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Breakfast menu from the Mountaineer train Canadian Pacific Railway Company. The Mountaineer 1926

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  "THE MOUNTAINEER"
BREAKFAST
PRODUCTS   OF   THE   CALEDONIA   MINERAL   SPRINGS
MAGI   "SALINE"   WATER,  SPARKLING
DUNCAN   "APERIENT"   WATER,  SPARKLING
HALF PINTS PINTS
15 25
Berries with Cream 35
BRITISH COLUMBIA APPLES
Baked Apple 15, with Cream 25
Table Apple (One 10,  (Two) 15
CANTALOUPE (HALF) 30 ORANGE, WHOLE 15, SLICED 20 ORANGE JUICE 30
BANANA SLICED WITH CREAM 25 STEWED PRUNES WITH CREAM 25
Sliced Pineapple with Bran Muffins 35
Stewed New Rhubarb 25
CEREALS  WITH   MILK 20,  WITH  CREAM   30
GRIDDLE CAKES  WITH   CANADIAN   MAPLE SYRUP  30
Fish Calces 40, with Bacon 50
FISH
Broiled or Fried Alberta Whitefish 65
Grilled Lake Trout 65
CHOPS, STEAKS, ETC.
Broiled or Fried Chicken (Half) 1.25   (20 Minutes)
BROILED SIRLOIN STEAK  1.50 SMALL STEAK  1.00 LAMB CHOPS  (ONE)  45;  (TWO)  80
BACON   (THREE)  STRIPS 35;   (SIX)  STRIPS 65 BROILED  HAM  65
HAM  AND  FRIED  EGGS 65 SAUSAGE 60 BACON AND  FRIED  EGGS 65
ONE STRIP BACON, WHEN SERVED WITH OTHER ORDERS,  15 CENTS
Griddle Cakes with Bacon 65
CALF'S  LIVER  WITH   BACON  65
Corned Beef Hash with Poached Egg 65 "THE MOUNTAINEER"
A LA CARTE
EGGS
BOILED  (ONE)  20;   (TWO)  35 SCRAMBLED 35 FRIED  (ONE)  20;   (TWO)  35
SHIRRED 40 POACHED ON TOAST  (ONE) 20;  (TWO) 40
OMELETS: PLAIN 45 TOMATO AND CHEESE 50 JELLY,   HAM  OR SPANISH  60
BRITISH COLUMBIA POTATOES
FRENCH   FRIED 25 HASHED  BROWNED 25
PRESERVED FRUITS, MARMALADE, JAMS OR JELLIES 25
(in individual jars)
STRAWBERRIES PINEAPPLE RASPBERRIES
CRABAPPLE JELLY BRAMBLEBERRY JELLY QUINCE JELLY
STRAWBERRY JAM ~   RASPBERRY JAM
ORANGE OR  GRAPE  FRUIT   MARMALADE
PRESERVED  FIGS 35 INDIVIDUAL COMB OR STRAINED  HONEY 25
BREAD AND BUTTER SERVICE PER PERSON
TOAST  15 HOT  ROLLS   15 CORN   MUFFINS   15
MILK TOAST 30 BRAN   MUFFINS   15 CREAM  TOAST 40
WHITE,  BROWN AND  RAISIN   BREAD   10
TEA, COFFEE, ETC.
COFFEE, POT 20  (served with cream or hot milk) COCOA,  POT 25 TEA, POT 20
NESTL,E'S  MILK   FOOD   25 HORLICK'S  MALTED  MILK 20
INSTANT POSTUM  20 INDIVIDUAL SEALED  BOTTLE  MILK  15
FOR BOTTLED AND OTHER BEVERAGES SEE SPECIAL LIST
WAITERS   ARE   FORBIDDEN   TO   ACCEPT   OR   SERVE   VERBAL   ORDERS
passengers are requested to inspect meal check before making payment, and in case of any overcharge or
unsatisfactory service, report the matter to the steward in charge of the car or to
W. A. COOPER,
MANAGER,
sleeping, dining, parlor cars
restaurants and news service
MONTREAL
SOUVENIR COPY  OF THIS MENU CARD  IN  ENVELOPE READY FOR  MAILING,  MAY  BE HAD ON APPLICATION TO
THE  DINING  CAR STEWARD THE INDIAN MAYOR.
By Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance.
Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance, the author, is a full-blooded Indian, a chief of the blood tribe of Alberta. He is a graduate of Carlisle,
where he gained a reputation in university sports. He was appointed to Vfcst Point in 1915, but relinquished this appointment in 1916 to go overseas
with the Canadian forces. Entering the field as a private, he served with distinction, was twice wounded and returned at the end of the war with the
rank of captain.   He is at present engaged in writing a history of the Indians of the Canadian plains, British Columbia and the North Country.
T
HE photograph on the reverse side of this menu shows Chief Running Rabbit and Drunken Chief watering their horses
on the historic Sun Dance flats along the Bow River in Southern Alberta. Once a year the Blackfeet journey to
this spot, pitch their camp of two hundred painted tepees and, for two weeks, carry on the ancient rites of the famous Sun
Dance. The big circular camp is situated a half-mile from this watering hole, just back of the rise of prairieland, and about
eight miles south of Gleichen.
Chief Running Rabbit, standing on the river bank, is perhaps the only Indian on the continent who has had the
distinction of being mayor of a city. During the Calgary Stampede of July, 1923, the Indian tribes of the Alberta plains
were brought together for the first time since the Peace Treaty of 1877, when they were purposely scattered on widely
separated reserves to insure peace and safety to the incoming settlers. While thus gathered in the city which had grown
up on what had been their fighting grounds a few years back, the Indians decided to play a joke on the white man. An
old-time war council was held among the chiefs of the various tribes: Chiefs Running Rabbit, Weasel Calf—a signer of the
Treaty of '77—Spring Chief, Calf Bull, Heavy Shield, Back Fat, Water Chief and Calf Child of the Blackfeet; White Head,
Killing Moose and Walking Buffalo of the Stonys; Big Plume of the Sarcees and Buffalo Child Long Lance of the Bloods.
They decided to recover their hunting-grounds; to take the city of Calgary away from the white man.
Painted and feathered and mounted on their war ponies, they charged down the streets, captured the city hall,
bound Mayor Webster to a horse and took him to the center of the city, where they ended their joke by making him an
honorary chief of the Blackfoot tribe. Mayor Webster reciprocated by making Chief Running Rabbit full mayor af Calgary
for one month. r
Running Rabbit, who is the head-chief of the Blackfoot tribe, is one of the most famous warriors left among the
Indians of the Canadian West. In a big Indian massacre forty miles north of Saskatoon he saved the entire tribes of Blackfeet, Bloods, Sarcees and Piegans from practical annihilation. The Blackfeet and their allies were advancing up the Saskatchewan River in search of their enemies, the allied Crees, Saulteaux and Assiniboines, whom they knew to be camping
somewhere along that stream.
On the night preceding the massacre, Running Rabbit had a "Medicine Dream," in which he foresaw overwhelming
defeat for his tribe and their allies. When he related this dream to the chief and advised him to turn back, the chief told
him and his followers that anyone who chose to go back, "might as well go home and put on his. wife's dress." Running
Rabbit said: 'Tarn not married, but I will go home and put on a woman's dress."
The chief continued his search with an advance party of 300 scouts, but the majority of the four tribes, having great
faith in the strength of Running Rabbit's "Medicine," had turned back with him.
The next day it was learned that the chief and his men had been trapped by an ambuscade consisting of the whole
force of the three enemy tribes, and practically wiped out. From that time on Running Rabbit's fame as a Medicine Man
increased until finally he became a great chief whose exploits are still talked of daily among the Plains Tribes.
In a latter conflict with the Crees, Running Rabbit had his head split open from between the eyes to the crown of
his head, and he received a bullet through the chest and another which smashed his right thigh, but he recovered and fought
many subsequent battles before the Treaty of '77 was signed. ■, "'■."-.,
The warrior who so badly mutilated Running Rabbit was a brave named Playing-With-Arrows, who still lives in
the Touchwood Agency of Saskatchewan. He told me that he met Running Rabbit on the train, returning from the Winnipeg Stampede in 1913, and he said to him: "I suppose we will have to be friends now; we can't fight anymore." Running
Rabbit replied:  "I suppose so." m
Running Rabbit wears seven medals in this photograph, including one from Queen Victoria, one from the royal
family of Japan and one from President U. S. Grant.

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