south these snowpeaks enclose Simpson's
Pass. A sharp turn, and also on the left we see
Pilot Mountain, a landmark of mountain trappers
visible from either end of the Bow, Hole-in-the-
Wall Mountain (9184 feet), on the right, has an
interesting cavern running into the mountain for
160 feet.
Castle Mountain, a sheer precipice 9030 feet in
height that towers almost 5000 feet ^above the
railway, is so named because no imagination
whatever is required to see in it the outlines of
the towers and battlements of some ancient fortress. This mountain overlooks the railway for
almost eight miles. After passing Castle Mountain, we see to the right the bare, rugged and
sharply serrated Sawbuck sub-range, with a spur,
called the Slate Mountains, in the foreground at
Lake Louise. Looking ahead we catch many
enchanting glimpses until, at Eldon, the whole
array is in full view. Turning to the left, and
looking backward we see Pilot Mountain, Copper
Mountain, Mount Brett and Vermilion Pass,
where the continental watershed sends the Vermilion River westward into the Kootenay.
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
P.M.
14
Continued on Page 16      P.M. '        S:: I
D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
Ar.
12.35
Lv.
12.35
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
LAKE LOUISE and VICINITY
Lake Louise Alt. 5044 Thirty-five miles from
Banff we reach Lake
Louise. This is one of the most perfect gems of
scenery in the world—"a lake of the deepest and
most exquisite coloring, ever changing, defying
analysis, mirroring in its wonderful depths the
sombre forests and cliffs that rise from its shores
on either side, the gleaming white glacier and
tremendous snow-crowned peaks that fill the back^
ground of the picture, and the blue sky and fleecy
clouds overhead." On the shores of this beautiful
lake the Canadian Pacific Railway operates one
of its splendid hotels, the Chateau Lake Louise.
The out-door warm water swimming pool is
popular.
The principal mountains surrounding Lake
Louise are (from left to right as you stand on the
hotel veranda) Saddleback (7,783 feet), Fairview
(9,001 feet), Lefroy (11,220 feet), Victoria (11,355
feet), Whyte (9,776 feet), Devil's Thumb (8,066
feet), Big Beehive (7,440 feet), Niblock 9,754
feet), St. Piran (8,681 feet), and Little Beehive
(7,110 feet), Victoria Glacier, which shuts off the
southern end of the lake, is an awe-inspiring spectacle. Alongthe westerly shores of the lake is a
delightful mile-and-a-half walk affording splendid
views of these gigantic peaks.
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
P.M.
16
Continued on Page 18       P.M. Sii^^^HI
: A;:    MA      "'**'.A
..
|PWyps|;S;&
P |$|::s|I
'::"':-'S:'';:'s'S:
SSSS:S';SS-:,-;,
Bow River and Golf Course, Banff
17 D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DQ
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
P.M.
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
Among the numerous delightful excursions
from Lake Louise is that to Lakes in the Clouds,
two gems that nestle high up on the mountain
side. The trail leaves the west end of the Chateau
and rises gradually to Mirror lake (altitude 6,650
feet), and thence to Lake Agnes (6,875 feet).
There are beautiful views on the way up, and the
trail is excellent. A charming tea house has recently been established on the shore of Lake
Agnes. The trail continues around Lake Agnes
and up a zigzag path to the Observation House
on the Big Beehive. The trip can be made either
by sure-footed mountain pony or on foot, and
the round trip distance is about five miles. Return
can be made if desired via the Little Beehive and
Mt. St. Piran, or via the lower glacier trail.
Another charming trip is that to Moraine Lake,
a lovely mountain lake lying in the "Valley of the
Ten Peaks." These ten peaks, all of which are
over 10,000 feet high, and the highest of which,
Mount Deltaform, is 11,225 feet, encircle the eastern and southern sides of the lake, and present
a serrated profile that affords a most majestic view.
Lake Moraine affords good trout-fishing. On the
eastern shore of the lake is the Tower of Babel
(7,580 feet), a mountain of somewhat curious
shape, on the other side of which is Consolation
Lake.
Still another fine pony trip is to Paradise Valley. Ponies may be taken up Paradise Valley, via
either the Saddleback and Sheol Valley, or via
the low trail. The journey is continued up the
valley to a short branch trail leading to the
Giant's Steps, a step-like rock formation over
which the water glides in silver sheets. The journey may then be continued across the valley to
Lake Annette (altitude 6,500 feet), a tiny emerald
sheet of water on the side of Mount Temple, and
thence back to Lake Louise, a distance of thirteen
miles.
In a southwesterly direction from Lake Louise
is Lake O'Hara. There is an excellent trail from
Wapta Lodge, a few miles west of Lake Louise
station, and the trip affords an extremely delightful two days' camp. There is also a new trail to
Lake O'Hara direct from Lake Louise. Consolation Lake, which is about three miles from Moraine Lake, is a very profitable place to fish for
cut-throat trout.
For those who wish to visit the glaciers, climb
mountains, or make some of the more strenuous
trips through the passes, Swiss guides, whose
services can be obtained by visitors, are attached
to the Chateau Lake Louise. There is good trout-
fishing at several points near Lake Louise.
The Great Divide Alt. 5298      S i x  miles   west   of |
Lake Louise is the
"Great Divide," which is the highest elevation of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, the boundary between Alberta and British Columbia, and the very
backbone of the continent. It is marked by a
rustic arch spanning a stream under which the
water divides.
18 P.M. D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
f 12.57
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
Mountain
Time
Ar.
1.35
Lv*
12.50
Pacific
Time,
Hector
From the Great Divide the railway begins to descend. Wapta Lodge ©n Wapta
Lake  (Hector Station)  is an attractive summer
resort for tourists, consisting of rustic bungalows
with a central community house.
Between here and Field, a distance of fourteen
miles, it descends nearly a quarter of a mile
through the Kicking Horse Pass. Formerly this
was a difficult track, the gradient being 4.5 per
cent; but by two wonderful tunnels—forming one
of the iffolt notable engineering feats in existence
—this difficulty has now been eliminated, and the
grade reduced to 2.2 per cent. These tunnels are
the famous "Spiral Tunnels."
FIELD TO REVELSTOKE
Field Alt. 4072 Towering 6,000 feet higher than
the little town is seen Mount
Stephen (10.485 feet) and in front of it roars
Kicking Horse River, which the railway will now
follow for a considerable distance.
Field is the gateway to a wonderful mountain
resort, the far-famed Yoho Valley, which
stretches away to the north between great
glacier-bound peaks. Yoho Park, another national
park, has an area of 476 square miles. Among its
attractions are Takakkaw Falls, Twin Falls, Yoho
Glacier, etc. Takakkaw Falls, the trip to which
can be made in a day by either motor or pony
along a good trail, are among the most wonderful
in the world. An immense volume of seething,
boiling water rushes over the precipice on the far
side of a narrow gorge, and descends the rock
sides in clouds of foam, a drop of 1,200 feet.
Farther up the Yoho Valley, following the Yoho
River, is a rather more rugged country, affording
a longer trip. Twin Falls, divided by a high rock
on the edge of the precipice, are of even greater
interest than Takakkaw Falls, owing to the vast
columns of steam-like spray caused by the concussion of their two columns of water with the
rock flooring nearly 700 feet beneath. From here
one can penetrate still farther into the ranges
and reach Yoho Glacier.
The trip from Field to Emerald Lake is a delightful one. An excellent auto road crosses the
Kicking Horse River at Field to the base of
Mount Burgess, and leads through a forest of
balsam and spruce to Emerald Lake, seven miles
distant. This beautiful lake, of most exquisite
coloring and sublimity of surroundings, lies placid
under the protection of Mount Wapta, Mount
Burgess and Mount President. It is well stocked
with fish, and its vicinity affords many charming
excursions on foot. A picturesque two-story log
chalet has been erected on the shore of the lake,
and is operated by the Canadian Pacific. Here
the tourist may break his journey en route to the
Yoho Valley.
It is also possible to reach the Yoho Valley
from Emerald Lake. From Emerald Lake an
excellent trail leads around the lake to the Yoho
Pass (altitude 6,020 feet), where it is joined by
the trail from Field over Mount Burgess. Reaching the summit by pony, a wonderful view is
obtained.  Summit  Lake, a small but beautifully
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
f 3.55
Mountain
Time
Lv.
3.15
Ar.
2.00
Pacific
Time
P.M.
19
Continued on Page 22        P.M. I
EMERALD LAKE   Reached from Field
The trip from Field to Emerald Lake is a delightful one. An
excellent auto road crosses the Kicking Horse River at Field to the
base of Mount Burgess, and leads through a forest of balsam
and sprute to Emerald Lake, seven miles distant. This beautiful
lake, of most exquisite coloring and sublimity of surroundings,
lies placid under the protection of Mount Wapta, Mount Burgess
20
and Mount President. It is well stocked with fish, and its vicinity
affords many charming excursions on foot. A picturesque two-story
log chalet has been erected on the shore of the lake, and is operated by the Canadian Pacific. Here the tourist may break his journey en  route to the Yoho Valley.
21 D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
f L33
2.20 .
>■
P.M.
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
colored lake, is passed, and thence descent is
made into the Yoho Valley. Yet another route
to the Yoho Valley is over Burgess Pass. The
pony trail from Field rises up the wooded slopes
of Mount Burgess to the pass (altitude 7,150
feet), from which a magnificent panoramic view
of the surrounding mountain ranges may be
obtained. Mount Burgess, a sharp-topped mountain (8,463 feet) is in the center, with the Kicking
Horse River on the left and the road to Yoho
Pass on the right. Continuing along the slopes
of Mount Wapta the trail is almost level until
the Yoho Pass is reached, whence descent is
made to either Takakkaw Falls or to Emerald
Lake.
At Wapta Lake, Lake O'Hara and in the Yoho
Valley are picturesque lodges for the accommodation of visitors.
Leanchoil Alt. 3682 Resuming our journey westward from Field, we use the
open observation cars provided for travelers, which afford the utmost
opportunities for viewing the magnificent scenery.
The locomotives are oil-burning, which means an
absence of smoke and dust. The railway begins
to descend steadily. The narrow valley of the
Kicking Horse divides the Ottertail Range on the
left from the Van Home Range on the right.
A vivid contrast in mountain formation can be
made between the two ranges. One mile west of
Emerald we can see Mount Goodsir (11,676 feet),
on the left, the highest of the Ottertail group. At
Leanchoil we leave the Yoho Park.
On the left, Mts. Vaux and Chancellor are
seen, the glacier on the former plainly visible.
Mount Chancellor (10,731 feet), is one of the
giant peaks of the Ottertail Range. At the base of
Mount Hunter the river turns abruptly and
plunges into the lower Kicking Horse Canyon.
Golden Alt. 2583 The canyon rapidly deepens
until, beyond Palliser,, the
mountain sides become vertical. The roar of the
river as it rushes from side to side of the narrow
gorge, the thunder of the train as it follows the
river—pandemonium increased a thousandfold by
the reverberations of the canyon walls—gives an
indescribable sensation until at Golden we suddenly reach daylight again, and the noisy, turbulent Kicking Horse is received into the calm
bosom of the mighty Columbia.
Golden, an interesting town, commands the
trade of the fertile Windermere Valley to the
south. The Columbia river, the most important
waterway flowing into the north Pacific Ocean on
the western side, rises in the north end of Lake
Windermere, and flows north in a famous "Big
Bend," paralleling the railway for several miles
until it leaves it at the lower slopes of the Selkirks
to reappear at Revelstroke on its way south to the
United States. To the right on the track, shortly
after leaving Golden station, can be seen the
model Swiss village of "Edelweiss," erected by
the Canadian Pacific for the Swiss guides whom
22
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
P.M. Q
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
f 2.33
3.25
4.40
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
it employs for the benefit of mountain climbers.
Previous to the erection of this village, which lies
on the slopes of a hill and reproduces with remarkable verisimilitude the characteristic architecture of the Swiss chalet, the guides had always
returned to Switzerland at the end of each season,
but now they live in Canada the entire year.
Moberly Alt. 7731 takes its name from Mount
Moberly, one of the most
prominent peaks for some miles along the river
valley. About two miles west of Moberly, on the
south just before crossing Blaeberry River, is
the site of the oldest cabin in the mountains—
the cabin where a government survey party under
Walter Moberly, C. E., engaged in a preliminary
surveying for the railway, passed the winter of
1871-2. They wintered their stock on the shore of
what is now Lake Windermere.
Beavermouth is  the farthest  north  station  of
the   transcontinental   route,   at
the base of the Selkirks.
Stoney Creek The bridge which crosses Stoney
Creek, 270 feet above the gorge,
is the highest on the main line of the Canadian
Pacific. Stoney Creek is a noisy mountain torrent, flowing in the bottom of a narrow V-shaped
channel cut deeply into the steep slopes along
which the railway creeps.
Glacier Alt. 3778     Mount  Macdonald towering
more   than  a  mile  in  vertical
height above the railway, makes a most impressive picture.
Connaught Tunnel Until the end of 1916, the
railway crossed the Selkirks
through Rogers Pass, following Bear Creek and
then bending round to Glacier and back again to
the Illecillewaet River in a series of sharp loops.
This was a most spectacular route, affording
some magnificent views of Mount Macdonald,
Mount Tupper, and other giant peaks; but it had
many disadvantages, among which were the enormous track curvature and the necessity of maintaining long stretches of snowsheds.
These difficulties were finally overcome by the
construction of the Connaught Tunnel, under
Mount Macdonald, named in honor of H. R. H.
the Duke of Connaught, then Governor General
of Canada. This tunnel measures slightly over five
miles from portal to portal, it not only eliminated
track curvature to an amount corresponding to
seven complete circles, but also lowered the summit attained by the railway by 552 feet, reduced
the length of the line by Ays miles and dispensed
with Al/2 miles of snow-sheds. The tunnel is
double tracked, and measures 29 feet from side
to side and 21^2 feet from the base rail to the
crown. The method by which it was pierced involved the tunnelling of a pioneer bore paralleling the center line of the main tunnel—a feature
that was new and aroused the interest of tunnel
engineers the world over. The railway emerges
from the tunnel at Glacier station.
The Soo-
Dominion
A.M.
11.22
Lv.
10.26
P.M.
23
A.M. D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
5.32
f 5.52
Ar.
6.20
Lv.
6.35
f 7.38
Ar.
8.15
Ar.
11.45
P.M.
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
Albert Canyon is a deep fissure in the solid rock,
its walls rising straight up on
both sides to wooded crags. The railway runs
along the very edge of this gorge. We see the
river nearly 150 feet below, boiling angrily in a
narrow twenty foot flume.
Twin Butte takes its name from the double summit nearby to the left, now known
as Mounts Mackenzie and Tilley. In this district
is the home of the woodland or black-faced caribou, the mountain goat, the grizzly, cinnamon and
black bears.
REVELSTOKE TO VANCOUVER
Revelstoke Alt. 1494 This flourishing city lies in
the beautiful Columbia
River Valley, surrounded by lofty and picturesque
mountains, some clothed with trees and verdure
to their very peaks, others crowned with rugged
and rocky spires or glistening glaciers. It is the
gateway to the Kootenay and Arrow Lakes, and
is the center of large timber and mineral districts.
Revelstoke is in the heart of very fine hunting
grounds, and the Alpine climber will find whole
worlds to conquer. In winter, a popular winter-
sport carnival is held here. Besides the drive up
Mount Revelstoke, there is also the beautiful excursion along the Columbia River.
Mount. Revelstoke 100 square miles in extent, is
National Park bounded on the south by the
Illecillewaet River. It includes not only the striking mountain from which
it derives its name, but also the Clach-na-Cudainn
Range.
The park, altogether a mountain-top one, provides a wonderful automobile trip. A road, as
hard and smooth as a city boulevard, has been
constructed by the Dominion Government. It ascends by an easy grade through a virgin forest,
winding along rocky ledges and on the verge of
deep chasms. The glory of the ride is the remarkable view that can be obtained, all the way
up, of the valley below—the Selkirks to the southeast, the Monashee Range to the southwest, and
the Columbia and Illecillewaet Rivers twisting
like ribbons around the city.
Craigellachle Alt. 1225 Here an obelisk alongside the track commemorates the completion of the construction of the
Canadian Pacific Railway. It was here, on November 7th, 1885, that the rails from the East
met the rails from the West, and the long-
cherished vision of a Canadian transcontinental
railway became a reality.
Sicamous Alt. 1153 on Shuswap Lake, is not only
the junction of the main line
with the Okanagan Valley branch; it is also a
favorite stop-over point for travelers who, having
traversed the mountains, wish also to see by daylight the wonderful canyon scenery that lies between here and Vancouver. To accommodate
this traffic, the Canadian Pacific has erected a
comfortable hotel on the shore of the lake.
Kamloops Alt. 1159 The chief town of the interior country of British Columbia, is over a hundred years old, having
originally been a Hudson Bay post. Situated at
The Soo-
Dominion
A.M.
24
Continued on Page 26
AM. A^ArAAMp^AA
A:::^Mi^:A-A
A Sunset Study
in
Light at
id Shadow,
Lake Louise
25 I—
D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
c
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
AM.
f 12.41
1.30
2.26
3.15
Ar.
4JL5
f 5.30
6.28
7.18
A.M.
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
the confluence of the North and South Thompson Rivers, both draining fertile valleys, it is a
beautiful city, with a climate that makes it a
most desirable resort. Trout fishing and game
add to its charm for the tourists and sportsmen.
Tranquille Just   below   Kamloops   the
Cherry Creek Thompson   widens   out   into
Savona Kamloops    Lake,    a    beautiful
Walhachin sheet of water. The railway runs
Ashcroft along its south shore for twenty
Spatsum miles and, because of the series
Spence's Bridge of mountain spurs projecting
into the lake, a number of tunnels punctuate this twenty miles. At Savona the
lake ends, and we enter the series of Thompson
River canyons which leads us through marvelous
scenery westward to the  Fraser.
Drynoch From this point on we notice various
Thompson peculiarities of the scenery and soon
Gladwin we find ourselves running upon a
Lytton ledge cut out of the bare hills on the
Keefers       irregular south side of the river. The
mountains draw together and we wind
along their face and gaze upon the boiling flood
of Thompson Canyon hundreds of feet below.
At Lytton the canyon widens to admit the
Fraser, the chief river of British Columbia, which
comes down from the north between two great
lines of mountain peaks, and whose turbid flood
soon absorbs the bright green waters of the
Thompson. The great river is forced between
vertical walls of black rock, where, repeatedly
thrown back upon itself by opposing cliffs, it
madly foams and roars. Six miles below Lytton
we cross the Fraser by a fine bridge, plunge into
a tunnel and emerge at Kanaka. Along the way
we can see the old Government Road, abandoned
now, and often Indians spearing salmon or scooping them out with dip-nets.
North Bend^^North Bend is a desirable stopping
Spuzzum 4*s^place for those who wish to see
Yale *■*■*-* more of the Fraser Canyon than is
Haig possible from the train. From Bos-
Hope ton  Bar, a few miles below, where
the principal canyon of the Fraser
begins, to Yale, the scenery is startling. Ten miles
below North Bend two jutting promontories suddenly compress the river and force it to escape
in a roaring cataract through a bottleneck outlet.
This is the famous "Hell's Gate." This section of
the railway commands the admiration for the
way it has overcome apparently insuperable difficulties. The railway follows the canyon, at often
a considerable height above the river bank; the
track, hewn from the solid rock, also tunnels
through great rock spurs. Ten miles below Spuz-
zum there is an interesting engineering feat, the
four tunnels of the Fraser Canyon, located in
rapid succession.
Ruby Creek Soon the canyon widens out and
Agassiz broad   level   fields   displace   the
Harrison Mills rude Indian farms. Ruby Creek
Nicoamen obtains its name from the garnets
Mission found in the neighborhood. Agas
siz has a Government Experimen-
26
The Soo-
Dominion
AM.
P.M. D
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
A.M.
A.M.
Ar.
8.45
Lv.
10.30
AM.
C.P.S.S.
A.M.
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
tal Farm and is also the station for Harrison Hot
Springs. There are hot sulphur springs on Harrison Lake, highly regarded for their curative
properties. Here we cross the Harrison River
just above its confluence with the Fraser. A few
miles beyond Nicoamen, that isolated cone we
see is the gigantic Mount Baker, in the State of
Washington.
Whonnock The  country through which we
Haney are now passing—practically on
Hammond sea-level—has a rapidly expand-
Westminster Jct. ing small fruit industry. The
fields, in growing season, present to the traveler a very attractive picture.
When we come to the crossing of the Stave River
we should look back up the Fraser. This is the
best way to get a good view of Mount Baker.
We traverse Pitt Meadows, cross Pitt River, and
reach Westminster Junction, where we leave the
Fraser River.
Port Moody Port Moody, at the head of Burrard
Barnett Inlet, was once the terminus of the
Hastings Canadian   Pacific   Railway.  We   fol
low the south shore of the Inlet, enjoying its picturesque features, pass Hastings,
formerly a watering place, and at last find ourselves in Vancouver.
Vancouver Vancouver, the terminal of the Canadian Pacific transcontinental rail
lines and its trans-Pacific steamship routes, is the
largest commercial center in British Columbia. It
has an excellent harbor nearly land-locked and
fully sheltered, facing a beautiful range of mountains that are tipped with snow the year around.
The magnificent ! fotel Vancouver is operated
by the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National
Railway Companies.
Vancouver is most picturesquely situated on
Burrard Inlet. Surrounding it are beautiful environs of varied character. All kinds of water
sports are available, and are encouraged through
a mild climate and extensive bodies of water.
There are many bathing beaches, parks, boulevards, automobile roads and paved streets. The
roads around the city are famous for their excellence, and there are many fine drives, varying
from an hour to a day in time. Among them may
be mentioned Stanley Park—one of the largest
natural parks in the world, a primeval forest
within the city limits and containing thousands of
Douglas firs and giant cedars of a most amazing
size and age. The park is encircled by a perfect
road. The "Marine Drive" takes the visitor
through the best residential parts of the city, including Shaughnessy Heights and Point Grey,
thence to the mouth of the Fraser River with its
fleets of salmon trawlers, and back along the
coast. Capilano Canyon, a gorge of great natural
beauty, in North Vancouver, is reached by a recently completed road. The Pacific Highway, including Kingsway, runs through Vancouver, connecting up with the main American roads of the
Northwest.
27
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
P.M.
Lv.
7.15
Ar.
6.35
P.M.
C.P.SS
P.M. D
DD
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
Ar.
3.10
Lv.
4.30
Pacific
Time
Ar.
9.00
(For Summer Service, Please See Page 3.)
Vancouver has several good golf courses which
are open to visitors. There are a number of good
tennis clubs.
Vancouver is the port of the trans-Pacific services of the Canadian Pacific Steamships, which
maintain regular services to Japan and China. A
large proportion of the silk trade of the Orient
passes through Vancouver, and the Canadian
Pacific "Silk Train" is perhaps the most famous
freight train in the world. From Vancouver the
steamers of the Canadian-Australasian Line ply to
Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand and Australasia.
Various Canadian Pacific steamer services along
the British Columbia coast run from Vancouver.
VANCOUVER TO VICTORIA AND
SEATTLE
Victoria From Vancouver to Victoria is a pleasant sail of about five hours across the
Strait of Juan de Fuca. There is a double, daily
service on this trip, one by day that makes the
triangular route to Seattle, the other by night
that goes direct.
Victoria, charmingly situated at the southern
end of Vancouver Island, is the Garden City of
Canada. Its delightfully mild climate makes it a
favorable resort for both summer and winter. It
is the provincial capital of British Columbia, and
owing to the characteristic beauty of its residential district has often been called "A bit of England on the shores of the Pacific." It is distinctively a home city, with fine roads and beautiful
gardens, although its enterprising business district, composed of imposing stores and tall office
buildings, speak of a rich commerce drawn from
the fishing, lumber and agricultural industries of
Vancouver Island. Victoria's beauty lies in its
residential districts, its boulevards, parks, public
buildings, numerous bathing beaches, and semi-
tropical foliage. The famous strawberry growing
districts of Gordon Head and Keatings are close
to Victoria.
The Empress Hotel, last in the chain of Canadian Pacific hotels, overlooks the inner harbor,
within a stone's throw of the Parliament Buildings.
Victoria is the seat of the British Columbia
Provincial Government. The Parliament Building
is a handsome structure, overlooking the inner
harbor.
Grolf^ can be enjoyed every day of the year at
Victoria. Several golf courses are open to visitors.
Saanich Mountain Observatory, reached by
splendid auto road or interurban car, was selected
as observatory site, owing to Vancouver Island's
equable climate. The observatory, in addition to
being of interest itself, commands from its site
one of the finest views on the Pacific Coast.
Seattle Seattle is the largest city in the State
of Washington, and one of the most
important onthe Pacific Coast. It is a beautiful
and progressive city, with a rapidly increasing
population. Situated on the east side of Puget
Sound^ up the slopes of the hills that front the
latter, it has a fine harbor accessible to the largest
vessels afloat. Lake Washington, a body of fresh
The Soo-
Dominion
P.M.
Lv.
1.55
Ar.
1.15
Pacific
Time
9.00
Lv.
P.M.
28
Continued on Page 30        A.M. Moraine Lake in the Valley of the Ten Peaks
An unforgettable motor trip from the Lake Louise Chateau is
that to Moraine Lake, a lovely mountain lake lying in the "Valley
of the Ten Peaks." These ten peaks, all of which are over 10,000
feet high, and the highest of which, Mount Deltaform, is 11,225 feet,
encircle the eastern and southern sides of the lake, and present a
serrated profile that affords a most majestic view. Moraine Lake
affords good trout fishing. On the eastern shore of the lake is the
Tower of Babel (7,580 feet), a mountain of somewhat curious shape,
on the other side of which is Consolation Lake.
29 a
aa
NOTES    BY    THE    WAY
D
DD
The Soo-
Dominion
water about twenty miles long and three miles
wide, bounds the city on the east, and is now
connected with the Sound by the Lake Washington Canal, a very notable feat of engineering that
has a great and important bearing upon Seattle's
future. The down-town business section of Seattle
has many large buildings, including the L. C.
Smith Building, one of the highest in America.
Seattle has a very pleasing residential section,
especially in the vicinity of the University of
Washington, and many beautiful parks and summer resorts. A large number of enjoyable trips
can be made from Seattle, by train, steamer, and
motor, such as to Bellingham, Everett, Tacoma,
Mount Rainier, the Olympic Peninsula wonderland, and to many resorts and lakes in the
Cascade and Olympic mountain ranges.
The Soo-
Dominion
the STAMPEDE RANCH
Location—In the beautiful Eden Valley, on the Highwood
River, in the big foothills of the Canadian Rockies. Altitude,
4,600 feet. The high peaks of the Rockies are only a short
distance west of ranch headquarters. Ranch cars meet guests
and their baggage, by appointment, at either High River or
Aldersyde, Alberta, no transfer charges. It joins the E. P.
Ranch, the property of H. R. H. the Duke of Windsor.
Accommodations—Main lounge in the log ranch house, big
stone fireplace, piano, phonograph, radio. Running water, tub
and shower baths, electric lights, telephone and telegraph
service, medical attendance close by, excellent meals served
in spacious, light dining room. Competent and friendly service and genuine western hospitality.
Rates: May 15th to October 1st, $35.00 per week, $130.00
per month.
Rates include board, room, saddle horse, guide services,
occasional "over night" camping trips with pack outfit or
with chuckwagon.
Ranch Address—Telegraph and mail. The Stampede Ranch,
Long View, Alberta,  Canada.
For information communicate direct with
GUY WEADICK
Manager
The Stampede Ranch
Long View, P. O. Alberta, Canada
30 The Chalet, Emerald Lake
There are many glacial lakes of emerald hue in the Canadian
Rockies, but none that more adequately justifies its name than the
Emerald Lake to which you motor from Field Station through the
fragrant forest of Snow Peak Avenue. The lake is encircled by
mountains with Mount Carnarvon, Emerald Peak and Mount Burgess towering above, while Mount President rears its snowy twin
head behind. The Chalet is supplemented by cottages equipped with
private baths. These cottages are ideal for those planning a restful
vacation, while there is a spacious club house for social entertainment.
31 f
6299        POOLE BROS. CHICAGO,
32 ALASKA-YUKON
FROM
SEATTLE, VICTORIA, VANCOUVER
TO
SKAGWAY and RETURN
^TpO Alaska and back by the Inside Passage is a two
-■- thousand mile nine-day journey from Vancouver,
with six ports of call. During the summer months the
Canadian Pacific assigns for this service the finest
units of its well-known "Princess" fleet. All staterooms
are outside rooms—light, cozy and well ventilated.
Public rooms—dining room, observation room,
lounges, smoking room — are bright, cheerful and
charmingly furnished. All ships have dance floors and
carry orchestras.
Alaska is a land of gold, of flowers, of fox farms,
salmon, Indians and totem poles. Its scenery is of a
character unknown elsewhere on this continent. For
four days the steamer threads the long, almost landlocked "Inside Passage," winding through mountain-
hemmed fiord-like waterways, with wooded islands,
tremendous glacier-clad peaks and fascinating old
settlements as continuous episodes.
It is a country of mystery—a strange land of charm
and contrast. Busy towns with their modern industries beside weird, ancient totem poles—silent snow-
fields, great granite peaks lifting snow-covered heights
into brilliant sunshine—painted hills like magic rainbows — heavy green-clad shores with filmy mists.
Strong and vast, free and untamed, with the pulse of
fresh life rising high in its veins.
It is a land of contrasts. Never was so mistaken an
idea as that it is all winter. If it were, whence come the
gorgeous, vivid flower gardens that one sees everywhere, such masses of color that they dazzle the eye?
The answer is simple: the warm Japan current, striking Vancouver Island, is deflected northward, and carries to the Land of the Midnight Sun the same delightful humidity that the Pacific Coast knows.
No Water Journey in America can quite compare
in Scenery with the Trip to Alaska.
33 LODGES IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES
Name of Lodge
Radium Hot Springs
Lodge A
Radium Station, B. C.
(Owned and operated by
Mrs. Charlotte Armstrong)
Mount Assiniboine
Lodge A
Reached via Banff, Alta.
(Owned and operated by
Erling vStrom)
Moraine Lake
Lodge     A
Motor from Lake Louise,
Alta.
Lake O'Hara Lodge A
Hector, B. C.
or  by   Pony  from  Lake
Louise
Lake Wapta Lodge A
Hector, B. C.
Yoho Valley Lodge A
Field, B. C.
Altitude
3456
7200
6200
6664
5219
5000
Season
1939
June 10-
Sept. 10
July 1-
Oct. 15
June 24-
Sept. 10
June 24-
Sept. 10
June 24-
Sept. 10
June 24-
Sept. 10
Recreations
Hiking, Motoring,
Fishing, Mountain
Climbing, Swimming
in hot Radium Pools.
Two days horseback
ride from Banff. 35
miles by trail, stopping overnight in
half-way cabin. Lodge
is at the foot of Mount
Assiniboine (11,870
ft.) in the center of
one of the most magnificent mountain
areas in the world.
Head of Valley of Ten
Peaks. Consolation
Lake. Trout Fishing,
Pony Trails, Climbs,
etc.
Riding, Hiking,
Mountain Climbing,
Fishing. Trips to Lake
McArthur and Lake
Oesa, also Alpine
Hut, Abbot Pass.
Center for explorations. Excursions to
Lake O'Hara, Yoho
Valley, etc. Very good
fishing in Sherbrooke
Lake near Lodge.
Half-way between
Wapta Lodge and
Emerald Lake Chalet, by road and trail.
Takakkaw Falls,
Twin Falls, Summit
Lake, Yoho Glacier
etc.
A—American Plan
SPECIAL EVENTS IN THE WEST—1939
Trail Riding, Canadian
Rockies—T railing the
clouds on horseback by
day, camping in a tepee or
at one of the mountain
lodges in the cool of the
evening — these are the
joys of trail riding. The
1939 Ride is July 28th to
August 1st. Ask for information from the Secretary, Room 318, Windsor
Station, Montreal, Canada.
Her First Ride
The   Stampede,   Calgary
— Cowboys and Indians
from every part of the
continent vie for the honors in roping, broncho-
busting and bull-dogging
which are but part and
parcel of this western carnival week July 10th to
15th. Reservations at
Hotel Pallister, Calgary,
Alberta.
He Takes a Bow
Sky Line Trail Hikers of the Canadian Rockies—Annual
Camp, August 4th to 7th, 1939. For rates apply Room 318,
Windsor Station, Montreal, Canada, or to Dan McCowan,
Banff, Alberta.
34 CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
Name of Hotel
Winnipeg, Man.
Royal Alexandra
Hotel E
Regina, Sask.
Hotel Saskatchewan.. E
Calgary, Alta.
Hotel Palliser E
Banff, Alta.
Banff Springs Hotel. . E
Lake Louise, Alta.
Chateau Lake Louise. E
Emerald Lake (near
Field, B. C.)
Emerald Lake Chalet.A
Vancouver, B. C.
Hotel Vancouver E
Victoria, B. C.
Empress Hotel E
Altitude
772
1896
3438
4625
5680
4272
100
Sea Level
Season
All Year
All Year
All Year
June10-
Sept.   10
June 10-
Sept. 10
June 10-
Sept. 10
All Year
All Year
Recreations
Golf, Motoring, center
of Canadian West
(Site of old Fort
Garry).
Golf, Motoring.
Golf, Motoring, Fishing (Trout).
Golf, Swimming, (fresh
water and warm sulphur pools), Riding,
Climbing, Motoring,
Fishing, Boating.
Banff National Park.
Alpine Climbing, Boating, Swimming, Pony
Trails, Fishing.
Boating, Fishing, Pony
trails to Yoho Valley,
Takakkaw Falls.
Riding to Summit
Lake and Twin Falls.
In operation until the
end of May, 1939, by
the Canadian Pacific
Railway. The new
Hotel Vancouver is
expected to open in
the latter part of May,
1939, and will be operated by the Vancouver Hotel Company Limited on behalf of the Canadian
National and Canadian Pacific Railway
Companies.
Golf, Motoring, Yachting, Sea and stream
fishing.
HOTELS REACHED BY THE CANADIAN PACIFIC
Name of Hotel
Sicamous, B. C.
Hotel Sicamous A
(M. J. Brennan, Lessee)
Penticton, B. C.
Hotel Incola A
(Owned and operated by
the Okanagan Hotel
Company.)
Cameron Lake, B. C.
Cameron Lake Chalet.A
Vancouver Island
Qualicum Beach, B. C.
Qualicum Beach Hotel.A
Vancouver Island
Agassiz, B. C.
Harrison Hot Springs
Hotel A
(Owned and operated by
Harrison Hot Springs
Hotel Co., Ltd.)	
Altitude
1153
1132
604
100
60
Season
All Year
All Year
May to
Sept.
All Year
All Year
Recreations
Rowing, Canoeing,
Motor boats, Trout
fishing, (Shuswap
Lake), Hiking.
Boating and Fishing
Okanagan Lake,
Splendid Motor
Roads.
Fishing,(Trout), Boating, (Salmon fishing
adjacent).
Golf, Riding, Shooting
in season, Fishing
(Salmon, Trout and
Summer Steelhead).
Two Natural Hot
Springs (sulphur and
potash),Motor Boating, Golf, Canoeing,
Fishing, Swimming,
Tennis, Mountain
Climbing.
A—American plan.    E—European plan.
Indian Days at Banff—It's a colorful spectacle, the celebration July 20th to 23rd, when four hundred Stoney Indians
gather for their tribal sports. Superbly mounted, the braves in
their costumes of white Montreal buckskin, trimmed with bead-
work and ermine, and their feathered head-dresses, make a
memorable pageant.
Golf Week at Banff—August 21-26, 1939.
35 ALL EXPENSE
CANADIAN
The   following are illustrative of 2, 3, 4 and 6 day
of $37.50, $47.25, $57.00 and $74.50 respectively (per
$82.00
4
Colorful    $57
Days
PER  PERSON
2 in room
accommodation.
SINGLE ROOM $ftQ
ACCOMMODATION        wO
WESTBOUND
1st    Day—Ar.   Banff,   Train 9:15 A.M.
Transfer to Banff Springs Hotel.
Lunch—Dinner—Lodging.
2nd   Day—At Banff Springs Hotel.
Meals and Lodging—Drive around Banff  10:00 A.M.  or 1:30 P.M.
3rd    Day—At Chateau Lake Louise.
Breakfast at Banff Springs Hotel.
Lv. Banff Springs Hotel 9:00 A.M. Motor to Chateau Lake Louise.
Lunch—Dinner—Lodging at Chateau Lake Louise.
4th    Day—At Chateau Lake Louise.
Meals and Lodging.
Motor to Moraine Lake, or Pony Trip 10:00 A.M., 1:30 or 4:00 P.M.
5th    Day—At Emerald Lake  Chalet—Lv.  Field.
Breakfast at Chateau Lake Louise.
Lv.   Chateau  Lake  Louise  9:00  A.M.   Motor  to  Emerald  Lake Chalet  via
the Great Divide, Kicking Horse Pass and Yoho Valley.
Lv. Emerald Lake Chalet. Motor to Field Station.
Lv. Field,  Train 11:40 A.M.
Lunch in Dining Car.
EASTBOUND
1st    Day—Ar.   Field,   Train 2:00 P.M.
Lunch in Dining Car prior to arrival Field.
Motor to Emerald Lake Chalet—Half-hour sightseeing.
Lv. Emerald Lake Chalet. Motor to Chateau Lake Louise via Yoho Valley,
Kicking Horse Pass and the Great Divide.
Dinner—Lodging at Chateau Lake Louise.
2nd   Day—At Chateau Lake Louise.
Meals   and Lodging.   Motor  to  Moraine   Lake,   or   Pony   Trip   10:00   A.M.,
1:30 or 4:00 P.M.
3rd    Day—At Banff Springs Hotel.
Breakfast at Chateau Lake Louise.
Lv. Chateau Lake Louise 9:00 A.M. Motor to Banff Springs Hotel.
Lunch—Dinner—Lodging at Banff Springs Hotel.
4th    Day—At Banff Springs Hotel.
Meals and Lodging—Drive around Banff  10:00 A.M. or 1:30 P.M.
5th    Day—Lv. Banff.
Breakfast and Luncheon at Banff Springs Hotel.
Lv. Banff Springs Hotel. Transfer to Banff Station.
Lv.   Banff,   Train 6:55 P.M.
These low-cost all-expense tours will be operated during the period
when hotels are open, from June 10 to September 10, 1939. They offer
a complete adventure in the world-famous Canadian Rockies . . .
play in two great national parks—Banff and Yoho . . . visits to three
delightful resorts—Banff Springs, Lake Louise and Emerald Lake . . .
and 126 miles of spectacular mountain motoring. Banff, Lake Louise
and Emerald Lake are as exquisitely different as you could imagine
—ranging from the baronial grandeur of Banff to the Continental
charm of Chateau Lake Louise and the Swiss-like chalet of Emerald.
GENERAL
BAGGAGE—One piece of hand baggage carried free throughout tour, each
extra piece 50 cents. Trunks $3.00 each for tour. Children under twelve travel
at Half-Fare, if accompanied by an adult and occupying a cot in room with adult.
All-Expense Tours include accommodation in room -with bath at Banff Springs
Hotel, facing Sulphur Mountain, in room with bath at Chateau Lake Louise facing Pipestone Range and in room without bath at Emerald Lake Chalet. Patrons
36 TOURS IN
ROCKIES
"All-Expense" tours which will be available at rates
person if 2 in room) and $40.50, $51.75, $63.00 and
(single).
g Wonderful W"
Days
PER PERSON
Ct in room
accommodation.
SINGLE ROOM $QO
ACCOMMODATION       O^
WESTBOUND
1st    Day—Ar.   BarJf,   Train „ 9:15 A.M.
Transfer to Banff Springs Hotel.
Lunch—Dinner—Lodging.
2nd  Day—At Banff Springs Hotel.
Meals and Lodging.
General Drive around Banff 10:00 A.M. or 1:30 P.M.
3rd    Day—At Chateau Lake Louise.
Breakfast at Banff Springs Hotel.
* Lv. Banff Springs Hotel 9:00 A.M. Motor to Chateau Lake Louise.
Lunch—Dinner—Lodging at Chateau Lake Louise.
4th    Day—At Chateau Lake Louise.
Meals and Lodging.
Motor   to   Moraine   Lake   and   return,   or   Pony   Trip   10:00   A.M.,   1:30   or
4:00 P.M.
5th   Day—At Chateau Lake Louise.
Meals and Lodging.
6th    Day—At Emerald Lake Chalet.
Breakfast and Lunch at Chateau Lake Louise.
Lv. Chateau Lake Louise 2:30 P.M. Motor to Emerald Lake Chalet, via the
Great Divide, Kicking Horse Pass and Yoho Valley.
Dinner—Lodging at Emerald Lake Chalet.
7th    Day—Lv. Field.
Breakfast—Lv. Emerald Lake Chalet. Motor to Field.
Lv.   Field,   Train 11:40 A. M.
Lunch at Emerald Lake Chalet or in Dining Car.
* Departure from Banff Springs Hotel is optional for third or fourth day.
EASTBOUND
1st    Day—Ar.   Field,   Train 2:00 P.M.
Lunch in Dining Car prior to arrival.
Motor to Emerald Lake Chalet, Dinner    Lodging.
2nd  Day—At Emerald Lake Chalet.
Breakfast Emerald Lake Chalet.
Lv.  Emerald  Lake  Chalet  9:15  A.M.  Motor to  Chateau  Lake  Louise,  via
Yoho Valley, Kicking Horse Pass and the Great Divide.
Lunch—Dinner—Lodging Chateau Lake Louise.
3rd   Day—At Chateau Lake Louise.
Meals and Lodging.
Motor to Moraine Lake, or Pony Trip 10:00 A.M., 1:30 or 4:00 P.M.
4th    Day—At Banff Springs Hotel.
Breakfast Chateau Lake Louise.
* Lv. Chateau Lake Louise 9:00 A.M. Motor to Banff Springs Hotel.
Lunch—Dinner—Lodging Banff Springs Hotel.
5th    Day—At Banff Springs Hotel.
Meals and Lodging.
6th   Day—At Banff Springs Hotel.
Meals and Lodging.
General Drive around Banff 10:00 A.M. or 1:30 P.M.
7th   Day—Lv. Banff.
Breakfast and Lunch at Banff Springs Hotel.
Lv. Banff Springs Hotel. Transfer to Banff Station.
Lv.   Banff,   Train 6:55 P.M.
* Departure from Chateau Lake Louise is optional for fourth or fifth day.
INFORMATION
desiring choicer accommodations such as "Bow Valley" view rooms at Banff
Springs Hotel and "Lake" view rooms at Chateau Lake Louise, or room with
bath at Emerald Lake Chalet, if available, may obtain it on additional payment
at the hotel of difference in rate for room selected. Reservations will be made
by selling agents for all accommodation, but premium for preferred rooms will
be arranged at hotel when registering and payment made there.
37 THE BREWSTER TRANSPORT, BANFF, ALBERTA
offers a delightful Motor Detour
Every day in each direction, from June 10 to September 10, 1939.
Traveling Westward
Motor
Miles
0 Arrive   Banff    from   Chicago   and   Twin
Cities.
2 Transfer to  Banff Springs Hotel,    General    Drive    around
Banff   1:30 pm
Returning to hotel at  3:30 pm
24 Leave Banff Springs Hotel  4:00 pm
40    Ar. Johnston   Canyon,   40   minutes'   stop—30   minutes'   walk
65    Arrive Chateau   Lake Louise.— 6:30 pm
STOP OVERNIGHT
65 Leave Chateau Lake Louise  8 :30 am
Arrive The Great Divide
73        "        Wapta  Bungalow Camp 9:00 am
Kicking Horse Pass
81        "        Meeting of the Waters
86        "       Yoho Valley Camp 10:00 am
97        "        Field Station  11:00 am
99        "        Natural Bridge
103        "        Emerald Lake Chalet ...11:30 am
103 Leave Emerald Lake Chalet 11:45 am
Arrive Kicking Horse Canyon
West Park  Entrance
142        "       Golden  Station   1:45 pm
Time changes at Golden to
Pacific time—One Hour Slower
Leave Golden for Vancouver
Motor
Miles
Traveling  Eastward
Arrive Golden from Vancouver
All   times below are   Mountain  time,   one
hour  faster.
0 Leave   Golden  Station  2:15 pm
Arrive West Park Entrance
"        Kicking Horse Canyon
35        "        Natural Bridge
39        " Emerald Lake Chalet.... 4:15 pm
39 Leave Emerald Lake Chalet  4:30 pm
45 Leave Field Station    5:00 pm
56 Arrive Yoho Valley Camp   6:00 pm
61        "        Meeting of the Waters
Kicking Horse Pass
69        "        Wapta  Bungalow  Camp 7:00 pm
The Great Divide
77 Arrive Chateau Lake Louise  7:30 pm
STOP OVERNIGHT
77 Leave Chateau Lake Louise  9:00 am
Arrive Lake Louise Station
102       "       Johnston Canyon
40 minutes'   stop—30 minutes'
walk
118   Arrive  Banff Springs  Hotel 12 noon
118    Leave Banff Springs Hotel  1:30 pm
General Drive around Banff,
returning to hotel at  3:30 pm
142 Transfer to Banff Station
Leave Banff
For Twin Cities and Chicago
COST
The   cost   of   the   above   Motor   Detour  in
either   direction   is:
^General   Drive   around   Banff $ 3.00
Banff   to  Lake   Louise     5.00
Lake Louise  to Emerald Lake     5.00
Emerald Lake to Golden...     5.00
$18.00
* Optional.
Not   included—Meals   en   route   or   room   at
Chateau Lake Louise.
Any part of the above trip can be omitted,
or the journey may be broken at any intermediate point and resumed at a later date.
The entire Detour may be made in an elapsed
time of 24 hours when necessary.
BAGGAGE
One club bag or valise will be carried free,
additional pieces as follows—no trunks or
heavy pieces.
Banff to Lake Louise     _ .$0.25 per piece
Lake Louise to Emerald Lake    .25 per piece
Emerald Lake to Golden     .25 per piece
Through trip, Banff to
Golden           .75 per piece
SLEEPING CAR ACCOMMODATIONS
If you want sleeping car reservations
made, so that when you come to the end
of this Motor Detour you will have reservations—and if you have not already made them
—you should:—
Going Westward—Apply on arrival at
Banff, either Depot Ticket Office or Hotel
Ticket Office, for space west of Golden.
Going Eastward—Apply on arrival at
Chateau Lake Louise (Ticket Office) for
space east of Banff.
38 ALL EXPENSE TOURS
A comprehensive programme of economical All Expense
Tours are operated during the season from June 10th to
September 10th, embracing all the high lights of the Canadian Rockies and enabling the traveler to get the fullest benefit from whatever length of stay is desired, in hotel accommodation to meet the individual taste and at a predetermined
cost.
2 Day Tour—3 Day Tour—4 Day Tour—6 Day Tour.
West bound—detrain at Banff.     Eastbound—detrain at Field.
Ask your railway ticket agent for full particulars
and schedules.
HUNTING, CAMPING AND FISHING TRIPS
IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES
Banff and Lake Louise are two of the most convenient outfitting points in the Canadian Rockies.
For the angler, there are many lakes and streams seldom
fished, within a day or two's journey into the mountains.
In season the hunter has an opportunity to bag such game
as deer, elk, moose, sheep, goat and bear. From 10 days to
a month should be allowed for this sport.
RIDING is very popular among visitors to the National
Parks. Saddle horse rates and charges for Guides are as
follows:
Saddle Horses Guides
Per hour   $1.50      Per hour    $1.50
Each additional hour. ..   1.00      Per half day   3.50
Per half day   3.00      Per day     6.00
Per day      4.50
Note—One day consists of nine (9) hours and not more
than  twenty miles.
SPECIMEN TRIPS
Banff
Sulphur Mountain   One Day
Spray Valley Half Day
Loop and Golf Links Half Day .
Sunshine Lodge   Two Days
Lake Louise
Lakes in the Clouds Half Day
Plain of Six Glaciers Half Day
Paradise Valley    One Day
Lake O'Hara (1 way) '. One Day
Emerald Lake
Yoho Valley, one way Half Day
Yoho Valley, via Burgess Pass One Day
Hamilton  Falls    Half Day
Mt. Burgess   One Day
BREWSTER TRANSPORT COMPANY
BANFF, ALBERTA
39 MOTOR DRIVES IN ROCKIES
Brewster Transport Co.
BANFF
Tour No. 1—General Drive
To Buffalo Park, thence Tunnel Mountain Road; an excellent view of the Bow Falls
Spray Valley and town of Banff. After visiting the Buffalo Park,  the return journey
is made through the village, stops being made at Cave and Basin, and Golf Links.
Daily at 10:00 a. m. and 1:30 p. m..—2Y2  hours $3.00
Tour No. 2—-Lake Louise via Johnson Canyon
An excellent motor trip, among many points of interest en route being Vermilion
Lakes, Hole-in-the-Wall, Pilot Mountain. Mt. Ball and Castle Mountain. A 45-minute
stop is allowed at Johnson  Canyon to visit the Falls.
Daily at 9:00 a. m. and 4:00 p. m.—3 hours....$5.00. Return Trip—All Day $8.00
Tour No. 3—Lake Minnewanka
A combined motor and launch trip of thirty-six miles. The road passing through the
village continues to the Lake via Buffalo Park, Bankhead and Devil's Canyon. A delightful sail on the Lake included.
Daily at 2:30 p. m.—3 hours $2.50
Tour No. 4—-Twilight Tour
Of Beaver Dams and Mt. Norquay Road—14 miles—V/z hours Rate $1.50
Leaving each evening depending on hour of sunset.
At dusk the Beaver can usually be seen in the actual construction of their dams and
mud and log houses. The slopes of Mt. Norquay, where is situated the Banff Ski Club,
afford some of the finest views of the Bow Valley, and the environs of Banff.
LAKE LOUISE
Tour No. 1—Moraine Lake and Valley of Ten Peaks
A motor trip of eighteen miles. After rounding the shoulder of Mt. Temple the
crescent formation of the 10 Peaks comes into view. This range of Mountains, attaining an altitude of 11,500 feet above the sea, together with their glaciers, are seen at
close range when Moraine Lake is reached. At Moraine Lake Lodge refreshments may
be obtained.
Daily at 10:00 a. m., 1:30 and 4:00 p. m.—2% hours $2.50
Tour No. 2—Banff via Johnson Canyon
Visitors to Lake Louise should take advantage of the excellent motor trip to Banff,
described under Trip No. 2 out of Banff.
Daily at 9:00 a. m. and 4:00 p. m.—3 hours $5.00
Return  Trip—all  day   8.00
Tour No. 3—Emerald Lake via Yoho Valley
An interesting feature on this trip is crossing the Continental Divide. After leaving
Wapta the road continues through the Kicking Horse Canyon, thence into the famous
Yoho Valley, terminating at the C. P. R. Lodge near the foot of Takakkaw Falls. From
Yoho to Emerald Lake the road is by way of Field and Natural Bridge.
Daily at 8:30 a. m. and 2:30 p. m.—3 hours $5.00
Return  Trip—all day.   8.00
Tour No. 4—Bow Lakes and Peyto Glacier
On the Ice Fields Highway. 60 miles—3 hours—Daily at 2:00 p. m.. .Rate $5.00
This new scenic tour to Bow Pass, thirty miles north of Lake Louise opens up an
Alpland district heretofore accessible only by Pack Train. The route runs parallel to
the main chain of the Rockies, forming the Continental Divide. At Bow Pass, an altitude of nearly 7,000 feet is attained. Wild flowers bloom in profusion. Some of the
outstanding features are Hector Lake, Mt. Heetor, Bow Lakes, Crowfoot Glacier, Ten
Peaks, Mt. Temple, Lefroy, Victoria, White, Niblock, Cathedral, Stephen and many
other peaks.
Tour No. 5—Icefield Highway
This trip is an extension of Tour No. 4 to the Saskatchewan River featuring Waterfowl Lakes, Mt. Chephren, Mt. Forbes (11,900 ft.), Mt. Murchison, Mistaya Canyon,
Howse River and innumerable ice fields and glaciers.
Daily July and August, 9:00 A. M. (Picnic lunch extra) $7.00
Tour  No.  6—Jasper  Park  (1%  Days).  All  Expense—Motor and
Saddle Horse.
A spectacular tour combining No. 4 and 5 described above, as well as the motor drive
from the Saskatchewan Big Hill to Jasper. The uncompleted 12-mile section of the
highway is covered on saddle horses. Outstanding points of interest north of Saskatchewan River Crossing are Saskatchewan, Athabasca and Dome Glaciers, Sunwapta River
and Falls, etc. Overnight stop is made at Brewster's Columbia Icefield Chalet. This
tour is sold from Lake Louise or Jasper.
Daily July and August.
Leave Lake Louise 9:00 A. M., arrive Jasper noon second day.
Leave Jasper 2:00 P. M., arrive Lake Louise 5:00 P. M. second day.
Single    $32.50
Return    ,   60.00
EMERALD LAKE
Tour No. 1—Yoho Valley
To parties having but one day to spend in Yoho Park, making their headquarters at
Emerald Lake, we strongly recommend the trip to Yoho Valley, as it embraces all
points of interest in this district accessible by motor.
Daily at 9:15 a. m., one way—2 hours $2.75
Daily at 9:15 a. m., return—all day   4.50
Tour No. 2—Field Bus Service
Daily,  connecting all trains $1.00
Tour No. 3—Lake Louise via Yoho Valley
East-bound passengers should avail themselves of the opportunity of making the trip
from Emerald Lake to Lake Louise. The road is via Yoho Vallej^, continuing to Lake
Louise through the Kicking Horse Canyon, past Wapta Bungalow Camp and over the
Great Divide.
Daily at 9:15 a. m. and 4:30 p. m.—3 hours $5.00
40 )j%*K?tJsL"
M
N  MOTOR DRIVES IN ROCKIES
Brewster Transport Co.
BANFF
T
Sp
sti
T
vi)
111
mi
aff
Tc
i
ere
ing
clo:
be
Tc
Tc
A
Wa
Yol
Yol
To
T
Alp
the
tudj
outs
Pea
otht
To
TI
fow;
Hov
To
S
A
fron
high
wan
and
tour
Toi
To
Erne
poim
I
Tot
]
Tou
Ea
from
Louis
Greal
I TRAFFIC DfiPABTDIIirT OFFICIALS
E. G. CLARK, General Traffic Manager Minneapolis, Minn.
H. M. LEWIS, General Passenger Agent Minneapolis, Minn.
C. V. GALLAGHER, Assistant Freight Traffic Manager Chicago, 111.
R. N. GOLDEN, Assistant Freight Traffic Manager Minneapolis, Minn.
E.F.RICE, General Freight Agent  Minneapolis. Minn.
W. P. TULLER, Assistant General Freight Agent Minneapolis. Minn.
G. K. REID, Assistant General Freight Agent Minneapolis, Minn.
G. A. SHERWOOD, Assistant General Freight Agent Duluth, Minn.
G. M. THOMPSON, Assistant General Freight Agt....Neenah-Menasha, Wis.
B. E. SMEED, Assistant General Freight Agent New York, N. Y.
O. A. ROEDELL, General Baggage Agent Minneapolis, Minn
F. M. CHRISTEN. Supt. Dining 4 Sleeping Cars Minneapolis, Minn.
AGUKCIUS
Atlanta, Ga., 404 C.&S. Natl. Bank Bldg..W. A. Shackelford, Gen* 1 Agt. Pass. Dept.
Bismarck, N. D., L. K. Thompson, General Agent
Boston, Mass., 40 Central St H. W. Hobbs, New England Frt. Agent
405 Boylston St L. R. Hart, Gen'l Agent Pass. Dept.
Brandon, Man., C.P.R. Station L. D. Egan, Ticket Agent
Buffalo, JN. Y., 22 Court St W. P. Wass. Gen'l Agt. Pass. Dept.
F. B. Ward, District Freight Agent
Calgary, Alta., C.P.R. Station J. W. Dawson, District Passenger Agent
124A Eighth Ave. W F. J. Hurkett, City Ticket Agent
Chicago, ill., 71 E.Jackson Blvd T. J. Wall, Gen'l Agt. Pass. Dept.
T. J. Nolan, City Passenger Agent
Grand Central Station G. Tompkins, Depot Ticket Agent
Bankers Bldg., Suite 1630 C. V. Gallagher. Asst. Frt. Traffic Mgr.
2040 Board of Trade Bldg...      E. L. Cardie, General Freight Agent
Cincinnati, O., 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.A. D. Macdonald, Gen'l AgentPass. Dept.
F. W. Mager, District Freight Agent
Cleveland, O., 1010 Chester Ave G. H. Griffin,  Gen'l Agent Pass. Dept.
940 Union Commerce Bldg      J. J. MacEwen, District Freight Agent
Dallas, Tex., 1212 KIrby Bldg P. G. Jefferson, Dist. Pass. Representative
Detroit, Mich., 1231 Washington Blvd...M. E. Malone, Gen'l Agent Pass. Dept.
2243 Nat'l. Bank Bldg.,   G. A. Macnamara. General Freight Agent
C. D. Strieker, Dist. Frt. Representative
W. A  Carlsen, General Agent
Duluth, Minn., 201 Alworth Bldg G. A. Sherwood, Asst. Gen'l Frgt. Agent
J. J. Pearce, Traveling Agent
E. J. Olsen, Traveling Agent
A. E. Sword, Depot Ticket Agent
302 W. Superior St. (Lonsdale Bldg.)...S. C. Kirby, District Passenger Agent
W. B. Cravath, City Passenger Agent
Eau Claire, Wis., SooLine Station A. O. Plunkett, Trav. Freight Agent
Ji^iutoiiton   Alta., C. P. R. Bldg Ernest Jacquest, Traveling Agent
Gladstone, Mich A. D Harris, Trav. Freight Agent
Gr. Rapids, Mich., 928 Grand Raplda National Bank Bldg.,
H. L. Young, Dist. Frt. Representative
Great Falls, Mont., 418 Ford Bldg W. H. Hall, Traveling Frgt. Agent
Indianapolis. Ind.,  Mer. Bk. Bldg R. A. Hasenstab, Dist. Freight Agent
D. W. Allan, Trav. Passenger Agent
Kansas City, Mo., 202 Waldheim Bldg..R. G. Norrls, City Passenger Agent
L. S. Roan, District Freight Agent
Los Angeles, Cal., 621 So. Grand Ave...H. A. Lee, Gen'l Agent Pass. Dept.
530 Van Nuys Bldg T. A. Dickson,   District Freight Agent
Memphis, Tenn., 36 Porter Bldg P.D.Salmon, District Freight Agent
Milwaukee, Wis., 1014 Warner
Theatre Bldg. W. C. Giese, General Agent
802 Straus Bldg F. T. Fultz,   Dist. FreightAgt.
Minneapolis, Minn., Soo Line Bldg.. 5th St. So. and Marquette Ave.
F. A. Waterhouse, Div. Pass. Agt.
J. P. Gehrey. City Ticket Agt.
J. O. Haugum. City Passenger Agt.
A. E. Piers. Traveling Pass. Agt.
Regina, Sask.  C.P.R. Station..
St. Louis, Mo.,  418 Locusr St	
E. J. Murphy, General Agent
H. H. Thomas. Commercial Agt.
G. W. Hawes, Division Freight Agent
R. F. Ronnan, Dist. Freight Agent
J. O. Klapp, Gen'l Agt  Perishable Frgt.
Minot, No. Dak A.T.Peterson, General Agent
H. W. Monson, Trav. Freight Agent
Neenah-Menasha, Wis G. M. Thompson, Asst. Gen'l Freight Agt.
R. C. Thorne, Traveling Agent
Nelson, B. C, Baker and Ward8ts N. J. Lowes, City Ticket Agent
New York, N. Y.,   Woolworth Bldg H. Stockdale, Gen'l East. Frgt. Agent
B. E. Smeed, Ass't Gen'l Freight Agent
A. J. O'Malley, General Agent
C. P. Bldg.. Madison Ave. at 44th J. E. Roach, Gen'l Agt. Pass. Dept.
Omaha, Neb.,803 W. O. W. Bldg H. J. Clark, Traveling  Passenger Agent
F. H. Pitzl, District Freight Agent
Philadelphia. Pa., 1500 Locust St E.A. Kenney, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.
914Fidelity-Phila. Trust Bldg H. S. Hankee, Dist. Freight Agent
Pittsburgh, Pa., 444 7th Ave W. N. McKendry, City Pass. Agent
1901 Koppers Bldg G. C. Mensing, District Freight Agent
Portland, Ore.. 626 S. W. Broadway W. H. Deacon,   Gen'l Agent Pass. Dept.
A. E. Walker, District Freight Agent
E. N. Phelps, General Agent Frgt. Dept.
,...J. C. Pike, District Passenger Agent
R. J. Burland, City Pass, and Tkt Agent
...G. P. Carbrey. Gen'l Agent Pass. Dept.
2051 Railway Exch. Bldg..   W. W. Kremer, Dist. Freight Agent
St. Paul, Minn., 922 Minnesota Bldg.   H. E. Benson, General Agent Frgt. Dept.
E. M. Ostby, Trav. Freight Agent
Fourth and Cedar Sts      W. H. Lennon, Gen'l Agent Pass. Dept.
San Francisco, Cal., 152 Geary St S. E. Corbin, Gen'l Agent Pass. Dept.
681 Market St....D. C. MacDonald, District Freight. Agent
Saskatoon, Sask., 115 Second Ave. W. Fridfinnson, City Ticket Agent
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich S. S. Allen, General Agent
Seattle, Wash., 562 Stuart Bldg E. M. Phelps, District Freight Agent
B. G. Spears, General Agent Frgt. Dept.
1320 4th Ave E. L. Sheehan,  Gen'l Agent Pass. Dept.
Spokane, Wash.. 1006 Old National Bank Bldg.
E. S. McPherson, Spokane International
Ry.
H. T. Duffy, General Agent
Superior, Wis T. Carlson, Depot Ticket Agent
Tacoma, Wash.. 1113 Pacific Ave L. N. Jones, City Passenger Agent
Vancouver, B. C, 434 Hastings St. W....F. H. Daly, Gen'l Agt. Pass. Dept.
Victoria, B. C, 1102 Government St J. Macfarlane, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.
Washington, D. C, 14th «fe New York.C. E.Phelps, Gen. Agt. Passenger Dept.
Ave. N. W.
209 Mills Bldg J. T. Kingsley, General Agent
Winston Salem, N. C. 606 Reynolds
Bldg J. G. Quick, General Agent
Winnipeg, Man., 47-48 C. P. R. Bldg., C. F. Ronnan. General Agent
H. D. Burton, City Passenger Agent
Cor. Main and Portage E. A. McGuinness, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept.
663 Main St Calder <fc Co.
S mA.im:AA&
■   ' '■".'   SS
WAMSa

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0356802/manifest

Comment

Related Items