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Across Canada : Canadian Pacific tour de luxe Canadian Pacific Railway Company Mar 31, 1930

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 ACROSS  CANADA
CANADIAN PACIFIC
TOUR DE LUXE
July 25th, 1930  YOUR HOLIDAY-
in   CANADA
Planned for you
by
CANADIAN   PACIFIC
CANADA, the ideal holiday land, with all its attractions, is
comparatively little known except to the discerning and
discriminating few. And yet a Holiday in Canada is well
worth while; but, the right places should be visited at the right
time. In fact, to get the best out of a holiday of such wonderful
possibilities, that holiday should be planned by experts with
sympathetic knowledge of the real Canada.
Such a holiday has been planned—
THE   -CANADIAN   PACIFIC
TOUR DE LUXE THROUGH CANADA."
The resources and the world-wide activities of the Canadian
Pacific on land and sea make possible this Tour of outstanding
excellence.
Travelling on Canadian Pacific ships and trains, staying at
Canadian Pacific hotels, members will enjoy the exceptional
advantages of unity of management. One of the particular
features of the Tour deserves special mention : members will
have a private train, luxuriously appointed, for their exclusive
use, which will carry them across Canada and back.
It would not be possible to see Canada under more
attractive, carefree conditions.
The itinerary has been carefully devised so that this
remarkably complete and comprehensive Tour may be enjoyable,
profitable and comfortable. Ample time for sightseeing, for
leisure and for rest ; Canadian Pacific officials in constant
attendance; all the annoying details incidental to travel eliminated ; everything foreseen and prearranged ; every minute
is available for your especial enjoyment.
This is an outstanding opportunity to combine a never-to-
be-forgotten holiday with first-hand knowledge of the true
greatness of our nearest Dominion.
PAGE ONE SNOW PEAK AVENUE, NEAR FIELD,  B.C.
PAGE TWO CANADIAN   PACIFIC
TOUR DE LUXE   1930
DAILY   ITINERARY
Liverpool
Belfast   ..
leave             p.m. Friday
leave             p.m.       „
July        25 \
25 |
Duchess
of
Glasgow
leave             a.m. Saturday
26 r
York
Quebec    ..."'■
arrive         —       Friday
August        1 /
„
leave     1.30 a.m. Monday
4
Train
Ottawa
arrive 11.30 a.m.        „
4
tt
»
leave   10.40 p.m.       ■,,
4
,t
Toronto d.
arrive    6.50 a.m. Tuesday
5
„
»       ♦ ♦           . ♦
leave     1.15 p.m. Wednesday
6
Steamer
Niagara Falls, Ont.
arrive    5.30 p.m.       \t
„              6
tt
tt
leave     1.37 p.m. Thursday
7
Train
Toronto ..
. •           ..        arrive    5.40 p.m.       „
7
„
»        *' ♦           A. ■■■■'.A   *
leave   11.50 p.m.       „
7
tt
Kenora   .,
arrive    9.20 a.m. Saturday
9
„
„          ..".
leave     6.15 p.m.       „
9
,t
Indian Head
arrive    9.30 a.m. Sunday
tt             10
„
„                '..,'■.
leave   11.45 a.m.        „
tt             10
tt
Regina     .. ..
arrive    1.05 p.m.        „
tt             10
„
„
. ' ■:       ...        leave     5.00 p.m.       ,,
tt             10
tt
Calgary
arrive    9.15 a.m. Monday
tt           11
,,
At         ♦ ♦          ':♦"'♦
leave   11.45 a.m.        tt
tt            11
tt
Banff      ..           ..    .
arrive    3.00 p.m.       „
tt            11
„
„           .;            ..    •     •..
leave     8.30 a.m. Thursday
14
Automobile
Castle Mountain Camp
arrive 11.30 a.m.        „
14
„
*>
leave     1.30 p.m.       „
14
tt
Park Gate
arrive    5.00 p.m.       „
14
„
»
leave     6.00 p.m.       tf
14
Train
Kootenay Landing
arrive    7.00 a.m. Friday
15
tt
»
leave     8.00 a.m.        ,,
15
Steamer
Nelson    ..           ..
'■. ♦ d . arrive    3.00 p.m.       „
15
tt
»
leave     4.00 p.m.       '„
15
Train
Bonnington Falls
arrive   4.30 p.m.       „
15
„
„
leave     6.00 p.m.       „
15
tt
Penticton
arrive   7.45 a.m. Saturday
16
,f
»                    .'.'•.
leave     —   a.m.        >,
16
Automobile
Winslow ...
.            ..        arrive    —   a.m.        ;>
16
„
„
leave   11.15 a.m.       „
16
Train
Vancouver          '♦■-..'
.            ..        arrive 10.25 P»m*       tt
16
tt
tt
..        leave      —■   a.m. Wednesday
tt           20
Steamer
Victoria ..
arrive    2.30 p.m.       „
tt           20
tt
t*      * ♦       """♦♦
leave   11.45 p.m. Friday
tt              22
tt
Vancouver
arrive    7.00 a.m. Saturday
23
„
>>
..        leave     7.45 a.m.        „
23
Train
Revelstoke
arrive 11.00 p.m.       „
23
„
tt                      *»'--.'
leave     6.00 a.m. Sunday
24
,,
Field       ..            .d   ,
arrive     Noon.           ,,
24
tt
tt           ♦ ♦
leave     1.00 p.m.       „
24
Automobile
Emerald Lake
arrive    1.30 p.m.       „
24
„
>/
leave     3.30 p.m.       „
24
tt
Yoho
arrive    4.30 p.m.       „
24
tt
tt           ♦♦.•■■■
•".♦..    leave     5.50 p.m.       „
tt              24
tt
Lake Louise           ..
arrive    6.45 p.m.       '„
24
„
»                   ♦ ♦           ♦
..        leave   11.00 p.m. Tuesday
26
s Train-.,
Edmonton
..        arrive    9.00 a.m.  Wednesday
27
tt
„
■ ..'.        leave   12.40 p.m.       ,,
27
„
Winnipeg               .;.           .
arrive    8.00 p.m. Thursday
28
„
»
leave     9.45 p.m. Friday
29
„
Fort William
arrive    9.50 a.m. Saturday
tt             30
tt
tt
leave       Noon.          ,>
30
„
Nipigon River Camp
arrive    2.15 p.m.       „
30
tt
tt
.            ..        leave     6.00 p.m.       „
tt             30
tt
Sudbury ..
arrive io.oo a.m.  Sunday
31
tt
tt
leave     1.00 p.m.       „
31
„
French River Camp
..        arrive    2.20 p.m.       „
tt             31
„
tt
;.        leave     6.30 p.m.        „
31
tt
Montreal             ..
arrive 11.00 a.m. Monday
September    1
„
tt                    A...'     . «
leave      —   a.m. Thursday
4
\ Duchess of
j   Atholl
Liverpool
..         arrive    —                  „
tt           11
PAGE THREE THE
LOUNGE
■111
«
■Hi
I
IW
'*! 'i    '     a   '
DUCHESS OF YORK
DUCHESS OF ATH0LL
^^^B
THE
DRAWING-
ROOM
PAGE FOUR Crossing  the   Atlantic
The Ships and the Route
The steamship Duchess of York to be used
on the outward voyage, and the Duchess of
Atholl to be used homeward, are two of the
four new Duchess steamships recently added
to the Canadian Pacific Atlantic Fleet.
Each of 20,000 tons, they are the largest steamships running to Montreal and have a speed of
17J knots. Canadian Pacific steamships take the
short open-sea route across the Atlantic. On
this route, after 4J days' steaming, the coast of
Newfoundland is reached, and thence for two
whole days passengers enjoy the sail up the
sheltered waters of the St. Lawrence Gulf and
River to Quebec; a thousand miles—or nearly
one-third of the way—in a luxurious liner past
some of the most delightful scenery possible to
find anywhere.
Across Canada
The Special Train and its Equipment
Landing operations when travelling by Canadian
Pacific are insignificant; from boat to shore,
thence to a Canadian Pacific hotel or to Canadian
Pacific station for a rail journey—continuity of
service and interest is assured. For the Tour de
Luxe a Special Train will be in readiness at
Quebec when the Duchess arrives, and thereafter
for practically five weeks will be constantly ready to
take its guests farther and farther on its wonderful
itinerary. In striking contrast to travel on
European railways, Canadian trains allow considerable freedom of movement-—the special train
for the Tour through Canada will consist of the
highest standard equipment—Sleeping Cars of
the latest type, Dining Car, Compartment Car,
and Library-Observation Car. The Observation
Car, with its wide windows and platform at the
rear, enables passengers to obtain uninterrupted
views of the country. In the mountains an Open-
Observation Car will also be attached to the train.
TEA ON DECK
DECK quoits
IIP
A GAME OF DECK TENNIS
PAGE FIVE CHATEAU FRONTENAC, QUEBEC
*ws^
MONTMORENCY FALLS
QUEBEC.—In approaching Quebec from the river
attention is at once attracted by the Canadian
Pacific Chateau Frontenac Hotel. Modelled on the
architecture of the seventeenth-century French
chateau, although of entirely modern structure, it is
in perfect harmony with the mediaeval atmosphere of
Quebec.
Friday, August I
QUEBEC—Arrive p.m. We make the Chateau
Frontenac our headquarters
Saturday, August 2
QUEBEC.—Morning drive in this historical city,
including Lower Town, Sous le Cap Street, Notre
Dame des Victoires, and the Plains of Abraham.
Afternoon free for personal exploration of the many
historical and interesting points and nooks in old
Quebec,
Sunday, August 3
QUEBEC.—The morning will be free for members
to spend as they wish. In the afternoon there will
be an auto drive to Montmorency Falls and Kent
House; very good views of the St. Lawrence are
obtained.
The special train detailed for the Tour is now awaiting
our pleasure, and we join it during the evening as suits
our convenience.    Depart at midnight for Ottawa.
Monday, August 4
OTTAWA.—Arrive 11.30 a.m. Chateau Laurier
Hotel. Sightseeing drive embracing Rockcliffe Park,
Government Experimental Farm, Ottawa-Hull
industrial district, Chaudiere Falls, Canadian Senate
and House of Representatives.    Leave 10.40 p.m.
TORONTO WATERFRONT
Large building in centre is Royal York Hotel
page six Tuesday, August 5
TORONTO.—Arrive 6.50 a.m. Stay at the Roval
York Hotel.
Beautifully situated on the shore of Lake Ontario,
Toronto is affectionately called the " Queen City "
by its citizens. It is the seat of the Provincial
Government, and has some of the largest commercial
houses in the Dominion. Its population is largely
of English and Scotch extraction, or of United
Empire Loyalist descent, but the city is distinctively
North American in the intensity of its activity and
energy.
In the morning there will be a 12-mile auto drive of
the historical points, churches and cathedrals, financial
and commercial districts, residential and park sections,
University of Toronto, Parliament Buildings (with
stop and tour of buildings).    Afternoon free.
PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS,  OTTAWA
Wednesday, August 6
NIAGARA FALLS.—Leave Toronto after lunch for
trip by steamer across Lake Ontario to Lewiston,
thence by the famous Gorge Route via Whirlpool
Rapids and Falls View Bridge to Niagara Falls,
arriving at 5.30 p.m. Stay at General Brock Hotel.
Of Niagara Falls it is unnecessary to say much, such
is its hold on everybody's imagination as one of
the most remarkable works of Nature. The sheer
descent of the unbroken plunge gives to Niagara a
sublimity which height alone cannot impart; the
tumultuous rapids above the Falls, and the deep
gorge below, add not a little to the grandeur of the
scene. By night the Falls are a scene of enchantment,
the tumbling cascade of waters, lit by multi-coloured
searchlights, a truly never-to-be-forgotten sight.
-. - #^       ""
A.    A.
-' - -   '
THE WHIRLPOOL AT NIAGARA
A      ". " ,     '
NIAGARA FALLS
PAGE SEVEN ALONG THE SHORES OF LAKE SUPERIOR
HHHH
BUNGALOW   CAMP,  KENORA
KENORA,  ONTARIO
PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, REGINA
Thursday, August j
Morning.    Sightseeing drive to points of interest.
Leave Niagara Falls by train at 1.37 p.m. via the
Orchard District of Eastern Canada  for  Toronto,
arriving at 5.40 p.m.    Leave Toronto at 11.50 p.m.
Friday, August 8
EN ROUTE.—Northward from Toronto we proceed
through the Muskoka region, so firmly established in
the affection of those who know it, that it has now
become one of the best known summer playgrounds of
this continent.
Passing Sudbury we continue through the big-game
territories of Northern Ontario, and for many miles
before arriving at Port Arthur skirt the shores of Lake
Superior, from which a magnificent panorama of
grand and impressive beauty is unrolled before us.
We plunge into deep cuts, vast tunnels, and out again
into dazzling sunshine, which turns to blue the
distant islands fringing the shore and the distant
promontories ahead and behind.
Saturday, August 9
KENORA.—Arrive 9.20 a.m. Devil's Gap Bungalow
Camp is delightfully situated almost due south of
Kenora Station, about four miles distant. A 20-minute
motor-boat spin from the dock, winding a rapid
passage through a succession of leafy channels and
finally turning a sudden corner, brings one to the
Camp, nestling amid slender pale birches and pines
on the crest of a ridge between two bays. Motor launch
trip will be taken on the Lake of the Woods. Leave
6.15 p.m.y
Sunday, August 10 j
INDIAN HEAD.—Arrive 9.30 a.m. Indian Head is
generally known in the Prairie Provinces as the chief
tree distributing centre of the Federal Forestry Branch.
From this point millions of trees are annually shipped
without charge to farmers in the West. The Dominion
Government also maintains an agricultural experimental farm which will be visited. Leave at
11.45 a.mJg
REGINA.—Arrive 1.05 p.m. Regina is the capital
and largest city in the province of Saskatchewan, and
one of the most important distributing centres west
of Winnipeg. The Provincial Parliament Buildings,
which face the placid Wascana Lake, are very handsome. Regina was formerly the capital of the North-
West Territories, and was for over forty years the
headquarters of the Royal North-West Mounted
Police, one of the most famous forces in the world,
whose exploits have been so often chronicled in both
fact and fiction as to have become almost historic.
Sightseeing drive.    Leave 5.00 p.m.
Monday, August 11
CALGARY.—Arrive 9.15 a.m. Here we reach the
end of the Prairie proper and are on the edge of the
foothills. Calgary is the largest city in Alberta, and
also the largest between Winnipeg and Vancouver.
Founded less than forty years ago, it is now a
flourishing industrial and agricultural centre.
At Calgary, adjoining the Canadian Pacific Station, is
PAGE EIGHT the fine Palliser Hotel, the social centre of this prosperous city, owned and operated by the Canadian
Pacific Railway. Sightseeing drive.    Leave 11.45 a-m«
THE GAP.—Beyond Calgary Canadian Pacific rails
traverse the most wonderful region of Canada—the
Canadian Rockies—which we enter at The Gap, two
almost vertical walls of dizzy height, streaked and
capped with snow and ice. Nature has thrown up
this system on so vast a scale that their greatness is
difficult to grasp. They comprise 650 peaks 6,000 ft.
in height or more.
In places the road-bed is cut out of solid rocks; in
others huge steel trestles span deep chasms through
which incipient rivers churn.
BANFF.—Arrive 3.00 p.m. Headquarters of Rocky
Mountains Park, a wonderful region of 2,751 square
miles, embracing rivers, lakes, and noble mountain
ranges. No part of the Rockies exhibits a greater
variety of sublime and pleasing scenery, and nowhere
are good points of view and features of special interest
so accessible as in this district, where so many good
roads and bridle paths have been constructed, offering
delightful rides, drives, and walks.
On the east side of the Bow Falls is the road which
switchbacks up Tunnel Mountain, affording splendid
views of the Bow Valley and the surrounding mountains. Another beautiful walk is past the Cave and
Basin to Sundance Canyon. The magnificent Banff
Springs Hotel, the finest mountain hotel in the world,
stands on a height between the foaming falls of the
Bow and the mouth of the rapid Spray River. From
its veranda beautiful panoramas are to be viewed.
Had Banff not become famous for its beauty it must
have become famous for its Hot Springs, which are
amongst the most important of this continent. The
Banff Springs Hotel has its own beautiful sulphur pool.
Tuesday, August 12
BANFF.—There will be a morning drive round
Tunnel Mountain to Bow Falls, Golf Links, Buffalo
Park, Zoo, Cave and Basin, Banff Village, etc. The
rest of the day will be free.
Among the recreations of Banff are golf, tennis,
driving, motoring, riding, swimming, boating, fishing,
and mountain climbing.
Wednesday, August 13
BANFF.—This day will be free-for members to
pursue such pastimes as appeal to them most.
Thursday, August 14
BANFF-WINDERMERE HIGHWAY.—LeaveBanff
8.30 a.m. We now make a spectacular automobile
trip through the most magnificent mountain scenery
of the world over the new Banff-Windermere Highway. At Castle Mountain we cross the Bow River
and shortly after enter Vermilion Pass, at which point
Kootenay Park commences. Soon we are passing
Marble Canyon, a remarkable fissure 300 ft. deep.
We then follow the Vermilion River to its junction
with the Kootenay River.
Crossing the Kootenay we proceed through a beautiful
avenue of virgin forest, and ascending Sinclair Pass
reach Radium Hot Springs.
During the motor trip our train has been sent empty
to Park Gate.
CALGARY, ALBERTA
BOW FALLS,  BANFF
BANFF—WINDERMERE HIGHWAY
PAGE NINE NELSON,  BRITISH COLUMBIA
Thursday, August 14
COLUMBIA VALLEY.—Boarding our train at Park
Gate we pass Windermere Lake and continue through
the fertile Columbia Valley and join the Crow's Nest
Line at Colvalli, arriving at Kootenay Landing in the
morning, where we transfer to a comfortable C.P.R.
steamer for Nelson, while our train is put on barges
and ferried to Nelson.
Friday, August 15
KOOTENAY LAKE AND NELSON.—Kootenay
Lake is a beautiful sheet of water between two
separate ranges of the Selkirks, about 70 miles
in length. On either side, the mountains, dipping
sometimes steeply into the water, at other times
affording shelter to little ledges of fertile land, afford
most magnificent scenery.
NELSON.—Arrive 3.00 p.m. The city is charmingly
situated on a commanding eminence overlooking
the west arm of Kootenay Lake, and is the commercial centre of the Kootenay district, and practically
of the entire southern British Columbia region. At
the convergence of lake and rail systems it is an
attractive little city in which life passes very pleasantly.
The people of Nelson say that Nature practised on
Switzerland before making British Columbia. They
compare the location of their city to Lucerne; and
indeed, the Selkirks, the dominant features of the
Kootenay Landscape, have nothing to suffer in comparison with the Alps.
IN   THE KETTLE VALLEY
■iiiiiiiilBiis
BllE!
■MBiii^BI
MORAINE LAKE, IN THE VALLEY OF THE TEN PEAKS
PAGE TEN Leaving Nelson at 4.00 p.m. we run alongside the
Kootenay River for a number of miles through a very
picturesque country. A stop at Bonnington, ten miles
out of Nelson, will give us a splendid view of the
awe-inspiring waterfalls of the Kootenay River.
Saturday, August 16
PENTICTON,     KELOWNA     VALLEY.—Arrive
7.45 a.m. Penticton, with its mild, even climate, is
rapidly becoming one of the principal resorts of this
region. It is the southern terminus of the Canadian
Pacific steamers on the Okanagan Lake. Auto drive
to Winslow to visit fruit farm.
KETTLE VALLEY.—Leave Winslow 11.15 a.m.
As we continue our journey, beautiful views of the
lake are to be seen from the railway, while we
gradually ascend to the Coquihalla Pass through the
Cascades. Just beyond Othello Station is a remarkable engineering achievement, five tunnels in such
perfect alignment that a view is obtained directly
through all five of them at once. At the portal of
each tunnel the walls rise sheer for hundreds of feet.
At Hope, the western terminus of the Kettle Valley
Railway is reached. The train crosses the Fraser
River and joins the Canadian Pacific, on which it
travels 87 miles to Vancouver.
VANCOUVER. — Arrive 10.25 P,m. Stay at
Canadian Pacific Hotel Vancouver.
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BIG  TREES,  STANLEY PARK, VANCOUVER, B.C.
A CANADIAN PACIFIC TRANS-CONTINENTAL TRAIN
PAGE ELEVEN BANFF,  alberta.     SHOWING   CANADIAN   PACIFIC   BANFF   SPRINGS   HOTEL
PAGE TWELVE
PAGE THIRTEEN CAPILANO CANYON, VANCOUVER, B.C.
SA ■■;'■ '■'■'■% ■"    !'j
illililS
MALAHAT  DRIVE, VICTORIA, B.C.
Sunday, August 17
VANCOUVER.—The largest commercial centre in
British Columbia, a very important seaport with a
vast Oriental business, and the centre of a large
lumbering and fishing trade. It has an excellent
harbour, nearly land-locked and fully sheltered, facing
a beautiful range of mountains.
The city is most picturesquely situated on Burrard
Inlet, surrounded by environs of varied character.
There are many bathing beaches, parks, and
boulevards; and, in particular, Stanley Park should
be seen—a primeval forest right within the city
limits. The Marine Drive takes one through the best
residential parts of the city, including Shaughnessy
Heights, thence to the Fraser River, with its fleets
of salmon trawlers, and back along the coast past
bathing beaches and golf links.
Morning free. Sightseeing drive to Stanley Park,
Shaughnessy Heights, and along the Marine Drive in
afternoon.
Monday, August 18
VANCOUVER.—In the morning an auto drive to
Capilano Canyon; the route crosses Burrard Inlet
at Second Narrows Bridge, proceeds through North
Vancouver, thence through virgin forests to the first
Canyon with its famous bridge. A few miles farther
on the Second Canyon, more rugged in its grandeur,
is reached.    Afternoon free.
Tuesday, August 19
VANCOUVER.—Day   free.     Embark  during   the
evening on one of the palatial "Princess " steamships;
sleep on board.
Wednesday, August 20
VICTORIA.—Leave Vancouver by steamship. The
short trip across the Straits of Georgia between
Vancouver and Victoria will prove to be one of the
most interesting on the Tour, and provides a pleasing
diversion after the train journey.
During the voyage passengers have an ever-changing
and wonderful panoramic view of beautiful islands,
bays, and rocky headlands, with show-capped mountains of the coast ranges and the Olympics as a
background.
Arrive Victoria 2.30 p.m. and Stay at the Canadian
Pacific Empress Hotel.
Thursday, August 21
VICTORIA.—-Victoria is charmingly situated at the
southern end of Vancouver Island. Owing to the
characteristic Beauty of its residential district, it has
often been called " a bit of England on the shores of
the Pacific." It is distinctively a home city, with
beautiful gardens, although its enterprising business
district speaks of rich commerce drawn from the
fishing, lumber, and agricultural industries of
Vancouver Island.
Victoria's beauty lies in its residential districts, its
boulevards, parks, public buildings, numerous bathing
beaches, and semi-tropical foliage. But it is not only
the situation of Victoria that is beautiful, for wherever
one goes in the surrounding countryside one finds
vistas of seas, mountains, shoreline, and bay that are
both magnificent and picturesque.
Morning auto drive to the summit of Saanich Mountain, thence to the famous But charts' Sunken Gardens.
After lunch at Brenta Lodge we take ferry across
Saanich Inlet and return via the Malahat Drive to
Victoria.
PAGE FOURTEEN Friday, August 22
VICTORIA.—Day free.    Leave  at  11.45  p.m.  by
steamship for Vancouver.
Saturday, August 23
VANCOUVER.—-Arrive 7.00 a.m. and leave 7.45 a.m.
For 500 miles east of Vancouver the Canadian Pacific
leads through scenery such as can be found nowhere
else on earth. Stupendous masses of rock, piled to the
sky and crowned with snow, mark the beginning of the
Canyons, about 85 miles from Vancouver.
This country is second in spectacular scenery only to
the Rockies themselves. The gorge draws together
as the train winds along ledges cut on its face; the
track, following the river, often at a considerable height
above it and hewn from solid rock, not only crosses
from side to side in the Canyon, but also tunnels
through great rock spans, while below the Fraser
River foams and roars.
Just before reaching North Bend (130 miles) is the
famous " Hell's Gate," where two jutting promontories suddenly compress the river and force its
escape in a roaring cataract through a bottle-necked
outlet. At Lytton we leave the Fraser and parallel
the Thompson River, arriving at Revelstoke during
the night.
Our train is held at this point until 6.00 a.m. the
following morning to enable us to continue our trip
through the mountains in daylight.
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TOTEM POLE
HELL'S GATE ON FRASER RIVER, B.C.
PAGE FIFTEEN EARLY  MORNING EXERCISE
Sunday, August 24
THE, SELKIRKS.—From Revelstoke to Glacier
we follow the Illecillewaet River, skirting several
remarkably deep fissures in solid rock. The most
impressive of these is Albert Canyon, where the river
is nearly 150 ft. below the railway. We stop here for
a few minutes to permit of a view of this wonderful
gorge. We pass Glacier, the centre of the finest
mountain-climbing region of the Selkirk Range.
Here Mount Sir Donald rises, a naked and abrupt
pyramid, to a height of a mile and a quarter above the
railway. Rogers Pass and the snowy Hermit Range
are in full view and all around us a sea of mountain
peaks. We plunge into the Connaught tunnel, five
miles in length, the longest tunnel in America.
Leaving the tunnel, we pass through more magnificent
scenery, and at Golden begin climbing again to Field,
ascending 1,500 ft. in 35 miles, for we are now entering
the Rockies system proper. Leaving Golden we pass
through the Kicking Horse Canyon, the sides of
which are almost vertical, and soon reach Field.
EMERALD LAKE AND YOHO VALLEY.—Arrive
Field at noon. We will leave our train at Field and
motor to Lake Louise. Crossing the turbulent
Kicking Horse River, the road leads through a forest
of balsam and spruce to Emerald Lake (7 miles).
The road passes on the way the Natural Bridge—a
barrier of rock damming the river.
Emerald Lake, a beautiful sheet of water of most
exquisite colouring and sublimity of surroundings, lies
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EMERALD  LAKE,  NEAR FIELD, B.C.
PAGE SIXTEEN placid under the protection of Mount Wapta, Mount
Burgess, and Mount President. Luncheon will be
taken in the charming log Chalet on the shore of the
lake.
YOHO AND WAPTA,—Leaving Emerald Lake we
return over the same road for a part of the distance,
skirt the base of Mount Burgess to the Yoho River, and
then ascend the Valley, one of the most beautiful in the
entire Rockies. Near the end of the road is the Yoho
Valley Camp and Takakkaw Falls, forming one high
ribbon of water descending from precipitous cliffs in
clouds of foam from a height of 1,200 ft.
Having partaken of tea at the camp we return to the
outlet of the valley, where we get on to the " Great
Divide Highway," which leads us through sublime
scenery and past Wapta Camp, an attractive summer
resort for tourists. From our motors we will be able
to see what the railway had to contend with in getting
through the Kicking Horse Pass. The difficulty of
the grade has been eliminated by two wonderful
tunnels, forming one of the most notable engineering
feats in existence. These are the famous " spiral
tunnels," the railway doubling back upon itself twice
and forming a rough figure " 8 " in shape.
Six miles before Lake Louise is the " Great Divide,"
the very backbone of the continent. It is marked by a
rustic arch spanning a stream under which the water
divides; thrt flowing to the east reaches Hudson Bay
and the Atlantic, and the rivulet that runs to the west
adds its mite to the volume of the Pacific. Our motors
land us at the doors of the Chateau Lake Louise in
time for dinner.
lAV'A:
09Sf
ALBERT CANYON, BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE SWIMMING POOL AT  CHATEAU  LAKE LOUISE
PAGE SEVENTEEN LAKE  O HARA,  BRITISH COLUMBIA
Monday, August 25
LAKE LOUISE.—Lake Louise is one of the most
perfect gems of scenery in the world—" a lake of the
deepest and most exquisite colouring, ever changing,
defying analysis, mirroring in its wonderful depths
the sombre forests and cliffs that rise from its shores
on either side, the gleaming white glacier and tremendous snow-covered peaks that fill the background of
the picture, and the blue sky and fleecy clouds overhead."
On the shores of this beautiful lake the Canadian
Pacific operates the splendid Chateau Lake Louise.
No more beautiful spot and no more comfortable
hotel could be chosen by anyone wishing to make
either a short stay or a long one in the Rockies. Many
there are who are entirely satisfied to sit on the
veranda watching the marvellous kaleidoscope of
colour that flits across the surface of the lake.
Numerous magnificent and imposing mountains
surround the lake. Victoria Glacier, which shuts off
the southern end of the lake, is an awe-inspiring
spectacle. Along the western shore of the lake is a
delightful mile and a half walk affording splendid
views of these gigantic peaks.
Among the numerous delightful excursions is that to
the Lakes in the Clouds, two gems that nestle high
upon the mountain sides. Morning auto drive to
Moraine Lake, a lovely mountain lake lying in the
Valley of the Ten Peaks.
Tuesday, August 26
LAKE LOUISE.—Day entirely free. We rejoin our
train during the evening as our departure will be at
11.00 p.m.
THE LAKES IN THE  CLOUDS
PAGE EIGHTEEN TWIN FALLS, YOHO VALLEY, B.C.
PAGE NINETEEN JASPER AVENUE, EDMONTON
ROYAL ALEXANDRA HOTEL AND STATION, WINNIPEG
Wednesday, August 27
EDMONTON.—Arrive 9.00 a.m. Situated on both
sides of the North Saskatchewan River, Edmonton
was established as a fur-trading post in 1795; the
magnificent Parliament Buildings of the Province of
Alberta are now located near the site made historic
by the original trading post of Fort Edmonton. The
University of Alberta and many other educational
institutions are situated here.
The city is run on very progressive municipal lines;
it is the distributing centre for the vast Peace River
country to the north and north-west. Auto sightseeing drive. Leave 12.40 p.m. for Winnipeg, passing
en route Saskatoon, Yorton, Portage la Prairie, etc.
Thursday, August 28
EN   ROUTE.—Again   we   cross   the   great   rolling
prairie country, this time on the fringe of the Great
North.
WINNIPEG.—Arrive 8.00 p.m. Stay at the Royal
Alexandra Hotel.
Friday, August 29
WINNIPEG.—Winnipeg is Canada's third largest
city with a population of nearly 300,000. The city is
handsomely built, one of the most notable structures
being the provincial Parliament Buildings; it is also
the seat of the University of Manitoba and the
Manitoba Agricultural College. It is a city of fine
boulevards and parks, many golf courses, and summer
and winter sports of all kinds. Winnipeg is the
greatest grain market and grain inspection point in the
British Empire.
Auto sightseeing drive through this city in the morning.
Leave 9.45 p.m.
NIPIGON BUNGALOW CAMP
PAGE TWENTY Saturday, August 30
PORT ARTHUR AND FORT WILLIAM.—
Arrive 9.50 a.m. The Twin Cities together form
Canada's greatest grain port. The total capacity of
the thirty-six great terminal elevators is in excess of
64,000,000 bushels, the largest having capacity of
10,000,000 bushels. As a summer resort the Twin
Cities have many attractions. They are the gateway
to a vast area of forest, lake, stream, and mountain.
Leave 12.00 noon.
NIPIGON RIVER BUNGALOW CAMP.—Arrive
2.15 p.m. This camp is situated deep in the sweet-
smelling woods of the north, occupying a broad bench
that looks across an expansion of the Nipigon River
bearing the name of Lake Helen. The forest and the
streams.are full of invitation for those who have been
(like the poet) " too long in city pent." Clear waters,
bright skies, and balmy, invigorating breezes in this
region singularly blessed with its rugged settings can
never be forgotten. The party will be taken for a
launch trip which members will find both interesting
and refreshing.    Leave 6.00 p.m.
Sunday, August 31
SUDBURY.—Arrive 10.00 a.m. Sightseeing drive
and surface inspection of this well-known mining
place.    Leave at 1.00 p.m.
FRENCH  RIVER  BUNGALOW  CAMP.—Arrive
2.20 p.m. Perched on a cliff overlooking a broad river
that sweeps down between grey-blue rocky walls—
walls that are touched here and there into rare beauty
by lichen and nodding flowers, green birch, and clumps
of jewel-like berries—is a group of artistic bungalow
cottages.    This lordly stream in the forest is  the
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FORT WILLIAM, ONTARIO
AN IDLE HOUR
FRENCH RIVER BUNGALOW  CAMP
PAGE  TWENTY-ONE CANADIAN PACIFIC DINING CAR
EN  ROUTE
French River, and the group of cottages, the famous
French River Bungalow Camp.
Recreations : Golf, tennis, bathing, canoeing, and
fishing. There will be a motor-launch trip. Leave
6.30 p.m. for Montreal.
Monday, September 1
MONTREAL.—Arrive 11.00 a.m. The commercial
capital of Canada and the largest inland port in the
world. Everywhere the thrill of achievement, the
sense of progress—this is Montreal, gateway to Canada.
Motor to the Mount Royal Hotel.
Morning, Tally-Ho trip to the top of Mount Royal,
a large and beautiful park. From its Look-out wonderful views can be obtained of the city and river.
Afternoon free.
Tuesday, September 2
MONTREAL.—Drive  in  afternoon  to  Macdonald
College and  to   St.  Annes, tea being taken at the
Habitant Inn.
Wednesday, September 3
MONTREAL.—Day free.
Thursday, September 4
MONTREAL.—After   breakfast  we   motor   to   the
wharf to embark on the De Luxe Cabin liner Duchess
of Atholl.
The domes, spires and towers of Montreal fade in
the distance. We leave behind a great modern
harbour, the largest grain port of the world. Huge
warehouses line the wharves, but wedged in among
them we see the old Church of Notre Dame de
Bonsecours, where the miraculous Virgin, set up to
guard the sailors two centuries ago, still looks out
towards the water with hands raised in benediction
and farewell.
impiiiiifi
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MONTREAL
PAGE TWENTY-TWO GENERAL   INFORMATION
DEPOSIT.—Membership will be registered and accommodation definitely
engaged upon payment of deposit of £25. Balance of fare to be paid
not later than July 7th.
STEAMSHIP ACCOMMODATION.—Accommodation rated at more than
the minimum can be provided upon payment of supplement
according to tariff.
DECK CHAIRS.—A chair and rug will be reserved for the use of each member.
SEATS IN DINING SALOON.—Reservations on both Atlantic ships will
be made.
PASSPORTS.—All members must be in possession of a valid passport.
Forms of application will be sent on request.
BAGGAGE.—Members are advised, in their own interests, not to take
unnecessary luggage; this is particularly desirable on the trip
through Canada, where experienced travellers find two suitcases
ample for their needs. It is not always realized that at most hotels
laundry handed in during the morning will generally be returned the
same evening.
INSURANCE.—Members are recommended to insure their baggage. Rates
on application.
MONEY.—For safety and convenience, members are recommended to carry
their funds in Canadian Pacific Express Travellers5 Cheques
obtainable at any Canadian Pacific Office.
MAIL.—For the convenience of members' relatives or friends at home, a list
is being prepared showing dates for posting and addresses to which
letters may be sent.
Iliiiiiiiiiiiiii
A WESTERN RANCH
PAGE TWENTY-THREE The Fare £199 10s. includes:
Cabin class berth on Duchess of York and
Duchess of Atholl, rated minimum. Super
accommodation can be provided if desired.
First-class rail travel in Canada.
Lower berth in Standard (first class) sleeping cars
on special train.
Use of comfortable armchairs in observation car of
train.
First-class hotels as shown in itinerary.
All meals on Atlantic steamships and breakfast,
lunch, afternoon tea and dinner in Canada.
Sightseeing drives in special automobiles as specified.
Transfer of members and baggage between train
and hotels, etc.
Deck chair and rug on Atlantic ships.
Gratuities on all services provided by the Tour both
on the Atlantic and in Canada.
Services of special officials throughout the entire
tour.
THE TOWER OF BABEL, MORAINE LAKE
YOU HAVE ONLY TO ENJOY YOURSELF
SPECIAL TRAIN EQUIPMENT
The Standard Sleeping Cars, as the title denotes,
are the standard of travel mostly used, but for the
convenience of those who prefer a private compartment or a drawing-room (each accommodating two
members) it has been arranged to operate a limited
number of these on the special train.
Following are additional per capita charges :
Compartment     ....      ....    £j 15 s.
Drawing-room   ..;. .. £14 15s.
A REDUCTION OF £3  55.   WILL
BE MADE FOR   BOOKINGS   OF
UPPER STANDARD BERTHS
TEE FOR TWO
CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RAILWAY
(Incorporated in Canada with limited liability)
European Head Office :
62-65   CHARING CROSS, TRAFALGAR SQUARE, LONDON, S.W.I
PAGE TWENTY-FOUR
fyg&ujS^      4-AfjAA
A,™ BREAKFAST
Baked Apple Sliced Oranges
Cereals with Cream
Fresh Water Fish, Broiled or Fried
Maitre d'Hotel
Cambridge Sausage
Ham Bacon
Eggs as Desired
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Toast Bread Rolls
Griddle Cakes, Maple Syrup
Coffee
Cocoa
Specimen
Mentis on
Dining Car
of
Canadian
Pacific
Special
Train
Ice
v,anape
spinach
Xec!uceMayonoa-
I
Crea
fiotte
^uss«
Ca«adian
GrackCJ
Coffee
Stttto
Cake
Specimen Menus
LUNCHEON
PLATEAU OF HORS D'CEUVRES VARIES
Spiced Anchovies Olives Farcies Fish Salad Parisienne
Eggs Tartare Assorted Sausage Bordeaux Sardines
Pickled Cauliflower Tunny Fish in Oil Potted Herring
Sour Gherkins Smoked Salmon
Consomme Plain or Perles de Nizam       Cream of Barley Balzac
Grilled Bluefish Maitre d'H6tel Fried Fillet of Whitefish Figaro
Omelettes—Jardiniere, Durand
Poached Egg Benedict Rizotto a la Grecque
Curried Lapereaux Nepaul
Braised Neck Chop Bourgeoise
Prime Roast Ribs of Beef, Horseradish
Celery au gratin Fresh Spinach a 1'Anglaise
Potatoes—Boiled New, Baked Jacket, Mashed
To Order i Blood Sausage and Bacon
I Grilled Ham Steak, Chutney Sauce
COLD  BUFFET
Lobster Salad Spiced Herring
Prime Roast Beef Jellied Chicken and Ham London Brawn
Ox Tongue Roast Lamb, Mint Sauce
Terrine of Duckling Rouennaise Cumberland Ham
Galantine of Veal      Luncheon Sausage       Pressed Beef
Poached Egg Suedoise
Salads—Lettuce, Potato, Beetroot, Watercress, Mixed Green
Rice Pudding Baked Cup Custard        Pineapple Fritters
Compote of Cherries Orange Jelly
Maple Ice Cream Wafers Raspberry Water Ice
Lemon Cheesecakes
Cheese—Cheddar, Stilton, Beaumert, Oka
Coffee
DINNER
Delice de foie gras Salted Nuts
Smoked Salmon      Radishes      Queen Olives      Pecans
Consommg Belle Fermiere Cream Nissarde
Chicken Essence  in Cup
Poached Brett, Sauce Normande
Fillet of Kingfish,  Grenobloise
Mousse of Ham Carmen Pigeon en Casserole,Grand Mere
TO   ORDER:
Noisette of Lamb, Vert Pr€
Contre-filet of Beef, Horseradish Cream
Cauliflower Polonaise Carrots Vichy
Potatoes—New Persil6e, Ghgteau
Roast Turkey, Cranberry Sauce
Saratoga Potatoes
Salads—Lettuce      Waldorf
Saxon Pudding Baba au Rhum
Coupe Mexican
Petit Fours
Dessert Coffee
on Canadian Pacific Duchess Ships \ *   :
CANADIAN  PACIFIC OFFICES
Telegrams,
Antwerp
E. Schmitz, 25, Quai Jordaens.
GACANPAC
Basle
Canadian Pacific, 9, Centralbahnplatz.
GACANPAC                I
Belfast
W. H. Boswell, 14, Donegall Place.
GACANPAC
I              Bergen
L. Kirkwokf, Guldskogaarden 2.
GACANPAC
Berlin
A. W. Treadaway, Unter den Linden, 39.
GACANPAC
1             Birmingham
W. T. Treadaway, 4, Victoria Square.
GACANPAC
Bristol
A. S. Ray, 18, St. Augustine's Parade.
GACANPAC
1              Brussels
G. L. M. Servais, 98, Boulevard Adolph Max.
GACANPAC
Bucharest
D. Kapeller, Transit, Calea Grivitei 157.
GACANPAC
Budapest
Gesa Von Braun Belatin, VII Baross-ter 12.
GACANPAC
Cherbourg
Canadian Pacific, 46, Quai Alexandre III.
GACANPAC
Cobh (Queenstown)    J. Hogan, io, Westbourne Place.
GACANPAC
Copenhagen
M. B. Sorenson, Vesterbrogade 5.
GACANPAC
Christianssand
A. Normann.
Dundee
H. H. Borthwick, 88, Commercial Street.
GACANPAC
Genoa
H. Coe & Clerici, Via Cairoli, 16.
Glasgow
W. Stewart, 25, Bothwell Street.
GACANPAC
Gothenburg
G. W. Hallstrom, S. Hamngatan 43.
GACANPAC                1
Hamburg
T. H. Gardner, Alsterdamm 9.
GACANPAC
Havre
J. M. Currie & Co., 2, Rue Pleuvry.
GACANPAC
Helsingfors
The Finska Angfartygs Aktiebolaget.
FINSKA
Kovno
Canadian Pacific, Laisves Aleja 15.
GACANPAC
!              Lemberg
C. Cramb, ul Grodecka 93.
GACANPAC                I
Liverpool
H. T, Penny, Royal Liver Building, Pier Head.
GACANPAC
Ljubljana
Jos. Zidar, Dunajska Cesta 31.
7 nisiDnM
( C. E. Jenkins, 62-65, Charing Cross, S.W.i.
| G. Saxon Jones, 103, Leadenhall Street, E.C.3.
GACANPAC                1
■                     x^\jr$u\jis
SEEPERAICO              1
Manchester
J.s W. Maine, 31, Mosley Street.
GACANPAC
Newcastle-on-Tyne A. S. Craig, 34, Mosley Street.
GACANPAC                J
Oslo
E. Bordewick, Jernbanetorvet 4.
GACANPAC                1
Paris
A. V. Clark, 24, Boulevard des Capucines.
GACANPAC
Moscow
H. V. Gard, 20, Kuznetzky Most.
GACANPAC
1             Plymouth
Weeks, Phillips & Co., 10, Millbay Road.
WEEKES
Prague
W. D. Alder, Poric 22, Legio Bank Palace.
GACANPAC
1             Riga
L. Callaghan, Aspasia Blvd., 3 P.O. Box 478.
GACANPAC                I
I             Rome
A. Ross Owen, 130-131, Via del Triione.
GACANPAC                I
1             Rotterdam
J. Springett, 91, Coolsingel.
GACANPAC
[             Southampton
H. Taylor, Canute Road.
GACANPAC
Stavanger
H. N. Pederson, Skandsegaten, 1 P.O. Box 18.
HALYARD
Stockholm
J, H. Kullander, Vasagaten 8.
GACANPAC
Trondhjem
Olaf Ruud, Fjordgaden 17.
GACANPAC
Tarnapol
A. Mauer, Canadian Pacific, Ul Piesudskiego 19.
Vienna
F. King, Opernring 6.
GACANPAC
1             Warsaw
G, Hyna, 117, Marszalkowska.
GACANEAC
Zagreb
A. W. Bradshaw, 59, Gajeva Ulice.
GACANPAC
FOR INFORMATION & TICKETS APPLY—
COX  & KINGS   (AGENTS), LTD.
1
i        TELEPHONE:
GERRARD 5050.                                    13,   REGENT   ST.,
[                                             TELEGRAMS:
j                                   1                ......
edcoxship.                                                    LONDON,
S.W.I.
Always carry Canadian Pacific Express Company*s Travellers9 Cheques.
Negotiable everywhere.
{March, 1930)

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