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[Booklet regarding government regulation of Chinese immigration] [Government of British Columbia] May 9, 1876

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47 Vic. Chinese Question. 229
.PAPERS
Relating to Chinese question, printed for the information of the Select Committee
on Chinese Immigration.    .
Extract from Journals of Legislative Assembly of British Columbia, dated 9th May, 1876.
Pursuant to Order, the House again resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole, for
the purpose of considering the expediency of taking some steps towards preventing the country
from being flooded with a Mongolian population, ruinous to the best interests of British
Columbia, particularly her labouring classes.
On Mr. Speaker resuming the Chair, Mr. Vowell, Chairman of the Committee reported—
That, in the opinion of this Committee, it is expedient for the Government to take some
steps (at as early a day as possible) to prevent this Province being overrun with a Chinese
population to the injury of the settled population of the country.
Report adopted.
Copy of Resolution passed by Legislative Assembly on 31st July, 1878.
On the motion of the Honourable Mr. Beaven, seconded by Mr. J. W. Williams, it was
Resolved,—
That this House is of opinion that Chinese should not be employed upon the Public
Works of the Province, and that a clause should be inserted in the specifications of all contracts
awarded, to the effect that Contractors will not be permitted to employ Chinese labour upon
the work, and that in the event of their doing so the Government will not be responsible for
payment of Contract.
Copy of Resolution passed by Legislative Assembly on 19th February, 1879.
On the motion of the Honourable Mr. Walkem, seconded by the Honourable Mr.
Humphreys, it was Resolved,—
That a Select Committee be appointed to enquire into, and report, the best means in their
opinion to deal with our Chinese population and to prevent further immigration of Chinese
into the Province.
The following Members were appointed to form the Committee:—Messrs. Williams,
McGillivray, Drummond, Mellmoyl, and Evans.
Extract from Journals of Legislative Assembly of 28th March, 1879.
Mr. J. W. Williams presented a Eeport from the Select Committee appointed to consider
the question of Chinese Immigration, and to devise means of arresting or diminishing the
same, which was read and received.
Ordered to be referred to the Committee on Printing.
Copy of .Report of Select Committee on the question of Chinese Immigration.
Your Committee appointed to consider the question of Chinese Immigration as it affects
this Province, and to devise means, if possible, to arrest or materially diminish it, have felt
much embarrassment in framing their report, in consequence of the scanty information at their
command with respect to the views held and the course taken upon the subject by older
communities; and this embarrassment has rather been increased, than otherwise, by the recent
action of the President of the United States in vetoing an Anti-Chinese measure, passed by
Congress in the interests of the neighbouring Pacific States. The measure referred to, as the
House is doubtless aware, was not dissimilar in some of its provisions to the Queensland Act,
which received the Imperial sanction notwithstanding the existing Treaty between Great
Britain and China.
17 230 Chinese Question. 1883
It has, however, been admitted that this Legislature has no power to pass the Queensland.
Act, as its provisions would interfere with trade and commerce, and thus conflict with the
British North America Act, which confers the regulation of that subject upon the Dominion
Parliament.
As the Australias are now organizing a combined movement to obtain, if possible, from
the Imperial Government such measures of protection against the further influx of Chinese
into their country, the time would seem opportune for united or independent action on the
part of the Dominion in the same direction.
Your Committee have ascertained that several measures of an Anti-Chinese tendency, and
more or less restrictive in character, have been passed in New Zealand, and in Victoria and
other Australian Colonies, but have been disallowed by the Home Government.
It is, therefore, respectfully suggested that an Address to the Dominion Government
should be passed by the House, setting forth the baneful effects of the presence of Chinese in
our midst, and the necessity of such measures being adopted as will effectually prevent their
further immigration to the Province.
J. W. Williams, Chairman.
Extract from Journals of Legislative Assembly of 7th April, 1879.
Mr. J. W. Williams moved, seconded by Mr. M.clhnpyl,—
That an Address to the Dominion Government be passed by this House, setting forth the
baneful effect of the presence of Chinese in our midst, and the necessity of such measures
being adopted as will effectually prevent their future immigration to this Province.
By leave of the House the following words were added : " And a Committee of three be
appointed to draft an Address, such Committee to consist of Messrs. Walkem, Evans, and the
mover."
Motion, as amended, put and carried.
Copy of a Report of a Select  Committee appointed to  draft an Address to the  Dominion
Government on Chinese Question.
Your Committee appointed to draft a Report upon the Chinese question, beg to state
that, in the absence of any statistical information on the subject, they have felt some embarrassment in dealing with it.
There are various opinions as to the number of Chinese in the Province, but 6,000 is
within the mark.
The acknowledged strong and growing antipathy to their presence in the community is
attributable to several causes, of which the following would appear to be the most prominent:—
1st. Their moral and social condition is degraded in the extreme. A large majority of
the men are in a state of semi-bondage, if not of absolute slavery, while all the women are
prostitutes and are daily bought and sold as such. A state of marriage is unknown amongst
them; hence the influence exerted upon society by such wholesale vice cannot be otherwise
than highly pernicious, as no attempt is even made at concealment.
2nd. They are also undesirable settlers as they are wholly opposed to any assimilation or
amalgamation of races or to becoming a portion of the permanent population of the country.
The wealth gradually acquired by thern is from time to time transmitted to China, and the
Province is impoverished to the extent of and in an inverse ratio to their gains.
3rd. Their system of Coolie labour defies competition, as the low rate of wages paid is
insufficient to support ordinary labouring classes, hence the Chinese are gradually monopolizing
and controlling many industries which have hitherto afforded employment to the permanent
population of the Province. This fact is not alone calculated to drive many valuable settlers
elsewhere, but is likely to seriously discourage desirable immigrants from coming to the
Province.
4th. It is well known from experience that slave labour has a degrading effect wherever
it exists, as it causes an unconquerable and not unreasonable prejudice on the part of the free
members of a community against engaging in any work similar to that performed by the Coolies
in their midst.
The great groups of Colonies constituting the Australias and New Zealand, are now
unitedly moving the Home Government to aid them in restricting, if not in stopping, the
further influx of Chinese to their shores. The Committee would recommend that advantage
be taken of this circumstance, and that the Dominion Government be respectfully requested 47 Vic. Chinese Question. 231
to co-operate with the other Colonies of Her Majesty's Empire, and add its powerful influence
with a view of securing the object mutually aimed at, namely the restriction of further Chinese
immigration to British Columbia, as well as to the Colonies referred to.
Geo. A. Walkem,  Chairman.
Copy of a Resolution passed by the Legislative Assembly 21st April, 1880.
On the motion of the Honourable Mr. Beaven, seconded by Mr. Drummond, it was
Resolved,—
Whereas the Legislative Assembly of Queensland, Australia, passed An Act intituled
" The Chinese Immigrants Regulation Act of 1877," which has received the assent of the
Imperial Government, the principles of which, if made law by the Parliament of Canada,
would beneficially regulate the immigration of Chinese into this Province;
Be it therefore Resolved, That the Government of the Dominion of Canada be respectfully
requested by this Legislative Assembly, by telegram from the Honourable the Speaker, to
cause an Act similar in principle to the "Chinese Immigrants Regulation Act, 1877," of
Queensland, Australia, to become law during the present Session of the Parliament of Canada.
Copy of Resolution passed by Legislative Assembly on 22nd April, 1880.
On the motion of the Honourable Mr. Beaven, seconded by Mr. E. Brown, it was
Resolved,—
Whereas the payment of taxes and licences is evaded by the Chinese population:
And whereas an Act has been passed in Queensland, Australia, and assented to by the
Imperial Government, to the effect hereinafter mentioned:
Be it therefore Resolved, That the Government of the Dominion of Canada be requested
by this House to cause a Bill to be passed, empowering the Province of British Columbia to
pass an Act to the following effect:—
1. The sum payable by Chinese for a free miner's certificate shall be fifteen dollars, and
for a business licence shall be double the rates levied under the various Licences Ordinances
and Acts of the Province, for each year during which the same is to be in force,
And no free miner's certificate or business licence shall hereafter be issued to any such
Chinese except on payment of such sums as aforesaid respectively.
2. Any Chinese who shall be found mining or carrying on business on any gold field not
having in his possession a free miner's certificate or business licence lawfully issued to him;
And any person who shall upon any gold field employ in mining any Chinese who has not
in his possession a free miner's certificate lawfully issued to him,
Shall, on conviction thereof, forfeit and pay a sum not exceeding twenty-five dollars, and
in default of immediate payment the amount of such penalty shall be levied by distress and
sale of the goods and chattels of the offender, and in default of such distress, or if sufficient
distress be not found, the offender shall be liable to be imprisoned, with or without hard labour,
for any period not exceeding three months.
3. In any prosecution for any offence against the provisions of this Act, the averment in
the information that any person named therein had not in his possession at the time of the
alleged offence a free miner's certificate or business licence lawfully issued to him, shall be
sufficient proof that such person had not such free miner's certificate or business licence, unless
the defendant shall prove the contrary.
4. Any information for any offence against this Act may be heard and determined by any
two Justices of the Peace, and any such Justices may hear and determine the same in a summary-manner at any place where any offender shall be found within the limits of any gold
field.
5. No Chinese shall be entitled to be naturalized.
6. This Act shall be styled and may be cited as the "Chinese Tax Act."
Copy of a Resolution passed by the Legislative Assembly 28th February, 1882.
On the motion of Mr. Armstrong, seconded by Mr. McGillivray,   it was Resolved,—
That, taking into  consideration the various advantages to  accrue to  all classes of the
community by having Railway and other works carried on by means of a better class of labour
than by Chinese labour, be it 232 Chinese Question. 1883
Resolved, that the Government of British Columbia be respectfully requested to move
the Government of the Dominion to take such steps as may be considered necessary to induce
the contractors on the Canadian Pacific Railway to import and employ white labour on their
works, instead of Chinese; and also to take into consideration the advisability and expediency
of devising proper means of assisting immigration, with the view of carrying out the system of
employing white labour on Railway construction throughout the Dominion.
Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Executive Council,  approved by  His
Honour the Lieutenant-Governor on the 9th March, 1882.
On a Memorandum from the Honourable the Provincial Secretary, dated 8th March,
1882, reporting that the following Resolution has passed the Legislative Assembly, viz.:—
" That, taking into consideration the various advantages to accrue to all classes of the
" community by having Railway and other works carried on by means of a better class of
" labour than by Chinese labour, be it
" Resolved, that the Government of British Columbia be respectfully requested to move
" the Government of the Dominion to take such steps as may be considered necessary to induce
" the contractors on the Canadian Pacific Railway to import and employ white labour on their
" works, instead of Chinese; and also to take into consideration the advisability and expediency
" of devising proper means of assisting immigration, with the view of carrying out the system
" of employing white labour on Railway construction throughout the Dominion,"
and recommending that His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor will be pleased to approve of
the same, and to forward it to the Dominion Government.
The Committee advise that the recommendations be approved.
Certified,
(Signed)        T. Elwyn,
Deputy Clerk Executive Council.
The Acting Secretary of State to the Lieutenant-Governor.
Ottawa, 6th June, 1882.
Sir,—I have the honour to inform you that His Excellency the Governor-General has had
under his consideration in Council the Resolutions of the House of Assembly of the Province
of British Columbia, which were embodied in a Minute of your Executive Council of the 9th
March last, a copy of which was enclosed in your Despatch of the 16th of that month, in
reference to the advisability of assisting emigration, and inducing the Railway Contractors to
employ white rather than Chinese labour on the Canadian Pacific Railway in that Province.
1 have now to state, for the information of your Government, that His Excellency is
advised that there are no means at the disposal of the Government to induce the Contractors
on the Canadian Pacific Railway to import and employ the labours of white immigrants on
their works instead of Chinese.
If, however, the Contractor desires to prepay the passages of white labourers from the
United Kingdom, the utmost facilities of assisted ocean passages, and such services as can be
rendered by the Agents of the Department of Agriculture, will be freely afforded. Transportation across the Continent is, however, at present, both difficult and expensive, and the
Government have not at their disposal any means to assist such movement of emigrants.
The advantages offered by British Columbia as a field for settlement of immigrants, have
been fully set forth in authentic publications disseminated by the Department of Agriculture to
promote immigration to that Province, which will, however, be difficult until the transcontinental Railway through Canadian Territory is completed.
I have, &c,
(Signed)        A. Campbell,
Acting Secretary of State.
\ 47 Vic. Chinese Question. 233
Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Executive Council, approved by His
Honour the Lieutenant-Governor on the 19th August, 1882.
The Committee of Council advise that the attention of the Dominion Government be again
called to the immense influx of Chinese into this Province, consequent upon the Railway
Contractor importing large numbers from Asia, and to the following facts:—
That the employment of Chinese, as carried on, is practically establishing a system of
slave labour in the Province.
That at the present time there are about twelve thousand Chinese here, and that more
than one-half of that number are employed on the Canadian Pacific Railway.
That Chinese being largely employed drives white labour away from seeking work thereon.
That Chinese as a class are injurious to a young community, as they trade almost exclusively among their own people, send all their earnings to Asia, introduce loathsome diseases
and demoralizing habits, put the authorities to constant expense in endeavouring to suppress
crime among them, and in granting charitable aid to their sick and infirm.
That they manage to evade punishment for crime, and payment of their taxes.
That they are a non-assimilating, alien race; and that the Australian Colonies of Great
Britain, and the States and Territories of the United. States of America, are protected front
their presence.
That British Columbia is the only portion of the American Continent on the North
Pacific, above Mexico, where Chinese now have the unrestricted right to land.
That the Congress of the United States have passed a law, which came into effect on the
5th of August, 1882, which prohibits all skilled and unskilled Chinese labourers from coming
into the United States, unless having certificates from the Collector of an American Port that
they resided in the United States previous to August, 1882. Government officials, merchants,
or privileged classes are permitted to come*, provided they are entered on a separate passenger
list, but they are not allowed to land until examined by the United States Collector or deputy.
Chinese labourers cannot travel through the United States, or touch at any ports thereof on
their way back to China, unless in case of distress. The penalty for the violation of this law
is the absolute forfeiture of the ship.
That Queensland, Australia, in 1877, passed a Statute which received the assent of the
Imperial Government, which prevents any vessel arriving with a greater number of Chinese
than in proportion of one to every ten tons of the tonnage of the vessel, under a penalty of
ten pounds for each Chinese passenger carried in excess.
That the immigrants of all other nationalities are practically excluded from the Province
by the knowledge that so large a proportion of the population is Chinese, and the settlement
and progress of the Province is very materially retarded.
That a large proportion of the Chinese recognize no laws except the orders of the companies who employ them.
That; in pursuance of a Resolution of the Legislative Assembly of the Province, dated
31st July, 1878, no Chinese are employed on any Provincial Public Works, or in any way by
the Provincial Government, and a stipulation is put in all contracts that, in the event of the
contractor employing Chinese, the Provincial Government will not be responsible for the payment of the work.
The Committee therefore request that the Dominion Government may be urged to promote
the necessary legislation for the purpose of preventing immigration of Chinese to this Province,
and for the prevention of their employment upon Dominion Public Works; and further, to
provide that in the event of any Charter being granted for a Railway or other Public Work in
British Columbia, a clause may be inserted preventing their employment thereon.
The Committee advise that a copy of this Minute be forwarded to the Dominion Government.
Certified,
(Signed)        W. J. Armstrong,
Provincial Secretary,
.and Clerk, Executive Council.
Copy of Resolution passed by the Legislative Assembly on the 28th February,
That this House strongly urges upon the Government of the Province the importance of
adopting every constitutional method which can be devised for restricting the further immi- 234 Chinxse Question. 1883
gration of Chinese into British Columbia; for compelling those who are now resident here to
comply with the revenue and other laws of the Province, and for inaugurating a liberal scheme
of assisted white immigration; and this House requests the Government at once to open
negotiations with the Dominion Government with a view to concurrent action upon these vital
questions in time to be submitted to the Dominion Parliament and this House respectively at
their present sessions.
Copy of Resolution passed by Legislative Assembly on 7th December, 1883.
On the motion of the Honourable Mr. Davie, seconded by the Honourable Mr. Robson, it
was Resolved,—
That this House do resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole for the purpose of
considering the best means of preventing Chinese Immigration.
The House then resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole.
Upon Mr. Speaker resuming the Chair, Mr. Galbraith, Chairman of the Committee,
reported the following Resolution :—
That a Select Committee be appointed to draft and submit to this House an Address to
His Excellency the Governor-General in Council, concerning Chinese Immigration and the
evils consequent upon their presence in British Columbia in large numbers, with a view of
inducing restrictive and remedial legislation on the part of. the Dominion Parliament. Such
Committee to consist of Messrs. Drake, Beaven, T. Davie, Raybotdd, Duck, A. E. B. Davie,
Cowan, Orr, and Martin. And that the Committee be instructed to prepare an Act to restrict
the immigration of Chinese, in addition to any Address which may be prepared.
Report Ordered to be considered forthwith.
On the motion of the Honourable Mr. Davie, seconded by the Honourable Mr. Robson,
it was Resolved,—
That the report of the Committee of the Whole be adopted by the House.
VICTORIA.
No. CCLIX.
An Act to amend the Laws affecting the Chinese immigrating to or resident in Victoria.
Be it enacted by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty by and with the advice and consent
of the Legislative Council and the Legislative Assembly of Victoria in this present Parliament
assembled and by the authority of the same as follows that is to say—
1. This Act may be called and may be cited as the " Chinese Immigrants Statute 1865."
2. From and after the passing of this Act the Act mentioned in the Schedule hereto shall
be and the same is hereby repealed but nothing herein shall affect any act regulation appointment or order lawfully clone or made or any penalty incurred before the passing of this Act.
3. In the interpretation and for the purposes of the provisions of this Act the following
words shall unless inconsistent with or repugnant to the context have the respective meanings
hereby assigned to them that is to say—
The word "master" shall be held to apply to any person in command of any vessel.
The word "ship" shall mean any sea going vessel of any kind or description.
And the word "immigrant" shall mean any male adult native of China or its dependencies
or of any islands in the Chinese seas not born of British parents or any person born of
Chinese parents.
4. The Governor in Council may appoint such and so many persons to carry out   the
provisions of this Act with   such designations   as   to   the   Governor in   Council shall   seems
necessary or desirable.
5. The Governor in Council may make such rules and regulations as may be deemed
necessary for defining the duties and conduct of the officers to be appointed under the
authority of this Act the registration of immigrants on their arrival at the district or place to
which they may proceed the removal from such district of all or any of such immigrants if it
shall be found  necessary or desirable to do so the  circumstances   under   which  any such 47 Vic. Chinese Question. 235
registration or removal shall be required the period for which such registry or removal is to
last and the mode time and place of any such registration or removal also for the protection of
immigrants and the adjustment of disputes between them and generally for the management
and good government of immigrants and any such rules and regulations may alter vary or
annul and substitute others as occasion may require and any immigrant or other person who
shall be wilfully guilty of any breach or infringement of any such rule or regulation shall
forfeit and pay a penalty not exceeding five pounds.
6. The master of every ship upon arrival at any port in Victoria having passengers on
board shall distinctly specify and state in the list of passengers required by any Act now or
hereafter in force relating to passengers arriving in Victoria to be exhibited or delivered to the
collector or other chief officer of customs at the port of arrival whether any and which of such
passengers are immigrants within the meaning of this Act, and in default of his delivering
such list without so specifying as aforesaid such master shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding
two hundred pounds.
7. If any person shall hinder molest obstruct or assault any person appointed under this
Act or any person acting under his authority or under any power or authority given by this
Act every such person shall on conviction forfeit and pay a penalty not exceeding ten pounds.
8. The Governor in Council whenever any immigrants are sentenced to imprisonment or
imprisonment and hard labour may direct that such immigrants so sentenced shall be worked
and employed at such places and on such public work or local work for the public benefit or
convenience and may make such rules and regulations and may alter or annul the same for the
safe custody control and general management of.such immigrants so sentenced as aforesaid as
the Governor in Council shall deem desirable.
9. All offences under this Act shall be heard and determined and all penalties' recovered
in a summary manner before any two or more justices and at the hearing of any case the justices
adjudicating shall decide upon their own view and judgment whether any person charged before
them is or is not an immigrant within the meaning of this Act.
10. No immigrant within the meaning of this Act notwithstanding that he holds a miner's
right or business license or other document under any Act now or hereafter in force relative to
the gold fields shall be entitled to vote at the election of members for any mining board.
SCHEDULE.
Date of Act.
Title of Act. !   Extent of Repeal.
27 Vic. No. 200
" The Chinese Immigration Statute 1864"
The whole.
VICTORIA.
No. DCCXXIII.
An Act to amend " The Chinese Immigrants Statute 1865."
[24th December 1881,.]
Be it enacted by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty by and with the advice and consent
of the Legislative Council and the Legislative Assembly of Victoria in this present Parliament
assembled and by the authority of the same as follows (that is to say) :
1. This Act shall be called and.may be cited as " The Chinese Act 1881," and shall be read
and construed as one with "The Chinese Immigrants Statute 1865," and shall commence and
come into operation on the first day of April One.thousand eight hundred and eighty-two.    ,
2. If any vessel having on board a g eater number of immigrants (within the meaning of
the Act No. 259) than in the proportion of one such immigrant to every hundred tons of the
tonnage of such vessel shall arrive at any time in any port in Victoria the owner master or
charterer of such vessel shall be liable on conviction to a penalty of One hundred pounds for
each immigrant so carried in excess of the foregoing limitation. 236 Chinese Question. 1883
Eor the purposes of this Act the tonnage of a vessel shall be ascertained in the manner
prescribed by " The Passengers, Harbours and Navigation Statute 1865."
3. Before any immigrant arriving from parts beyond Victoria shall be permitted to land
from any vessel at any port or place in Victoria and before making any entry at the Customs
the master of the vessel by which such immigrant shall so arrive shall pay to the Collector or
other principal officer of Customs the sum of Ten pounds for every such immigrant, and no
entry shall be deemed to have any legal effect until such payment shall have been made and
such immigrant for whom such sum has been paid shall receive from the said Collector or other
principal officer a certificate to that effect. If any master shall neglect to pay any such sum
or shall land or permit to. land or suffer to land or to escape from such vessel at any port or
place in Victoria any immigrant before such sum shall have been paid by such master or his
agent or before such list shall have been delivered such master shall be liable for every such
offence to a penalty of Eifty pounds for each immigrant so landed or permitted or suffered to
land or escape and in addition to such penalty shall also pay the sum hereby required to be
paid for each such immigrant.
4. If any immigrant shall enter or attempt to enter this Colony by sea who shall not have
paid or had paid for him the said sum of Ten pounds he shall be liable to a penalty of Ten
pounds, and on default of payment of such penalty shall be liable to imprisonment for twelve
months unless such penalty be sooner paid, and may be apprehended and taken before any
justice to be dealt with in due course of law.
5. Notwithstanding anything in this Act contained any immigrant arriving in Victoria
who produces evidence to the satisfaction of the Collector or other principal officer of Customs
or other duly authorized officer that he is a British subject shall be wholly exempt from the
operation of this Act, and a certificate of the Governor of any British colony shall on being
verified to the satisfaction of such Collector or other officer be sufficient evidence of the claim
of such immigrant to exemption under this section.
6. The aforesaid sum of Ten pounds shall not be payable by or for any immigrant duly
accredited to this colony by the Government of China or by or under the authority of the
Imperial Government on any special mission.
7. The penalties and restrictions imposed by this Act shall not nor shall any of them be
held to be applicable in the case of any immigrant being one of the crew of any vessel arriving
in any port in Victoria and no such immigrant being one of such crew shall be discharged and
landed from such vessel within Victoria or shall at any time go on shore except in the performance
of his duties in connection with such vessel, and every such immigrant so discharged and landed
or so going on shore shall be liable to a penalty of Twenty pounds.
8. Any vessel on board which immigrants shall be transhipped from another vessel and be
brought to any port or place in this colony shall be deemed to be a vessel bringing immigrants
into the said colony from parts beyond the said colony, and shall be subject to all the requirements and provisions of this Act, and all immigrants so transhipped and brought to such port
or place shall be deemed to be immigrants arriving from parts beyond Victoria.
9. For the purpose of any proceeding taken under any of the provisions of this Act or
the Act No. 259 the burden shall lie on the defendant of proving that he is exempt from the
operation of any of such provisions, and it shall not be necessary in any information summons
or conviction or other document to state or negative any exception in or exemption under the
said Acts.
10. The Governor in Council may make such rules and regulations not inconsistent herewith as may be necessary for carrying out the provisions of this Act.
11. The tenth section of "The Chinese Immigrants Statute 1865" shall be and is hereby
amended as follows by adding after the last word in such section the words following:—"nor
" at any municipal or parliamentary election (notwithstanding that such immigrant is a rate-
" payer) unless such immigrant is a naturalized or natural-born subject of Her Majesty."
12. The collectors of the city of Melbourne and of the town of Geelong and tEfeslown
clerk of every city and borough and the secretary of every shire shall when preparing't-he
citizen burgess or voters' list for such city town borough or shire as the case may be omifr-
therefrom the names of all immigrants who are not known to such collectors town clerk or
secretary to be natural-born or naturalized subjects of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, and every
such collector town clerk or secretary shall for such purpose decide upon his own belief or view
or knowledge or judgment whether any ratepayer is or is not such an alien immigrant. To
each and every immigrant so omitted from any such citizen burgess or voters' list every such
collector town clerk or secretary shall send a notice in the form of the Schedule hereto or to the like effect. In any proceedings taken for the insertion of such immigrant's name upon the
ratepayers' roll no costs shall be given against any such collector town clerk or secretary by
'reason of such omission.
1.3. Every Court for revising the citizen or burgess lists of the city of Melbourne or town
of Geelong and every Revision Court of every municipal district shall expunge from the
citizen burgess or voters' lists as the case may be the names of all immigrants against whom
objections shall have been lodged unless such immigrants prove to the satisfaction of the Court
that they are natural-born or naturalized subjects of Her Majesty.
SCHEDULE.
Mr. residing at
You are hereby required to take notice that I have omitted your name from the citizen
burgess or voters' list prepared by me under section fifteen of the Act 6 Vict. No. 1 or section
seventy-seven of the Act No. 506, for the City Town Borough or Shire of
on the ground that I believe that you are a Chinese and that you are not known to me as being
either a natural-born or a naturalized subject of Her Majesty Queen Victoria. If you feel
aggrieved at being so omitted and think that your name has been improperly omitted from such
list you can claim under and in accordance with the provisions of section sixteen of the said
Act 6 Vict. No. 7 or section seventy-nine of the said Act No. 506, to have your name inserted
in the said citizen burgess or voters' list.
A.B.
Collector, Town clerk [or secretary] of
Dated at this day of 188
QUEENSLAND.
No. 8.
An Act to regulate the Immigration of Chinese and to make provision against their becoming
a charge upon the Colony.
[Assented to 20th August, 1877.
Whereas it is expedient to regulate the Immigration of Chinese into the colony of Queensland and to obtain security for the payment of any expenses that may be incurred in respect
of such Immigrants and of any fines or penalties imposed upon them Be it therefore enacted
by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative
Council and Legislative Assembly of Queensland in Parliament assembled and by the authority
of the same as follows—
1. Eor the purposes of this Act the following words in inverted commas shall unless the
context otherwise indicate bear the meanings set against them respectively—
"Chinese"—Any native of the Chinese Empire or its dependencies not born of British
parents
"Vessel"—Any ship or   other sea-going vessel of whatsoever kind or description
"Master"—The person other than a pilot for the time being in actual command of any
such vessel.
2. The master of every vessel having Chinese on board shall immediately on his arrival
from beyond the colony in any port of the colony and before making any entry at the Customs
deliver to the Collector or other Principal Officer of Customs a list of such Chinese specifying
the name the place of birth the apparent age the ordinary place of residence the place and
date of shipment and the calling or occupation of each such Chinese And for each default
herein such master shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding two hundred pounds.
3. If any vessel shall arrive in any port in Queensland having on board a greater number
of Chinese passengers than in the proportion of one to every ten tons of the tour age of such
vessel according to the registry thereof if British and if not then according to the measurement
defined by "The Merchant Shipping Act 1854" the owner charterer or master of such v ssel
shall be liable on conviction to a penalty not exceeding ten pounds for each ClrLitse pa. se ger
so carried in excess.
4. Before any Chinese arriving from beyond the colony shall 1 e permitted to Ian' from
any vessel and before making any entry at the Customs the master of the vessel 4ia4 x.ay to 238 Chinese Question. 1883
such Collector or other principal officer the sum of ten pounds for every such Chinese to be
applied in manner hereinafter provided and no entry shall be deemed to have been legally made
or to have any legal effect until such payment shall have been made
And if any master shall neglect to pay any such sum or shall land or permit to land any
Chinese at any place in the colony before such sum shall have been paid for or by him or before
such list shall have been delivered such master shall be liable for every such offence to a penalty
not exceeding twenty pounds for each Chinese so landed or permitted to land in addition to the
amount of such sum
And in every such case in addition to any such penalty the vessel shall be forfeited and
may be seized condemned and disposed of in like manner as ships forfeited for a breach of any
law relating to the Customs.
5. Every Chinese arriving in the colony after the passing of this Act otherwise than by
any vessel shall pay or have paid for him to some officer whom the Governor in Council may
appoint at any places on or near the borders of the colony or otherwise conveniently situate
for that purpose a like sum of ten pounds.
6. The Collector or other officer receiving such sum from or for any Chinese shall without
demand -forthwith give him a certificate in writing under his hand of the payment of such sum
which certificate shall be in a form to be prescribed by the Governor in Council And such
certificate whensoever and wheresoever produced by such Chinese shall be conclusive evidence
on behalf of himself and of any other person who may have paid such sum for him that such
sum has been duly paid.
7. All sums so paid by or on behalf of any Chinese shall be paid over to the Colonial
Treasurer and be by him applied in manner following that is to say—
If at any time within three years from the date of the landing or arrival of any Chinese
in respect of whom such sums shall have been paid such Chinese shall depart from the colony
to parts beyond the seas and shall before his departure prove to the satisfaction of the Colonial
Treasurer that during his residence in the colony he has not been confined in any gaol or lockup after conviction of any offence and that he has paid all fines and penalties imposed upon
him under the provisions of any Act in force in the colony and that he has paid all expenses
incurred in respect of his confinement or medical treatment in any public hospital benevolent
asylum lunatic asylum or other place for the care treatment or cure of the sick poor or insane
and that no expense or charge has fallen upon the revenue for his support then upon production to the Collector or other principal officer of Customs at the port of embarkation of the
certificate given to such Chinese on his arrival the amount so paid in respect of such Chinese
shall be repaid to him on board of the ship by which he shall so depart But if he shall fail to
make such proof within the period aforesaid the amount shall be paid into the Consolidated
Revenue.
8. If any Chinese shall enter or attempt to enter the colony without paying or having
paid for him the sum of ten pounds aforesaid he shall besides such sum be liable to a penalty
not exceeding ten pounds and may be apprehended and taken before any justice of the j)eace
who may take sufficient bail for his appearance at the next court of petty sessions or remand
him to such court as to such justice shall seem fit unless and until such Chinese shall produce
a certificate of payment as aforesaid.
9. At the hearing of any prosecution under this Act the justices may decide upon their
own view and judgment whether any person charged or produced before them is a Chinese
within the meaning of this Act.
10. It shall be lawful for the Colonial Treasurer or any person authorised by him upon
the application of any Chinese and upon being satisfied that such Chinese was at the time of
the passing of this Act a bona fide resident of the colony and that he desires to be absent therefrom for a temporary purpose only to grant to such Chinese a certificate that he is exempt
from the provisions of this Act for a time to be specified in such certificate And during the
time so specified the holder of such certificate shall be exempt from all payments under this Act.
11. The sum of ten pounds aforesaid shall not be payable by or in respect of any Chinese
who is one of the crew of any vessel unless he shall land from such vessel.
12. All penalties and forfeitures imposed by this Act shall be sued for prosecuted and
recovered in the name of some officer of Customs or other person thereunto authorised by the
Governor in Council.
13. This Act shall be styled and may be cited as "The Chinese Immigrants Regulation
Act of 18774 47 Vic. Chinese Question 239
QUEENSLAND.
No. 12.
An Act to amend "The Gold Fields Act,  1874" so far as relates to Asiatic and African
Aliens and in other respects.
[Assented to 2nd October, 1877.
Whereas great expense is incurred in maintaining order on the Gold Fields in consequence
of the presence of large numbers of Asiatic aliens thereon and it is desirable to discourage the
immigration of such aliens and their employment in gold mining and for that purpose to amend
' The Gold Fields Act 1874" so far as the same relates to the issue of Miners' Rights and
Business Licences to Asiatic and African aliens and in other respects Be it therefore enacted
by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative
Council and Legislative Assembly of Queensland in Parliament assembled and by the authority
of the same as follows—
1. The sum payable by an Asiatic or African alien for a miner's right shall be three
pounds and for a business licence shall be ten pounds for each year during which the same is
to be in force instead of ten shillings and four pounds respectively as by the said recited Act
is provided.
And no miner's right or business licence shall hereafter be issued to any such alien except
on payment of such sums as aforesaid respectively
2. Any person who shall be found mining, or carrying on business on any gold field not
having in his possession a miner's right or business licence lawfully issued to him
And any person who shall upon any gold field employ in mining any person who has not
in his possession a miner's right lawfully issued to him
Shall on conviction thereof forfeit and pay a sum not exceeding five pounds and in default
of immediate payment the amount of such penalty shall be levied by distress and sale of the
goods and chattels of the offender and in default of such distress or if sufficient distress be not
found the offender shall be liable to be imprisoned with or without hard labour for any period
not exceeding three months.
3. In any prosecution for any offence against the provisions of this Act the averment in
the information that any person named therein had not in his possession at the time of the
alleged offence a miner's right or business licence lawfully issued to him shall be sufficient
proof that such person had not such miner's right or business licence unless the defendant
shall prove the contrary.
4. Any information for any offence against this Act may be heard and determined by any
warden or any two justices of the peace and any such warden or justices may hear and determine the same in a summary manner at any place where any offender shall be found within
the limits of any gold field.
5. This Act shall be styled and may be cited as "The Gold Fields Act Amendment Act
o/1877."
NEW SOUTH WALES.
INFLUX OF CHINESE RESTRICTION.
An Act to restrict the Influx of Chinese into New South Wales.    [6 December, 1881.]
Whereas it is expedient to regulate and restrict the Immigration and Introduction of
Chinese into New South Wales Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's Most Excellent
Majesty by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council and Legislative Assembly of New South Wales in Parliament assembled and by the authority of the same as follows :
1. For the purposes of this Act the following words in inverted commas shall unless the
context otherwise indicate bear the the meanings set against them respectively:—
"Chinese"—Any person of the Chinese race.
"Vessel"—Any ship or vessel of whatsoever kind or description.
" Master"—The person (other than a pilot) for the time being in actual command or charge
of any vessel.
2. The master of every vessel upon arrival at any port or place in this Colony from parts
beyond the Colony having Chinese on board shall before making any entry at the Customs
deliver to the Collector or other principal officer of Customs a list of such Chinese specifying 240 Chinese Question. 1883
to the best of his knowledge the name the place of birth the apparent age the ordinary place
of resilience the place and date of shipment and the calling or occupation of each such Chinese
under a penalty for not delivering such list not exceed! u, two hundred pounds.
3. If any vessel having on board a greater number of Chinese than in the proportion of
one Chinese to every one hundred tons of the tonnage of such vessel shall arrive at. any time
in any port in this.Colony the owner master or charterer of such vessel shall be liable on conviction to a penalty of one, hundred pounds for each Chinese carried in excess of the foregoing
limitation unless the defendant shall show that the Chinese so carried is a British subject or
one of the crew or has not been landed in the Colony and is not intended to be so landed For
the purposes of this Act the tonnage of a vessel shall be ascertained (if she be a British ship)
by her certificate of registry and if not or if the said certificate shall not be produced then
according to the rules of measurement prescribed by the "Merchant Shipping Act 1854" being
the Act of the Imperial Legislature seventeenth and eighteenth Victoria chapter one hundred
and four.
4. Before any Chinese arriving from parts beyond this Colony shall be permitted to land
from any vessel at any port or place in the said Colony and before making any entry at the
Customs the master of the vessel by which such Chinese shall so arrive shall pay to the said
Collector or other principal officer the sum of ten pounds for every such Chinese and no entry
shall be deemed to have any legal effect until such payment shall have been made and such
Chinese for whom such sum has been paid shall receive from the said Collector or other
principal officer a certificateto that effect And if any master shall neglect to pay any such
sum or shall land or permit to land or suffer to land or to escape from such vessel at any
port or place in the said Colony any Chinese before such sum shall have been paid by such
master or his agent or before such list shall have been delivered such master shall be liable for
every such offence to a penalty of fifty pounds for each Chinese so landed or permitted or
suffered to land or to escape and in addition to such penalty shall also pay the sum hereby
required to be paid for each such Chinese.
5. Every Chinese arriving in this Colony after the passing of this Act otherwise than by
a vessel shall pay or there shall be paid for him to some officer whom and at such places as the
Governor with the advice aforesaid may appoint at or near the borders of the Colony or otherwise conveniently situated for that purpose the sum of ten pounds.
6. If any Chinese shall enter or attempt to enter this Colony who shall not have paid or
had paid for him the said sum of ten pounds he shall be liable to a penalty of ten pounds and
to the payment in addition thereto of the said sum of ten pounds required to be paid by section
four hereof and on default of payment either of such penalty or sum shall be liable to imprisonment for twelve months unless such penalty and sum be sooner paid and may be apprehended
and taken before any Justice of the Peace to be dealt with in due course of law.
7. All penalties and all moneys ordered to be paid or being the proceeds of any sale made
under the authority of this Act shall be paid into the Consolidated Revenue.
8. For the purposes of all proceedings under this Act the Justices may decide upon their
own view and judgment whether any person produced before them is a Chinese within the
meaning of this Act.
9. It shall be lawful for the Colonial Treasurer or any person authorized by him upon the
application of any Chinese and upon being satisfied that such Chinese was at the passing of
this Act a bona fide resident of this Colony and that he desires to be absent -therefrom for a
temporary purpose only to grant to such Chinese a certificate that he is exempt from the provisions of this Act for a time to be specified in such certificate.
10. Notwithstanding anything in this Act contained any Chinese arriving in the Colony
who produces evidence to the Collector of Customs or other duly authorized officer that he is a
British subject shall be wholly exempt from the operation of this Act and a certificate of the
Governor of any British Colony or of a British Consul shall be sufficient evidence of the claim
of such Chinese to exemption under this section.
11. The provisions of this Act shall not be applicable to any Chinese duly accredited to
this Colony by the Government of China or by or under the authority of the Imperial Government on any special mission.
12. The penalties and restrictions imposed by this Act shall not nor shall any of them be
held to be applicable in respect of any Chinese being one of the crew of any vessel arriving in
any port in New South Wales and who shall not be discharged therefrom or land except in
the performance of his duties in connection with such vessel. _ .
13. All penalties and sums of money recoverable under this Act shall be recovered in a 47 Vic. Chinese Question. 241
summary way at the suit of some officer of Customs authorized by the Colonial Treasurer
before any two or more Justices of the Peace in accordance with the provisions of the Acts
regulating proceedings on summary conviction And it shall be lawful for the Colonial Treasurer by writing under his hand to authorize any officer to detain any vessel the master whereof
shall in the opinion of the said Treasurer have committed an offence or be a defaulter under
this Act Such detention may be either at the port or place where such vessel is found or at
any port or place to which the said Treasurer may order such vessel to be brought For the
purposes of such detention the officer so authorized shall be entitled to obtain in the customary
manner such writ of assistance or other aid and assistance in and about the detention of or
other lawful dealing with such vessel as are by law provided under the Act or Acts regulating the
Customs with reference to seizure of vessels or goods But such detention shall be for safe custody
only and shall cease and be discontinued if a bond with two sufficient sureties be given by such
master for thepayment of the amount of such penalty and other sums as may be adjudged to
be paid under the provisions of this Act Provided that if default be made in payment of any
such penalty incurred by such master in terms of any conviction adjudging the payment
thereof it shall be lawful for such officer to seize such vessel and for him and any other officer or
person duly authorized or empowered in that behalf to take all such proceedings for the purpose of procuring the condemnation and sale of such vessel as are provided by law in case of
condemnation or forfeiture of a vessel for a breach of the Customs Laws of the said Colony
Provided that the proceeds of sale of any such vessel shall be paid into the Consolidated Revenue
and after payment of the amount of such penalty and of all costs incurred in and about such
sale and the proceedings leading thereto the balance shall be placed by the Colonial Treasurer
to a trust.account and be held in trust for the owners of or other persons lawfully entitled to
the vessel so condemned and sold.
14. Any vessel on board which Chinese shall be transhipped from another vessel and be
brought to any port or place in this Colony shall be deemed to be a vessel bringing Chinese
into the said Colony from parts beyond the said Colony and shall be subject to the provisions
of this. Act.
15. This Act may be cited as the "Influx of Chinese Restriction Act of 1881."
THE UNITED STATES CHINESE RESTRICTION ACT.
5th August, 1882.
Be it enacted * * * That from and after the expiration of ninety days next
after tho passage of this Act, and until the expiration of ten years next after the passage
of this Act, the coming of Chinese laborers to the United States be, and the same is
hereby suspended ; and during such suspension it shall not be lawful for any Chinese
laborer to come, or, having so come after tho expiration of said ninety days, to remain
within the United States.
Sec. 2. That the master of any vessel who shall knowingly bring within the United
States on such vessel, and land, or permit to be landed, any Chinese laborer from any
foreign port or place, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof
shall be punished by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars for each and every such
Chinese laborer so brought, and may be also imprisoned for a term not exceeding one year.
Sec. 3. That the two foregoing sections shall not apply to Chinese laborers who
were in the United States on the seventeenth day of November, eighteen hundred and
eighty, or who shall have come into the same before tho expiration of ninety days next-
after the passage of this Act, and who shall produce to such master before going on
board such vessel, and shall produce to the Collector of the port in the United States
at which such vessel shall arrive, the evidence hereinafter in this Act required, of his
being one of the laborers in this section mentioned ; nor shall the two foregoing sections
apply to the case of any master whose vessel, being bound to a port not within the
United States, shall come within the jurisdiction of tho United States by reason of being
in distress or in stress of weather, or touching at any port of the United States on its
voyage to any foreign port or place : Provided that all Chinese laborers brought on
such vessel shall depart with the vessel on leaving port.
Sec 4. That for the purpose of properly identifying Chinese laborers who were in
the United States on the seventeenth day of November, eighteen hundred and eighty,
or who shall have come into the same before the expiration of ninety days next after 242 Chinese Question, 1883
the passage of this Act, and in order to furnish them with the proper evidence of their
right to go from and come to the United States of their free will and accord, as provided
by the treaty between the United States and China, dated November seventeenth,
eighteen hundred and eighty, the Collector of Customs of the district from which any-
such Chinese laborer shall depart from the United States shall, in person or by deputy,
go on board each vessel having on board any such Chinese laborer, and cleared, or about
to sail from his district for a foreign port, and on such vessel make a list of all such
Chinese laborers, which shall be entered in registry books to be kept for that purpose,
in which shall be stated the name, age, occupation, last place of residence, physical
marks or peculiarities, and all facts necessary for the identification of each of such
Chinese laborers, which books shall be safely kept in the Custom House ; and every
such Chinese laborer so departing from the United States shall be entitled to, and shall
receive, free of any charge or cost upon application therefor from the collector or his
deputy, at the time such list is taken, a certificate signed by the collector or his deputy,
and attested by his seal of office, in such form as the Secretary of the Treasury shall
prescribe, which certificate shall contain a statement of the name, age, occupation, last
place of residence, personal description, and facts of identification of the Chinese laborer
to whom the certificate is issued, corresponding with the said list and registry in all
particulars. In case any Chinese laborer, after having received such certificate, shall
leave such vessel before her departure he shall deliver his certificate to the master of
the vessel, and if such Chinese laborer shall fail to return to such vessel before her
departure from port the certificate shall be delivered by the master to the Collector of
Customs for cancellation. The certificate herein provided for shall entitle the Chinese
laborer to whom the same is issued to return to and re-enter the United States upon
producing and delivering the same to the Collector of Customs of the district at which
such Chinese laborer shall seek to re-enter ; and upon delivery of such, certificate by
such Chinese laborer to the Collector of Customs at the time of re-entry in the United
States, said collector shall cause the same to be filed in the custom house and duly
cancelled.
Sec. 5. That any Chinese laborer mentioned in section four of this Act being in the
United States, and desiring to depart from the United States by land, shall have the
right to demand and receive, free of charge or cost, a certificate of identification similar
to that provided for in section four of this Act to be issued to such Chinese laborers as
may desire to leave the United States by water; and it is hereby made the duty of the
Collector of Customs of the district next adjoining the foreign country to which the said
Chinese laborer desires to go, to issue such certificate, free of charge or cost, upon
application by such Chinese laborer, and to enter the same upon registry books to be
kept by him for the purpose, as provided for in section four of this Act.
Sec 6. That in order to tho faithful execution of articles one and two of the treaty
in this Act before mentioned, every Chinese person, other than a laborer, who may be
entitled by said treaty and this Act to come within the United States, and who shall be
about to come to the United States, shall be identified as so entitled by the Chinese
Government in each case, such identity to be evidenced by a certificate issued under the
authority of the said Government, which certificate shall be in the English language, or
(if not in the English language) accompanied by a translation into English, stating such
right to come, and which certificate shall state the name, title, or official rank (if any),
the age, height, and all physical peculiarities, former and present occupation or profession,
and place of residence in China of the person to whom the certificate is issued, and that
such person is entitled conformably to the treaty in this Act mentioned to come within
the United States. Such certificate shall he prima facie evidence of the fact set forth
therein, and shall be produced to the Collector of Customs, or his deputy, of the port in
the district in the United States at which the person named therein shall arrive.
Sec 7. That any person who shall knowingly and falsely alter or substitute any
name for the name written in such certificate, or forge any such certificate, or knowingly
utter any forged or fraudulent certificate, or falsely personate any person named in any
such certificate, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor; and upon conviction thereof
shall be fined in a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars, and imprisoned in a
penitentiary for a term of not more than five years.
Sec. 8. That the master of any vessel arriving in the United States from any foreign
port or place shall, at the same time he delivers a manifest of the cargo, and if there be no 47. Vic, Chinese Question. 243
cargo, then at tho time of making a report of the entry of the vessel pursuant to law, in
addition to the other matter required to be reported, and before landing, or permitting
to land, any Chinese passengers, deliver and report to the Collector of Customs of the
district in which such vessels shall have arrived, a separate list of all Chinese passengers
taken on board his vessel at any foreign port or place, and all such passengers on board
the vessel at that time. Such list shall show the names of such passengers (and if
accredited officers of the Chinese Government travelling on the business of that Government, or their servants, with a note of such facts), and the names and otherparticulars, as
shown by their respective certificates ; and such list shall bo sworn to by tho master in
the manner required by law in relation to the manifest of the cargo. Any wilful refusal
or neglect of any such master to comply with the provisions of this section shall incur
the same penalties and forfeiture as are provided for a refusal or neglect to report and
deliver a manifest of the cargo.
Sec 9. That before any Chinese passengers arc landed from any such vessel, the
collector, or his deputy, shall proceed to examine such passengers, comparing the certificates with the list and with the passengers ; and no passenger shall be allowed to
land in the United States from such vessel in violation of law.
Sec 10. That every vessel, whose master shall knowingly violate any of the provisions of this Act, shall be deemed forfeited to the United States, and shall be liable
to seizure and condemnation in any district of the United States into which such vessel
may enter or in which she may be found.
Sec 11. That any person who shall knowingly bring into, or cause to be brought
into the United States by land, or who shall knowingly aid or abet the same, or aid or
abet tho landing in the United States from any vessel of any Chinese person not lawfully entitled to enter the United States, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and
shall, on conviction thereof, be fined in a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars, and
imprisoned for a term not exceeding one year.
Sec. 12. That no Chinese person shall be permitted to enter the United States by
land without producing to the proper officer of customs the certificate in this Act required of Chinese persons seeking to land from a vessel. And any Chinese person found
unlawfully within the United States shall be caused to be removed therefrom to the
country from whence ho came, by direction of the President of the United States, and
at the cost of the United States, after being brought before some Justice, Judge, or
Commissioner of a Court of the United States and found to be one not lawfully entitled
to be or remain in the United States.
Sec 13. That this Act shall not apply to diplomatic and other officers of the Chinese
Government travelling upon the business of that Government, whose credentials shall
be taken as equivalent to the certificate in this Act mentioned, and shall exempt them
and their body and household servants from the provisions of this Act as to other
Chinese persons.
Sec 14. That hereafter no State Court or Court of the United States shall admit
Chinese to citizenship ; and all laws in conflict, with this Act are hereby repealed.
Sec 15. That the words " Chinese laborers," wherever used in this Act, shall be
construed to mean both skilled and unskilled laborers and Chinese employed in mining.
VICTORIA: Printed by Richard Wolfendex, Government Printer,
at the Government Printing Office, James' Bay.

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