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Slow orders encourage fuel guzzlers Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1970

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 Slow Orders
encourage
Fuel Guzzlers
CPRail H Got any old slow orders hangin' 'round?
Some people do - and they're causing problems for CP Rail!
Slow orders are a necessary precaution in running a safe
railway.
A lot of people recognizing an unsafe situation - or a potentially unsafe one - have the authority to issue or recommend
slow orders. That includes everyone from maintenance-
of-way personnel, roadmasters and train crews to a host
of railway officers in the course of their regular duties and
on specific inspection tours. And, of course, the R.T.C.
Slow orders, when required, help ensure safe operations
until repairs can be effected.
And safety always counts!
But, when a problem is recognized and a slow order
issued, corrective action must be taken as quickly as
possible. The repairs must be inspected and approved
without delay.
Then, equally important - and too often overlooked -
there is a responsibility to lift the slow order promptly.
Slow orders hanging around after they have served their
purpose are not providing benefits to anyone.
In fact, slow orders left on when no longer required have
a definite negative effect on the railway's plant, equipment,
train schedules, work programs, capacity and operating
costs.
For example, on CP Rail's fixed plant, slow running speeds
increase wear and tear. On curves, they have a noticeable
crushing effect on the low rail resulting in premature
deterioration.
On subdivisions, under slow orders, the capacity of the
railway is retarded by the reduced average speed of trains.
Work programs are disrupted as train delays interfere with
planned work blocks.
In the case of fuel consumption and energy efficiency, here
are a couple of examples where studies have translated
slow orders directly into dollars and cents costs.
These simulations reflect trains of different tonnages,
lengths and make up. The figures show fuel consumption
and cost for the trains running at a steady 50 mph compared with the same train, to comply with slow orders,
reducing speeds to 10 mph, 20 mph, and 30 mph. The
lower speed was maintained until the rear of the train
cleared the initial point of slow down. The train then^
accelerated back to 50 m£>h.
Train "A"
Consist Summary
Train                —
928 (Piggybac
Cars                —
64
Empties           —
21
Loads              —
43
Feet
4973
Net Ton
3461
Gross Ton       —
4052
Lading Ton     —
1594
H.P.
9000 - (three S
H.P./Ton
2.22
Ton/BRK
60
Net B.R.
16.1
Test (1) (Normal operation)
50 mph — No slow down
Distance —      4.56 Miles
Speed —      50 mph
Time —      5 min., 28 sec.
Fuel -      12 Gallons @ $1.50 Gal.
$18.00
Test (2)
50 mph
Distance
Speed
Time
Fuel
Test (3)
50 mph
Distance
Speed
Time
Fuel
Test (4)
50 mph
Distance
Speed
Time
Fuel
10 mph — 50 mph
— 4.57 Miles
- 50-10-50 mph
— 10 min., 57 sec.
- 28 Gallons @ $1.50 Gal. = $42.00
Increased fuel
cost over normal
operation $24.00
per train
20 mph - 50 mph
— 4.46 Miles
- 50-20-50 mph
— 7 min., 57 sec.
- 26 Gallons @ $1.50 Gal. = $39.00
Increased fuel
cost over normal
operation $17.00
per train
30 mph - 50 mph
- 4.24 Miles
- 50-30-50 mph
- 6 min., 17 sec.
- 21 Gallons @ $1.50 Gal. = $31.50
Increased fuel
cost over normal
operation $13.50
per train Train "B"
Consist Summary
Train
482
Cars
95
Empties
11
Loads
84
Feet
5621
Net Ton
8672
Gross Ton
9456
Lading Ton
5674
H.P.
-     12000
H.P/Ton
1.26
Ton/BRK
95
Net B.R.
12.1
(four SD40-2 Units)
Test (1) (Normal operation)
50 mph — No slow down
Distance —      6.23 Miles
Speed —      50 mph
Time —      7 min., 32 sec.
Fuel -     31 Gallons @ $1.50 Gal. = $46.50
Test (2)
50 mph
Distance
Speed
Time
Fuel
Test (3)
50 mph
Distance
Speed
Time
Fuel
10 mph — 50 mph
- 6.24 Miles
- 50-10-50 mph
- 13 min., 51 sec.
- 64 Gallons @ $1.50 Gal. = $96.00
Increased fuel
cost over normal
operation $49.50
per train
20 mph - 50 mph
- 6.17 Miles
- 50-20-50 mph
- 10 min., 32 sec.
- 58 Gallons @ $1.50 Gal. = $87.00
Increased fuel
cost over normal
operation $40.50
per train
Test (4)
50 mph — 30 mph — 50 mph
Distance
Speed
Time
Fuel
5.75 Miles
50-30-50 mph
8 min., 21 sec.
54 Gallons @ $1.50 Gal. = $81.00
Now each of these figures may not seem too impressive in
itself, but when you multiply the increased fuel consumption
and costs by the number of trains a day, every day of the
month, that's a lot of extra fuel and a lot of money.
Just one such slow order in place on any of our busy
subdivisions for one year can run up more than $150,000
in unnecessary fuel costs.
There is no question of the need to place slow orders, as
required, to ensure safe train operation.
Once placed, carefully consider the effect of that order on
train schedules, congestion, disruption to gangs, fuel costs
and wear and tear on track. While we have looked at only
fuel costs, all of these other factors represent an increased
cost as well.
Remember, do not place a more restrictive speed over a
territory requiring protection than the condition requires.
The more restrictive the slow order, the more pronounced
are the total detrimental effects.
Having placed a slow order, all reasonable steps must be
taken to do those things that must be done to have it
removed. If you don't, it's costing us unnecessary time
and expense.
If you can't do something right away to take the order off,
remember, even a partial fix could let you INCREASE
THE SPEED to reduce the effect of the order.
When action has been taken to eliminate the need for a
Slow Order, BE SURE THE ORDER IS LIFTED.
If you know there are old, unnecessary slow orders
hangin' 'round there somewhere, take the initiative.
HAVE THEM LIFTED.

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